Saturday 14th December 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘united states’

Infographics: The United States and the new energy era’s lithium-ion supply chain

December 11th, 2019

by Nicholas LePan | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | December 11, 2019

The world is rapidly shifting to renewable energy technologies. Battery minerals are set to become the new oil, with lithium-ion battery supply chains becoming the new pipelines.

China is currently leading this lithium-ion battery revolution—leaving our neighbour to the south dependent on its economic rival. However, the harsh lessons of the 1970s-to-’80s oil crises have increased pressure on the U.S. to develop its own domestic energy supply chain and gain access to key battery metals.

Introducing the new energy era

This infographic from Standard Lithium TSXV:SLL explores the current energy landscape and America’s position in the new energy era.

 

The new energy era’s lithium-ion supply chain

 

An energy dependence problem

Energy dependence is the degree of a nation’s reliance on imported energy, resulting from an insufficient domestic supply. Oil crises during the 1970s to ’80s revealed America’s reliance on foreign-produced oil, especially from the Middle East.

The U.S. economy ground to a halt when gas prices soared during the 1973 oil crisis—altering consumer behavior and energy policy for generations. In the aftermath of the crisis, the government imposed national speed limits to conserve oil, and also demanded cheaper, smaller and more fuel-efficient cars.

U.S. administrations set an objective to wean America off foreign oil through “energy independence”—the ability to meet the country’s fuel needs using domestic resources.

Lessons learned?

Spurred by technological breakthroughs such as hydraulic fracking, the U.S. now has the capacity to respond to high oil prices by ramping up domestic production.

By the end of 2019, total U.S. oil production could rise to 17.4 million barrels a day. At that level, American net imports of petroleum could fall in December 2019 to 320,000 barrels a day, the lowest since 1949.

In fact, the successful development of America’s shale fields is a key reason why the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) has lost most of its influence over the supply and price of oil.

A renewable future: Turning the ship

The increasing scarcity of economic oil and gas fields, combined with the negative environmental impacts of oil and the declining costs of renewable power, are creating a new energy supply and demand dynamic.

Oil demand could drop by 16.5 million barrels per day. Oil producers could face significant losses, with $380 billion of above-ground investments becoming worthless if the oil industry and oil-rich nations are not prepared for a surge in green energy by 2030.

Energy companies are hedging their risk with increased investment in renewables. The world’s top 24 publicly listed oil companies spent on average 1.3% of their total budgets on low carbon technology in 2018, amounting to $260 billion. That is double the 0.68% the same group had invested on average through the period of 2010 and 2017.

The new geopolitics of energy: battery minerals

Low carbon technologies for the new energy era are also creating a demand for specific materials and new supply chains that can procure them.

Renewable and low carbon technology will be mineral-intensive, requiring many metals such as lithium, cobalt, graphite and nickel. These are key raw materials, and demand will only grow.

 

Material 2018 2028 2018-2028 % growth
Graphite anode in batteries 170,000 tonnes 2.05M tonnes 1,106%
Lithium in batteries 150,000 tonnes 1.89M tonnes 1,160%
Nickel in batteries 82,000 tonnes 1.09M tonnes 1,229%
Cobalt in batteries 58,000 tonnes 320,000 tonnes 452%

(Source: Benchmark Minerals Intelligence)

 

The cost of these materials is the largest factor in battery technology and will determine whether battery supply chains succeed or fail.

China currently dominates the lithium-ion battery supply chain and could continue to do so. This leaves the U.S. dependent on China in this new era.

Could history repeat itself?

The battery metals race

There are five stages in a lithium-ion battery supply chain—and the U.S. holds a smaller percentage of the global supply chain than China at nearly every stage.

 

The new energy era’s lithium-ion supply chain

 

China’s dominance of the global battery supply chain creates a competitive advantage that the U.S. has no choice but to rely on.

However, this can still be prevented if the U.S. moves fast. From natural resources, human capital and technology, the U.S. can build its own domestic supply.

Building the U.S. battery supply chain

The U.S. relies heavily on imports of several key materials necessary for a lithium-ion battery supply chain.

 

U.S. net import dependence
Lithum 50%
Cobalt 72%
Graphite 100%

(Source: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management)

 

But the U.S. is making strides to secure its place in the new energy era. The American Minerals Security Act seeks to identify the resources necessary to secure America’s mineral independence.

The government has also released a list of 35 minerals it deems critical to the national interest.

