Wednesday 24th May 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘gold’

Ivanhoe veteran Matthew Hornor joins Aurvista Gold as president/CEO

May 23rd, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 23, 2017

Management changes should help Aurvista Gold TSXV:AVA move to the next level as Matthew Hornor takes charge of financial and business development while Jean Lafleur leads exploration at the company’s Douay project in Abitibi.

Ivanhoe veteran Matthew Hornor joins Aurvista Gold as president/CEO

Hornor’s background includes 10 years as VP and executive VP for Ivanhoe Mines, where he negotiated deals with international banking syndicates, strategic alliances and equity financings totalling more than $450 million. He also spent 10 years as managing director for Ivanhoe Capital and four years as chairperson for Ivanplats Holding SARL, owner of the Platreef platinum-palladium mine in South Africa.

As president/CEO of Kaizen Discovery TSXV:KZD from 2013 to 2016, Hornor arranged project acquisitions, equity financings and a collaboration agreement with ITOCHU Corp, a prominent Japanese trading and investment house. Fluent in Japanese, he began his mining career in Japan 27 years ago. He visits the country frequently, maintaining relationships with major corporations, mining companies, investment firms and trading houses.

The appointment also allows Jean Lafleur to move from president/CEO to VP of exploration on the Douay project in Abitibi’s Casa Berardi deformation zone. Hornor’s experience “speaks for itself,” Lafleur said, “and having his corporate, capital markets and project financing leadership will help us accelerate the company’s growth and true value. I look forward to leading our exploration team in Quebec and working with our group to define the ultimate extent of gold mineralization at Douay.”

Well underway is a 43-hole, 30,000-metre campaign with an update planned later this year for a resource that currently shows an inferred 83.3 million tonnes averaging 1.05 g/t for 2.81 million gold ounces. Among results released so far, the company announced stepout intercepts earlier this month despite an assay lab backlog caused by the pace of drilling. In March Aurvista announced initial metallurgical test results in line with comparable Abitibi projects.

Last month the company more than doubled its Douay land position, which now stands at 30,500 hectares. Aurvista holds a 100% interest in about 29,300 hectares and a 75% interest in the 1,190-hectare North West zone, with the remainder held by JV partner SOQUEM, the mineral exploration branch of the provincial government’s Investissement Québec.

Read more about Aurvista Gold.

Kapuskasing targets zinc past-producer to bolster Newfoundland presence

May 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 18, 2017

A former zinc mine with potential for another discovery would expand Kapuskasing Gold’s (TSXV:KAP) portfolio of Newfoundland prospects for high-performing metals. Under a non-binding letter of intent announced May 18, the company would get the 1,050-hectare Daniel’s Harbour property on the Rock’s Great Northern Peninsula.

The announcement follows a recent acquisition of proximal claims by Altius Minerals TSX:ALS, but the former mine sits on property covered by the Kapuskasing deal.

Kapuskasing targets zinc past-producer to bolster Newfoundland presence

In operation from 1975 to 1990, Daniel’s Harbour produced around seven million tonnes averaging 7.8% zinc. A chief characteristic was the mine’s Mississippi Valley Type deposit, a kind that characteristically occurs in clusters or districts, Kapuskasing stated. “There remains potential in the area of the old mine workings of the historic ore bodies continuing at depth or along the favourable breccia horizon,” the company added.

Subject to due diligence and approvals, the 100% acquisition calls for $60,000, 1.75 million shares and $100,000 of spending within two years. A 3% NSR applies, two-thirds of which can be bought back for $2 million. Should Kapuskasing define a resource of five million tonnes at a grade to be determined, the vendor gets a $50,000 bonus.

The news comes amid a busy few months as Kapuskasing collects properties in Newfoundland and Labrador. The company began in March with the acquisition of eight properties offering potential for copper, cobalt or vanadium. Among the standouts is Lady Pond, which an LOI announced last week would expand to 1,625 hectares covering historic mine workings. Surface grab samples graded up to 3.3% copper, 0.12% cobalt and 813 ppb gold.

While previous operators focused on copper, Kapuskasing sees potential for other metals including cobalt. The company has drilling planned later this year.

