Tuesday 22nd September 2020

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘washington’

Update: Belmont Resources announces new plans for B.C. projects

August 31st, 2020

by Greg Klein | August 31, 2020

Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA has now contracted Pioneer Exploration Consultants to fly a drone magnetic survey and a helicopter LIDAR (light detection and ranging) survey over its Athelstan-Jackpot gold project and Come By Chance copper-gold project in southern British Columbia’s historic Greenwood camp.

On August 27 the company announced TSXV approval of a $688,125 private placement that followed a $25,000 placement that closed in July.

 

Belmont Resources to begin first systematic exploration of historic B.C. property

by Greg Klein | July 2, 2020

Following recently announced plans for its nearby Athelstan-Jackpot project in southern British Columbia’s Phoenix-Greenwood camp, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA has now released a summer agenda for its Come By Chance claims.

Belmont Resources to begin first systematic exploration of historic B.C. property

Both hosting a powerline route, the two properties sit on either side of Highway #3, roughly 500 kilometres east of Vancouver, and on a mineralized trend from the former Phoenix mine three kilometres northwest. The trend also runs through the company’s Black Bear and Pride of the West properties.

This month the newly optioned 527-hectare Come By Chance project gets an airborne high-res imagery survey to map old shafts, mine dumps, showings and rock exposures. The resulting data will be overlaid onto a 3D Digital Terrane Model to help guide future exploration.

Plans also call for a deep-penetration induced polarization survey of the entire property to investigate a possible porphyry system. A sampling program will target the property’s numerous showings, pits and adits. Despite the location in a busy former mining camp, this will be CBC’s first systematic exploration campaign.

“Early indications are that the Come By Chance property provides a huge potential for a large mineralized porphyry system containing a broad spectrum of mineralization types including copper-silver-gold-bearing skarn zones, gold-bearing massive sulphide veins, and gold-bearing epithermal quartz veining,” said president/CEO George Sookochoff. “Our 2020 exploration program is designed to acquire further evidence to substantiate the presence of this system.”

Late last month the company announced Athelstan-Jackpot plans that also included IP and airborne imagery, as well as possible drilling.

Belmont’s regional portfolio includes the Pathfinder gold-polymetallic property and an LOI for the Lone Star property across the border in Washington state. The company also holds interests in the Crackingstone uranium property in northern Saskatchewan and the Kibby Basin lithium property in Nevada.

Last month Belmont offered a private placement up to $25,000. In May the company closed the final tranche of an over-subscribed placement totalling $199,665.

Belmont Resources to begin first systematic exploration of historic B.C. property

July 2nd, 2020

This story has been updated and moved here.

Belmont Resources adds gold-copper prospect to its Greenwood holdings

May 28th, 2020

by Greg Klein | May 28, 2020

Another property acquisition shows continued interest in this region dotted with former mines and early-stage projects. Expanding its presence in southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA has optioned the Come By Chance claims, a 527-hectare block about eight kilometres from Grand Forks and 500 highway kilometres east of Vancouver.

Belmont Resources adds gold-copper prospect to its Greenwood holdings

Although unused pits and adits attest to previous activity, CBC has yet to be explored systematically, the company stated. So far work has largely focused on the property’s copper skarn-type mineralization that’s similar to the historic Phoenix deposit three kilometres northwest.

“Given the regional importance of epithermal gold mineralization and the favourable structural setting, a thorough exploration program to assess the property for this style of mineralization is planned,” Belmont added.

“The acquisition of the Come By Chance property is another exciting milestone for the company and further enhances Belmont’s strategy of consolidating properties with known historic gold-copper mines in the prolific Greenwood mining district,” commented George Sookochoff. The president/CEO comes from a Greenwood mining family.

Belmont’s 100% option calls for $7,500 on approval plus 500,000 shares issued over two years. The vendor retains a 1.5% NSR, two-thirds of which the company may buy for $1 million.

In anther Greenwood acquisition earlier this month, Belmont signed a definitive agreement to pick up the Athelstan-Jackpot claims, covering a site of historic gold-silver production. Looking just across the border, the company signed an LOI in February to acquire the Lone Star copper-gold past-producer in Washington state’s Republic area. Previous Greenwood acquisition announcements from Belmont concern the Glenora, Pride of the West and Great Bear claims.

Assays released in November from the company’s Greenwood-region Pathfinder project reached up to 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 20,700 ppm copper and 45.1 ppm cobalt.

Earlier this month Belmont closed the final tranche of an oversubscribed private placement totalling $199,665.

