Tuesday 11th August 2020

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘Uranium Energy Corp (UEC)’

Work suspended

March 26th, 2020

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

by Greg Klein | March 26, 2020

Shut Down Canada has largely been achieved, but not by the forces that advocated it nor—until someone finds a way of blaming this on climate change—by the doomsday belief they were pushing. Residents of our strangely quiet cities and towns watch the horror unfold elsewhere while wondering how long and hard the pandemic will hit Canada. Meanwhile, workers and business owners might consider themselves lucky if the economy fares no worse than a very serious recession.

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

A reminder that one crisis can trigger another unwittingly came from FortisAlberta on March 23. The company that provides 60% of the province’s electricity “is taking the necessary actions and precautions to protect the health and well-being of its employees and to provide electricity service to its customers.”

The obvious but demoralizing question arises: What happens if too many key people get sick? That danger could apply to any number of essential services. Economic collapse, social disorder, a breakdown of supply chains add to the nightmarish possibilities.

All of which might not happen. In the meantime we can thank the front line workers who keep our society functioning to the extent that it does. Those one- or two-buck-an-hour temporary pay raises hardly acknowledge society’s debt to retail staff who interact constantly with a potentially plague-ridden public. Care workers for the elderly constitute another group of low-paid heroes, several of whom have already made the ultimate sacrifice.

In the meantime here are some reports on Canadian mining’s response to the crisis.

Inconsistent closures suggest an ambivalent industry

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

IAMGOLD sidelined its Westwood operation in Quebec but
continues work on its Coté project in Ontario. (Photo: IAMGOLD)

Mining hasn’t actually been banned in Ontario and Quebec, although shutdowns of non-essential services continue to April 8 and April 13 respectively. Extensions, of course, look likely. Quebec has ordered the industry, along with aluminum smelting, to “minimize their activities.” Ontario specifically exempted mineral exploration, development, mining and their support services from mandatory closures.

Interpreting Quebec’s decree as a ban, IAMGOLD TSX:IMG suspended its Westwood gold mine in that province but continued work at its 64.75%-held, advanced-stage Coté gold project in Ontario as an “essential service.” Production continues at the company’s Burkina Faso and Suriname operations.

But regardless of government bans or directives, voluntary suspensions take place. Restrictions on travel and social distancing have made projects non-viable, while the threat of localized outbreaks looms large—not just at the job sites and accommodations, but in the isolated communities that supply much of the labour.

In Canada, that often means native communities. “They have a bad history with disproportionate impacts from epidemics,” a Vale Canada spokesperson told the Financial Post. The company put its Voisey’s Bay mine in Labrador on care and maintenance, and planned reductions at its associated Long Harbour nickel-copper-cobalt processing plant in Newfoundland.

So far alone of the Northwest Territories’ three operations, Dominion Diamond Mines announced an indefinite suspension for Ekati on March 19. The Union of Northern Workers stated its intention to grieve the manner in which its members were laid off.

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

Having laid off its native staff, Agnico Eagle continues its Nunavut
operations largely with workers from Quebec. (Photo: Agnico Eagle)

Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM made the ramp-down decision a day after Quebec’s March 23 order, after discussions with government “to get additional clarity.” The suspensions applied to three Quebec mines but the company planned “reduced operations” at Meliadine and Meadowbank in Nunavut, largely under Quebecois workers.

Five days earlier Agnico Eagle began sending home Nunavummiut staff from its Nunavut mines and exploration projects to prevent virus transmission “from a southern worker to a Nunavut worker, with the risk of it moving into the communities,” explained CEO Sean Boyd. Production was expected to continue under the remaining staff.

The following day residents blocked a road from Rankin Inlet airport to Meliadine to protest the use of replacement workers from Mirabel and Val d’Or, Quebec. Although the territory has banned travel from other jurisdictions, critical workers may apply for an exemption. They’re also required to undergo two weeks of isolation in their own region prior to travel.

From boots on the ground to fingers on the keyboard

Exploration suspensions haven’t come at a bad time for some projects, which had completed or nearly completed winter programs. Where labs remain open, assays might provide some badly needed good news.

Much of the crucial work of analyzing results and planning future exploration can be done by desktop. One example of a company with a multinational work-at-home team is Turmalina Metals TSXV:TBX, which completed a seasonal field program at its San Francisco de Los Andes gold project shortly before Argentina imposed a nation-wide quarantine. “While Turmalina maintains a corporate office in Canada our technical and managerial team operate remotely from individual home offices located in Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Canada and Asia,” states a March 23 announcement. “The current compilation, analysis and modeling of recently collected data is being done on a physically decentralized basis from these individual home offices as the company prepares for drilling.”

Follow the money

No one’s saying so out loud, but travel restrictions just might divert money from conferences, trade shows and expense accounts to actual work. Then again, money can still be squandered on low-IQ promotional campaigns produced at the kitchen table.

Every metal and mineral has a silver lining

This isn’t a sector that overlooks opportunity. Two days after Vanstar Mining Resources TSXV:VSR reported that drilling “continues without stopping” at its 25%-held Nelligan project in Quebec, the company acknowledged that majority partner IAMGOLD had suspended work. But “it should be noted that current events can also bring certain opportunities for acquiring gold projects at a lower cost,” Vanstar pointed out. The junior was merely echoing comments made by others, including BHP Group NYSE:BHP earlier this month.

With the economic outlook as confused as a professional stock-picker’s thought processes, mining’s future remains profoundly uncertain. But diminished supply can certainly help chances of rebounding demand.

And suspensions might encourage advantageous awareness, as noted by Uranium Energy Corp NYSE:UEC president/CEO Amir Adnani. “The recent global events and supply disruptions further underscore the importance of domestic supply chains for vital resources,” stated the U.S. purveyor of U3O8.

How could we live without them?

Endeavours deemed essential by Ontario and Quebec include capital markets services and agencies like the TMX Group and securities commissions. The provinces also consider alcohol and cannabis retailers essential. As if the world wasn’t already facing worse consequences, Toronto medical officer Eileen de Villa said banning booze “would lead to pretty significant health consequences.”

She didn’t specifically mention geoscientists.

The experts speak

Some fatuous remarks at PDAC provided retrospectively grim humour, as well as an exhibition of prognosticator pomposity. Here’s Mickey Fulp’s take on COVID-19, as quoted by IKN:

  • “I think it’s overblown.”

  • “All these shows are flu incubators, anyway.”

  • “I think it (i.e. infections) are going to be less this year, because people are doing things like washing their hands.”

  • “This is a blip on the radar screen. Especially in the U.S. where I’m from, because our economy is absolutely roaring and virus fears are not going to do major damage to the U.S. market.”