Another recently expanded March acquisition is King’s Court, now 2,275 hectares covering at least 10 copper showings at surface. Historic channel samples included 14% copper over three metres, 9.3% over 10 metres, 19% over 2.13 metres and 15.87% over 2.59 metres, along with cobalt samples up to 0.24%. The company has sent a 4.79-metre section of drill core to be re-assayed for cobalt and other elements.

Additional acquisitions bring with them historic, non-43-101 results:

  • Alexis, with grab samples up to 0.422% nickel and 0.822% cobalt

  • Cape Charles, with grab samples up to 1.12% copper, 0.47% nickel and 0.526% cobalt

  • Hayes, with a reported 27,000 tonnes averaging 54% iron, 9% titanium and 0.2% vanadium

  • Indian Head, with two dormant mines and iron-titanium-vanadium mineralization

  • Iron Mountain, with grab samples up to 39.8% iron and 0.26% vanadium

  • Ross Lake, with drill intercepts of 21.49% titanium dioxide, 0.24% vanadium and 0.16% chromium oxide over 13 metres; as well as 15.9% titanium dioxide, 0.2% vanadium and 0.13% chromium oxide over 11 metres

Again, those are historic, non-43-101 results.

With Daniel’s Harbour and Lady Pond as dual flagships, Kapuskasing has a busy year planned. Last month the company offered private placements totalling up to $750,000, including up to $250,000 in flow-through.

High-grade gold helps BonTerra Resources close the Rivage gap

May 16th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 16, 2017

With a goal of demonstrating continuity along a 1.2-kilometre potential strike—and maybe stealing some of Osisko Mining’s (TSX:OSK) Urban Barry glory—BonTerra Resources TSXV:BTR released another batch of high-grade assays May 16. Results so far show the Gladiator deposit open in all directions but much of the drilling has focused on closing its gap with the Rivage zone to the west.

Intercepts released for the Rivage gap’s four zones show:

Hole BA-17-04

  • 9.5 g/t gold over 4.2 metres, starting at 88.8 metres in downhole depth, North zone

  • 10 g/t over 4 metres, starting at 233 metres, Footwall zone

  • 1.4 g/t over 25 metres, starting at 272 metres, Porphyry/Main zone
  • (including 3.6 g/t over 3 metres)
High-grade gold helps BonTerra Resources fill the Rivage gap

Fortified by money and high grades, BonTerra Resources
plans up to 40,000 metres for Gladiator’s current program.

BA-17-07

  • 12 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 355 metres, Main zone

BA-17-08

  • 7.5 g/t over 1 metre, starting at 210 metres, North zone

  • 8 g/t over 1 metre, starting at 264 metres, Mid zone

  • 6.4 g/t over 1.8 metres, starting at 300.2 metres, Footwall zone

  • 3.4 g/t over 5.7 metres, starting at 390 metres, Main zone

BA-17-09

  • 9 g/t over 1.8 metres, starting at 67 metres, Footwall zone

BA-17-10

  • 5.6 g/t over 1.5 metres, starting at 177.5 metres, North zone

  • 8.4 g/t over 3.5 metres, starting at 198.5 metres, Footwall zone

  • 5.2 g/t over 2.5 metres, starting at 212.5 metres, Mid zone

  • 5.3 g/t over 2 metres, starting at 237 metres, Main zone

True widths were estimated between 60% and 80%.

Continued high grades add to the anticipation of an update to Gladiator’s 2012 resource, which used a 4 g/t cutoff to show an inferred 905,000 tonnes averaging 9.37 g/t for 273,000 ounces gold.

With up to 40,000 metres planned for this campaign, drilling has so far hit multiple high-grade intercepts between Gladiator and Rivage, confirmed over one kilometre in strike for each of the Main and Footwall zones, and sought extensions of the Gladiator deposit to 850 metres in depth and 1.2 kilometres in strike, BonTerra stated. Drilling also focuses on the Deep East zone “and within large gaps or voids with currently little drill information” on the 8,126-hectare property.

In late March the company took out a 100% option on Durango Resources’ (TSXV:DGO) Trove property, which BonTerra described as a direct extension of its Gladiator/Coliseum southwest mineralized trend.

A few days earlier the company gained another large cash injection, this one a $5.2-million private placement that gave Kinross Gold TSX:K an approximately 9.5% stake in BonTerra. That followed nearly $15 million raised over February and March with the participation of Sprott Capital Partners.