Read more about Belmont Resources.

Update: Belmont Resources plans to expand portfolio in B.C.’s Greenwood camp, add nearby claims in Washington

May 11th, 2020

Update: On May 11, 2020, Belmont Resources announced a definitive agreement to acquire the Athelstan-Jackpot claims from Forty Ninth Ventures under terms reported in February. Earlier in May Belmont closed the final tranche of an oversubscribed private placement that totalled $199,665.

 

by Greg Klein | February 27, 2020

An international border runs through this historic mining region, but geology knows no such barriers. Two recently signed letters of intent would build Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) presence in southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp and extend into Washington’s adjacent Republic area.

Belmont Resources plans to expand portfolio in B.C. Greenwood camp, add nearby claims in Washington

Greenwood gave up plenty of gold despite using, by today’s standards, primitive techniques. Now Belmont hopes more sophisticated analysis will help rejuvenate regional mining. The company’s proposed Athelstan-Jackpot acquisition sits adjacent to the Republic district, where Kinross Gold TSX:K applied newly developed metallogenic models that led to discovery and mining of several epithermal gold deposits. Although a “similar geologic regime” applies to Greenwood, Belmont stated, previous exploration and development on the B.C. side of the border focused on skarn-type copper-gold deposits with little attention to epithermal-type gold.

Bringing impressive credentials for a more contemporary approach, president/CEO George Sookochoff comes from a mining family in Grand Forks, about eight kilometres east of Athelstan-Jackpot, and has an extensive Greenwood background as well as GIS database expertise. He’s spent years building a digital database storing more than a century of Greenwood geoscientific info. This digital library would allow him to assess the probability of regional epithermal gold deposits by searching for characteristics comparable with those in Washington, the company added.

The review would precede recommendations for a 2020 exploration program on Athelstan-Jackpot. Intermittent mining on the property between 1901 and 1940 produced around 33,200 tonnes averaging about 5.4 g/t gold and 6.3 g/t silver for approximately 6,324 ounces of gold and 7,378 ounces of silver, according to historic records. Trenching and sampling took place in 2003, with historic, non-43-101 trench intervals up to 6.6 g/t gold and 12 g/t silver over 3.7 metres. Other historic 2003 grades reached as high as 28.4 g/t gold and 166 g/t silver over 0.3 metres.

Maybe the cross-border geological interest spanning Greenwood and Republic attracted Belmont to a nearby former mine in Washington. Just two days after reporting the proposed Athelstan-Jackpot acquisition, Belmont announced an LOI to pick up Lone Star, in operation from 1897 to 1918 and 1977 to 1978. Using a 1.5% copper-equivalent cutoff, an historic, non-43-101 report from 2007 estimated:

  • indicated: 63,000 tonnes averaging 1.28 g/t gold and 2.3% copper for 2,600 ounces gold and 3.19 million pounds copper

  • inferred: 682,000 tonnes averaging 1.46 g/t gold and 2% copper for 32,000 ounces gold and 30.07 million pounds copper

Should the deal close, Belmont plans to compile a 43-101 resource and prepare an IP survey prior to infill drilling for a potential deposit upgrade.

A 100% interest in Athelstan-Jackpot would cost Belmont 200,000 shares on signing. After a year Belmont would issue another 200,000 shares, and also pay US$50,000 in cash or US$25,000 in cash and the equivalent of US$25,000 in shares. The vendor would retain a 2% NSR, half of which Belmont could buy back for US$500,000.

A 100% stake in Lone Star would call for C$25,000 on signing and 1.5 million shares issued in three installments over two years. An additional C$100,000 payment would follow a major financing to be completed by Belmont.

Other recent Greenwood forays have already strengthened the company’s regional standing. In November the company picked up the 45-hectare Pride of the West and Great Bear claims, following the October acquisition of the 127-hectare Glenora property.

Pathfinder, another Greenwood-area Belmont holding, underwent two sampling programs last year. Assays reached up to 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 2.07% copper and 45.1 ppm cobalt, along with other results as high as 29.2 g/t gold.

Greenwood sits about 500 highway kilometres east of Vancouver.

The company’s portfolio also includes a 75% interest in the Kibby Basin lithium project in Nevada and, in northern Saskatchewan, two uranium properties shared 50/50 with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Belmont Resources plans to expand portfolio in B.C.’s Greenwood camp, add nearby claims in Washington

February 27th, 2020

by Greg Klein | Updated February 27, 2020

An international border runs through this historic mining region, but geology knows no such barriers. Two recently signed letters of intent would build Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) presence in southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp and extend into Washington’s adjacent Republic area.