  • “I think it absolutely is an overreaction and the quicker it’s realized, the better.”

  • “This is a variety of flu.”

Of course to sheltered North Americans, the first week of March might seem a long time ago. So here’s Doug Casey’s insight, as published by Kitco on March 24:

“The virus itself isn’t nearly as serious, I don’t know how serious it’s going to be, but not terribly in my opinion. What I’m really shocked at, Daniela, is the degree of hysteria on the part of the powers that be. They’ve actually just gone insane.”

Click here for objective data on the coronavirus pandemic.

Investors beware: VRIC returns

January 14th, 2020

by Greg Klein | January 14, 2020

Actually this might be the best event in years but, as is obligatory with all investment decisions, any stock tips gleaned from the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference require due diligence. Last year’s Top Picks Competition provided a case in point.

Marin Katusa and Frank Holmes staged a fast-paced contest promoting three companies apiece. A rep from each company spoke for six minutes then, adding to the game show format, audience members cast their verdicts with votes—and, no doubt in many cases, investments too.

In keeping with our policy of not publicizing stock tips, ResourceClips.com didn’t name the companies. But nearly a year later it’s instructive to review the performance of the stocks and their pickers.

The competition took place Sunday, January 20. Closing prices are given for the previous Friday, January 18, 2019, and the afternoon before press time, January 13, 2020.

 

Katusa went first, with these three companies (all charts from TMX Group):

Lucara Diamond TSX:LUC
(Closed January 18, 2019, on $1.56. Closed January 13, 2020, on $0.84.)

Investors beware VRIC returns

Equinox Gold TSX:EQX
(Closed January 18, 2019, on $5.24. Closed January 13, 2020, on $10.50.)

Investors beware VRIC returns

Uranium Energy NYSE:UEC
(Closed January 18, 2019, on $1.29. Closed January 13, 2020, on $0.898.)

Investors beware VRIC returns

 

Holmes said he also invested in Katusa’s three picks. Here are Holmes’ selections:

Gran Colombia Gold TSX:GCM
(Closed January 18, 2019, on $3.53. Closed January 13, 2020, on $5.21.)

Investors beware VRIC returns

GoldSpot Discoveries TSXV:SPOT
(Went public February 21, 2019, closing that day on $0.38. Closed January 13, 2020, on $0.135.)

Investors beware VRIC returns

Mene TSXV:MENE
(Closed January 18, 2019, on $0.60. Closed January 13, 2020, on $0.485.)

Investors beware VRIC returns

 

The Top Picks Competition doesn’t appear on this year’s VRIC agenda. But stock tips have always been a mainstay of the event, now in its 25th year according to host Cambridge House International. Founder Joe Martin, however, has previously told ResourceClips.com that the event began with a diamond conference that he held in 1994, which would make this the 26th year. An earlier report comes from a 1993 Vancouver Sun story that mentioned Martin’s International Diamond Conference & Exhibition, held in May of that year.

Investors beware VRIC returns

VRIC: Promotion aplenty, but no soliciting.

That must have been quite the spectacle. Still basking in reflected glory from the 1991 Ekati discovery of Chuck Fipke and Stewart Blusson, juniors clamoured for cash after staging possibly the biggest staking rush in mining history. As the 1993 Sun article reported, “At last count, there were 138 diamond exploration companies listed on the Vancouver Stock Exchange, 37 on the Toronto exchange, 23 on Alberta and 10 on Montreal.”

The hustle might be more diffuse this time, but VRIC 2020 offers the most impressive speaker lineup in several years. That follows a few years of decline, when the agenda conspicuously narrowed to exclude some speakers and some topics, for example energy minerals.

But maybe recognizing mining’s plight in the culture wars, VRIC organizers featured Rex Murphy last year. Expanding on that approach, some 2020 highlights include uncategorizable political and social commentator Conrad Black, Greenpeace founder and critic Patrick Moore, and rare earths analyst Clint Cox.

Next door to VRIC at the Vancouver Convention Centre and overlapping with the event will be the Association for Mineral Exploration Roundup 2020 from January 20 to 23.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

December 5th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission strikes 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, delays maiden resource

All assays are in but Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) highly anticipated resource for Patterson Lake South seems to have been put off. The milestone was originally scheduled for this month but in a December 1 statement president/COO Ross McElroy said, “We expect to be able to release preliminary results by early 2015.” Meanwhile the company announced last summer’s final 18 delineation holes, again flaunting the PLS trademark of high grades at shallow depths.

This batch comes entirely from R780E, by far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. R780E itself now extends about 164 metres at its widest point and 905 metres in strike, remaining open in all directions. The upcoming resource will focus on zones R780E and R00E.

Some of the best December 1 assays follow.

Hole PLS14-275

  • 0.2% U3O8 over 26 metres, starting at 137.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.26% over 2 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

A summer of round-the-clock drilling brought the
final assays prior to Patterson Lake South’s first resource.

  • 0.31% over 9 metres, starting at 171 metres
  • (including 1.96% over 1 metre)

PLS14-276

  • 13.84% over 10 metres, starting at 71.5 metres
  • (including 29.29% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-278

  • 0.48% over 13 metres, starting at 117.5 metres
  • (including 1.17% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-279

  • 0.83% over 30 metres, starting at 131 metres
  • (including 2.09% over 10.5 metres)

  • 1.24% over 6.5 metres, starting at 163.5 metres
  • (including 2.5% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-282

  • 0.4% over 14.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres
  • (including 1.02% over 4 metres)

PLS14-283

  • 0.54% over 9 metres, starting at 177 metres
  • (including 3.84% over 1 metre)

  • 2.61% over 9 metres, starting at 257.5 metres
  • (including 8.61% over 2.5 metres)

PLS14-285

  • 0.96% over 7.5 metres, starting at 287.5 metres
  • (including 2.56% over 2 metres)

  • 0.36% over 15 metres, starting at 299 metres

PLS14-286

  • 7.91% over 21.9 metres, starting at 61.1 metres
  • (including 17.3% over 9.5 metres)

  • 0.42% over 30.5 metres, starting at 86.5 metres

  • 1.49% over 4.5 metres, starting at 96 metres

PLS14-290

  • 3.72% over 64.5 metres, starting at 133.5 metres
  • (including 32.53% over 6.5 metres)

PLS14-293

  • 2.34% over 11 metres, starting at 198.5 metres
  • (including 11.74% over 2 metres)

PLS14-294

  • 0.8% over 10.5 metres, starting at 61 metres
  • (including 1.77% over 4 metres)

  • 0.27% over 21 metres, starting at 111 metres

PLS14-296

  • 0.7% over 33 metres, starting at 174 metres
  • (including 2.21% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 2.2% over 4 metres)

PLS14-297

  • 0.52% over 22.5 metres, starting at 184 metres
  • (including 1.39% over 3 metres)

  • 2.21% over 5.5 metres, starting at 210 metres
  • (including 6.76% over 1.5 metres)

PLS14-298

  • 1.51% over 13.5 metres, starting at 246.5 metres
  • (including 2.38% over 5 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

Fission noted that scissor drilling brought “vastly improved strength of mineralization on section 735E.” Oriented opposite to the south-to-north holes, they “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” One scissor hole hit the star assay for this batch, 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, in an area that had previously seen only moderate results, the company stated.

