Sunday 19th February 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘vanadium’

As cobalt prices soar, King’s Bay expands prospects with Newfoundland acquisition

February 16th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 16, 2017

A name and a commodity that are both objects of feverish attention seem to meet up in Newfoundland, where King’s Bay Gold TSXV:KBG has acquired the Trump Island copper-cobalt property. A 100% option announced February 16 expands the company’s cobalt prospects in Newfoundland, Labrador and Quebec.

Back in 1863 a Cornish miner sunk a six-metre shaft to follow a zone of massive chalcopyrite. He reportedly sent a shipment of high-grade copper-cobalt ore to Wales.

King’s Bay expands cobalt prospects with Newfoundland acquisition

Grab samples collected nearby in 1999 brought historic, non-43-101 results up to 3.8% copper, 0.3% cobalt, 2.9 g/t gold and 10.9 g/t silver.

The initial King’s Bay agenda would call for additional sampling, along with mapping and a local-scale electromagnetic survey on the 200-hectare property. Successful results could bring a summer drill campaign.

Subject to approvals, King’s Bay gets Trump Island for 200,000 shares at a deemed value of $0.195 and a 2% NSR.

The boat-accessible property sits seven kilometres south of Twillingate, a town immortalized in Newfoundland’s unofficial national anthem.

In Labrador, meanwhile, King’s Bay has airborne EM planned for its Lynx Lake copper-cobalt project, where grab samples have shown non-43-101 results up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt and 0.21% nickel, as well as chromium, molybdenum and vanadium values. Last month the company expanded Lynx Lake from about 2,000 hectares to approximately 24,000 hectares.

Earlier this month King’s Bay picked up three cobalt projects in Quebec. The company closed a $938,752 private placement in January.

The acquisitions come as cobalt prices continue their meteoric rise, hitting six-year highs up to $20 a pound, reported MetalBulletin.com. That represents an approximately 50% increase since September, according to Reuters. Stating that many traders are hoarding the metal, Reuters predicted a supply deficit this year “exacerbated by an insecure supply chain. Almost 60% of the world’s cobalt lies in politically risky Democratic Republic of Congo.”

See an infographic about cobalt.

King’s Bay Gold acquires three Quebec cobalt projects

February 6th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 6, 2017

A metal facing rising prices and supply-side risk, cobalt has drawn King’s Bay Gold TSXV:KBG to three new properties in Quebec. Previous work has shown cobalt on each acquisition.

King’s Bay Gold acquires three Quebec cobalt projects

Northeast of the Hudson Bay coast, the 875-hectare Ninuk Lake project underwent surface sampling, mapping and electromagnetics by Falconbridge in 2001. Samples from massive sulphides in outcrop found historic, non-43-101 results up to 2.6% nickel, 1.8% copper and 0.27% cobalt. Falconbridge neglected to follow up due to other discoveries that year, King’s Bay stated.

A northwestern Quebec property, the 418-hectare Broadback River project revealed several large conductors through airborne surveys in 1985. Sampling by Falconbridge from 1999 to 2000 showed historic, non-43-101 results up to 0.7% nickel, 0.3% copper and 0.09% cobalt. Drilling tested the property’s northwestern area but not the southeastern conductors.

South of Quebec City, the 179-hectare Roberge project has undergone soil sampling with historic, non-43-101 results up to 1.06% cobalt.

Now compiling data from the properties, King’s Bay plans a spring program of mapping and sampling to confirm the historic results.

Last month the company closed its acquisition of the 24,000-hectare Lynx Lake copper-cobalt project in south-central Labrador, which has airborne EM planned. Grab samples from the property’s east side brought non-43-101 results up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver. Grab samples on the west side showed non-43-101 results up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium.

King’s Bay closed a $938,752 private placement in January.

See an infographic about cobalt.

Updated: Financing, permitting, 12-fold expansion bring King’s Bay closer to Labrador copper-cobalt exploration

January 17th, 2017

by Greg Klein | January 15, 2017

Update: On January 17, King’s Bay announced the expansion of its Lynx Lake property from about 2,000 hectares to approximately 24,000 hectares “to adequately cover the geological structures and geophysical signatures of interest.”

 

With a provincial permit in hand and a $938,752 private placement that closed earlier this month, King’s Bay Gold TSXV:KBG readies for airborne EM over its Lynx Lake copper-cobalt project in south-central Labrador. The survey will precede a proposed first-ever drill program for the property.