Belmont Resources plans to expand portfolio in B.C. Greenwood camp, add nearby claims in Washington

Greenwood gave up plenty of gold despite using, by today’s standards, primitive techniques. Now Belmont hopes more sophisticated analysis will help rejuvenate regional mining. The company’s proposed Athelstan-Jackpot acquisition sits adjacent to the Republic district, where Kinross Gold TSX:K applied newly developed metallogenic models that led to discovery and mining of several epithermal gold deposits. Although a “similar geologic regime” applies to Greenwood, Belmont stated, previous exploration and development on the B.C. side of the border focused on skarn-type copper-gold deposits with little attention to epithermal-type gold.

Bringing impressive credentials for a more contemporary approach, president/CEO George Sookochoff comes from a mining family in Grand Forks, about eight kilometres east of Athelstan-Jackpot, and has an extensive Greenwood background as well as GIS database expertise. He’s spent years building a digital database storing more than a century of Greenwood geoscientific info. This digital library would allow him to assess the probability of regional epithermal gold deposits by searching for characteristics comparable with those in Washington, the company added.

The review would precede recommendations for a 2020 exploration program on Athelstan-Jackpot. Intermittent mining on the property between 1901 and 1940 produced around 33,200 tonnes averaging about 5.4 g/t gold and 6.3 g/t silver for approximately 6,324 ounces of gold and 7,378 ounces of silver, according to historic records. Trenching and sampling took place in 2003, with historic, non-43-101 trench intervals up to 6.6 g/t gold and 12 g/t silver over 3.7 metres. Other historic 2003 grades reached as high as 28.4 g/t gold and 166 g/t silver over 0.3 metres.

Maybe the cross-border geological interest spanning Greenwood and Republic attracted Belmont to a nearby former mine in Washington. Just two days after reporting the proposed Athelstan-Jackpot acquisition, Belmont announced an LOI to pick up Lone Star, in operation from 1897 to 1918 and 1977 to 1978. Using a 1.5% copper-equivalent cutoff, an historic, non-43-101 report from 2007 estimated:

  • indicated: 63,000 tonnes averaging 1.28 g/t gold and 2.3% copper for 2,600 ounces gold and 3.19 million pounds copper

  • inferred: 682,000 tonnes averaging 1.46 g/t gold and 2% copper for 32,000 ounces gold and 30.07 million pounds copper

Should the deal close, Belmont plans to compile a 43-101 resource and prepare an IP survey prior to infill drilling for a potential deposit upgrade.

A 100% interest in Athelstan-Jackpot would cost Belmont 200,000 shares on signing. After a year Belmont would issue another 200,000 shares, and also pay US$50,000 in cash or US$25,000 in cash and the equivalent of US$25,000 in shares. The vendor would retain a 2% NSR, half of which Belmont could buy back for US$500,000.

A 100% stake in Lone Star would call for C$25,000 on signing and 1.5 million shares issued in three installments over two years. An additional C$100,000 payment would follow a major financing to be completed by Belmont.

Other recent Greenwood forays have already strengthened the company’s regional standing. In November the company picked up the 45-hectare Pride of the West and Great Bear claims, following the October acquisition of the 127-hectare Glenora property.

Pathfinder, another Greenwood-area Belmont holding, underwent two sampling programs last year. Assays reached up to 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 2.07% copper and 45.1 ppm cobalt, along with other results as high as 29.2 g/t gold.

Greenwood sits about 500 highway kilometres east of Vancouver.

The company’s portfolio also includes a 75% interest in the Kibby Basin lithium project in Nevada and, in northern Saskatchewan, two uranium properties shared 50/50 with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Belmont Resources signs LOI for additional property in B.C.’s Greenwood camp

February 25th, 2020

This story has been updated and moved here.

Anchorage shakes, West Coasters quake

November 30th, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 30, 2018

“Waiting for the big one” comprises a fairly common West Coast refrain. So far on November 30 three destructive earthquakes have hit Anchorage. More may be coming.

The first and biggest, reaching magnitude 7 on the Richter scale, struck at 8:29 a.m. local time at an epicentre 13 kilometres north, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Six minutes later a magnitude 5.7 emanated from four kilometres northwest of the city of almost 300,000 people. Nearly two hours later the Richter scale measured 4.9 at an epicentre 17 kilometres northwest.