With assays for 22 exploration holes still pending and a winter program in the planning stages, speculation remains on whether the company will spend more time testing the property’s lesser-known areas.

Denison drills 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres at Wheeler River

The final batch of assays from Gryphon’s summer season at Denison Mines’ (TSX:DML) Wheeler River property revealed the zone’s highest grade so far, 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres. Announced December 2, that hole was also the deepest, making down-plunge extensions a priority for the next round of drilling, scheduled to start next month.

As usual, the chemical assays generally show better grades than the previously reported U3O8-equivalents that came from a downhole gamma probe.

Some highlights include:

Hole WR-571

  • 8.8% U3O8 over 2.5 metres, starting at 757.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 1.9% over 1 metre, starting at 761.5 metres

WR-572

  • 2.5% over 1 metre, starting at 651.1 metres

  • 9.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 1.8% over 1 metre, starting at 714.5 metres

  • 2.1% over 1 metre, starting at 717.5 metres

WR-573D1

  • 22.2% over 2.5 metres, starting at 768 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 779 metres

WR-574

  • 5% over 2 metres, starting at 665 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 14.6% over 2 metres, starting at 696.5 metres

WR-581

  • 2.7% over 2 metres, starting at 626.5 metres

The company estimates true widths at about 75%.

Wheeler River’s summer program comprised 20 holes totalling 14,937 metres, all of it at or near the newly discovered Gryphon zone.

Meanwhile, as a result of metallurgical testwork from the project’s Phoenix deposit, “a high-purity yellowcake product was produced that met all ASTM C967-13 specifications,” Denison stated. The sample grade was 19.7% U3O8, close to the average for Phoenix, which hosts 70.2 million pounds indicated.

The company closed a $14.99-million private placement in August.

With a 60% interest in Wheeler River, Denison acts as project operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% of the 11,720-hectare southeastern Athabasca Basin property, leaving JCU (Canada) Exploration with the other 10%.

Lakeland Resources boosts portfolio, offers $1.88-million private placement

All acquired by staking, four new properties and five property expansions announced by Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK on November 19 increase the company’s portfolio by 40,218 hectares in and around the Basin.

The five expansions cover targets identified by historic data. Among the highlights is the 4,753-hectare addition to Lazy Edward Bay, which underwent extensive field work last summer. Now totalling 31,128 hectares, the project features eight exploration trends, many of them drill-ready. Other additions came to Lakeland’s Riou Lake, Hawkrock Rapids, Small Lake and Fedun Lake properties.

Of the new land, the 1,508-hectare Carter Lake property covers part of the Carter Lake Structural Corridor, parallel to the Patterson Structural Corridor hosting the discoveries of Fission and NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE.

If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.—Jonathan Armes, president/CEO of Lakeland Resources

Cable Bay, a 1,077-hectare property on the Basin’s southern rim, benefits from extensive geophysics showing a trend of graphitic meta-sedimentary rocks in the basement, below 10 metres or less of Athabasca sandstone.

The 6,479-hectare Highrock property on the Basin’s southeastern margin features a moderately strong conductor that has yet to see follow-up work.

Extending beyond the Basin’s eastern rim, the 8,889-hectare Wright River project underwent an airborne survey showing a radiometric anomaly in the property’s centre. Regional lake sediment samples have graded up to 61 ppm.

Early new year plans include a 1,500-metre program on Star/Gibbon’s Creek, two adjacent properties forming one project on the Basin’s north-central rim. Also drill-ready are Lazy Edward Bay and, east of Star/Gibbon’s, Newnham Lake. More funding is expected from a $1.88-million private placement announced December 4.

“There’s not that much ground left to be had in the Basin,” Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes tells ResourceClips.com. “Most of what we see as quality ground is not available. If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

NexGen plans 18,000 metres for Rook 1, updates other properties

Funded by an $11.5-million private placement that closed last month, NexGen plans a three-rig, 18,000-metre program to start in January. Work will focus on Rook 1’s Arrow zone and along strike to the northeast and southwest, but will also test some of the project’s regional targets, the company stated on December 3. An infill ground gravity survey will precede the drilling.

Now complete are airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys over Rook 1 as well as additional nearby land that has had little or no previous mention from NexGen, the “SW2 property portfolio which includes Bishop 1 and 2, Meanwell and R-7 claims.” Winter plans include a radon-in-water survey.

NexGen also updated what it calls its “SW3 project portfolio (Rook 2, Sandhill and Dufferin).” Rook 2 and Sandhill underwent airborne gravity surveys. Dufferin got airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys, as did the eastern Basin Madison and 2Z Lake properties.

Rook 1 covers all the southwestern Basin’s major uranium-bearing conductor corridors, according to the company. Still pending are assays from 16 summer holes on Arrow. In October the company claimed one of the Basin’s best-ever drill results.

UEC reports 77% increase in Burke Hollow’s inferred resources

Seven trends at Uranium Energy Corp’s (NYSE MKT:UEC) Burke Hollow project in Texas now have total inferred resources of 2.9 million tons averaging 0.09% for 5.12 million pounds U3O8. About 14,152 metres of drilling in 526 holes were used to calculate the 77% increase. UEC has three additional areas of the property under consideration for drilling.

Burke Hollow, potentially an in-situ recovery operation, has an application for a radioactive material licence and mine permit currently under review.

The 7,824-hectare project lies about 80 kilometres from the company’s Hobson processing plant, the centrepiece of UEC’s “hub and spoke” properties. The portfolio includes the Palangana ISR mine, the Goliad ISR development project and nearly two dozen exploration projects, two in Paraguay and the rest in the western U.S. The company released a preliminary economic assessment for its Anderson uranium project in Arizona last September, as well as a PEA for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado last April.

On December 2 UEC stated it secured US$5.6 million of surety bonds to replace the same amount in reclamation deposits for future decommissioning. The bonds “require cash collateral of $1.7 million, allowing for the release of $3.9 million of previously restricted cash to the company.”