BonTerra also holds the 2,165-hectare Larder Lake gold project in Ontario’s Cadillac-Larder Lake fault zone, where drilling’s planned to bring historic, non-43-101 resources for two zones up to date.

Read more about BonTerra Resources.

Infographic: Platinum and its uses, from fuel to food, medicine to money

May 15th, 2017

Posted with permission of BullionVault | May 15, 2017

Platinum Week starts in London today, the key annual gathering of industry players and analysts, meeting in the platinum market’s key global hub.

To mark this series of platinum industry meetings, seminars and events, BullionVault’s latest infographic looks at the incredible uses of this unique and increasingly vital precious metal.

Heavier and more hard-wearing than gold, tiny quantities of platinum today help make anti-cancer drugs as well as the electrodes on your car’s spark plugs.

Most dramatically, platinum’s unique catalytic properties help create enough fertilizer to keep the world fed, as well as turning crude oil into gasoline and aviation fuel, plus cleaning toxic exhaust emissions from diesel engines around the world.

Discover where this invaluable metal comes from, what it is used for, and how it supports key aspects of modern life in this new platinum infographic.

Incredible platinum uses

 

Diesel autocats

The biggest single use of platinum each year, automotive catalytic converters reduce toxic emissions from combustion engines. Over 41% of all platinum used in 2016 went to cut emissions in diesel autocats. The global push to reduce diesel emissions further will likely see platinum use grow. As the giant economies of China and India upgrade their regulations, adopting the Euro 5 standards and moving towards new Euro 6 rules, some analysts predict the global catalytic converter market could grow 47% in the five years to 2021 to a value over $55 billion.

Jewelry

Platinum engagement rings, wedding bands, necklaces and bracelets account for over a third of the metal’s use each year, almost as much as autocats. Most popular in China, platinum jewelry is generally purer than its gold counterpart because the metal is denser (21.5 grams per cubic centimetre versus 19.3 g/cm3) and more hard-wearing. An identically shaped wedding ring made from platinum will weigh 40% more than that made of 18-carat gold. So although bullion platinum prices are currently cheaper than gold per ounce, this high purity adds to the retail price, as do the extra costs of working this significantly harder metal with its higher melting point (1758°C versus 1064°C).

Fibreglass

Platinum’s high melting point and resistance to abrasion or corrosion makes it ideal for handling very hot substances, most notably molten glass. Platinum tools are used both to channel the liquid and to create the hair-like strands making fibreglass, now used for everything from printed circuit boards to kayaks, home insulation to water pipes in sewage systems. “Fiberization” is the term for extruding molten glass from a “bushing”—a platinum alloy container with tiny holes or jets for drawing out the fibres. Bushings are recycled once they are worn or have lost sufficient platinum to require replacement.

Fertilizers

Without the synthetic fertilizers developed 100 years ago, the Earth could feed perhaps only half as many people as are alive today. Platinum catalysts are vital to making nitric acid, 90% of which goes to produce the 190 million tonnes of fertilizer nutrients used each year. The first stage of making nitric acid means oxidizing ammonia gas with air to form nitric oxide. To achieve high conversion efficiencies above 95%, this is normally carried out at pressure over precious-metal catalyst gauzes made of platinum with one-tenth rhodium.

Petrol

Platinum is vital to the world’s supply of petroleum. Without it, oil refineries couldn’t produce enough fuel to meet demand. Coated onto catalysts made from silica or alumina, platinum aids the chemical process of turning low-octane naphtha into gasoline, diesel, gasoil and jet-engine fuel, cracking large molecules of hydrocarbons into smaller, reformed structures. The developed-world’s OECD economies go through 32 million barrels of these liquids per day.

Spark plugs

Traditionally made with a copper electrode due to its superior conductivity, spark plugs using a harder element such as platinum are a popular choice for all but the highest-performance petrol engines. Because copper is one of the softest metals, platinum spark plugs can last roughly 50% longer, giving around 45,000 miles of driving. Each electrode is tiny; just one kilo of platinum could make enough for 46,000 spark plugs.

Medical implants

The least reactive of all metals, platinum and gold cause no irritation to human skin or flesh. But platinum is harder-wearing, making it best for the connections and wires in implants such as pacemakers, protecting against corrosion by acids inside the body. Estimates say more than five tonnes of platinum go into biomedical devices worldwide each year, around 80% for proven treatments (such as pacemakers and guidewires to fit catheters) and the rest in newer devices for neuromodulation (to help control pain and neurological dysfunction) and stents (mesh tubes to widen arteries and improve blood flow).