Financing, permitting bring King’s Bay closer to Labrador copper-cobalt exploration

Previous work began after construction of the Trans-Labrador Highway in 2008, which unlocked some of the region’s geology. Grab samples from a quarry on the property’s east side showed non-43-101 results up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver. Other non-43-101 grab sample results from a west-side quarry ranged up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium.

Preliminary evidence of strong conductors in the area came from the province’s regional low-res magnetic surveys and a hand-held EM-16 device.

With highway and powerlines running adjacent to the property, Lynx Lake can be reached by a 1.5-hour drive from the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay.

Cobalt, one of the energy metals essential to battery manufacture, presents especially troubling supply concerns due to the instability and human rights infractions of the metal’s largest producer, the Democratic Republic of Congo. See an infographic about cobalt’s precarious supply chain.

King’s Bay Gold to acquire never-drilled copper-cobalt property in Labrador

October 28th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 28, 2016

An intriguing chance find has King’s Bay Gold TSXV:KBG hoping the Trans-Labrador Highway will be a road to discovery. That’s the story behind the company’s October 27 announcement of a definitive agreement to acquire the Lynx Lake copper-cobalt property in south-central Labrador.

King’s Bay Gold to acquire never-drilled copper-cobalt property in Labrador

Powerlines and the Trans-Labrador Highway
run adjacent to the Lynx Lake copper-cobalt property.

As Newfoundland was building the highway in 2008, a provincial contractor with prospecting experience noticed evidence of disseminated and massive sulphides, King’s Bay geologist/director Nick Rodway explains. Some geological sleuthing eventually drew the contractor to the property’s east side, where a quarry had been blasted for aggregate.

Grab samples assayed the following year showed non-43-101 results up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver. Regional low-res magnetic surveys undertaken by the province and preliminary work in 2014 with a hand-held EM-16 device suggest strong conductors underlying the area.

Grab samples taken on the property’s west side in 2015 brought non-43-101 results up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium.

With a team returning to Lynx Lake next week, King’s Bay intends to conduct a sampling program to bring 43-101 results, along with further EM-16 surveys. Should all go to plan, airborne geophysics could follow this winter.

Open to year-round work, highway-accessible and with adjacent powerlines, the 20-square-kilometre property sits about 100 kilometres southeast of the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay.

Subject to approvals, the acquisition costs King’s Bay $100,000 over three years and 900,000 shares over two years. On October 27 the company also announced a private placement of up to $1 million.

The news comes amid growing concerns over future cobalt supply. Nearly 60% of global production comes from the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country rife with political instability and conflict mining.

At the same time increased demand comes from “the energy storage revolution,” reports Benchmark Mineral Intelligence. Its data shows “2015 total global supply at 100,000 tpa, of this the battery market consumed 48,000 tpa.

“With a lithium-ion battery production surge well underway—and Benchmark recently revising its megafactories tracker to now 14 that are under construction ranging from three- to 35-GWh capacity—lithium-ion battery demand for cobalt is set to exceed 100,000 tpa by 2020.”

A battery-powered revolution

January 21st, 2015

VRIC 2015 speakers look at emerging needs in energy and commodities

by Greg Klein

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Battery megafactories are on their way, heralding a potential “battery revolution,” says Simon Moores. Although they’re already ubiquitous, much more widespread than only a decade ago, he says batteries remain in a relatively “young stage of development.” Electric vehicles and large-scale storage for utilities could bring on a new phase demanding much more of the minerals and metals they require.

VRIC 2015 speakers look at emerging needs in energy and commodities

Speaking at this year’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Moores dated the first commercial battery-powered watch to 1969. By the late 1990s, battery-powered tools, cellphones and mp3 players became common. By the mid-2000s laptops attained widespread use, followed by the “2007 smartphone revolution powered by Apple.” Tablets and other devices gained popularity. “It’s only now that we’ve evolved into a truly mobile world. You can just tell by the amount of mobile devices you have in your pocket now compared to 10 years ago,” the Benchmark Mineral Intelligence analyst pointed out.

But we’re now entering a new phase of fully electric vehicles—not hybrids—and electricity storage for utilities, he said.