Last March the company received a two-year extension on a $20-million loan.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 4th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 27 to October 3, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Fission continues PLS main zone’s perfect score, gets conditional approval for TSX listing

In a week that saw Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU win conditional approval to move up to the TSX big board, the company maintained this season’s 100% hit rate at Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone. All seven holes released September 29 returned wide mineralization. The main zone now boasts 61 successes out of 61 summer holes.

The results come from a hand-held device used to measure drill core for radiation. They’re no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Among the most recent batch’s highlights, hole PLS14-290 revealed intervals totalling a composite 97.5 metres of mineralization, the shallowest beginning at 113.5 metres in downhole depth. PLS14-298 showed a composite 84 metres, with the shallowest intercept starting at 146.5 metres. PLS14-296 came up with a 94.5-metre composite, with one interval starting at 96 metres. True widths weren’t available.

An innovation to the summer program has been angled drilling from barges over the lake. Now Fission’s emphasizing three “scissor” holes, each sunk north to south at an opposite azimuth to a south-to-north hole. The purpose is to “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” PLS14-290, for example, “intersected well-developed mineralization … in an area that had previously only seen moderate results.”

By far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike, R780E shows a continuous strike of 930 metres and, at one point, a lateral width of 164 metres. The project’s mineralization sits within a metasedimentary lithologic corridor bounded to the south by the PL-3B basement electromagnetic conductor.

Still to come are assays to replace the summer’s radiometric results, as well as assays for the final dozen of last winter’s 92 holes. December’s still the target for a maiden resource.

Fission greeted October 3 by announcing conditional approval for a TSX listing. The company anticipates big board trading on or about October 8, retaining its FCU ticker.

In an interview posted by Stockhouse October 3, Fission chairperson/CEO Dev Randhawa contrasted Saskatchewan’s stability with that of other uranium-rich jurisdictions like Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Namibia and Niger. Verifying his intention to sell the project, Randhawa told journalist Gaalen Engen, “We have about six or seven Asian and North American companies in the midst of due diligence who are interested in doing private placement and/or taking over the company.”

The previous week Fission closed a $14.4-million private placement and released regional PLS drill results.

Field work and drilling approach for Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek flagship

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 27 to October 3, 2014

Scintillometer in hand, a geologist prospects
for radiometric anomalies over the Star uplift.

Announced September 29, the termination of an option with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN gives Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK full control of its 12,771-hectare Gibbon’s Creek project, which features boulder samples up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the Athabasca Basin’s highest-ever radon readings. Three days later Lakeland released rock and soil sample results from its adjacent Star property, showing gold, platinum and palladium, as well as some rare earths and low-grade uranium. Especially when considered for their proximity to a structural lineament that runs through both properties, the results show similarities to major Basin discoveries of high-grade uranium, the company states. With the two properties on the Basin’s north-central margin united as one project, Lakeland has additional field work planned for autumn. That leads up to a drill program slated to begin this winter, if not sooner.

Jody Dahrouge, president of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, told ResourceClips.com of geophysical data showing “a major regional structural lineament that’s about 30 or 40 kilometres in length, and it’s been reactivated many times over 100 million years or more. This is a key ingredient to every uranium deposit in the Athabasca Basin…. Having it reactivated time and time again allows multiple generations of fluid to flow along that structure and deposition of perhaps multiple ore bodies.”

He identified three mineralizing systems within five to 10 kilometres of the structure. The Star uplift, a basement outcrop about 700 metres by 350 metres, was the location of many of the samples showing gold and platinum group elements, along with some rare earths and low-grade uranium.

A massive alteration zone about a kilometre south had historic drill results up to 1,500 parts per million uranium. A few kilometres farther sits the boulder field that graded up to 4.28% U3O8. “Clearly something’s going on and clearly it’s related to the structure,” Dahrouge said.

With drill permits in place, road access from a nearby community, shallow depths, high ground that can be worked year-round and a healthy treasury, Lakeland now plans the next stage of an extensive exploration program for its flagship.

Read more about Lakeland’s Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

September 19th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 13 to 19, 2014

by Greg Klein

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NexGen ends season with high-grade assays from Rook 1

A summer of largely successful drilling has come to a close at NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1 project. Patterson Lake South’s neighbour got 33 holes totalling 18,885 metres, with 24 of the holes focusing on the Arrow zone. Radiometric results for the final two holes, released September 17, confirm the 515-metre strike for a zone that’s 215 metres wide and open in all directions. At the same time NexGen released the season’s first batch of assays, which the company said confirms mineralization indicated by previously reported radiometrics.

The last two holes were sunk vertically 15 metres northeast and southwest from the project’s previously released “landmark.” One hole found intersections totalling 123.9 metres of mineralization (not true width), with the shallowest intercept starting at 328.15 metres in vertical depth. The other showed a composite total of 107.9 metres of mineralization starting at 186 metres in depth.

These results come from a hand-held device that measures drill core radiation in counts per second. They’re no substitute for assays, which have yet to come for most of the season’s holes.

But assays for six earlier holes also released September 17 correlate well with the previously reported radiometric results, NexGen stated. Some highlights include:

Hole RK-14-31

  • 0.13% U3O8 over 28.2 metres, starting at 292.5 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 13 to 19, 2014

  • 0.38% over 5.55 metres, starting at 618.1 metres

  • 0.29% over 3.9 metres, starting at 639.1 metres

  • 5.91% over 1.3 metres, starting at 650.8 metres

Hole RK-14-32

  • 0.17% over 7.6 metres, starting at 502.2 metres

  • 0.65% over 1.35 metres, starting at 514.3 metres

Hole RK-14-34

  • 0.12% over 96.75 metres, starting at 181.25 metres

  • 6.56% over 1.2 metres, starting at 540 metres

  • 0.12% over 3.7 metres, starting at 606.3 metres

  • 0.67% over 3.6 metres, starting at 621.9 metres

Hole RK-14-35

  • 0.21% over 2.85 metres, starting at 524.35 metres

  • 0.9% over 3.3 metres, starting at 600.55 metres

Hole RK-14-37

  • 0.1% over 7.5 metres, starting at 386.5 metres

  • 0.12% over 13.5 metres, starting at 401 metres

  • 1.08% over 18.25 metres, starting at 456.8 metres

  • 1.96% over 3.05 metres, starting at 482.4 metres

  • 2.66% over 0.65 metres, starting at 499.3 metres

  • 1.24% over 2 metres, starting at 505.45 metres

  • 1.31% over 11.85 metres, starting at 522.4 metres

  • 0.17% over 5.8 metres, starting at 541.2 metres

  • 5.35% over 4.6 metres, starting at 569.6 metres

Hole RK-14-39

  • 0.9% over 3.55 metres, starting at 540.7 metres

True widths were unavailable.

Thirty of 32 holes sunk on the Arrow zone over two seasons have shown mineralization. But not so with the project’s regional drilling, where five holes proved barren. The company still hopes they’ll show pathfinder elements.

