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Athabasca Basin and beyond

December 5th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission strikes 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, delays maiden resource

All assays are in but Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) highly anticipated resource for Patterson Lake South seems to have been put off. The milestone was originally scheduled for this month but in a December 1 statement president/COO Ross McElroy said, “We expect to be able to release preliminary results by early 2015.” Meanwhile the company announced last summer’s final 18 delineation holes, again flaunting the PLS trademark of high grades at shallow depths.

This batch comes entirely from R780E, by far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. R780E itself now extends about 164 metres at its widest point and 905 metres in strike, remaining open in all directions. The upcoming resource will focus on zones R780E and R00E.

Some of the best December 1 assays follow.

Hole PLS14-275

  • 0.2% U3O8 over 26 metres, starting at 137.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.26% over 2 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

A summer of round-the-clock drilling brought the
final assays prior to Patterson Lake South’s first resource.

  • 0.31% over 9 metres, starting at 171 metres
  • (including 1.96% over 1 metre)

PLS14-276

  • 13.84% over 10 metres, starting at 71.5 metres
  • (including 29.29% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-278

  • 0.48% over 13 metres, starting at 117.5 metres
  • (including 1.17% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-279

  • 0.83% over 30 metres, starting at 131 metres
  • (including 2.09% over 10.5 metres)

  • 1.24% over 6.5 metres, starting at 163.5 metres
  • (including 2.5% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-282

  • 0.4% over 14.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres
  • (including 1.02% over 4 metres)

PLS14-283

  • 0.54% over 9 metres, starting at 177 metres
  • (including 3.84% over 1 metre)

  • 2.61% over 9 metres, starting at 257.5 metres
  • (including 8.61% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-285

  • 0.96% over 7.5 metres, starting at 287.5 metres
  • (including 2.56% over 2 metres)

  • 0.36% over 15 metres, starting at 299 metres

PLS14-286

  • 7.91% over 21.9 metres, starting at 61.1 metres
  • (including 17.3% over 9.5 metres)

  • 0.42% over 30.5 metres, starting at 86.5 metres

  • 1.49% over 4.5 metres, starting at 96 metres

PLS14-290

  • 3.72% over 64.5 metres, starting at 133.5 metres
  • (including 32.53% over 6.5 metres)

PLS14-293

  • 2.34% over 11 metres, starting at 198.5 metres
  • (including 11.74% over 2 metres)

PLS14-294

  • 0.8% over 10.5 metres, starting at 61 metres
  • (including 1.77% over 4 metres)

  • 0.27% over 21 metres, starting at 111 metres

PLS14-296

  • 0.7% over 33 metres, starting at 174 metres
  • (including 2.21% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 2.2% over 4 metres)

PLS14-297

  • 0.52% over 22.5 metres, starting at 184 metres
  • (including 1.39% over 3 metres)

  • 2.21% over 5.5 metres, starting at 210 metres
  • (including 6.76% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-298

  • 1.51% over 13.5 metres, starting at 246.5 metres
  • (including 2.38% over 5 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

Fission noted that scissor drilling brought “vastly improved strength of mineralization on section 735E.” Oriented opposite to the south-to-north holes, they “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” One scissor hole hit the star assay for this batch, 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, in an area that had previously seen only moderate results, the company stated.

With assays for 22 exploration holes still pending and a winter program in the planning stages, speculation remains on whether the company will spend more time testing the property’s lesser-known areas.

Denison drills 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres at Wheeler River

The final batch of assays from Gryphon’s summer season at Denison Mines’ (TSX:DML) Wheeler River property revealed the zone’s highest grade so far, 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres. Announced December 2, that hole was also the deepest, making down-plunge extensions a priority for the next round of drilling, scheduled to start next month.

As usual, the chemical assays generally show better grades than the previously reported U3O8-equivalents that came from a downhole gamma probe.

Some highlights include:

Hole WR-571

  • 8.8% U3O8 over 2.5 metres, starting at 757.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 1.9% over 1 metre, starting at 761.5 metres

WR-572

  • 2.5% over 1 metre, starting at 651.1 metres

  • 9.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 1.8% over 1 metre, starting at 714.5 metres

  • 2.1% over 1 metre, starting at 717.5 metres

WR-573D1

  • 22.2% over 2.5 metres, starting at 768 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 779 metres

WR-574

  • 5% over 2 metres, starting at 665 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 14.6% over 2 metres, starting at 696.5 metres

WR-581

  • 2.7% over 2 metres, starting at 626.5 metres

The company estimates true widths at about 75%.

Wheeler River’s summer program comprised 20 holes totalling 14,937 metres, all of it at or near the newly discovered Gryphon zone.

Meanwhile, as a result of metallurgical testwork from the project’s Phoenix deposit, “a high-purity yellowcake product was produced that met all ASTM C967-13 specifications,” Denison stated. The sample grade was 19.7% U3O8, close to the average for Phoenix, which hosts 70.2 million pounds indicated.

The company closed a $14.99-million private placement in August.

With a 60% interest in Wheeler River, Denison acts as project operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% of the 11,720-hectare southeastern Athabasca Basin property, leaving JCU (Canada) Exploration with the other 10%.

Lakeland Resources boosts portfolio, offers $1.88-million private placement

All acquired by staking, four new properties and five property expansions announced by Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK on November 19 increase the company’s portfolio by 40,218 hectares in and around the Basin.

The five expansions cover targets identified by historic data. Among the highlights is the 4,753-hectare addition to Lazy Edward Bay, which underwent extensive field work last summer. Now totalling 31,128 hectares, the project features eight exploration trends, many of them drill-ready. Other additions came to Lakeland’s Riou Lake, Hawkrock Rapids, Small Lake and Fedun Lake properties.

Of the new land, the 1,508-hectare Carter Lake property covers part of the Carter Lake Structural Corridor, parallel to the Patterson Structural Corridor hosting the discoveries of Fission and NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE.

If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.—Jonathan Armes, president/CEO of Lakeland Resources

Cable Bay, a 1,077-hectare property on the Basin’s southern rim, benefits from extensive geophysics showing a trend of graphitic meta-sedimentary rocks in the basement, below 10 metres or less of Athabasca sandstone.

The 6,479-hectare Highrock property on the Basin’s southeastern margin features a moderately strong conductor that has yet to see follow-up work.

Extending beyond the Basin’s eastern rim, the 8,889-hectare Wright River project underwent an airborne survey showing a radiometric anomaly in the property’s centre. Regional lake sediment samples have graded up to 61 ppm.

Early new year plans include a 1,500-metre program on Star/Gibbon’s Creek, two adjacent properties forming one project on the Basin’s north-central rim. Also drill-ready are Lazy Edward Bay and, east of Star/Gibbon’s, Newnham Lake. More funding is expected from a $1.88-million private placement announced December 4.

“There’s not that much ground left to be had in the Basin,” Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes tells ResourceClips.com. “Most of what we see as quality ground is not available. If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

NexGen plans 18,000 metres for Rook 1, updates other properties

Funded by an $11.5-million private placement that closed last month, NexGen plans a three-rig, 18,000-metre program to start in January. Work will focus on Rook 1’s Arrow zone and along strike to the northeast and southwest, but will also test some of the project’s regional targets, the company stated on December 3. An infill ground gravity survey will precede the drilling.

Now complete are airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys over Rook 1 as well as additional nearby land that has had little or no previous mention from NexGen, the “SW2 property portfolio which includes Bishop 1 and 2, Meanwell and R-7 claims.” Winter plans include a radon-in-water survey.