Unlike the earlier mercury or lead-acid batteries, the new wave of batteries uses “niche minerals and metals, they’re not really commodities but specially processed and created products” using graphite, lithium and cobalt, among other minerals. Large-scale storage calls for lithium-ion or vanadium flow batteries.

The impending revolution wouldn’t be the first. The Apple iPhone triggered the “hand-held revolution” in 2007, not just outselling competitors but creating enormous additional demand. Its predecessor, the Nokia N70, sold a million handsets in a year, making it the best-selling smartphone of the time, Moores said. Less than two years later the iPhone emerged, selling a million handsets in 72 days. Last September the iPhone 6 sold 10 million in 72 hours.

Obviously that calls for more batteries, but there’s an additional factor that’s often missed, Moores emphasized. Notwithstanding miniaturization of electronics, batteries are getting bigger. In 2012 the iPhone 5 used roughly nine grams of graphite, he said. Two years later its successor took up to 19 grams. Similar increases apply to lithium and cobalt.

VRIC 2015 speakers look at emerging needs in energy and commodities

Simon Moores foresees a battery revolution brought about by
electronics, EVs and utility storage.

As for electric vehicles, the Nissan Leaf remains the top seller. But Tesla Motors’ approach “could be the tipping point,” Moores thinks. A key innovation was to build a car around the battery, “basically about the size of the chassis of the car” and more than twice the size of Leaf’s battery.

Other manufacturers had taken existing designs, stuck a battery in it and “then they complained the car didn’t go far enough.”

Now Tesla plans a $5-billion project to build the world’s biggest battery plant in Nevada. “They want to take what the world produced in 2013 and double that capacity in Nevada. The idea is lower-cost batteries, lower-cost cars, mass-scale commercialization of the EV.”

Korean manufacturer LG Chem has started building a $500-million battery plant in China. “We think that’s about a seven-gigawatt-hour plant.”

A manufacturer of iPhones for Apple, Foxconn has another battery factory planned for China that Moores thinks will produce about 15 GWh. Like Tesla, Foxconn’s new to the battery-building business.

Tesla’s factory, which the company hopes to see operating in 2017, would have a 35-GWh capacity. “The biggest plant today is about two gigawatt-hours.”

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

December 5th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission strikes 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, delays maiden resource

All assays are in but Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) highly anticipated resource for Patterson Lake South seems to have been put off. The milestone was originally scheduled for this month but in a December 1 statement president/COO Ross McElroy said, “We expect to be able to release preliminary results by early 2015.” Meanwhile the company announced last summer’s final 18 delineation holes, again flaunting the PLS trademark of high grades at shallow depths.

This batch comes entirely from R780E, by far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. R780E itself now extends about 164 metres at its widest point and 905 metres in strike, remaining open in all directions. The upcoming resource will focus on zones R780E and R00E.

Some of the best December 1 assays follow.

Hole PLS14-275

  • 0.2% U3O8 over 26 metres, starting at 137.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.26% over 2 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

A summer of round-the-clock drilling brought the
final assays prior to Patterson Lake South’s first resource.

  • 0.31% over 9 metres, starting at 171 metres
  • (including 1.96% over 1 metre)

PLS14-276

  • 13.84% over 10 metres, starting at 71.5 metres
  • (including 29.29% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-278

  • 0.48% over 13 metres, starting at 117.5 metres
  • (including 1.17% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-279

  • 0.83% over 30 metres, starting at 131 metres
  • (including 2.09% over 10.5 metres)

  • 1.24% over 6.5 metres, starting at 163.5 metres
  • (including 2.5% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-282

  • 0.4% over 14.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres
  • (including 1.02% over 4 metres)

PLS14-283

  • 0.54% over 9 metres, starting at 177 metres
  • (including 3.84% over 1 metre)

  • 2.61% over 9 metres, starting at 257.5 metres
  • (including 8.61% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-285

  • 0.96% over 7.5 metres, starting at 287.5 metres
  • (including 2.56% over 2 metres)

  • 0.36% over 15 metres, starting at 299 metres

PLS14-286

  • 7.91% over 21.9 metres, starting at 61.1 metres
  • (including 17.3% over 9.5 metres)

  • 0.42% over 30.5 metres, starting at 86.5 metres

  • 1.49% over 4.5 metres, starting at 96 metres

PLS14-290

  • 3.72% over 64.5 metres, starting at 133.5 metres
  • (including 32.53% over 6.5 metres)