Boasting a working capital of $6.5 million, NexGen’s now planning its winter campaign.

Uranium Energy Corp releases PEA for Anderson project

An Arizona project amenable to conventional mining and heap leach recovery would require low capital costs to produce a total of 16 million pounds of uranium over 14 years, according to a preliminary economic assessment announced September 16 by Uranium Energy Corp NYSE MKT:UEC.

Quoting all amounts in U.S. dollars, assuming a uranium price of $60 and using a 10% discount rate, the study calculated the Anderson project’s after-tax net present value at $76.4 million and the internal rate of return at 42%. With uranium at $65 a pound, the NPV comes to $101.1 million with a 50% IRR.

The initial capex comes to $43.9 million with an additional $8 million for four years of pre-production including development drilling, designing the mine and heap leach operation, as well as permitting. Another $87.6 million would be needed through years four to eight as the operation makes the transition from open pit to highwall and underground mining.

Heap leach recovery would produce a resin which would be processed at Energy Fuels’ (TSX:EFR) White Mesa mill in Utah.

The project has indicated resources showing 15.5 million pounds uranium oxide-equivalent for an open pit and another 1.5 million pounds underground. The inferred resources have 2.5 million pounds eU3O8 in the pit and 9.5 million pounds underground.

Future studies will examine vanadium as a byproduct.

UEC operates the Palangana in-situ recovery mine, Hobson processing plant and advanced-stage Goliad and Burke Hollow projects in Texas. Last April the company completed a PEA for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado. UEC holds over 20 projects in the western U.S. and two more in Paraguay.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

June 7th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 31 to June 6, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

NexGen assays improve on radiometric results from Rook 1’s Arrow

Where previous radiometric results found uranium mineralization in seven of eight holes, the Arrow zone at NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1 project now shows mineralization in all eight, according to assays released June 2. The company interprets the results to reveal “multiple parallel, steeply dipping, high-grade uranium mineralization zones within broader mineralized zones” and “continuity of uranium mineralization between holes.” The best results include:

Hole RK-14-30

  • 2.94% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 6.2 metres, starting at 475 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 5.81% over 2.6 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 31 to June 6, 2014

  • 2.51% over 10 metres, starting at 508 metres
  • (including 5.84% over 0.5 metres)
  • (and including 10.26% over 1.7 metres)

  • 1.51% over 4.9 metres, starting at 549.4 metres
  • (including 12.5% over 0.4 metres)

  • 1.61% over 8.4 metres, starting at 570.6 metres
  • (including 8.57% over 0.25 metres)
  • (and including 11.6% over 0.35 metres)
  • (and including 5.1% over 0.3 metres)

Hole RK-14-27

  • 1.04% over 29 metres, starting at 235 metres
  • (including 23.5% over 0.4 metres)
  • (and including 9.42% over 1.1 metres)

Hole RK-14-21

  • 0.37% over 5.75 metres, starting at 517.25 metres
  • (including 5.77% over 0.25 metres)

True widths weren’t provided.

Some of the intercepts showed “very minor” intervals of elevated copper and lead but “potentially deleterious elements such as arsenic, selenium, cadmium and mercury generally constitute only background levels,” NexGen stated. “Arrow is essentially a mono-mineralic uranium deposit without noticeable deleterious metals or waste.”

Winter drilling at Rook 1 consisted of 17 holes totalling 7,442 metres but February’s Arrow discovery suddenly shifted focus to the new area. Arrow’s potential strike currently reaches about 215 metres, open in all directions and at depth, NexGen has stated. More drilling’s planned for summer on the property adjacently east of Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South.

Denison releases two high-grade Wheeler River assays, outlines summer plans

Also improving on previous radiometric results—and not for the first time at that project—Denison Mines TSX:DML released assays for two holes at Wheeler River’s new Gryphon zone on June 3:

Hole WR-556

  • 15.3% U3O8 over 4 metres, starting at 697.5 metres in downhole depth

Hole WR-560

  • 21.2% over 4.5 metres, starting at 759 metres

True widths were estimated at about 75%. The zone remains open in both strike directions and at depth, Denison stated.

In April the company released a batch of high-grade assays from Zone A of Wheeler’s Phoenix deposit, three kilometres southeast of Gryphon. A Phoenix resource is expected this month. But summer drilling will concentrate on Gryphon, which is slated for an 18-hole, 14,000-metre program. “Most of the drilling will consist of 50-metre step-outs along strike and down dip of the new discovery,” Denison stated. “Some of the holes will also complete drill fences 800 metres along strike to the northeast and southwest of Gryphon.” Work begins in mid-June.

With a 60% interest in the project, Denison acts as operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% while JCU (Canada) Exploration holds the remainder.

Drills will also turn at three other Denison interests this summer. Crawford Lake and Bachman Lake, two more Denison-operated projects, get follow-up work on alteration zones found last year and on anomalies revealed by last winter’s geophysics. Denison holds 100% of Crawford and 80% of Bachman, where International Enexco TSXV:IEC holds the rest.

On June 4 Enexco security holders approved their company’s takeover by Denison.

Exploration drilling at the McClean Lake project will test geophysical anomalies near the McClean South deposit. McClean Lake is held 22.5% by Denison, 70% by project operator AREVA Resources Canada and 7.5% by OURD Canada. In all, the four properties get about 21,000 metres of drilling.

Additionally, Denison has geophysics planned for five properties.

Last month the company announced a $15-million budget for Canadian exploration focusing on the eastern Athabasca Basin.

UEX reports drill results from Laurie and Mirror River JV

UEX Corp TSX:UEX announced drill results from its Laurie and Mirror River projects on June 5. Joint venture partner AREVA Resources Canada acts as operator on both, located about 35 and 55 kilometres respectively east of PLS.

Five holes totalling 1,803 metres at Laurie failed to find significant radioactivity or geochemical values. But they did confirm existence of three conductors at the unconformity and found a large fault zone which will be tested for possible up-dip continuation at the unconformity.

Nor was significant radioactivity encountered in three Mirror River holes totalling 1,579 metres, although one of two conductors was confirmed.

However the projects “remain vastly underexplored and have extensive untested EM conductors that warrant additional drilling,” UEX stated.

Another western Basin project, Erica now undergoes a ground tensor magneto-telluric survey to further examine a conductive trend found by previous geophysics.

All three projects are part of a seven-property, 116,137-hectare western Basin JV package held 49.1%/50.9% by UEX and AREVA Resources Canada. Major UEX projects consist of Shea Creek and Hidden Bay, the former also held 49.1%/50.9% with AREVA, the latter held 100% by UEX. In April the company reported six holes from Black Lake, a JV with Uracan Resources TSXV:URC.