NexGen also updated what it calls its “SW3 project portfolio (Rook 2, Sandhill and Dufferin).” Rook 2 and Sandhill underwent airborne gravity surveys. Dufferin got airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys, as did the eastern Basin Madison and 2Z Lake properties.

Rook 1 covers all the southwestern Basin’s major uranium-bearing conductor corridors, according to the company. Still pending are assays from 16 summer holes on Arrow. In October the company claimed one of the Basin’s best-ever drill results.

UEC reports 77% increase in Burke Hollow’s inferred resources

Seven trends at Uranium Energy Corp’s (NYSE MKT:UEC) Burke Hollow project in Texas now have total inferred resources of 2.9 million tons averaging 0.09% for 5.12 million pounds U3O8. About 14,152 metres of drilling in 526 holes were used to calculate the 77% increase. UEC has three additional areas of the property under consideration for drilling.

Burke Hollow, potentially an in-situ recovery operation, has an application for a radioactive material licence and mine permit currently under review.

The 7,824-hectare project lies about 80 kilometres from the company’s Hobson processing plant, the centrepiece of UEC’s “hub and spoke” properties. The portfolio includes the Palangana ISR mine, the Goliad ISR development project and nearly two dozen exploration projects, two in Paraguay and the rest in the western U.S. The company released a preliminary economic assessment for its Anderson uranium project in Arizona last September, as well as a PEA for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado last April.

On December 2 UEC stated it secured US$5.6 million of surety bonds to replace the same amount in reclamation deposits for future decommissioning. The bonds “require cash collateral of $1.7 million, allowing for the release of $3.9 million of previously restricted cash to the company.”

Last March the company received a two-year extension on a $20-million loan.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

November 15th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to November 14, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Kivalliq’s Nunavut property reveals new drill priority

Heralding its “most advanced, drill-ready target outside of the Lac 50 trend,” Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV announced the Angilak project’s Dipole target on November 12. The new area came to light after a 1,335-line-kilometre VTEM survey and 1,514 soil samples south of the 111,476-hectare property’s Lac 50 deposit in Nunavut.

Preliminary analysis confirms geophysical targets at Dipole and the RIB area, Kivalliq stated. The company expects final VTEM data shortly to further define targets south of Lac 50.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to November 14, 2014

Located 225 kilometres south of the hamlet of Baker Lake,
Angilak has an exploration season lasting from April to September.

Enzyme leach soil samples showed 379 anomalous uranium results, about a quarter of the total, ranging from 6 ppb up to 285 ppb uranium, placing the results in the 75th percentile. Out of that group, 77 samples made the 95th percentile. The sampling has “significantly upgraded” drill targets in the Hot and KU areas, as well as Dipole.

Kivalliq describes the latter area, 27 kilometres southwest of Lac 50, as “a distinct, two-kilometre-long geophysical anomaly having a coincident boulder assay of 2.24% U3O8, now confirmed by an anomalous uranium-in-soil trend over 3.4 kilometres of strike length” with anomalous copper, molybdenum and silver.

This year’s work also confirmed a conductor in the RIB area, which has “geological similarities with both Dipole and Lac 50,” the company added. Soil samples showed a 3.6-kilometre-long geochemical trend with uranium values ranging from 6 ppb to 61.9 ppb.

Historic 1970s drilling at RIB found shallow mineralization up to 0.19% U3O8 over 9.3 metres (including 0.52% over 2.6 metres) and 1.61% over 0.7 metres.

Lac 50’s January 2013 inferred resource used a 0.2% cutoff to show 2.83 million tonnes averaging 0.69% for 43.3 million pounds U3O8. The inferred category also shows 1.88 million ounces silver, 10.4 million pounds molybdenum and 15.6 million pounds copper.

In late October Kivalliq announced a 1,914-hectare addition to its Genesis project in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, where Roughrider Exploration TSXV:REL funds exploration through an 85% earn-in.

A big piece of Strateco brings Toro Energy to Canada

An ASX-listed uranium company would gain a substantial portion of Strateco Resources TSX:RSC under an agreement announced November 3. Toro Energy would issue shares to obtain a chunk of the Sentient Group’s holdings in Strateco and SeqUr Exploration, a Strateco subsidiary. As a result, Toro would hold 19.8% of Strateco shares, $14.1 million of secured convertible notes receivable in Strateco, a $3-million senior secured first ranking loan receivable in Strateco and five million SeqUr shares, representing 25% of the subsidiary.

Sentient’s interest in Strateco would drop from 27.13% to about 8%. Sentient would also hold 800 convertible notes representing $800,000 secured by Strateco assets.

Toro’s Wiluna project is “set to become Western Australia’s first-ever uranium mine,” according to Strateco. “Toro has shown clear interest in the Matoush project, as well as in SeqUr’s uranium projects in Saskatchewan. Toro’s experience … permitting the Wiluna project, in an area formerly under moratorium, will certainly be an asset for Strateco.” The latter company’s Matoush project in Quebec has been stalled by a moratorium while a provincial inquiry into uranium takes place.

The transaction is part of a wider deal that includes Sentient’s AU$10-million placement into Toro, with another AU$10 million to fund the Wiluna flagship. Sentient now holds 18.9% of Toro, in which Oz Minerals holds 21.9% and Mega Uranium TSX:MGA 21.5%.

Toro anticipates closing the deals by mid-December.

Hook Lake JV proposes $2.9-million 2015 budget, Purepoint announces

Hook Lake partners will be on the hook for $2.9 million worth of exploration next year, if the joint venture committee’s proposals go through. Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU announced November 11 that a final decision on the budget, which would cover 4,200 metres of drilling, would follow geophysical results and a detailed drill plan. An airborne magnetic and VTEM-plus survey finished last month north of the project’s Spitfire zone. Beginning soon will be a ground EM survey to pinpoint drill targets on the 28,683-hectare property five kilometres northeast of Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) Patterson Lake South discovery.

Purepoint announced the Spitfire zone last March and released additional drill results in May.

The Hook Lake JV consists of Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (39.5%), AREVA Resources Canada (39.5%) and Purepoint (21%). The latter company’s share of the budget would come to about $310,000.

Western Athabasca Syndicate, Aben, Alpha update Preston, Mann Lake and Carpenter Lake

A recent analysis of airborne geophysics confirms existing drill targets at the 246,643-hectare Preston property, the Western Athabasca Syndicate reported November 13. The four-company group has further geophysical and geochemical work planned for early 2015, along with land- and lake-based drilling.

Some $3.75 million worth of expenditures so far have identified 15 target areas on the southwestern Athabasca Basin PLS-proximal property. In July the companies released results from Preston’s initial drill campaign of nine holes totalling 1,902 metres.

Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH currently acts as project operator for partners Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 31st, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to October 31, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission hits 8.53% over 24 metres at Patterson Lake South

The 600th company to graduate from the Venture to the big board since 2000,
Fission Uranium opens the TSX on October 30. (Photo: TMX Group)

 

Fission hits 8.53% U3O8 over 24 metres at Patterson Lake South

A second batch of assays hit the streets October 27 from Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) Patterson Lake South summer program, the final drill season before a maiden resource due in December. Thirteen holes from the R780E zone showed mineralization at shallow depths, some with very impressive results. Several holes broaden the zone’s lateral width at different locations up to about 93 metres north and 38 metres south, and also extend the depth. Still the focal point of PLS, R780E remains by far the largest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open at both ends.