PLS14-293

  • 2.34% over 11 metres, starting at 198.5 metres
  • (including 11.74% over 2 metres)

PLS14-294

  • 0.8% over 10.5 metres, starting at 61 metres
  • (including 1.77% over 4 metres)

  • 0.27% over 21 metres, starting at 111 metres

PLS14-296

  • 0.7% over 33 metres, starting at 174 metres
  • (including 2.21% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 2.2% over 4 metres)

PLS14-297

  • 0.52% over 22.5 metres, starting at 184 metres
  • (including 1.39% over 3 metres)

  • 2.21% over 5.5 metres, starting at 210 metres
  • (including 6.76% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-298

  • 1.51% over 13.5 metres, starting at 246.5 metres
  • (including 2.38% over 5 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

Fission noted that scissor drilling brought “vastly improved strength of mineralization on section 735E.” Oriented opposite to the south-to-north holes, they “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” One scissor hole hit the star assay for this batch, 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, in an area that had previously seen only moderate results, the company stated.

With assays for 22 exploration holes still pending and a winter program in the planning stages, speculation remains on whether the company will spend more time testing the property’s lesser-known areas.

Denison drills 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres at Wheeler River

The final batch of assays from Gryphon’s summer season at Denison Mines’ (TSX:DML) Wheeler River property revealed the zone’s highest grade so far, 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres. Announced December 2, that hole was also the deepest, making down-plunge extensions a priority for the next round of drilling, scheduled to start next month.

As usual, the chemical assays generally show better grades than the previously reported U3O8-equivalents that came from a downhole gamma probe.

Some highlights include:

Hole WR-571

  • 8.8% U3O8 over 2.5 metres, starting at 757.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 1.9% over 1 metre, starting at 761.5 metres

WR-572

  • 2.5% over 1 metre, starting at 651.1 metres

  • 9.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 1.8% over 1 metre, starting at 714.5 metres

  • 2.1% over 1 metre, starting at 717.5 metres

WR-573D1

  • 22.2% over 2.5 metres, starting at 768 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 779 metres

WR-574

  • 5% over 2 metres, starting at 665 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 14.6% over 2 metres, starting at 696.5 metres

WR-581

  • 2.7% over 2 metres, starting at 626.5 metres

The company estimates true widths at about 75%.

Wheeler River’s summer program comprised 20 holes totalling 14,937 metres, all of it at or near the newly discovered Gryphon zone.

Meanwhile, as a result of metallurgical testwork from the project’s Phoenix deposit, “a high-purity yellowcake product was produced that met all ASTM C967-13 specifications,” Denison stated. The sample grade was 19.7% U3O8, close to the average for Phoenix, which hosts 70.2 million pounds indicated.

The company closed a $14.99-million private placement in August.

With a 60% interest in Wheeler River, Denison acts as project operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% of the 11,720-hectare southeastern Athabasca Basin property, leaving JCU (Canada) Exploration with the other 10%.

Lakeland Resources boosts portfolio, offers $1.88-million private placement

All acquired by staking, four new properties and five property expansions announced by Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK on November 19 increase the company’s portfolio by 40,218 hectares in and around the Basin.

The five expansions cover targets identified by historic data. Among the highlights is the 4,753-hectare addition to Lazy Edward Bay, which underwent extensive field work last summer. Now totalling 31,128 hectares, the project features eight exploration trends, many of them drill-ready. Other additions came to Lakeland’s Riou Lake, Hawkrock Rapids, Small Lake and Fedun Lake properties.

Of the new land, the 1,508-hectare Carter Lake property covers part of the Carter Lake Structural Corridor, parallel to the Patterson Structural Corridor hosting the discoveries of Fission and NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE.

If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.—Jonathan Armes, president/CEO of Lakeland Resources

Cable Bay, a 1,077-hectare property on the Basin’s southern rim, benefits from extensive geophysics showing a trend of graphitic meta-sedimentary rocks in the basement, below 10 metres or less of Athabasca sandstone.

The 6,479-hectare Highrock property on the Basin’s southeastern margin features a moderately strong conductor that has yet to see follow-up work.

Extending beyond the Basin’s eastern rim, the 8,889-hectare Wright River project underwent an airborne survey showing a radiometric anomaly in the property’s centre. Regional lake sediment samples have graded up to 61 ppm.