Anchorage shakes, West Coasters quake

Police block traffic on a highway north of Anchorage
following the November 30 earthquakes.
(Photo: JT Fisherman/Shutterstock.com)

More shocks came from the town of Big Lake, about 35 crow-flying kilometres northwest of Anchorage, ranging in magnitude from 3.7 to 5.1.

By press time no deaths or serious injuries were reported. But highways and roads have been mangled out of shape, power has been knocked out, rail transport and the 1,290-kilometre Trans-Alaska pipeline have been shut down and at least one hospital has postponed non-emergency surgeries. A tsunami warning was issued and cancelled.

The Alaskan events serve as a warning to those living in tectonically troubled regions farther afield. Some of them have experienced lighter quakes just recently. One day earlier, magnitude 4 and 4.5 quakes struck near Fort St. John in northeastern British Columbia. A November 19 magnitude 4.1 event took place in the Juan de Fuca Strait 78 kilometres southeast of Sooke, B.C. The Pacific seafloor west of the northern Vancouver Island town of Port Alice had a busy autumn with six quakes measuring between 4.2 and 6.8 at epicentres between 233 and 174 kilometres southwest of the town. Other quakes in the last six months have struck the vicinity of Victoria on Vancouver Island’s southern tip and Port Hardy on the Island’s north, as well as the southern Vancouver suburb of Tsawwassen.

In fact about 400 quakes a year take place between northern Vancouver Island and Seattle, according to Natural Resources Canada, although only a dozen or so shake things up enough to grab people’s attention.

This region’s activity comes from the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a route running from the northern Island to California in which the oceanic Juan de Fuca Plate pushes its way beneath the continental North American Plate “at roughly the same rate as fingernails grow—about four centimetres per year,” NRCan explains.

Anchorage shakes, West Coasters quake

A common sign in coastal communities.

Quakes along the plate boundaries can reach a monumentally destructive 9 on the Richter scale. The region experiences them every 200 to 800 years, with the last occurrence in January 1700.

Getting back to Alaska, where the Pacific and North American plates rub each other the wrong way, magnitude 9.2 fell upon Anchorage, Seward, Valdez and other southern state locations on Good Friday 1964. The worst quake ever recorded after Chile’s magnitude 9.5 in 1960, it killed about 140 people amid widespread destruction. A tsunami hammered towns along the coasts of Alaska, northern B.C. and western Vancouver Island, reaching as far as Hawaii.

Today, West Coast communities tend to show awareness about seismic building standards, earthquake preparedness and tsunami evacuation routes. But that wasn’t always the case. The Cold War generation of 1964 likely worried more about Soviet nukes from above than tectonic tribulations below. That might explain why some Vancouverites, on that Good Friday in 1964, actually flocked to the shoreline to watch the “tidal wave” roll in.

Luckily for them, it spared their city.

The November 30 Anchorage quakes follow new earthquake preparedness legislation passed by U.S Congress just three days earlier.

 

Update: The earthquakes in the Fort St. John district were probably caused by fracking, a Geological Survey of Canada scientist told Canadian Press.

Geoscience BC maps Greenwood’s mineral potential

September 28th, 2018

by Greg Klein | September 28, 2018

An historic British Columbia mining camp comes under additional scrutiny with new research released September 28. Geoscience BC’s latest report and 1:50,000-scale map focus on the province’s south-central Greenwood district, about 500 kilometres east of Vancouver.

Mining on the 800-square-kilometre area dates back to the late 1880s. Some 26 past-producers have given up more than 1.2 million ounces of gold and over 270,000 tonnes of copper, along with silver, lead and zinc, according to the independent non-profit organization. With a number of juniors currently working to find more mineralization, this research “should bolster the recent revival of mineral exploration activity in the Greenwood area,” said Geoscience BC VP of minerals and mining Bruce Madu.

Geoscience BC maps Greenwood’s mineral potential

Mining may one day return to the once-busy Greenwood camp.
(Photo: Geoscience BC)

Among the active companies is Grizzly Discoveries TSXV:GZD, which holds about 72,840 hectares of Greenwood turf. Under a 75% earn-in, Kinross Gold TSX:K has been drilling for gold in the Midway area of Grizzly’s holdings. Grizzly has been conducting geophysics and surface exploration on its Robocop cobalt-copper-silver claims and plans drilling for three other Greenwood targets.

Just across the international border, Kinross operated the Kettle River-Buckhorn gold mine until last year, extracting 1.3 million ounces over nine years.

Another of Greenwood’s large landholders is Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM, which attributes 31 historic mines to its 15,400-hectare portfolio.