Some of the best results follow:

Hole PLS14-253

  • 1.33% U3O8 over 16.5 metres, starting at 117.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 3.57% over 5.5 metres)

  • 1.65% over 5 metres, starting at 155 metres
  • (including 5.37% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-254

  • 0.62% over 13 metres, starting at 169 metres
  • (including 2.42% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-256

  • 1.76% over 39.5 metres, starting at 61.5 metres
  • (including 3.16% over 8 metres)
  • (and including 6.22% over 3.5 metres)

  • 1.17% over 11.5 metres, starting at 104 metres
  • (including 3.99% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-257

  • 5.02% over 5 metres, starting at 256.5 metres

PLS14-259

  • 4.21% over 38.5 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 23.53% over 6 metres)

  • 2.77% over 13.5 metres, starting at 205 metres
  • (including 6.95% over 4 metres)

PLS14-261

  • 1.43% over 42.5 metres, starting at 58 metres
  • (including 5.91% over 9.5 metres)

  • 0.74% over 26 metres, starting at 104 metres
  • (including 2.42% over 6 metres)

PLS14-263

  • 1.85% over 8 metres, starting at 234 metres
  • (including 6.63% over 2 metres)

PLS14-264

  • 0.27% over 22.5 metres, starting at 191.5 metres

  • 0.37% over 19.5 metres, starting at 216.5 metres

PLS14-270

  • 0.56% over 16 metres, starting at 164.5 metres
  • (including 1.44% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-271

  • 8.53% over 24 metres, starting at 78 metres
  • (including 24.87% over 7.5 metres)

  • 0.55% over 28.5 metres, starting at 105.5 metres
  • (including 2.02% over 3.5 metres)

True widths weren’t provided.

These results bring the total to 42 holes reported. Assays for another 18 delineation holes and 22 exploration holes are pending. The previous batch of summer assays, released earlier this month, included the project’s strongest intercept so far.

Lakeland Resources ready to drill Star/Gibbon’s project, confirms drill-ready targets at Lazy Edward Bay

A busy summer has moved two Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK projects to the drill-ready stage, one of which will see a rig working as soon as winter conditions allow. Announced October 28, a 1,500-metre program on the adjacent Gibbon’s Creek and Star properties follows positive results from surface sampling and a DC-resistivity survey, some of the Athabasca Basin’s highest RadonEx readings and confirmation of a radioactive boulder field grading up to 4.28% U3O8.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to October 31, 2014

A structural lineament connects this radioactive boulder field with
two other mineralized systems on the Star/Gibbon’s Creek properties.

The two properties on the Basin’s north-central rim host a regional, multi-staged, structural lineament immediately west of the Star Uplift, a basement outcrop about 350 metres by 700 metres, that extends south to the Gibbon’s Creek boulder field about three kilometres away. In addition an east-west resistivity low, interpreted as an alteration corridor, has been found near an historic intercept of 1,500 parts per million uranium.

Surface sampling at the uplift found a gold trend that also revealed platinum group elements, rare earths and anomalous low-grade uranium. Follow-up drilling will test the trend and examine basement geology as it relates to the Gibbon’s Creek targets, Lakeland stated.

With depth to the unconformity ranging from 50 to 250 metres, the company anticipates an economical program of shallow drilling. Roads and power lines cross the property, which lies a few kilometres from the town of Stony Rapids.

The company wholly owns Gibbon’s Creek and holds a 100% option on Star.

Meanwhile exploration at Lazy Edward Bay has confirmed the project’s drill-ready targets, as well as its prominence in Lakeland’s portfolio. Field work on two areas of the 26,375-hectare property on the Basin’s southeastern edge revealed anomalous rock samples, soil samples and RadonEx readings, the company announced October 30.

The Liberty Trend consists of an approximately five-kilometre-long conductive zone intruded by diabase dykes. Near a radioactive spring reported earlier in October, two boulders graded 537 ppm and 896 ppm U3O8, also showing anomalous levels of the pathfinder elements arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel and lead.

Two nearby soil samples returned uranium values of 13.7 ppm and 14.8 ppm, along with 2,920 ppm arsenic, 119 ppm cobalt and 112 ppm nickel. An outcrop sample farther south showed low-grade uranium and was also enriched in copper, cobalt and zinc, the company added.

The significance of the Liberty Trend “appears to be a rare combination of favourable geochemistry, geophysics and surface rock samples anomalous in radioactivity coupled with a series of radioactive springs within a complex structural setting,” said Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “This confluence of geologic features attests to the potential of this area to host a large mineralizing system.”

The project’s Bay Trend underwent 150 soil samples over a 789-sample radon-in-soil grid. The samples showed several anomalous geochemical results coinciding with previously identified basement conductors. This year’s work further refines the conductors.

Results from both the Liberty and Bay trends confirm high-priority drill-ready targets and Lazy Edward’s place among “the most promising early-stage exploration projects that Lakeland has assembled, which include the Gibbon’s Creek, Star and Newnham Lake properties,” Armes said.

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

Fission 3.0 stakes new ground, joins Brades on Clearwater West fall campaign

Seven new acquisitions, along with expansions to four other properties, bring the Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU portfolio up to 17 projects totalling 232,088 hectares, all in the Basin area except one in Peru. The expansion came through staking, the company announced October 29.

Karpinka Lake, a 3,072-hectare property 40 klicks south of the Basin, features at least 14 historic uranium occurrences. The most significant “consists of a series of five discontinuous low-grade zones of stratabound uranium mineralization,” Fission 3.0 stated.

Midas, a 1,476-hectare property near Uranium City, has five known uranium occurrences including an historic intercept of 0.19% U3O8 over 9.6 metres.

On the Basin’s north-central rim, the 1,678-hectare Hearty Bay property sits up-ice from a boulder train that graded up to 3% uranium.

Eighty kilometres south of the Basin’s southeastern margin, the 5,745-hectare Hobo Lake property has had historic lake sediment samples showing anomalous uranium. South of the Basin but north of Hobo Lake, the 1,213-hectare Costigan Lake property benefits from a 2005 airborne radiometric survey that found anomalous radioactivity associated with conductors.

Just beyond the Basin’s southern edge, the 1,866-hectare River Lake “has potential to host outliers of sandstone cover, which is the favourable host rock for unconformity and perched styles of uranium mineralization.”

East of the Basin’s northeastern margin, the 2,412-hectare Flowerdew Lake underwent airborne geophysics in 2005, finding “moderate to strong formational electromagnetic conductors trending northeast.”

A 1,024-hectare addition to Beaver River covers an extension of the property’s EM conductors and includes two historic uranium showings. Cree Bay got another 5,252 hectares of contiguous turf along the prospective Black Lake shear zone. Grey Island grew by 1,271 hectares over a strong EM conductor. Thompson Lake added 577 hectares, also covering the extension of a conductor.

On October 15 Fission 3.0 and Brades Resource TSXV:BRA announced fall plans for their Clearwater West joint venture. The program calls for mapping, prospecting and a DC resistivity survey to follow up on radiometric anomalies identified last May. Brades holds a 50% option on the 11,835-hectare project, where Fission 3.0 acts as operator. Read a review of the companies’ announcement by Geology for Investors.

Winter drilling planned for Azincourt/Fission 3.0’s Patterson Lake North

Patterson Lake North’s agenda calls for a $1.5-million, 3,200-metre winter program, JV partner Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ announced October 21. Work will follow up on last summer’s drilling, targeting the property’s A1-A4 conductor area and two untested areas, the N conductor trend and the Broach Lake conductor system.