Declaring U.S. battery independence

A supply chain starts with raw materials, and the U.S. has the resources necessary to build its own battery supply chain. This would help the country avoid supply disruptions like those seen during the oil crises in the 1970s.

Battery metals are becoming the new oil and supply chains the new pipelines. It is still early in this new energy era, and the victors are yet to be determined in the battery arms race.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

See European Union pledges €3.2 billion for lithium-ion R&D.

Commerce Resources congratulates Quebec PhD student for research on company’s rare earths project

December 5th, 2019

by Greg Klein | December 5, 2019

A study related to the Ashram rare earths-fluorspar deposit brought Université du Québec PhD candidate Sophie Costis first prize in an academic competition. Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE congratulated her on winning the $2,000 scholarship for her study on flotation tailings using the flowsheet for the company’s deposit. Costis delivered her presentation entitled Impact du gel-dégel et de la salinité sur le comportement de résidus miniers de terres rares en milieu nordique to l’Association Québécoise des Sciences de la Terre. Her first-place finish in le défi de la recherche en géosciences (Geoscience Research Challenge) was announced at last month’s Quebec Mines + Energy conference in Quebec City.

Commerce Resources congratulates Quebec PhD student for research on company’s rare earths project

A first-prize award recognizes the work of PhD candidate
Sophie Costis on Ashram’s flotation management.
(Photo: Université du Québec)

“The company is thrilled to see Sophie recognized for her hard work on the project over the last few years,” said Commerce president Chris Grove. “We are committed to advancing the Ashram project in an environmentally responsible manner and Sophie’s work will help build this foundation through high-quality data-gathering and analysis in a very important field.”

Backed by a $300,000 grant, Costis works in partnership with le Centre Eau Terre Environnement of l’Institut national de la recherche scientifique of l’Université du Québec. Expected to conclude late next year, her project provides further insight on tailings management in the flotation process plant.

Her findings so far show no serious concerns with Ashram’s flotation tailings management, show the process has no acid-generating potential and also show strong indications that there is no metal-leaching potential, Commerce stated.

In early October, Cynthia Kierscht, the U.S. deputy assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs, hosted Shawn Tupper, associate deputy minister of Natural Resources Canada, at the first critical minerals working group meeting in Washington. The group will continue talks in coming months to finalize the joint plan.—Canadian Press

The work complements Ashram’s pre-feasibility studies for Ashram, which coincide with heightened concerns about critical minerals like fluorspar and especially rare earths. This week Canadian Press reported Ottawa is examining the role Canada could play in supplying the United States and other allied countries with minerals considered necessary to the economy, technology and defence.

NRCanada has contracted Roskill Consulting to forecast future demand for critical minerals that Canada could supply, CP added.

Last week Commerce released assays from near-surface intervals at Ashram showing high grades over wide widths. The company also has metallurgical studies underway at a Colorado lab to upgrade the project’s fluorspar potential, increase rare earths extraction and produce samples requested by potential customers.

Fluorspar wasn’t considered in the project’s 2012 resource but will be included in an update anticipated for the coming year, as will two seasons of extensive drilling. A major advantage of Ashram is the carbonatite-hosted deposit’s relatively simple monazite, bastnasite and xenotime mineralogy that’s familiar to conventional rare earths processing.

Fluorspar potential also comes under consideration at another critical minerals project two kilometres away, where Saville Resources TSXV:SRE operates the Niobium Claim Group under a 75% earn-in from Commerce. Following a drill program earlier this year, Saville released promising niobium-tantalum-phosphate results in June.

Last month Commerce closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $2.51 million. A private placement in August brought in $413,749.

Read more about Commerce Resources.

Commerce Resources reports high grades over wide intervals at Quebec rare earths-fluorspar project

November 28th, 2019

by Greg Klein | November 28, 2019

With core moved from the storage vault to the lab, new assays further confidence in a resource update anticipated for next year as the Ashram deposit advances towards pre-feasibility. The results come from a 14-hole, 2,014-metre program sunk in 2016 but only recently assayed for budgetary reasons. Now cashed-up Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE unveils an impressive batch of near-surface rare earths and fluorspar intercepts from the northern Quebec property.

Commerce Resources reports high grades over wide intervals at Quebec rare earths-fluorspar project

Among the highlights are one of the project’s best-yet intercepts: 2.38% rare earth oxides over 64.54 metres, with sub-intervals including 3.02% over 28.35 metres. Another standout shows 1.71% over 221.95 metres, including 2.18% over 36.16 metres. Yet another hole boasts 2.16% over 53.55 metres. (True widths were unavailable.)