Early new year plans include a 1,500-metre program on Star/Gibbon’s Creek, two adjacent properties forming one project on the Basin’s north-central rim. Also drill-ready are Lazy Edward Bay and, east of Star/Gibbon’s, Newnham Lake. More funding is expected from a $1.88-million private placement announced December 4.

“There’s not that much ground left to be had in the Basin,” Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes tells ResourceClips.com. “Most of what we see as quality ground is not available. If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

NexGen plans 18,000 metres for Rook 1, updates other properties

Funded by an $11.5-million private placement that closed last month, NexGen plans a three-rig, 18,000-metre program to start in January. Work will focus on Rook 1’s Arrow zone and along strike to the northeast and southwest, but will also test some of the project’s regional targets, the company stated on December 3. An infill ground gravity survey will precede the drilling.

Now complete are airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys over Rook 1 as well as additional nearby land that has had little or no previous mention from NexGen, the “SW2 property portfolio which includes Bishop 1 and 2, Meanwell and R-7 claims.” Winter plans include a radon-in-water survey.

NexGen also updated what it calls its “SW3 project portfolio (Rook 2, Sandhill and Dufferin).” Rook 2 and Sandhill underwent airborne gravity surveys. Dufferin got airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys, as did the eastern Basin Madison and 2Z Lake properties.

Rook 1 covers all the southwestern Basin’s major uranium-bearing conductor corridors, according to the company. Still pending are assays from 16 summer holes on Arrow. In October the company claimed one of the Basin’s best-ever drill results.

UEC reports 77% increase in Burke Hollow’s inferred resources

Seven trends at Uranium Energy Corp’s (NYSE MKT:UEC) Burke Hollow project in Texas now have total inferred resources of 2.9 million tons averaging 0.09% for 5.12 million pounds U3O8. About 14,152 metres of drilling in 526 holes were used to calculate the 77% increase. UEC has three additional areas of the property under consideration for drilling.

Burke Hollow, potentially an in-situ recovery operation, has an application for a radioactive material licence and mine permit currently under review.

The 7,824-hectare project lies about 80 kilometres from the company’s Hobson processing plant, the centrepiece of UEC’s “hub and spoke” properties. The portfolio includes the Palangana ISR mine, the Goliad ISR development project and nearly two dozen exploration projects, two in Paraguay and the rest in the western U.S. The company released a preliminary economic assessment for its Anderson uranium project in Arizona last September, as well as a PEA for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado last April.

On December 2 UEC stated it secured US$5.6 million of surety bonds to replace the same amount in reclamation deposits for future decommissioning. The bonds “require cash collateral of $1.7 million, allowing for the release of $3.9 million of previously restricted cash to the company.”

Last March the company received a two-year extension on a $20-million loan.

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November 18th, 2014

Downhole geophysics in mineral exploration Geology for Investors
Credit Suisse analyst Michael Slifirski: New non-Chinese graphite and vanadium supply could create new demand Streetwise Reports
Uranium climbs to highest since January 2013 amid utility demand NAI 500
Osisko Gold to buy Virginia Mines for $476 million VantageWire
Swiss regulator fines UBS for precious metals price manipulation SilverSeek
The Swiss gold initiative and why it may affect bullion prices Stockhouse
Selective financing to snag pace of mine development Industrial Minerals
The last resort when monetary policy fails Equedia

Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 4th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 27 to October 3, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission continues PLS main zone’s perfect score, gets conditional approval for TSX listing

In a week that saw Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU win conditional approval to move up to the TSX big board, the company maintained this season’s 100% hit rate at Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone. All seven holes released September 29 returned wide mineralization. The main zone now boasts 61 successes out of 61 summer holes.

The results come from a hand-held device used to measure drill core for radiation. They’re no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Among the most recent batch’s highlights, hole PLS14-290 revealed intervals totalling a composite 97.5 metres of mineralization, the shallowest beginning at 113.5 metres in downhole depth. PLS14-298 showed a composite 84 metres, with the shallowest intercept starting at 146.5 metres. PLS14-296 came up with a 94.5-metre composite, with one interval starting at 96 metres. True widths weren’t available.

An innovation to the summer program has been angled drilling from barges over the lake. Now Fission’s emphasizing three “scissor” holes, each sunk north to south at an opposite azimuth to a south-to-north hole. The purpose is to “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” PLS14-290, for example, “intersected well-developed mineralization … in an area that had previously only seen moderate results.”