On June 6 UEX announced shareholders re-elected their board and approved management resolutions.

Pistol Bay announces winter drill results from C-5

On June 4 Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST released assays for two of six holes from last winter’s 3,344-metre campaign at the C-5 property, where Rio Tinto Canada Uranium Corp acts as operator. Results for hole 14CBK003 showed:

  • 0.054% U3O8 over 1.5 metres, starting at 366 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 0.071% over 0.5 metres)

Located 50 metres northeast and along strike, 14CBK005 showed:

  • 0.041% over 0.32 metres, starting at 379.82 metres

  • 0.022% over 1 metre, starting at 385 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Due to high core loss, assays for 14CBK003 “are not considered truly reflective of the mineralization,” Pistol Bay stated.

The C-4, C-5 and C-6 properties comprise a JV with Rio covering 1,624 hectares adjoining the Denison/Cameco/JCU Wheeler River project. Rio has earned 55% by paying Pistol Bay $147,000 and spending $1 million on exploration so far. The mining giant’s subsidiary may increase its stake to 75% by spending another $1 million by year-end.

Pistol Bay also holds interests in copper-gold properties contiguous with Colorado Resources’ (TSXV:CXO) North ROK discovery and Imperial Metals’ (TSX:III) Red Chris mine in British Columbia, and in a graphite property in Ontario.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 24th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 17 to 23, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Kivalliq signs LOI with Westham Resources on Saskatchewan Genesis property

Its flagship Angilak project in Nunavut holds Canada’s highest-grade uranium deposit outside the Athabasca Basin. Nevertheless Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV was drawn into Saskatchewan with last January’s acquisition of the 198,763-hectare Genesis project. Now the company plans to bring in Westham Resources TSXV:WHR.P as a funding partner.

Under a letter of intent announced May 21, the capital pool company could acquire an 85% interest in return for 20% of its issued and outstanding shares, $1 million in payments and $5 million in spending over four years. The exploration commitment would include $1 million by year-end and another $1.5 million by August 31, 2016. Kivalliq would act as project operator for at least two years. Kivalliq director Dale Wallster would join Westham’s board.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 17 to 23, 2014

Among other conditions, Westham must raise a private placement of at least $2 million.

The property lies northeast of the Basin in the prospective Western Wollaston Tectonic Domain and “covers basement rocks known to host uranium mineralization,” the companies stated. Previous operators and government surveys “outlined over 30 uranium showings that include several uranium-bearing boulder trains.” Based on that data, Kivalliq has identified eight initial targets for geophysics, sediment sampling, soil sampling, mapping and prospecting to be completed by early autumn. The company hopes to follow with a “major” drill program early next year.

Last February Kivalliq reported results of ore-sorting and metallurgical tests from Angilak’s Lac 50 deposit.

UEC adds one Texas property, “releases” another

Still expanding its southern Texas “hub-and-spoke” projects, Uranium Energy Corp NYSE MKT:UEC announced a new acquisition May 20, this one with a permitting advantage. The Longhorn project’s aquifer exemption “eliminates a major permitting hurdle” for a potential in-situ recovery operation, covering the mining zone of interest and allowing for expansion, the company stated. The project’s historic legacy includes drill maps and over 500 logs of gamma radiation data.

UEC compiled the project leases and data “over the last 18 months at a very low cost.”

The company also announced a decision to “release” its Channen project following evaluation of last summer’s drill results.

In April UEC completed a preliminary economic assessment for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado. A week before that, the company announced its Burke Hollow ISR project in Texas had begun permitting.

UEC’s southern Texas holdings include the Hobson processing plant, the Palangana ISR mine, the Goliad development project and satellite properties. Of its nearly two dozen exploration properties, two are located in Paraguay and the others in the western U.S.

Unity picks up historic Uranium City region property

Twenty-six kilometres southwest of Uranium City, Saskatchewan, the Gulch Mine project comprises Unity Energy’s TSXV:UTY latest acquisition. Announced May 21, the 3,010-hectare property holds an historic, non-43-101 “reserve,” estimated by one source at around 928,796 pounds uranium oxide (U3O8) and by another at 1.65 million pounds. Gulch adjoins properties held by Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU, Red Rock Energy TSXV:RRK and CanAlaska Uranium TSXV:CVV.

A 100% interest will require $1.2 million in payments over 18 months from Unity, which must drill 3,000 metres within three years. The vendor retains a 2.5% gross overriding royalty. Unity may buy back two-fifths for $1.5 million, less any previous royalty payments.

Earlier this month Unity closed a 100% option on the 14,200-hectare Camsell project in the northwestern Basin. In April the company optioned out 50% of its Mitchell Lake project to Rio Grande Mining TSXV:RGV.

MPVC tests NW Manitoba for uranium, “young” uranium, radon and lead 210

As a rotary air blast drill arrived on site, MPVC Inc TSXV:UNO updated its Northwest Manitoba project on May 22. The RAB drill is intended to quickly test shallow targets found by geophysical, geochemical and prospecting work. Drilling will take place over the lake while ice persists.

Two holes of core drilling have failed to convince a gamma ray spectrometer that they contain significant uranium mineralization, MPVC conceded. But “samples of the core are now being tested for radon, ‘young’ uranium and lead 210 which, if present, could signal the presence of uranium mineralization at greater depths.”

The company also reported receiving a letter of support for its one-year drill permit application from the Northlands Denesuline First Nation.

In early May MPVC stated preliminary results from the project’s radon-in-water survey showed, “to the author’s knowledge,” readings second only to Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South.

Contract prices, spending cuts help Ur-Energy withstand uranium’s descent

While uranium sinks to eight-year lows, on May 22 Ur-Energy TSX:URE revised its guidance for this year and next. With mid- and long-term contracts in place, customers have committed to buy approximately 518,000 pounds U3O8 at an average of $51.10 a pound this year, for projected revenues approaching $26.5 million.

As for 2015, the company so far has commitments for 630,000 pounds at an average of $50.10, for projected revenues of $31 million. With spending controls as well as managed production, Ur-Energy expects “to maintain a positive cash position throughout 2014 and 2015.”

Although its processing facility has a nameplate capacity of two million pounds annually, the company plans to keep production tied to contract obligations in 2015 “unless the market demonstrates sustained price improvement.”

Ur-Energy began ISR mining at Lost Creek in Wyoming last August.

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Lakeland’s new Athabasca Basin blog brings a number of perspectives to uranium exploration and nuclear energy

May 5th, 2014

by Greg Klein | May 5, 2014

The uranium space continues to excite attention thanks to optimistic long-term demand forecasts and northern Saskatchewan’s hot area play. But informed investors have to consider numerous issues ranging from geology to geo-politics. A distinctive, possibly unique new online source of information comes from the Athabasca Basin blog.