The 27,408-hectare property lies adjacent to and north of Patterson Lake South. Fission 3.0 acts as operator. Azincourt, which currently holds a 10% stake, said its $1.5-million winter expenditure will complete the $3-million year-two requirement, raising its total to 20%. The option allows Azincourt up to a 50% interest.

The company also stated it distributed the Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL stock resulting from that company’s acquisition of Azincourt’s Peruvian properties (read more here and here). Shareholders got “the equivalent of $0.09 per Azincourt share, based on the recent Macusani share price.”

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 23rd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 9 to 22, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission widens main zone, plans more step-outs, arranges $12.5-million bought deal

Although infill drilling has been the priority for Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) summer program, two step-outs have widened Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone, inspiring a 10-hole addition to the campaign. Radiometric results for nine holes released August 18 include one that extended the zone about 30 metres north and another 15 metres south. All nine holes returned wide mineralization, the company stated.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 9 to 22, 2014

R780E is the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open to the east and west.

These results, which are no substitute for assays, come from a handheld scintillometer that measures drill core for radiation in counts per second. Last month Fission replaced its old model, which maxed out at 9,999 cps, with a new-fangled gadget capable of measuring up to 65,535 cps. But the company still refers to anything above four nines to be “off-scale.”

By that standard several intervals were well off-scale, with a few reaching past 60,000 cps.

Another innovation introduced last month is barge-based angled drilling, allowing a better understanding of the geometry of mineralization beneath the lake. Encouraged by the widening of R780E, Fission plans another 10 step-outs. That adds 4,700 metres to a summer agenda now expected to total 25,000 metres in 73 holes.

There seems to be little worry about paying for all that. On August 18 Fission announced a $12.52-million bought deal that’s expected to close around September 23. Roughly three months later comes the maiden resource’s due date.

Winter assays reported August 13 further boosted confidence in R780E, while a summer exploration hole released two days earlier showed interesting radiometric results 17 kilometres away. Read more.

NexGen steps out to widen Rook 1’s Arrow zone

If any company can compete with Fission’s top spot as the Athabasca Basin’s number one newsmaker, it might be next-door neighbour NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE. Four “aggressive” step-out holes have extended the company’s Rook 1 Arrow zone from 180 metres to 215 metres in width for a zone that’s 515 metres in strike and open in all directions. The northwest-southeast fence of drilling announced August 20 has also revealed “multiple sub-vertical stacked mineralized shear zones” increasing the company’s hopes of finding additional high-grade areas.

One of the five holes failed to find significant mineralization.

Like Fission’s August 18 news, the results come from scintillometer readings that don’t substitute for assays, which are pending.

So far 25 of 27 Arrow holes totalling 15,318 metres have shown mineralization. Another three holes at Area A, however, failed to find anomalous radioactivity. They tested an electromagnetic conductor that NexGen interprets to be PL-3B, which hosts the PLS discovery.

Lakeland Resources updates three projects, appoints uranium veteran to board

As a busy summer progresses, Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK reported a new addition to its board and further work on one of the largest portfolios in and around the Basin. On August 20 the company announced the appointment of director Steven Khan, a veteran of Canadian investment and corporate governance with specific experience in raising funds and forging joint ventures for uranium companies. The next day Lakeland released a progress update for three of its projects.

The projects are Star, Lazy Edward Bay and Fond du Lac on the northern, southern and eastern margins of the Basin respectively. “That’s the shallowest depth—the depth to the unconformity becomes more shallow as you get closer to the Basin’s margin,” explains president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “At Gibbon’s Creek our target depths are between about 80 and 120 metres below surface. We hope the others will fall into that kind of range so we’ll be drilling 150- to 200-metre holes.”

At the Star property, crews from Dahrouge Geological Consulting have just wrapped up six days of sampling and mapping. They picked up some 73 rock samples and 124 soil samples around a basement outcrop that’s shown anomalous concentrations of gold, platinum group elements and rare earth elements, as well as highly anomalous uranium. The combination suggests a strong hydrothermal system.

“Those are typical pathfinders for uranium in the Basin,” says Armes. “At Patterson Lake South they had gold grades running two or three grams. So with the first pass on our exploration program in late 2013 we had gold grades of four or five grams.”

Lakeland holds a 100% earn-in option on Star, which has year-round road access from the town of Stony Rapids a few kilometres away.

Now that permits have arrived, mobilization to Lazy Edward Bay should begin ASAP, he adds. Under initial scrutiny will be the BAY trend, actually two parallel conductive trends, which will undergo a RadonEx survey. Field crews will also search out boulders or other signs of unconformity-style mineralization.

“We have Lazy Edward drill targets already but a lot of them were defined by yesterday’s technology,” Armes explains. “We’ll use RadonEx and other work to re-interpret the historic data to better define targets.” In all, the property has six known trends.

Lakeland adviser Rick Kusmirski knows the property from his time as president/CEO of JNR Resources. “He dug up some historic data which is very helpful to identify areas to focus on. There’s some historic areas we want to re-visit.”

Also in line for RadonEx is Fond du Lac, initially targeting a coincident geochemical and conductive target. Geologist and Lakeland director Neil McCallum thinks historic work “missed it by a couple of hundred metres,” Armes says.

But while the summer activity continues, he also looks further ahead “from a treasury standpoint as well as our projects. We’re convinced that 2015 is going to see a significant move in uranium prices. If we ever re-visit 2006 and 2007 levels, when there were 50, 60, 70 juniors active, we hope to be ready and get as many drill programs going as possible through the joint venture and prospect generator model, along with any programs we focus on 100% ourselves.”

[Khan’s JV work with Sumitomo and Kepco] was certainly a great experience in negotiating and concluding contracts, and working with them on the joint management committees. That built long-term relationships but also gave me insight into the Asian psyche and some of the issues they have to deal with.—Steven Khan, director
of Lakeland Resources

Just one day before the exploration update, Lakeland announced Steven Khan’s appointment as director. His background includes key positions with uranium companies Energy Fuels TSX:EFR, Strathmore Minerals and Fission Uranium’s predecessor, Fission Energy. He helped found the latter company, holding the role of executive VP. Khan served as president/chairperson of Strathmore Minerals until last year’s takeover by Energy Fuels, where he stayed on as a director until recently.

Khan played an instrumental part in the negotiating team that brought Japan’s Sumitomo Corp into a JV on Strathmore’s Roca Honda project in New Mexico. He also helped bring the Korea Electric Power Corp into two other JVs, with Strathmore on the Gas Hills project in Wyoming and with Fission, leading to the Waterbury Lake discovery.

Khan has nearly 20 years of experience in all aspects of the Canadian investment industry, including fundraising for early-stage private and public companies.

A confluence of factors convinced him to join Lakeland, he says. “I’ve had a long-term relationship with some of the company’s principals and I’ve always been interested in returning to the Athabasca Basin arena after I left Fission Energy in 2010. Strathmore was more focused on the U.S., where I spent the last number of years. That combination of moving back to the Basin, working with a group of people I respect and seeing a number of properties that have potential presented an opportunity for me.”

He says his work with Sumitomo and Kepco “was certainly a great experience in negotiating and concluding contracts, and working with them on the joint management committees. That built long-term relationships but also gave me insight into the Asian psyche and some of the issues they have to deal with.”