Chemotherapy

Tiny quantities of platinum go into many antineoplastic drugs, helping curb the growth of tumours by blocking the DNA in cancer cells. If a drug’s brand name contains the word “platin,” chances are it contains the precious metal. One such drug claims to be particularly effective against testicular cancer, improving the cure rate from 10% to 85%. In total, this form of chemotherapy uses around three-quarters of a tonne of platinum each year.

Legal tender coins

Having discovered platinum mining deposits at the start of the 19th century, Russia has been the only country to mint platinum coins for general circulation, running from 1830 to 1845. Nearly 16 tonnes of coins were minted, but production stopped because of low acceptance, volatility in world metal prices, and high minting costs due to platinum’s high melting point and hardness. No other legal tender platinum coin has yet to be struck, but bloggers and economists say that under U.S. law the Treasury could create a small coin with a face value of $1 trillion, and hand it to the Federal Reserve in exchange for that much cash. Debt-ceiling crisis solved at a stroke!

The International Prototype Kilogram (IPK)

How do you know your kilogram of flour or sugar actually weighs a kilogram? First made in 1889 from platinum alloyed with 10% iridium, the International Prototype of the Kilogram (IPK) remains the reference standard to calibrate one-kilo prototypes worldwide. This cylinder measures 39.17 millimetres in both diameter and height, and is stored at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) near Paris. The BIPM now holds five additional copies, with all access strictly controlled and supervised by the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM).

Fuel cells

If you think electric cars are the future of ecological transport, where will the energy for these engines come from? Fuel cell vehicles look like ordinary cars or buses, but mix hydrogen gas with oxygen from the air to create electricity. Aided by a vital platinum catalyst, the only tailpipe emission is pure water. First demonstrated in 1801 by Cornish chemist Humphry Davy, this process became a working fuel cell three decades later under Welsh scientist William Grove. NASA used platinum-catalyst fuel cells between 1961 and 1972 to put electricity and drinking water on the Apollo moon missions. Now a stationary fuel cell with 45 grams of platinum (1.4 troy ounces) has powered 35 homes with three kilowatt hours of electricity per day in a field trial in South Africa, proving that fuel-cell technology offers a viable, economic option for off-grid power.

Posted with permission of BullionVault.

Michael Eissenhauer of the State Museums of Berlin expresses dismay at the theft of a 100-kilo gold Maple Leaf coin

May 12th, 2017

…Read more

Pistol Bay Mining CEO Charles Desjardins prepares for state-of-the-art, regional exploration of his polymetallic Ontario projects

May 11th, 2017

…Read more

BonTerra president/CEO Nav Dhaliwal comments on a $5.2-million private placement by Kinross Gold

May 10th, 2017

…Read more

Far Resources hastens 100% acquisition of Manitoba lithium project

May 9th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 9, 2017

Encouraged by exploration results and a substantial price reduction, Far Resources CSE:FAT will take a 100% interest in its Zoro hard rock lithium property earlier than planned. The company expects to close the deal on May 9.

Far Resources hastens 100% acquisition of Manitoba lithium project

An expedited acquisition gives Far Resources
a 100% stake in its northern Manitoba project.

An accelerated payment plan calls for six million shares at a deemed price of $0.10, as well as $100,000 payable within a year. That’s on top of a previous $50,000 and one million shares. The new deal cuts the price by $200,000, Far Resources stated.

Last week the company announced sample results of 1.35% and 2.91% Li2O that surpassed historic results of 0.46% and 0.5% from the same pegmatite dyke on the Snow Lake-region project. Zoro hosts seven known spodumene-bearing pegmatite dykes.

Meanwhile the company awaits drill results from a Phase II program that finished last month. Seven holes totalling 1,088 metres targeted Zoro’s Dyke #1, where one hole found spodumene-bearing pegmatite over 53.7 metres and another found coarse spodumene crystals over 12.2 metres. Last year’s Phase I program brought grades up to 1.13% Li2O over 12.1 metres and 1.1% over 23.4 metres.

In New Mexico, Far Resources has a purchase agreement for the Winston silver-gold project pending approvals and due diligence.