Part of Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) revamped website, the blog will offer a range of perspectives, says company director Ryan Fletcher. “It’s for the board, the management team, the advisers and investor relations—whoever wants to contribute. Everyone will come at it from a different angle. For example Neil McCallum might want to explain a geological topic in layman’s terms.”

One of the first contributions comes from Lakeland adviser Canon Bryan. Clear and insightful, his inaugural post notes that while China and India continue to lead the world in uranium demand, 18 non-nuclear countries are planning or proposing nuclear energy.

Lakeland Resources’ new Athabasca Basin blog brings a number of perspectives to uranium exploration and nuclear energy

Canon Bryan

His insight comes partly from having held senior positions in several private and public companies including Texas miner Uranium Energy Corp NYSE MKT:UEC, which he co-founded.

“Most of the topics I’ll be writing about are related to the macro-economic market conditions of the nuclear industry, as well as the supply chain of the uranium and nuclear fuel sector,” Bryan says.

The Athabasca Basin blog will also feature news and updates about Lakeland as the company advances its growing portfolio of projects in and around the Basin.

See the Athabasca Basin blog.

Disclaimer: Lakeland Resources Inc is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Lakeland Resources.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 27th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 19 to 25, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium completes winter delineation, releases Patterson Lake South drill results

Delineation drilling, the focus of Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) winter 2014 Patterson Lake South program, has come to its seasonal end. While one rig worked outside the main mineralized area, four others sunk 82 infill holes, roughly 85% of the 30,000-metre campaign, since mid-January. As a result PLS now consists of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open at both east and west. Along with its April 24 announcement Fission Uranium released radiometric results for the last dozen holes. Two days earlier the company reported assays for nine others.

Ten of the 12 latest holes came from zone R780E, the third of the five east-west zones. With a total of 77 holes so far, R780E has about 855 metres in strike and up to about 95 metres in lateral width. Seven of the latest 10 holes showed substantial intercepts reaching the maximum possible reading of 9,999 counts per second on a hand-held scintillometer that measures radiation from drill core. Scintillometer results are no substitute for assays, which are pending for these holes.

R1620E, at the eastern extent and declared a new zone earlier this month after just one hole, now has a second which showed 38.5 metres (not true width) ranging from under 300 cps to 3,500 cps. Ironically for the discovery zone, R00E gave up just half a metre of 490 cps.

Assays released two days earlier included yet another PLS “best yet”—this time “the widest high-grade interval to date,” which helped PLS14-187 nearly equal a previously recorded best hole. This nine-hole batch marks the third set of assays, totalling 22 holes, for the winter campaign. Like the previous week’s dozen holes, all nine came from R780E. Some of the best results showed:

Hole PLS14-138

  • 0.2% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 34 metres, starting at 73 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 19 to 25, 2014

  • 0.4% over 3.5 metres, starting at 137.5 metres

  • 1.04% over 17 metres, starting at 170 metres
  • (including 2.88% over 4.5 metres)

PLS14-139

  • 0.15% over 30 metres, starting at 130 metres

  • 0.28% over 8.5 metres, starting at 199 metres

PLS14-140

  • 0.1% over 19.5 metres, starting at 22.5 metres

  • 0.28% over 7.5 metres, starting at 254.5 metres

PLS14-145

  • 0.13% over 27.5 metres, starting at 89.5 metres

  • 0.97% over 22.5 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 2.24% over 7.5 metres)

  • 1.34% over 2.5 metres, starting at 178.5 metres

  • 0.4% over 7.5 metres, starting at 203.5 metres

  • 0.22% over 8 metres, starting at 218 metres

PLS14-146

  • 2.18% over 47 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 4.3% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 14.27% over 2 metres)

  • 1.04% over 4 metres, starting at 237 metres
  • (including 3.64% over 1 metre)

  • 3.19% over 2 metres, starting at 254 metres

PLS14-147

  • 0.15% over 28.5 metres, starting at 115 metres

PLS14-151

  • 0.31% over 6 metres, starting at 125.5 metres

Best of the batch and second-best overall was PLS14-187:

  • 5.98% over 102.5 metres, starting at 63 metres
  • (including 27.2% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 12.93% over 10.5 metres)
  • (and including 14.12% over 6 metres)
  • (and including 16.92% over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 16.14% over 4.5 metres)

  • 2.59% over 9 metres, starting at 218.5 metres

True widths weren’t provided. “Mineralization is both located within and associated with a metasedimentary lithologic corridor, bounded to the south by the PL-3B basement electromagnetic conductor,” Fission Uranium added.

The $12-million winter agenda also calls for geophysics. And no, there’s still no word on when Fission Uranium might unveil its maiden resource.

Lakeland Resources acquisition expands Lazy Edward Bay project

Out of Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) portfolio of 16 uranium properties in and around the Athabasca Basin, Lazy Edward Bay has taken on greater prominence. A three-claim, 4,475-hectare acquisition announced April 24 expands the project to 26,375 hectares. The new turf also adds two conductive trends, giving Lazy Edward a total of six around the Basin’s southern margin.

Subject to TSXV approval, the 100% interest will cost Lakeland $5,000, 250,000 shares and a 2% gross revenue royalty.

Of the two additional conductive trends, the Ponderosa consists of two parallel graphitic trends, each about 2.5 kilometres long, Lakeland stated. Ground EM surveys and seven holes tested the trend in 1989, with more EM and another hole following in 2001.

The Jack trend extends from the original Lazy Edward property, tripling the trend to about 5.1 kilometres. In 2007 it underwent a ground fixed loop transient EM survey but hasn’t been drilled.

Historic work has sunk at least 53 holes on Lazy Edward’s six trends but, with each ranging between five and seven kilometres long, they remain under-explored. One hole on the Bay trend assayed 770 ppm uranium, along with anomalous pathfinder metals. Depths to the unconformity along the Basin’s southern edge range from zero to 350 metres.

“As a result of the historic and recent exploration on the property, all six trends are considered drill ready,” the company stated.

Among other projects in Lakeland’s portfolio is Gibbon’s Creek, a joint venture with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN that features surface boulders grading up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the highest radon readings ever measured in the Basin.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

Aldrin reports initial findings from Triple M’s initial four holes

With drilling suspended by snowmelt, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN reported preliminary results from the first four holes on its PLS-adjacent Triple M property. All four “intersected alteration, structures and breccia zones within a metasedimentary rock succession including elevated radioactivity counts in a graphitic fault zone,” the company stated on April 22. Assays have yet to come.

With less than 25% of the planned 4,000-metre program complete, the quartet tested the Forrest Lake fault. Aldrin plans at least four more holes over the same fault “moving towards the most intense part of the basement conductive anomaly” before starting on the Anticline target.