By far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike, R780E shows a continuous strike of 930 metres and, at one point, a lateral width of 164 metres. The project’s mineralization sits within a metasedimentary lithologic corridor bounded to the south by the PL-3B basement electromagnetic conductor.

Still to come are assays to replace the summer’s radiometric results, as well as assays for the final dozen of last winter’s 92 holes. December’s still the target for a maiden resource.

Fission greeted October 3 by announcing conditional approval for a TSX listing. The company anticipates big board trading on or about October 8, retaining its FCU ticker.

In an interview posted by Stockhouse October 3, Fission chairperson/CEO Dev Randhawa contrasted Saskatchewan’s stability with that of other uranium-rich jurisdictions like Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Namibia and Niger. Verifying his intention to sell the project, Randhawa told journalist Gaalen Engen, “We have about six or seven Asian and North American companies in the midst of due diligence who are interested in doing private placement and/or taking over the company.”

The previous week Fission closed a $14.4-million private placement and released regional PLS drill results.

Field work and drilling approach for Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek flagship

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 27 to October 3, 2014

Scintillometer in hand, a geologist prospects
for radiometric anomalies over the Star uplift.

Announced September 29, the termination of an option with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN gives Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK full control of its 12,771-hectare Gibbon’s Creek project, which features boulder samples up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the Athabasca Basin’s highest-ever radon readings. Three days later Lakeland released rock and soil sample results from its adjacent Star property, showing gold, platinum and palladium, as well as some rare earths and low-grade uranium. Especially when considered for their proximity to a structural lineament that runs through both properties, the results show similarities to major Basin discoveries of high-grade uranium, the company states. With the two properties on the Basin’s north-central margin united as one project, Lakeland has additional field work planned for autumn. That leads up to a drill program slated to begin this winter, if not sooner.

Jody Dahrouge, president of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, told ResourceClips.com of geophysical data showing “a major regional structural lineament that’s about 30 or 40 kilometres in length, and it’s been reactivated many times over 100 million years or more. This is a key ingredient to every uranium deposit in the Athabasca Basin…. Having it reactivated time and time again allows multiple generations of fluid to flow along that structure and deposition of perhaps multiple ore bodies.”

He identified three mineralizing systems within five to 10 kilometres of the structure. The Star uplift, a basement outcrop about 700 metres by 350 metres, was the location of many of the samples showing gold and platinum group elements, along with some rare earths and low-grade uranium.

A massive alteration zone about a kilometre south had historic drill results up to 1,500 parts per million uranium. A few kilometres farther sits the boulder field that graded up to 4.28% U3O8. “Clearly something’s going on and clearly it’s related to the structure,” Dahrouge said.

With drill permits in place, road access from a nearby community, shallow depths, high ground that can be worked year-round and a healthy treasury, Lakeland now plans the next stage of an extensive exploration program for its flagship.

Read more about Lakeland’s Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

September 19th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 13 to 19, 2014

by Greg Klein

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NexGen ends season with high-grade assays from Rook 1

A summer of largely successful drilling has come to a close at NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1 project. Patterson Lake South’s neighbour got 33 holes totalling 18,885 metres, with 24 of the holes focusing on the Arrow zone. Radiometric results for the final two holes, released September 17, confirm the 515-metre strike for a zone that’s 215 metres wide and open in all directions. At the same time NexGen released the season’s first batch of assays, which the company said confirms mineralization indicated by previously reported radiometrics.

The last two holes were sunk vertically 15 metres northeast and southwest from the project’s previously released “landmark.” One hole found intersections totalling 123.9 metres of mineralization (not true width), with the shallowest intercept starting at 328.15 metres in vertical depth. The other showed a composite total of 107.9 metres of mineralization starting at 186 metres in depth.

These results come from a hand-held device that measures drill core radiation in counts per second. They’re no substitute for assays, which have yet to come for most of the season’s holes.