Aurvista steps out to find more Abitibi gold

May 8th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 8, 2017

Stepout drill results have Aurvista Gold TSXV:AVA increasingly optimistic about potential outside the Douay project’s resource area. The program on Abitibi’s Casa Berardi deformation zone has so far seen 53 holes totalling 21,065 metres, with results received for 25 holes. Some highlights from a batch of assays released May 8 include holes DO-17-169 and DO-17-173 from northwest of the Porphyry zone:

DO-17-169

  • 2.46 g/t gold over 4.5 metres, starting at 312 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.44 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 325.5 metres

  • 0.72 g/t over 9 metres, starting at 336 metres

An earlier interval from DO-17-169, among assays released last month, showed 0.79 g/t over 34.5 metres.

Aurvista steps out to find more Abitibi gold

Previous core from Douay
reveals visible gold.

DO-17-173

  • 0.64 g/t over 7.5 metres, starting at 132 metres

  • 0.55 g/t over 4.5 metres, starting at 196.5 metres

  • 2.19 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 219 metres

A few other highlights include:

DO-17-165

  • 0.86 g/t over 7.5 metres, starting at 143.5 metres

  • 0.42 g/t over 6 metres, starting at 306.5 metres

DO-17-167

  • 0.36 g/t over 18.5 metres, starting at 209.5 metres

True widths are estimated at about 90%.

A resource update released in March used a 0.5 g/t cutoff for eight zones totalling:

  • inferred: 83.3 million tonnes averaging 1.05 g/t for 2.81 million gold ounces

With another resource update planned for later this year, drilling continues backed by $7.5 million raised last year. But the pace might exceed lab capacity. “Due to increased investment and high volume of exploration and drilling currently underway in the Douay region, assay labs are backed up and we have taken the necessary steps to expedite the assay process for the remainder of the program,” said president/CEO Jean Lafleur. “We look forward to results from 25-plus more drill holes from high-priority target areas at Douay.”

In March Aurvista released preliminary metallurgical test results that the company said were in line with comparable Abitibi projects. More tests are planned this year.

With additional claims staked last month, Douay now totals 30,500 hectares. Aurvista holds a 100% interest in approximately 29,300 hectares and a 75% interest in the 1,190-hectare North West zone, a JV with 25% partner SOQUEM, the mineral exploration branch of the provincial government’s Investissement Québec.

Lithium samples surpass historic assays on Far Resources’ Zoro property in Manitoba

May 2nd, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 2, 2017

As the company awaits drill results, Far Resources CSE:FAT reported two new sample assays that improve on historic grades from the Zoro hard rock lithium project in Manitoba’s Snow Lake mining region. The samples came from Dyke #7, one of seven known spodumene-bearing pegmatite dykes on claims added to the property last summer.

Lithium samples surpass historic assays on Far Resources’ Zoro property in Manitoba

With a nearby lake providing water for drilling, Zoro can
be reached by highway and helicopter or boat and ATV.

The two composite rock chip samples that the company gathered from previously blasted trenches graded 1.35% and 2.91% Li2O. That compares with historic results using older analytical techniques for the same dyke showing 0.46% and 0.5% Li2O.

Last July Far Resources compared new samples with historic results from three other dykes on the new claims. The more recent assays for Dyke #2 showed 2.71% and 3.53% Li2O, compared with historic results of 1.66% and 1.69%.

An assay for Dyke #4 came to 2.41%, compared with an historic 1.12%.

Dyke #5 results ranged from 1.46% to 6.35%, compared with the historic range from 2.42% to 7.28%.

The company plans to compile the new results with a revised geologic database to plan a spring program of ground-based mapping and exploration. Findings will be integrated with LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) data that measures elevation.

Meanwhile assays are pending for the seven-hole, 1,088-metre Phase II drill program that wrapped up last month on Zoro’s Dyke #1. One hole revealed spodumene-bearing pegmatite over 53.7 metres, while another found coarse spodumene crystals over 12.2 metres.

Seven holes from last year’s Dyke #1 program also found lithium-bearing pegmatite, with intervals grading up to 1.13% Li2O over 12.1 metres and 1.1% over 23.4 metres.

In March the company announced a purchase agreement for the Winston silver-gold project in New Mexico, subject to approvals and due diligence.