These are near-surface results, starting at downhole depths of 66.5 metres, 2.69 metres and 1.54 metres respectively.

Another critical mineral and one not factored into Ashram’s previous PEA, fluorspar also comes through in impressive grades, such as 7.2% calcium fluoride over 221.95 metres, including 11.5% CaF2 over 36.16 metres. Metallurgical studies currently underway work on upgrading the fluorspar to higher-priced acid grade in a flowsheet that would provide both rare earths and fluorspar concentrates, improve RE extraction and reduce tailings. The Colorado lab will also produce samples to meet requests from potential customers.

This round of definition drilling targeted the deposit’s northern, western and southern margins with holes spaced 50 metres apart, and in some cases 25 metres apart. Additional drilling at 25-metre centres may take place.

Using a 1.25% cutoff, Ashram’s 2012 resource estimate showed:

  • measured: 1.59 million tonnes averaging 1.77% total rare earth oxides

  • indicated: 27.67 million tonnes averaging 1.9% TREO

  • inferred: 219.8 million tonnes averaging 1.88% TREO

The carbonatite-hosted deposit features relatively simple monazite, bastnasite and xenotime mineralogy, familiar to conventional rare earths processing

Anticipated for the coming year is Ashram’s first resource update since 2012, factoring in 9,625 metres of drilling since then. Previous drilling followed mineralization from near-surface to depths beyond 600 metres where mineralization remains open, as evidenced by 4.13% REO over 0.6 metres beginning at 599.9 metres’ depth.

Work continues as the United States and other allied countries show increasing concern about China’s domination of several critical minerals with a special focus on rare earths but also including fluorspar, tantalum and niobium. Commerce also holds the advanced-stage Blue River tantalum-niobium deposit in southern British Columbia.

About two kilometres from Ashram, Saville Resources TSXV:SRE operates the Niobium Claim Group under a 75% earn-in from Commerce. After releasing niobium-tantalum-phosphate results last June, Saville now has the project’s fluorspar potential under evaluation.

Earlier this month Commerce closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $2.51 million. Another placement in August garnered $413,749.

Read more about Commerce Resources.

Over a Barrel: Documentary now online about Vivian Krause vs. the U.S.-funded campaign against Canadian oil

October 25th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 25, 2019

What they’ve done to us is actually brilliant—it’s pure brilliance. Because they’re not doing it to themselves. They’re getting Canadians to do it to ourselves. And I don’t think Canadians understand that this is what’s happening to them. On a larger scale, they’re doing to Canada what they did to my community. So I don’t think Canada really understands that the real war here is an outside force pitting Canadians against Canadians.—Ellis Ross, B.C. MLA and former chief councillor of the Haisla Nation, from the documentary Over a Barrel

The impressive work of a singularly remarkable activist has come to the screen, both in movie theatres and on computers. Over a Barrel presents a half-hour documentary on the research of Vivian Krause into the American-backed anti-oilsands campaign. Having already appeared in Alberta theatres, the film’s now online and, until October 31, for free (although donations are accepted).

Starting November 1, and in lieu of rich U.S. backers, an online viewing will cost $4.99.

Through well over a decade of perseverance, Krause has documented a money trail leading to powerful American interests whose more than half a billion in funding, tactics of disinformation, and interference in Canadian elections targets Albertans and other Canadians to the benefit of Americans and their oil industry.

The documentary also portrays a human cost to the campaign, as native spokespeople discuss how foreign interference and urban activists deprive their communities of badly needed economic development.

Click here to watch Over a Barrel online, for free or by donation until October 31 and for $4.99 after that.

Read an October 22 op-ed by Vivian Krause: Obama wasn’t the only American interfering in the Canadian election.

Read more about Vivian Krause and her work.

Infographic: The world’s most powerful reserve currencies

October 8th, 2019

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | October 8, 2019

Visual Capitalist The world’s most powerful reserve currencies

 

When we think of network effects, we’re usually thinking of them in the context of technology and Metcalfe’s Law.

Metcalfe’s Law states that the more users a network has, the more valuable it is to those users. It’s a powerful idea that is exploited by companies like LinkedIn, Airbnb or Uber—all companies that provide a more beneficial service as their networks gain more nodes.

But network effects don’t apply just to technology and related fields.