But assays for six earlier holes also released September 17 correlate well with the previously reported radiometric results, NexGen stated. Some highlights include:

Hole RK-14-31

  • 0.13% U3O8 over 28.2 metres, starting at 292.5 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 13 to 19, 2014

  • 0.38% over 5.55 metres, starting at 618.1 metres

  • 0.29% over 3.9 metres, starting at 639.1 metres

  • 5.91% over 1.3 metres, starting at 650.8 metres

Hole RK-14-32

  • 0.17% over 7.6 metres, starting at 502.2 metres

  • 0.65% over 1.35 metres, starting at 514.3 metres

Hole RK-14-34

  • 0.12% over 96.75 metres, starting at 181.25 metres

  • 6.56% over 1.2 metres, starting at 540 metres

  • 0.12% over 3.7 metres, starting at 606.3 metres

  • 0.67% over 3.6 metres, starting at 621.9 metres

Hole RK-14-35

  • 0.21% over 2.85 metres, starting at 524.35 metres

  • 0.9% over 3.3 metres, starting at 600.55 metres

Hole RK-14-37

  • 0.1% over 7.5 metres, starting at 386.5 metres

  • 0.12% over 13.5 metres, starting at 401 metres

  • 1.08% over 18.25 metres, starting at 456.8 metres

  • 1.96% over 3.05 metres, starting at 482.4 metres

  • 2.66% over 0.65 metres, starting at 499.3 metres

  • 1.24% over 2 metres, starting at 505.45 metres

  • 1.31% over 11.85 metres, starting at 522.4 metres

  • 0.17% over 5.8 metres, starting at 541.2 metres

  • 5.35% over 4.6 metres, starting at 569.6 metres

Hole RK-14-39

  • 0.9% over 3.55 metres, starting at 540.7 metres

True widths were unavailable.

Thirty of 32 holes sunk on the Arrow zone over two seasons have shown mineralization. But not so with the project’s regional drilling, where five holes proved barren. The company still hopes they’ll show pathfinder elements.

Boasting a working capital of $6.5 million, NexGen’s now planning its winter campaign.

Uranium Energy Corp releases PEA for Anderson project

An Arizona project amenable to conventional mining and heap leach recovery would require low capital costs to produce a total of 16 million pounds of uranium over 14 years, according to a preliminary economic assessment announced September 16 by Uranium Energy Corp NYSE MKT:UEC.

Quoting all amounts in U.S. dollars, assuming a uranium price of $60 and using a 10% discount rate, the study calculated the Anderson project’s after-tax net present value at $76.4 million and the internal rate of return at 42%. With uranium at $65 a pound, the NPV comes to $101.1 million with a 50% IRR.

The initial capex comes to $43.9 million with an additional $8 million for four years of pre-production including development drilling, designing the mine and heap leach operation, as well as permitting. Another $87.6 million would be needed through years four to eight as the operation makes the transition from open pit to highwall and underground mining.

Heap leach recovery would produce a resin which would be processed at Energy Fuels’ (TSX:EFR) White Mesa mill in Utah.

The project has indicated resources showing 15.5 million pounds uranium oxide-equivalent for an open pit and another 1.5 million pounds underground. The inferred resources have 2.5 million pounds eU3O8 in the pit and 9.5 million pounds underground.

Future studies will examine vanadium as a byproduct.

UEC operates the Palangana in-situ recovery mine, Hobson processing plant and advanced-stage Goliad and Burke Hollow projects in Texas. Last April the company completed a PEA for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado. UEC holds over 20 projects in the western U.S. and two more in Paraguay.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 9th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 2 to 8, 2014

by Greg Klein

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High grades, wide intervals from neighbours Fission and NexGen

Nearly simultaneous announcements from two adjacent projects once again evoke a sense of wonder about the Athabasca Basin’s southwestern rim. Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South still comes out ahead with an August 7 best result of 12.12% U3O8 over 27 metres. Still, NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) same-day best of 3.42% over 22.35 metres can hardly be dismissed. Fission also retains the shallower depths. But NexGen’s relatively recent Arrow discovery suggests something big might have spread beyond Fission’s 31,039-hectare property.

First, a look at NexGen.

Two days after announcing the “strongest and shallowest mineralization to date” from Rook 1’s Arrow zone, the company rushed to market with two stock-propelling assays from a single hole. Announced August 7, the results come from AR-14-15, the zone’s 15th hole so far. NexGen released the numbers in a sort of Russian doll formation of intervals within intervals, showing ever-higher grades as the widths contracted:

  • 3.42% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 22.35 metres, starting at 564 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 10.72% over 6.85 metres)
  • (which includes 15.74% over 4.5 metres)
  • (which includes 26.1% over 2.6 metres)
  • (which includes 55.8% over 0.45 metres)

  • 1.52% over 32 metres, starting at 594 metres
  • (including 2.98% over 15.85 metres)
  • (which includes 10.4% over 3.15 metres)
  • (which includes 43.7% over 0.35 metres)

True widths weren’t provided but the hole was sunk at a dip of -70 degrees.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 2 to 8, 2014

The assays follow an August 5 batch of radiometric readings. Those eight holes, which included AR-14-15, extend Arrow’s strike by 45 metres to about 515 metres in length for a zone that’s up to 180 metres wide and open in all directions. Encouraged by a near 100% hit rate, the company has increased its summer program from 13,500 metres to 18,500 metres of drilling.