Khan thinks Asian companies might revive their previous interest in early-stage explorers. “Before Fukushima they were attracted to earlier-stage projects like Fission had at the time, as well as more advanced projects like those of Strathmore in the U.S. When uranium prices come back I think they’ll be forced to return to earlier-stage projects because most of the advanced projects will have been tied up.”

As for uranium’s current price, “its resurgence has been muted and is taking longer than expected. But I think that in the medium to longer term, demand will certainly outstrip supply.”

“I’m quite excited about getting involved with the Lakeland team and I think the opportunity for the sector is attractive,” Khan emphasizes. “I think there’s going to be more Athabasca Basin discoveries and that bodes well for companies like Lakeland that are properly positioned and properly financed. So for me the timing is good and the interplay of several factors is favourable.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

June 14th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 7 to 13, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Strateco turns to Saskatchewan while Quebec uranium inquiry comes under fire

For the $123 million spent on it so far, the project has a resource showing 7.78 million pounds U3O8 indicated and 19.22 million pounds inferred. It also has an underground exploration permit issued by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. But Quebec’s moratorium on uranium activity has finally caused Strateco Resources TSX:RSC to shut down its Matoush camp in the province’s Otish Basin. Now with a $1.4-million financing that the company hopes will save its TSX listing, Strateco’s focusing on a Saskatchewan project acquired from Denison Mines TSX:DML.

Strateco turns to Saskatchewan while Quebec uranium inquiry comes under fire

Now mothballed, Strateco’s Matoush project has a 2012 resource
showing 7.78 million pounds U3O8 indicated and
19.22 million pounds inferred.

In a June 12 announcement, Strateco attributed Matoush’s cost-cutting closure to Quebec’s refusal to issue an exploration permit. Some of the project’s facilities and equipment have been sold. The company has already launched legal action over the permit refusal.

Strateco also closed a private placement to try to prevent a TSX delisting. The company raised $1.4 million from Sentient Executive GP IV, an insider.

Meanwhile a Strateco subsidiary, SeqUr Exploration Inc, issued just under 15 million Strateco shares to take on the Jasper Lake package, a 60% option on four eastern Athabasca properties totalling 45,271 hectares that Strateco negotiated with Denison late last year. SeqUr also closed a $100,000 private placement with Sentient. The subsidiary plans exploration “in the coming months.”

Two days before the Strateco announcements a Quebec inquiry into uranium mining and exploration was challenged again, this time by a group of 70 “scientists and professionals from industry and academia.” In an open letter distributed June 10, the group questioned the inquiry chairperson’s neutrality as well as the utility of the proceedings.

Quebec’s environmental watchdog, le Bureau d’audiences publiques sur l’environnement (BAPE), began hearings last month in a process expected to last 12 to 18 months. Until a decision is made whether to allow uranium activity, the moratorium imposed in March 2013 remains in effect. But Labrador, Greenland and Queensland have “recently lifted moratoria that they now perceive as unjustified,” the group maintained.

Calling Louis-Gilles Francoeur’s appointment as chairperson “perplexing,” the open letter stated, “Throughout his career, Mr. Francoeur has tended to echo uranium industry critics. The BAPE is an institution founded on the principle of absolute neutrality. What would become of the BAPE’s credibility if a former mining executive were appointed chairman of the commission?”

Francoeur was selected during the province’s previous Parti Quebecois government.

“Exploration for and development of any mineral, including uranium, cannot go against the public interest,” the group pointed out. But, the signatories argued, “We are heading into a process that was borne of uranium fear-mongering fuelled by an archaic and biased view of the mining industry.” They questioned whether the hearings, with a price tag they peg at over $2 million, “should even be held.”

Quoting November 2013 poll numbers, the group said Saskatchewan’s uranium industry has the support of about 80% of the population, “including 76% of people in the communities and reserves of northern Saskatchewan, where the uranium mines are found.”

The group also noted some environmentalists support nuclear energy, as indicated by “the latest report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an organization established by the United Nations Environment Programme and free from suspicion of complicity with industry.”

The 70 concluded that the industry already faces strict regulations. “It is impossible for any uranium deposit to be developed, and then mined, without the project meeting the most stringent standards and being subject to public hearings,” they stated. “The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), a globally recognized agency with no ties to industry, sets the standards and has permanent monitoring and, if needed, enforcement powers over all nuclear industry activities.”

The communique follows a similar challenge last month by the Quebec Mineral Exploration Association. The organization called for Francoeur to be replaced, describing his previous statements on the subject as “prejudicial and non-scientific.” A coalition of Quebec natives, doctors and environmentalists, however, have argued for an outright ban on the industry.

Last month Strateco, which has previously stated its intention to take part in the BAPE inquiry, threatened legal action should Quebec not replace Francoeur.

Denison closes acquisition of International Enexco

Its takeover by Denison complete, International Enexco delisted on June 10. Expansionist Denison now holds former Enexco assets in the eastern Athabasca Basin consisting of a 30% interest in Mann Lake and an additional 20% in Bachman Lake, giving Denison full control over the latter project. The company now shares the Mann Lake joint venture with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (52.5%) and AREVA Resources Canada (17.5%).

A spinco gets Enexco’s U.S. non-uranium properties including the Contact copper project, which approaches pre-feasibility in Nevada.

The transaction went through without the public acrimony that initially ensued when Denison snatched Rockgate Capital from its proposed merger with Mega Uranium TSX:MGA late last year. At the time, Denison stated its intention to spin out its foreign assets and concentrate on the Athabasca Basin.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 24th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 17 to 23, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Kivalliq signs LOI with Westham Resources on Saskatchewan Genesis property

Its flagship Angilak project in Nunavut holds Canada’s highest-grade uranium deposit outside the Athabasca Basin. Nevertheless Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV was drawn into Saskatchewan with last January’s acquisition of the 198,763-hectare Genesis project. Now the company plans to bring in Westham Resources TSXV:WHR.P as a funding partner.

Under a letter of intent announced May 21, the capital pool company could acquire an 85% interest in return for 20% of its issued and outstanding shares, $1 million in payments and $5 million in spending over four years. The exploration commitment would include $1 million by year-end and another $1.5 million by August 31, 2016. Kivalliq would act as project operator for at least two years. Kivalliq director Dale Wallster would join Westham’s board.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 17 to 23, 2014

Among other conditions, Westham must raise a private placement of at least $2 million.

The property lies northeast of the Basin in the prospective Western Wollaston Tectonic Domain and “covers basement rocks known to host uranium mineralization,” the companies stated. Previous operators and government surveys “outlined over 30 uranium showings that include several uranium-bearing boulder trains.” Based on that data, Kivalliq has identified eight initial targets for geophysics, sediment sampling, soil sampling, mapping and prospecting to be completed by early autumn. The company hopes to follow with a “major” drill program early next year.

Last February Kivalliq reported results of ore-sorting and metallurgical tests from Angilak’s Lac 50 deposit.

UEC adds one Texas property, “releases” another

Still expanding its southern Texas “hub-and-spoke” projects, Uranium Energy Corp NYSE MKT:UEC announced a new acquisition May 20, this one with a permitting advantage. The Longhorn project’s aquifer exemption “eliminates a major permitting hurdle” for a potential in-situ recovery operation, covering the mining zone of interest and allowing for expansion, the company stated. The project’s historic legacy includes drill maps and over 500 logs of gamma radiation data.

UEC compiled the project leases and data “over the last 18 months at a very low cost.”