In the financial sector, for example, stock exchanges grow in utility when they have more buyers, sellers and volume. Likewise, in international finance, a currency can become increasingly entrenched when it’s accepted, used and trusted all over the world.

What’s a reserve currency?

This visualization comes to us from HowMuch.net, and it breaks down foreign reserves held by countries—but what is a reserve currency, anyway?

In essence, reserve currencies (i.e. U.S. dollar, pound sterling, euro, etc.) are held by central banks for the following major reasons:

  • To maintain a stable exchange rate for the domestic currency

  • To ensure liquidity in the case of an economic or political crisis

  • To provide confidence to international buyers and foreign investors

  • To fulfill international obligations, such as paying down debt

  • To diversify central bank portfolios, reducing overall risk

Not surprisingly, central banks benefit the most from stockpiling widely held reserve currencies such as the U.S. dollar or the euro.

Because these currencies are accepted almost everywhere, they provide third parties with extra confidence and perceived liquidity. This is a network effect that snowballs from the growing use of a particular reserve currency over others.

Reserve currencies over time

Here is how the usage of reserve currencies has evolved over the last 15 years:

Currency composition of official foreign exchange reserves (2004-2019)
U.S. dollar Euro Japanese yen Pound sterling Other
2004 65.5% 24.7% 4.3% 3.5% 2.0%
2009 62.1% 27.7% 2.9% 4.3% 3.0%
2014 65.1% 21.2% 3.5% 3.7% 6.5%
2019 61.8% 20.2% 5.3% 4.5% 8.2%

Over this timeframe, there have been small ups and downs in most reserve currencies.

Today, the U.S. dollar is the world’s most powerful reserve currency, making up over 61% of foreign reserves. The dollar gets an extensive network effect from its use abroad, and this translates into several advantages for the multi-trillion-dollar U.S. economy.

The euro, yen and pound sterling are the other mainstay reserve currencies, adding up to roughly 30% of foreign reserves.

Finally, the most peculiar data series above is “Other,” which grew from 2% to 8.4% of worldwide foreign reserves over the last 15 years. This bucket includes the Canadian dollar, the Australian dollar, the Swiss franc and the Chinese renminbi.

Accepted everywhere?

There have been rumblings in the media for decades now about the rise of the Chinese renminbi as a potential new challenger on the reserve currency front.

While there are still big structural problems that will prevent this from happening as fast as some may expect, the currency is still on the rise internationally.

What will the composition of global foreign reserves look like in another 15 years?

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

James Rickards says China might have imposed a gold standard on the IMF’s special drawing right

October 7th, 2019

…Read more

Donald Trump employs the U.S. Defense Production Act to support reliable supplies of rare earth elements

September 12th, 2019

…Read more

Uranium: A 2040 prognosis

September 5th, 2019

Growing energy needs, emissions reduction look positive for the other yellow metal

by Greg Klein

Oversupplied and under-priced for years, uranium’s forecast now looks good up to 2040, according to a new study. In its latest Nuclear Fuel Report, a study released at roughly two-year intervals, the World Nuclear Association has revised its projections upwards for the first time in eight years. Demand will come from a growing reliance on nuclear energy thanks mainly to China, India and other Asian countries, said the industry organization. Global warming concerns also play a role.

Growing energy needs, emissions reduction look positive for the other yellow metal

The report presents different data for each of three case studies, explained World Nuclear News, a WNA publication. The Reference scenario reflects official targets and plans announced by states and companies, and also considers how nuclear can help address climate change. The Upper scenario anticipates more favourable economics, greater public acceptance and increased dependency to offset climate change. The Lower scenario considers the possibility of negative public sentiment, a lack of political support and more challenging economics.

Even at the Lower scenario, the study foresees nuclear capacity remaining at its current level of 402 gigawatt electrical to 2040. The Reference scenario sees moderate growth to 569 GWe, while the Upper scenario predicts capacity almost doubling to 776 GWe.

The Upper and Reference scenarios show faster growth than at any time since 1990.

Even greater expansion would be required should countries adopt the WNA’s Harmony climate change strategy, which calls for nuclear to supply 25% of the world’s electricity by 2050.

The need for new primary uranium supply becomes even more pressing as a number of older mines are projected to be depleted in the second decade.—World Nuclear Association

The three scenarios “show that the capacity of all presently known mining projects (current and idled mines, projects under development, planned or prospective) should be at least doubled by the end of the forecast period, and the need for new primary uranium supply becomes even more pressing as a number of older mines are projected to be depleted in the second decade,” the WNA emphasized. 