The Greenwood report might help illuminate other parts of B.C. as well. “This area could hold the key to a better understanding of mineral deposits that formed during key geological events that span almost 200 million years,” Madu added.

Working with First Nations, local communities, governments, academia and the resource sector, Geoscience BC opens its research to the public “with the aim of encouraging exploration, economic activity and informed land use decisions.” Most funding comes from the provincial government.

The organization’s other mapping projects in the area include:

See Geoscience BC’s Earth Science Viewer.

Fraser River rush revisited

August 3rd, 2018

A new book reveals how gold fever brought American warfare north of the border

by Greg Klein

Is this the price of gold—the murder of defenceless people followed by retaliatory beheadings as a private American army threatens genocidal war in the future Canada? There’s more to British Columbia’s first great gold rush than has been acknowledged and, 160 years after the fact, a newly published book casts harsh light on the Fraser River mania and its accompanying Fraser River War.

When gold fever brought American warfare north of the border

Natives mined and traded gold for about
two years prior to being overrun by newcomers.
(Photo: Royal British Columbia Museum)

That the war even happened will take many people by surprise. Downplayed or ignored in Canadian research, its significance gets special emphasis in Claiming the Land: British Columbia and the Making of a New El Dorado. The war constitutes one of a number of surprises in what author Daniel Marshall, a University of Victoria professor and descendant of 1858 arrivals from Cornwall, calls a “substantial revisionist history.”

Officially, the rush began with the sudden arrival of some 450 “dregs” of the California goldfields, unloaded by steamboat in April 1858 at the Hudson’s Bay Company fort in Victoria. But HBC officials including chief factor and Vancouver Island colonial governor James Douglas had been anticipating such an event for two years, all the while buying gold from native placer miners. That ongoing trade, of course, belies stories of a dramatic discovery that sparked the rush.

Douglas even tried to discourage such an event by posting pre-rush ads in American newspapers asserting British authority over the mainland of present-day B.C. (then under HBC jurisdiction) and warning that the natives “are decidedly dangerous and that they have forcibly expelled all the whites who have attempted to work Gold in their country.” Hedging his bets, he also ordered the company to manufacture California-style mining gear that the HBC could flog to new arrivals via roving teams of travelling salesmen.

Natives had already fended off gold miners at the aborted Queen Charlottes rush of 1851, when they expelled an HBC crew and fought off American boats. Haida Gwaii aboriginals had devised a way of extracting sub-surface gold by heating rock with fire, then cooling the expanded rock with water to break it up. They reportedly made bullets of gold, an ironic choice of ammo to use on rival miners. But on the mainland, HBC traders worked amicably with native miners, who added yellow metal to the furs and salmon that they provided the company for export.

When gold fever brought American warfare north of the border

No stronger contrast could be imagined with circumstances south of the border. All-out war raged between the U.S. Army and massed tribes of eastern Washington territory. In one battle, 1,200 natives delivered a monumental defeat to their adversaries just as the rush was gaining momentum.

As for California’s ’49ers, some of them considered “Indian fighting” an integral part of gold mining. Between 1848 and 1870, an estimated 50,000 California natives died of disease, starvation or murder. When placer mining played out and news arrived of gold on the Fraser, “much of the cultural mentality that informed the genocidal attitudes of the California mining frontier was baggage carried north with the requisite pick, pan, and shovel.”

Among those joining the rush were Chinese veterans of California, Cornish and Welsh miners with experience in a number of camps, hundreds of blacks and some “violently” republican former French soldiers encouraged to emigrate by Paris police after their country’s 1848 revolution.

But, with British military presence ending at the Fraser’s mouth, it was the white Americans—sometimes egalitarian and racist at the same time—who proved the biggest threat to colonial authority and aboriginal security.

Among them were not only Indian fighters but filibusters, Americans who had joined privately organized militias in attempted conquests of foreign territory. Some targets included Sonora, Baja California, Cuba and Nicaragua, where in the latter case a short-lived filibuster regime gained official recognition from the U.S.

Dreams of American Manifest Destiny and loose talk of 54-40 or Fight extended in time and space past the international boundary set at the 49th Parallel in 1846. With at least 30,000 newcomers, maybe many more, pouring into the yet-to-be-proclaimed colony of B.C., Americans flouted the almost non-existent British authority to establish their own California-style laws and customs.