The company also announced a decision to “release” its Channen project following evaluation of last summer’s drill results.

In April UEC completed a preliminary economic assessment for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado. A week before that, the company announced its Burke Hollow ISR project in Texas had begun permitting.

UEC’s southern Texas holdings include the Hobson processing plant, the Palangana ISR mine, the Goliad development project and satellite properties. Of its nearly two dozen exploration properties, two are located in Paraguay and the others in the western U.S.

Unity picks up historic Uranium City region property

Twenty-six kilometres southwest of Uranium City, Saskatchewan, the Gulch Mine project comprises Unity Energy’s TSXV:UTY latest acquisition. Announced May 21, the 3,010-hectare property holds an historic, non-43-101 “reserve,” estimated by one source at around 928,796 pounds uranium oxide (U3O8) and by another at 1.65 million pounds. Gulch adjoins properties held by Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU, Red Rock Energy TSXV:RRK and CanAlaska Uranium TSXV:CVV.

A 100% interest will require $1.2 million in payments over 18 months from Unity, which must drill 3,000 metres within three years. The vendor retains a 2.5% gross overriding royalty. Unity may buy back two-fifths for $1.5 million, less any previous royalty payments.

Earlier this month Unity closed a 100% option on the 14,200-hectare Camsell project in the northwestern Basin. In April the company optioned out 50% of its Mitchell Lake project to Rio Grande Mining TSXV:RGV.

MPVC tests NW Manitoba for uranium, “young” uranium, radon and lead 210

As a rotary air blast drill arrived on site, MPVC Inc TSXV:UNO updated its Northwest Manitoba project on May 22. The RAB drill is intended to quickly test shallow targets found by geophysical, geochemical and prospecting work. Drilling will take place over the lake while ice persists.

Two holes of core drilling have failed to convince a gamma ray spectrometer that they contain significant uranium mineralization, MPVC conceded. But “samples of the core are now being tested for radon, ‘young’ uranium and lead 210 which, if present, could signal the presence of uranium mineralization at greater depths.”

The company also reported receiving a letter of support for its one-year drill permit application from the Northlands Denesuline First Nation.

In early May MPVC stated preliminary results from the project’s radon-in-water survey showed, “to the author’s knowledge,” readings second only to Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South.

Contract prices, spending cuts help Ur-Energy withstand uranium’s descent

While uranium sinks to eight-year lows, on May 22 Ur-Energy TSX:URE revised its guidance for this year and next. With mid- and long-term contracts in place, customers have committed to buy approximately 518,000 pounds U3O8 at an average of $51.10 a pound this year, for projected revenues approaching $26.5 million.

As for 2015, the company so far has commitments for 630,000 pounds at an average of $50.10, for projected revenues of $31 million. With spending controls as well as managed production, Ur-Energy expects “to maintain a positive cash position throughout 2014 and 2015.”

Although its processing facility has a nameplate capacity of two million pounds annually, the company plans to keep production tied to contract obligations in 2015 “unless the market demonstrates sustained price improvement.”

Ur-Energy began ISR mining at Lost Creek in Wyoming last August.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 17th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 10 to 16, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Cameco suspends Millennium mine proposal

Declining uranium prices have forced Cameco Corp TSX:CCO to postpone its Millennium mine proposal. On May 16 the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission stated a public hearing for a licence application scheduled for June had been adjourned at Cameco’s request. A brief message on the company’s website blamed “poor economic conditions in world uranium markets.”

Figures from 2009 credited the project with an indicated resource of 46.8 million pounds uranium oxide (U3O8) averaging 4.53% uranium. A 2013 environmental impact statement forecast an initial 10-year lifespan, but anticipated extensions if further resources were found. Ore would have been shipped 36 kilometres south to the Key Lake mill, held 83% by Cameco and 17% by AREVA Resources Canada.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 10 to 16, 2014

Although just last month Cameco expressed optimism in uranium’s
long-term outlook, the company blamed market conditions as it
withdrew its Millennium licence application.

Uranium prices have continued their slide to new record lows. Although there’s no spot price for the metal, UX Consulting’s most recent indicator, published May 12, came to $29 a pound.

In last month’s Q1 report, Cameco expressed optimism about the long-term outlook, expecting “an increase in annual uranium consumption from today’s 170 million pounds to about 240 million pounds” over the next decade.

In March Cameco finally put its Cigar Lake mine into production, nine years after construction began and 33 years after its discovery.

The CNSC left the door open for Cameco to make a future request that its licence application be considered by the commission, which would then call a public hearing.

Fission Uranium hits 30 metres of 2.58% U3O8 at Patterson Lake South

Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU unloaded assays for eight more holes from Patterson Lake South on May 13, all of them from the R780E zone. This week’s star, PLS14-158, marks the eastern-most R780E hole for which assays have been released, boosting the company’s optimism in the deposit’s eastward potential. Some of the best results show:

Hole PLS14-141

  • 0.72% U3O8 over 11 metres, starting at 163 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 2.04% over 3 metres)

  • 0.77% over 6 metres, starting at 187.5 metres
  • (including 2.31% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-143

  • 0.26% over 14 metres, starting at 145 metres

  • 0.41% over 5 metres, starting at 248 metres
  • (including 1.06% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-144

  • 0.79% over 19 metres, starting at 127.5 metres
  • (including 3.21% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.46% over 7.5 metres, starting at 151.5 metres

  • 0.3% over 8.5 metres, starting at 196 metres
  • (including 1.43% over 1 metre)

  • 2.07% over 3 metres, starting at 208 metres
  • (including 3.21% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-148

  • 1.83% over 3.5 metres, starting at 154.5 metres
  • (including 2.9% over 2 metres)

  • 0.63% over 5 metres, starting at 192.5 metres

PLS14-149

  • 0.2% over 17.5 metres, starting at 117.5 metres

PLS14-150

  • 2.94% over 7 metres, starting at 219 metres
  • (including 5.58% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.22% over 19.5 metres, starting at 285.5 metres

PLS14-157

  • 0.35% over 6.5 metres, starting at 125 metres

  • 0.29% over 14.5 metres, starting at 168.5 metres

PLS14-158

  • 0.72% over 8 metres, starting at 141 metres

  • 2.58% over 30 metres, starting at 152 metres
  • (including 22.02% over 1 metre)
  • (and including 8.57% over 5 metres)

  • 6.85% over 10 metres, starting at 232.5 metres
  • (including 12.23% over 5.5 metres)

  • 3.53% over 4.5 metres, starting at 253.5 metres
  • (including 11.95% over 1 metre)

True widths weren’t provided. R780E is the middle of five zones, and the largest of all five, along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open both to the east and west. With assays released for 30 winter holes so far, lab results are pending for approximately 62 more.

Although winter exploration drilling fell short of exciting, the season’s focus was on infill drilling to define a maiden resource that will—on some unspecified date—debut to an intensely curious audience.

Powertech files Kyrgyzstan resource held 80% by proposed merger partner, updates South Dakota licence challenge

Powertech Uranium TSX:PWE has filed an inferred resource for the Kyzyl Ompul licence in Kyrgyzstan, the company announced on May 13. The 42,379-hectare project is held 80% by Azarga Resources Ltd, which plans to merge with Powertech. The resource uses a 0.01% cutoff to show 15.13 tonnes averaging 0.022% for 7.51 million pounds U3O8 inferred.

Powertech described the Kok Moinok main zone as about 700 metres along an east-west strike, 600 metres north-south and 10 to 30 metres in depth. The report also included two conceptual exploration target area estimates.