“There are more than adequate uranium resources to meet future needs. However, oversupply and associated low uranium prices are preventing the investment needed to convert these resources into production. Uranium resources would be unlikely to be a limiting factor for the expansion of nuclear programs in order to meet the Harmony goal.”

As for uranium production, the report sees “fairly stable” volume until the late 2020s, but a sharp decrease from 2035 to 2040 “as a quarter of all mines listed in the model reach the end of their production lives,” the WNN stated. “Global output of 66,400 tonnes uranium in 2030 declines to 48,100 tU under the Reference scenario. For the Upper scenario the figures are 71,500 tU (2030) and 49,400 tU (2040). The partial return of currently idled mines to production is expected to begin in 2023 in the Reference case, 2022 in the Upper scenario and 2026 in the Lower scenario.”

In addition to Asia’s growing nuclear reliance, the report bases its positive forecasts on improved government sentiment in France, and in the U.S. at the federal and state level. Countries like Bangladesh, Egypt and Turkey will become significant producers of nuclear energy.

In our models, we don’t get excited on the demand side.—Kazatomprom CEO
Galymzhan Pirmatov,
as quoted by Bloomberg

The study crunched data from questionnaires sent to WNA members and non-members, publicly available info and “the judgement and experience of the members of the association’s working group.” Among the considerations were nuclear economics, government policies, public acceptance, climate change, electricity market structure and regulatory standards.

Co-chairing the working group was Riaz Rizvi, chief strategy and marketing officer for Kazatomprom, the world’s top uranium miner. But the positive forecasts seem to contradict his boss. Last June Bloomberg quoted CEO Galymzhan Pirmatovas saying, “In our models, we don’t get excited on the demand side.”

Using data from other sources, Cameco Corp TSX:CCO estimated an August 31 U3O8 spot price of $25.30 per pound and long-term price of $31.00, down from $26.30 spot and $31.25 long-term a year earlier. The company gives numbers of $60.50 spot and $70.00 long-term for March 1, 2011, 10 days before a tsunami hit Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi complex. As Japan shut down other reactors one by one, followed by a few other countries like Germany, the mining industry faced oversupply. Uranium prices fell steadily, sometimes dramatically.

Make no mistake, there is still a long way to go before we decide to restart McArthur River-Key Lake.—Cameco CEO Tim Gitzel

By January 2018 Cameco suspended its McArthur River mining and Key Lake milling operations, despite having put Cigar Lake into production less than four years earlier. Expressing cautious optimism last July, CEO Tim Gitzel added: “However, make no mistake, there is still a long way to go before we decide to restart McArthur River-Key Lake.”

But without them, Cameco has become more buyer than producer. To meet 2019 supply commitments, the company anticipates purchasing 21 million to 23 million pounds from other sources. That compares with an estimated nine million pounds expected from Cigar Lake this year.

Lower cost, higher grade

August 30th, 2019

Denison Mines considers the Athabasca Basin’s first ISR uranium operation

by Greg Klein

Less than 80 kilometres from the technological marvel of Cigar Lake, another uranium project could introduce an extraction method that’s less innovative but a regional novelty just the same. Denison Mines TSX:DML now has testing underway for in-situ recovery at the Wheeler River project’s Phoenix deposit. Should the studies succeed and the mine become a reality, this would be ISR’s first application in Canadian uranium mining.

Denison Mines considers the Athabasca Basin’s first ISR uranium operation

Denison Mines hopes to apply low-cost extraction
to high-grade resources. (Photo: Denison Mines)

ISR finds common use in Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, the U.S., Australia and enough other countries to account for 48% of global uranium production in 2016, according to the World Nuclear Association. The lower-cost method has often been associated with lower-grade deposits that have geological conditions making the process viable. With a Phoenix probable reserve averaging 19.1%, Denison was able to consider other options. In fact the company originally planned to use Cigar Lake’s jet-boring technique.

But the experience of Cameco Corp TSX:CCO proved to be a cautionary tale. “Among 
the most technically challenging mining projects in the world” according to the company, Cigar Lake took nine years to build, with setbacks that included two serious floods. Finally opened in 2014, its jet-boring extraction makes the very high-grade operation “one of the technically most sophisticated mines in the world.”

Two years later, when Wheeler River reached PEA, Denison was still considering jet-boring for Phoenix. But capex, opex, length of construction and technical risks similar to Cigar Lake’s “catastrophic events” persuaded the company to pursue other options.