These results come from a handheld scintillometer that measures gamma radiation from drill core in counts per second. They’re no substitute for assays.

The zone’s shallowest finding came from hole AR-14-20, which showed a composite of 51.3 metres of mineralization within a 284.45-metre section starting at 118.55 metres in downhole depth. True widths weren’t provided.

The strongest results came from AR-14-15.

Two regional holes totalling 558 metres at Rook 1’s Area K failed to find mineralization. The company now plans regional drilling at Area A on an electromagnetic conductor that NexGen interprets to be PL-3B, which hosts the PLS discovery. Rook 1 has two other conductors as well.

Not including one abandoned hole, the eight Arrow holes bring the zone’s total to 22 so far. Just one failed to find mineralization. Radiometric results have been reported previously for the first six summer holes, while assays have been released for last winter’s eight-hole campaign.

With Arrow clearly the project’s focus, NexGen has changed Rook 1’s protocol for identifying holes. Arrow hole numbers now begin with the letters AR, while regional holes retain the prefix RK.

AR-14-15’s assay came out with remarkable speed. Both NexGen and Fission use the same lab (SRC Geoanalytical Laboratories in Saskatoon). But while Fission is still releasing assays from last winter’s drilling, months after publishing their radiometric results, NexGen somehow released a summer assay just two days after reporting the same hole’s radiometrics.

Fission hits with six holes from winter, 12 from summer

As has been the case for most of last winter’s PLS drilling, the half-dozen holes released August 7 came from the project’s R780E zone, the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. Fission’s most outstanding results showed:

Hole PLS14-201

  • 2.51% U3O8 over 12 metres, starting at 128 metres
  • (including 5.6% over 5 metres)

  • 12.12% over 27 metres, starting at 149 metres
  • (including 26.41% over 12 metres)

PLS14-205

  • 0.54% over 43 metres, starting at 132.5 metres
  • (including 1.54% over 7.5 metres)

  • 2.65% over 10 metres, starting at 229 metres
  • (including 11.57% over 1.5 metres)

  • 0.59% over 35.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres

PLS14-213

  • 4.05% over 34 metres, starting at 147.5 metres
  • (including 11.37% over 11 metres)

True widths weren’t provided. One additional hole on the R00E zone failed to find significant mineralization. Still to come are assays for another 17 holes from last winter’s 92-hole program.

Like NexGen, Fission’s assays followed radiometric results by two days. And, like NexGen, those measurements expand the size of a zone. Taking advantage of barge-based angle drilling, a new technique first announced the previous week, the crew sunk 12 angled holes into the lake, all of them showing wide mineralization.

Hole PLS14-248 expanded the zone’s eastern half approximately 40 metres south while PLS14-236 showed mineralization about 50 metres north. The usual scintillometer disclaimer applies.

The $12-million, 63-hole summer program continues its progress towards a December resource.

U3O8 Corp Argentinian PEA sees payback in 2.5 years

U3O8 Corp TSX:UWE emphasized low cash costs as the company announced a preliminary economic assessment for its Laguna Salada deposit in Argentina on August 5. The deposit’s characteristics would make it “competitive with low-cost in-situ recovery uranium projects and with high-grade deposits in the Athabasca Basin,” the company stated.

Taking into consideration a vanadium credit and a 3% NSR, cash costs for the 10-year mine life would average $21.62 per pound of uranium. The study estimates even lower initial cash costs of $16.14 a pound as production starts in higher-grade zones, bringing payback in just 2.5 years.

Using U.S. dollars for all figures, the PEA forecast a $134-million capex and used a 7.5% discount rate to calculate a net present value of $55 million and an 18% post-tax internal rate of return. The numbers were based on presumed prices of $60 a pound U3O8 and $5.50 a pound vanadium.

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