Although Powertech acknowledged that access to the project was blocked by political unrest in 2005 and 2010, the company maintained that “the main risk factors at this stage are commodity prices….”

Last year Kyrgyzstan managed to fall a few spots to the very bottom of the Fraser Institute’s policy perception index and achieved near-bottom rankings for several other categories in the annual poll of mining professionals. But a May 7 Financial Post article by Peter Koven pointed out that despite public opposition, social unrest and ongoing government policy threats, Centerra Gold’s (TSX:CG) Kyrgyzstan mine “continues to run and churn out cash.”

The Kyzyl Ompul licence expires at the end of 2015. Read more about the Powertech/Azarga merger here and here.

On May 14 Powertech updated events following a challenge to its operating licence for the company’s Dewey-Burdock project in South Dakota. In oral hearings the previous day, opponents questioned procedures followed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the importance of possible native religious sites in the area.

As the hearings continue, the NRC’s Atomic Safety and Licensing Board will decide whether Dewey-Burdock’s licence becomes effective or remains on hold until a formal hearing in August. Read more about the licence challenge.

MPVC begins drilling Maguire Lake target at NW Manitoba

Drilling has begun at MPVC Inc’s (TSXV:UNO) Northwest Manitoba project, the company announced May 14. While winter conditions persist, a diamond drill will focus on Maguire Lake. Preliminary radon measurements from the lake reported the previous week were, to the company’s knowledge, second only to PLS for a water-based survey. MPVC will also bring in a rotary air blast drill, which is intended to test shallow targets quickly.

With ground gravity survey results now in hand, the company has filled in gaps between three earlier sets of data, extending previously identified gravity lows and discovering new gravity lows.

To earn 80% of the 143,603-hectare project from CanAlaska Uranium TSXV:CVV, MPVC must spend $3.2 million on exploration by 2015.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 3rd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 26 to May 2, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Wheeler River JV gives up 36.8% U3O8 over 6.5 metres, Denison plans June resource

Denison Mines TSX:DML diverted attention from activity in and around the Athabasca Basin’s southwest on April 30 with huge grades from the east. Assays from seven of 11 winter holes at Zone A of the Phoenix deposit were reported along with previously released uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) results from a downhole probe for the same holes. In most cases the actual U3O8 graded higher than the eU3O8, sometimes with wider intervals.

Here are the best assays, with the previous eU3O8 results in brackets:

Hole WR-538

  • 2.92% U3O8 over 5 metres, starting at 393 metres in vertical depth
  • (2.14% eU3O8 over 5.1 metres)

Hole WR-539

  • 13.12% U3O8 over 5 metres, starting at 400 metres
  • (11.63% eU3O8 over 3.5 metres)

Hole WR-545

  • 24.47% U3O8 over 3.5 metres, starting at 401.7 metres
  • (16.98% eU3O8 over 3.1 metres)

Hole WR-548

  • 36.83% U3O8 over 6.5 metres, starting at 406.8 metres
  • (29.61% eU3O8 over 6.5 metres)

Hole WR-550

  • 29.32% U3O8 over 4 metres, starting at 406.2 metres
  • (18.37% eU3O8 over 4.7 metres)

Hole WR-555

  • 15.99% U3O8 over 3 metres, starting at 404.5 metres
  • (12.92% eU3O8 over 2.7 metres)

With vertical holes and approximately horizontal mineralization, the intercepts are close to true widths, Denison stated. One of the 11 holes wasn’t assayed while three others, with core recovery below 80%, were reported with eU3O8 only.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 26 to May 2, 2014

Still to come are assays for 16 holes from other parts of Wheeler including the newly discovered Gryphon zone, three kilometres northwest of the Phoenix deposit.

A Phoenix resource estimate is scheduled for June. Operator Denison holds a 60% interest in the project, along with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (30%) and JCU (Canada) Exploration (10%). The 11,720-hectare property lies 35 kilometres from the Key Lake mill.

Denison also acted as operator on 10 of its 12 winter programs in the eastern Basin, which included eight drill campaigns. “Highlights included intersections of weak uranium mineralization at the Oban target area at Waterbury Lake, intersections of weak uranium mineralization and strong base metal mineralization at Hatchet Lake, and intersections of weak uranium mineralization at Bell Lake,” the company added.

In mid-April Denison announced a definitive agreement to acquire International Enexco TSXV:IEC on the same terms reported in a March letter of intent.

Patterson Lake South exploration drilling disappoints but Fission finds high radon readings

Having announced the completion of winter delineation drilling the previous week, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU followed up on April 28 with an exploration update for Patterson Lake South. Ten holes failed to find significant radioactivity. But some radon-in-water anomalies were “on the scale of intensity as the anomalies associated with the PL-3B conductor” found last year, which the company called “a contributing factor in the success of drill collar step-outs as large as 465 metres.”

Mineralization has so far been revealed on two basement electromagnetic conductors, PL-3B and PL-3C. Last winter’s 12 exploration holes included two on PL-3C, which expanded the strike with the new R1620E zone. The most recent 10 holes, on conductors PL-1B and PL-2C, “provided encouraging data for use in upcoming drill programs,” the company stated.

PLS now consists of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open to the east and west. Still pending are assays for approximately 70 holes. Spring plans for the 31,039-hectare project have yet to be announced—as is the case for a maiden resource target date.

The company also reported the exercise of 17.97 million warrants on April 28 from a private placement that raised $28.75 million earlier that month.

Declan adds properties, releases VTEM, offers $2-million placement

Among news announced April 30 by Declan Resources TSXV:LAN are property acquisitions in Saskatchewan and Wyoming, preliminary VTEM results from Alberta and a $2-million offering.

The 10-claim Copper Mountain property in Wyoming covers most of the historic North Canning deposit which holds a non-43-101 resource averaging 0.05% uranium for approximately 6.5 million pounds U3O8, according to a reference book. The vendors get two million shares and a 2% gross overriding royalty. The Athabasca property costs Declan nine million shares. Its location wasn’t divulged.

From the Basin’s Alberta side, the company said early VTEM findings for its newly acquired Maybelle North and Richardson River properties indicate four EM trends linked to regional magnetic linears. Declan hopes further analysis will help find graphitic conductors within meta-sedimentary rocks associated with the Basin’s unconformity-style deposits.

The company also offered a private placement up to $2 million and cancelled 2.4 million options.

In March Declan announced plans for the northern Basin’s Gibbon’s Creek project, in which the company holds a $1.25-million first-year exploration commitment under a joint venture with Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK.

NexGen completes ground gravity at Rook 1’s Arrow zone, plans May drilling

Discovered last February, the Arrow zone continues to command NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) attention at its PLS-neighbouring Rook 1 project. A tightly spaced ground gravity survey extended a potential alteration system adjacent to recent drilling and along strike, the company stated April 29. The results will help NexGen choose drill targets for a three-rig program of over 13,000 metres to begin in mid-May.

So far seven of eight holes at Arrow hit mineralization, according to radiometric results from a hand-held spectrometer. Assays are still to come.