The old Californian miners and Indian-fighters were the worst, [believing that] they could travel in small parties and clean out all the Indians in the land.—A gold rush prospector

Miners who fought their way through the dangerous overland routes from Washington territory brought the Indian Wars with them, as they took revenge on defenceless targets north of the border. As one witness recounted, “The old Californian miners and Indian-fighters were the worst, [believing that] they could travel in small parties and clean out all the Indians in the land.”

Both rumours and credible reports circulated of increasing harassment and shootings on both sides, with dozens dead and headless corpses floating downriver, nine past Fort Yale, another six at Union Bar and stories of many more. Thousands of natives were said to have united, pushing newcomers back to Yale, where hundreds of miners formed five mounted militias. “Some were for exterminating all Native peoples encountered,” Marshall writes, “while others offered to broker a peace settlement supported by a large demonstration of armed force.”

The latter sentiment prevailed, as Captain Henry Snyder of the 250-strong Pike Guards, supported by a French militia, overshadowed the much smaller Whatcom Guards, who advocated wholesale slaughter. Pushing north, Snyder’s group held a dramatic meeting with Spintlum, described as the war chief for the Fraser region. He convinced 10 other Nlaka’pamux chiefs to pursue peace. An American army, supported by a French army, and the massed aboriginal bands ended their war in the nominally British region.

Within Canadian historical study “it is usually assumed that there is no parallel incident in Canada to the kinds of Native-newcomer violence that occurred in the American mining West,” Marshall points out. “There was, however, a most notable and neglected exception.”

Read more about B.C. mining history.

Golden Dawn Minerals reports high gold-copper grades in B.C., prepares for trial mining

June 11th, 2018

by Greg Klein | June 11, 2018

Channel sample results from the face of previous underground workings auger well for plans to re-start southern British Columbia’s Lexington mine, Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM stated June 11. The company released several dozen assays from a campaign that’s collected 339 samples so far. Four of the best composite results showed:

  • 30.18 g/t gold and 4.93% copper (37.57 g/t gold-equivalent) over 1.8 metres

  • 26.67 g/t gold and 1.77% copper (29.33 g/t gold-equivalent) over 2.3 metres

  • 13.41 g/t gold and 2.08% copper (16.54 g/t gold-equivalent) over 3.9 metres

  • 17.04 g/t gold and 3.42% copper (22.16 g/t gold-equivalent) over 2.6 metres
Golden Dawn Minerals reports high gold-copper grades in B.C. while preparing for trial mining

Underground refurbishment, equipment maintenance,
engineering studies and permitting bring the Lexington mine
closer to renewed operations.

The grades bolster confidence in the 2016 resource and would help reduce dilution of mill feed during trial mining, anticipated to begin later this year, the company stated. Having produced a PEA for its Greenwood properties last year, Golden Dawn hopes to re-start some of the former mines without de-risking at the feasibility level. The 15,400-hectare portfolio includes 31 historic mines. Processing would take place at the company’s nearby Greenwood mill, a 212-tpd facility that’s expandable to 400 tpd.

Using a base case cutoff of 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent, Lexington’s resource shows:

  • measured: 58,000 tonnes averaging 6.98 g/t gold and 1.1% copper (8.63 g/t gold-equivalent) for 16,100 gold-equivalent ounces

  • indicated: 314,000 tonnes averaging 6.38 g/t gold and 1.04% copper (7.94 g/t gold-equivalent) for 80,200 gold-equivalent ounces

  • inferred: 12,000 tonnes averaging 4.42 g/t gold and 1.03% copper (5.96 g/t gold-equivalent) for 2,300 gold-equivalent ounces

Under a previous operator between April and December 2008, the mine produced 5,486 ounces of gold, 3,247 ounces of silver and 860,259 pounds of copper.

Recent work suggests possible extensions to the northwest of two potential parallel mineralized zones near Lexington’s Main zone. Golden Dawn also sees a “one-kilometre-long trend of favourable host rocks” stretching from Lexington into the former Lone Star mine just across the border in Washington state. “The favourable stratigraphy also extends over three kilometres to the northwest through the historic Lexington, Mable and Number 7 mines, where minimal past exploration drilling was done,” the company stated. Previous sampling shows further potential around the nearby City of Paris former mine, Golden Dawn added.

The company continues its extensive work on Lexington’s mine infrastructure, equipment, engineering studies and permitting.

Earlier this month Golden Dawn closed a $734,700 first tranche of a private placement offered up to $5.4 million. Last month the company issued shares to repay $160,339 in debt to Lind Asset Management.

Read more about Golden Dawn Minerals.