That Denison did, examining some 32 extraction techniques over two years before selecting ISR for Phoenix in the pre-feasibility study released last October. Wheeler’s Gryphon deposit, about three kilometres northwest, has more conventional underground mining proposed.

Both deposits are classified as Athabasca Basin unconformity-related. But Gryphon features basement-hosted mineralization while Phoenix mineralization is unconformity-hosted and also shows ISR potential.

Denison Mines considers the Athabasca Basin’s first ISR uranium operation

With its current drill program, Denison hopes to find
potential satellite ISR deposits. (Photo: Denison Mines)

Put simply, the process involves drilling wells into the deposit, injecting a liquid solution that leaches uranium from ore, then pumping the uranium-bearing liquid to a surface processing facility. No tailings or waste rock come to surface. The solution then gets recharged with fresh reagents for re-use in a closed system.

ISR, also known as ISL or in-situ leaching, can be used for copper and other minerals as well.

However Phoenix differs from many ISR projects by the permeability of the deposit’s sandstone walls, which will require freezing to contain the solution. Ground freezing involves pumping very cold brine into holes outside the deposit’s circumference to extract heat from the surrounding rock. Cigar Lake also uses underground freezing to contain the jet-boring process. One advantage of Phoenix over other ISR projects, however, is the relatively compact size of the high-grade deposit, about one kilometre by 50 metres.

Should geology, engineering, permitting and financing come together, Phoenix would take only about two and a half years to build, according to the PEA. With an estimated 11-year lifespan, production would average six million pounds U3O8 annually for nine of those years.

Hinting at satanic numerology, Gryphon would spend six years in construction and another six in operation, producing six million pounds a year. Processing would take place at the McClean Lake mill, now chewing through Cigar Lake ore. Denison holds 22.5% of the mill, along with Orano Canada (70%) and OURD Canada (7.5%).

As for Wheeler River ownership, Denison maintains a 90% stake, with JCU Canada holding the rest.

Denison Mines considers the Athabasca Basin’s first ISR uranium operation

With a deposit lying below Patterson Lake South,
Fission Uranium now has second thoughts
about open pit mining. (Photo: Fission Uranium)

Denison has further ISR tests now underway, part of the project’s feasibility studies. With work conducted by Petrotek Engineering Corp, the program has so far sunk two pump/injection wells and four observation wells along a 34-metre portion of the deposit’s strike. This week president/CEO David Cates described early results as encouraging, “with initial pump and injection tests confirming hydraulic connectivity between all of the test wells within the ore zone.”

The tests also suggest the basement rock beneath the unconformity would contain the solution, unlike the sandstone walls which would require freezing.

Three more test areas will be evaluated up to summer 2020 to compile a hydro-geological model to simulate ground water flow and other factors. The current campaign also includes environmental baseline studies and a 10-hole, 5,000-metre drill program searching for potential satellite ISR operations along the project’s K West trend.

While Wheeler River holds the largest undeveloped deposits in the eastern Basin, the Patterson corridor extending beyond the Basin’s southwestern rim claims fame for two even larger projects.

A pre-feas released by Fission Uranium TSX:FCU in May for Patterson Lake South’s Triple R deposit examined a hybrid open pit and underground mine, but the company was quick to reconsider. An alternative pre-feas began in July to evaluate an underground-only operation. The May pre-feas foresaw four years of construction, six years of open pit operation and two years of underground operation to produce 87.5 million pounds U3O8 over the eight-year span.

The company hopes its new pre-feas, expected in September, will find “further-improved economics, even lower capex and a reduced construction time.” Permitting might also have been a concern, however, for open pit mining on a uranium deposit currently underneath a lake. With the new report using the same resource estimate, Fission plans to compare both scenarios before moving on to feasibility.

Another basement-hosted deposit, NexGen Energy’s (TSX:NXE) Arrow deposit on the Rook 1 project reached pre-feas in December. The proposed underground mine would begin production during the second year of development, ultimately producing 228.4 million pounds U3O8 over a nine-year life, enough to give the company an estimated 21% of global output, just behind first-place Kazatomprom’s 22%, NexGen says.

The company plans full feasibility for Arrow in H1 next year.

Cameco CEO Tim Gitzel remarks on a commitment by Donald Trump and Justin Trudeau to collaborate on critical minerals supply

August 29th, 2019

…Read more