The previous week NexGen announced a property acquisition from Long Harbour Exploration TSXV:LHC.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 19th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 12 to 18, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium releases second batch of winter assays from Patterson Lake South

With its first set of Patterson Lake South assays since February 19 and only the second since winter drilling began in mid-January, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU reported 12 holes on April 14. Nine showed high grades and all came from zone R780E, the third of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre west-east potential strike that remains open at both ends. Among the best assays were:

Hole PLS14-125

  • 0.46% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 56.5 metres, starting at 119.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.91% over 6 metres)
  • (and including 1.71% over 2.5 metres)

  • 0.21% over 12 metres, starting at 225.5 metres

Hole PLS14-126

  • 1.3% over 8.5 metres, starting at 152.5 metres
  • (including 4.44% over 1 metre)

  • 2.41% over 5.5 metres, starting at 178 metres
  • (including 4.66% over 2 metres)

  • 0.96% over 5 metres, starting at 230 metres

Hole PLS14-128

  • 0.46% over 6 metres, starting at 167.5 metres

  • 6.74% over 4 metres, starting at 216.5 metres
  • (including 13.04% over 2 metres)

Hole PLS14-130

  • 0.47% over 17 metres, starting at 84.5 metres
  • (including 1.57% over 3.5 metres)

  • 3% over 4 metres, starting at 142.5 metres
  • (including 11.1% over 1 metre)

Hole PLS14-131

  • 0.22% over 22.5 metres, starting at 168.5 metres

  • 0.3% over 30.5 metres, starting at 199.5 metres
  • (including 0.93% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.34% over 21.5 metres, starting at 234.5 metres

Hole PLS14-132

  • 0.4% over 12.5 metres, starting at 72 metres
  • (including 3.28% over 1 metre)

  • 0.72% over 46 metres, starting at 134.5 metres
  • (including 2.41% over 10.5 metres)

  • 1.54% over 5.5 metres, starting at 216 metres
  • (including 2.74% over 3 metres)

  • 4.03% over 8 metres, starting at 226.5 metres
  • (including 8.48% over 3.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-133

  • 0.9% over 13.5 metres, starting at 167 metres
  • (including 8.37% over 1 metre)

  • 0.48% over 21.5 metres, starting at 184 metres
  • (including 1.03% over 5 metres)

Hole PLS14-136

  • 0.92% over 41 metres, starting at 119 metres
  • (including 2.59% over 8 metres)
  • (and including 3.69% over 2.5 metres)

True widths were unavailable.

The previous week Fission Uranium stated 70 holes had been completed out of a planned 100 winter holes totalling approximately 30,000 metres. About 85 holes, using four rigs, will concentrate on delineation. A fifth rig explores outside the main mineralized trend. The 31,039-hectare project’s winter budget comes to $12 million, including geophysics. No target date has been announced for the project’s highly anticipated maiden resource.

Macusani Yellowcake, Azincourt sign LOI to consolidate Peruvian properties

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 12 to 18, 2014

Azincourt’s Macusani project, on Peru’s Macusani plateau
and surrounded by Macusani Yellowcake, borders a Fission 3.0
property also called Macusani.

Under a letter of intent announced April 17, Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL would swallow up additional properties held by Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ but surrounded by Macusani in southeastern Peru. The deal would give Azincourt 68.35 million Macusani shares, representing about 30% of the company following the transaction. Macusani would then control over 949 square kilometres hosting “one of the largest undeveloped uranium projects in the world,” the two companies stated.

Macusani’s current package, on Peru’s Macusani plateau, hosts four low-grade deposits that offer low-cost mining potential, according to a December preliminary economic assessment. August resource estimates total 321,000 pounds U3O8 measured, 31.15 million pounds indicated and 30.08 million pounds inferred.

Azincourt completed the acquisition of its two Peruvian assets in January, before contracting technical studies on them. An historic, non-43-101 resource released in 2011 for Azincourt’s 4,900-hectare, now confusingly named Macusani project showed 5.69 million pounds measured, 12.52 million pounds indicated and 17.42 million pounds inferred. The company’s 9,600-hectare Muñani project has undergone airborne geophysics and ground work but has yet to be drilled. Prior to Azincourt’s acquisition, the two projects had lain dormant for two years following Fukushima.

On closing the deal Macusani anticipates a new PEA that would “easily” incorporate the new properties into its existing mine plan.

The consolidated turf would then surround some 51 square kilometres held by Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU. The Fission Energy spinco collaborates with Azincourt on their PLS-adjacent PLN joint venture.

Definitive agreement advances Denison’s acquisition of Enexco

Denison Mines TSX:DML moved closer to its planned acquisition of International Enexco TSXV:IEC with a definitive agreement announced April 14. Terms of the all-share deal remain unchanged from the LOI reported last month.

In early April Denison reported radiometric results from the Wheeler River JV’s newly discovered Gryphon zone. More radiometric results followed the next day from Enexco’s Mann Lake JV.

Forum announces initial drill results from Clearwater

Spring break-up brought an early end to the Clearwater project’s first drill program, but Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC identified “five major structural trends with reactivated graphitic shear zones [and] alteration,” according to an April 17 statement. Core from two holes showed “locally elevated radioactivity” up to 300 counts per second.

Nine holes totalling 2,310 metres tested widely spaced targets “including a number of gravity lows, radon anomalies and EM conductors both on strike and running parallel” to the PLS trend, the company added. Forum expects to have more detailed results by early June.

The program focused on the 9,910-hectare project’s northern claim, which borders the southwest of PLS and is slated for summer follow-up work. Clearwater’s southern claim, with conductive trends, radiometric anomalies and significant values for uranium in lake sediment, has yet to be drilled.

In late March the company resumed drilling at its Northwest Athabasca project, a JV with NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE, Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada. Forum holds other properties in Nunavut and the northeastern Athabasca Basin.

Fission 3.0, Brades report initial radiometric and VTEM results from Clearwater West

Fission 3.0 and Brades Resource TSXV:BRA reported initial interpretations of two airborne surveys over their Clearwater West project on April 15. A radiometric survey using patent-pending equipment and methodology found a cluster of anomalies on the eastern 10 kilometres of the property where historic data shows EM conductors, the partners stated. Ground prospecting will follow up this summer.

A VTEM survey suggests the property’s east side hosts EM conductors that might continue from the PLS property bordering to the north. More detailed evaluation will follow.

The project’s $700,000 first-year program will also include ground geophysics and geochemical surveys including radon measurements. Fission 3.0 acts as operator on the 11,835-hectare property. Brades holds a three-year option to earn 50%.

Western Athabasca Syndicate to expand Swoosh drill program

The four-company Western Athabasca Syndicate reported preliminary drill results from its Preston property on April 15. Five holes totalling 986 metres tested the Swoosh target, a six-kilometre corridor identified by gravity, magnetic and EM surveys, and coinciding with surficial geochemical anomalies, the alliance stated. The group consists of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY.

All five holes hit a hydrothermally altered and reactivated structural zone. A downhole probe found elevated radioactivity in three holes, including one interval of 802 cps over 1.95 metres (not true width) starting at 186.68 metres in downhole depth. Four holes reached depths between 200 and 275 metres. A fifth was abandoned due to poor conditions. More detailed evaluation is expected in May.

Backed by an expanded budget, drilling will continue at Swoosh until late April. The following month the syndicate will test two other targets, CHA and Fin. Athabasca Nuclear acts as operator on the 246,643-hectare property.

On April 14 Ryan Kalt formally became Athabasca Nuclear’s CEO, having already held the position on an interim basis. Kalt has been prominent in acquiring Basin properties, including Preston, and as a director shifted the company to uranium exploration. With a 21.25% stake, he’s also the company’s largest shareholder. On April 15 Athabasca Nuclear announced an advance notice bylaw.

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