Drilling could resume on the 12,000-hectare property in as little as two weeks, the company added.

NexGen adds to eastern Basin holdings

The size of the property wasn’t divulged. Nor was its name. But NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE announced an eastside Basin acquisition and option on April 25. Subject to approvals, NexGen gets a 75% interest in five claims by issuing Long Harbour Exploration TSXV:LHC shares worth $135,000. NexGen’s option on the other 25% would require additional shares worth $45,000. Value would be calculated by the volume-weighted average for five days before closing. The property remains subject to a 2% NSR and 2% gross overriding royalty. The claims lie “in close proximity” to NexGen’s Thorburn Lake property.

On April 22 the company implemented a shareholder rights plan.

Late last month NexGen wrapped up winter drilling at its southwestern Basin Rook 1 flagship by announcing radiometric results for the project’s best hole so far.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 19th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 12 to 18, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Fission Uranium releases second batch of winter assays from Patterson Lake South

With its first set of Patterson Lake South assays since February 19 and only the second since winter drilling began in mid-January, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU reported 12 holes on April 14. Nine showed high grades and all came from zone R780E, the third of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre west-east potential strike that remains open at both ends. Among the best assays were:

Hole PLS14-125

  • 0.46% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 56.5 metres, starting at 119.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.91% over 6 metres)
  • (and including 1.71% over 2.5 metres)

  • 0.21% over 12 metres, starting at 225.5 metres

Hole PLS14-126

  • 1.3% over 8.5 metres, starting at 152.5 metres
  • (including 4.44% over 1 metre)

  • 2.41% over 5.5 metres, starting at 178 metres
  • (including 4.66% over 2 metres)

  • 0.96% over 5 metres, starting at 230 metres

Hole PLS14-128

  • 0.46% over 6 metres, starting at 167.5 metres

  • 6.74% over 4 metres, starting at 216.5 metres
  • (including 13.04% over 2 metres)

Hole PLS14-130

  • 0.47% over 17 metres, starting at 84.5 metres
  • (including 1.57% over 3.5 metres)

  • 3% over 4 metres, starting at 142.5 metres
  • (including 11.1% over 1 metre)

Hole PLS14-131

  • 0.22% over 22.5 metres, starting at 168.5 metres

  • 0.3% over 30.5 metres, starting at 199.5 metres
  • (including 0.93% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.34% over 21.5 metres, starting at 234.5 metres

Hole PLS14-132

  • 0.4% over 12.5 metres, starting at 72 metres
  • (including 3.28% over 1 metre)

  • 0.72% over 46 metres, starting at 134.5 metres
  • (including 2.41% over 10.5 metres)

  • 1.54% over 5.5 metres, starting at 216 metres
  • (including 2.74% over 3 metres)

  • 4.03% over 8 metres, starting at 226.5 metres
  • (including 8.48% over 3.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-133

  • 0.9% over 13.5 metres, starting at 167 metres
  • (including 8.37% over 1 metre)

  • 0.48% over 21.5 metres, starting at 184 metres
  • (including 1.03% over 5 metres)

Hole PLS14-136

  • 0.92% over 41 metres, starting at 119 metres
  • (including 2.59% over 8 metres)
  • (and including 3.69% over 2.5 metres)

True widths were unavailable.

The previous week Fission Uranium stated 70 holes had been completed out of a planned 100 winter holes totalling approximately 30,000 metres. About 85 holes, using four rigs, will concentrate on delineation. A fifth rig explores outside the main mineralized trend. The 31,039-hectare project’s winter budget comes to $12 million, including geophysics. No target date has been announced for the project’s highly anticipated maiden resource.

Macusani Yellowcake, Azincourt sign LOI to consolidate Peruvian properties

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 12 to 18, 2014

Azincourt’s Macusani project, on Peru’s Macusani plateau
and surrounded by Macusani Yellowcake, borders a Fission 3.0
property also called Macusani.

Under a letter of intent announced April 17, Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL would swallow up additional properties held by Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ but surrounded by Macusani in southeastern Peru. The deal would give Azincourt 68.35 million Macusani shares, representing about 30% of the company following the transaction. Macusani would then control over 949 square kilometres hosting “one of the largest undeveloped uranium projects in the world,” the two companies stated.

Macusani’s current package, on Peru’s Macusani plateau, hosts four low-grade deposits that offer low-cost mining potential, according to a December preliminary economic assessment. August resource estimates total 321,000 pounds U3O8 measured, 31.15 million pounds indicated and 30.08 million pounds inferred.

Azincourt completed the acquisition of its two Peruvian assets in January, before contracting technical studies on them. An historic, non-43-101 resource released in 2011 for Azincourt’s 4,900-hectare, now confusingly named Macusani project showed 5.69 million pounds measured, 12.52 million pounds indicated and 17.42 million pounds inferred. The company’s 9,600-hectare Muñani project has undergone airborne geophysics and ground work but has yet to be drilled. Prior to Azincourt’s acquisition, the two projects had lain dormant for two years following Fukushima.

On closing the deal Macusani anticipates a new PEA that would “easily” incorporate the new properties into its existing mine plan.

The consolidated turf would then surround some 51 square kilometres held by Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU. The Fission Energy spinco collaborates with Azincourt on their PLS-adjacent PLN joint venture.

Definitive agreement advances Denison’s acquisition of Enexco

Denison Mines TSX:DML moved closer to its planned acquisition of International Enexco TSXV:IEC with a definitive agreement announced April 14. Terms of the all-share deal remain unchanged from the LOI reported last month.

In early April Denison reported radiometric results from the Wheeler River JV’s newly discovered Gryphon zone. More radiometric results followed the next day from Enexco’s Mann Lake JV.

Forum announces initial drill results from Clearwater

Spring break-up brought an early end to the Clearwater project’s first drill program, but Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC identified “five major structural trends with reactivated graphitic shear zones [and] alteration,” according to an April 17 statement. Core from two holes showed “locally elevated radioactivity” up to 300 counts per second.

Nine holes totalling 2,310 metres tested widely spaced targets “including a number of gravity lows, radon anomalies and EM conductors both on strike and running parallel” to the PLS trend, the company added. Forum expects to have more detailed results by early June.

The program focused on the 9,910-hectare project’s northern claim, which borders the southwest of PLS and is slated for summer follow-up work. Clearwater’s southern claim, with conductive trends, radiometric anomalies and significant values for uranium in lake sediment, has yet to be drilled.

In late March the company resumed drilling at its Northwest Athabasca project, a JV with NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE, Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada. Forum holds other properties in Nunavut and the northeastern Athabasca Basin.

Fission 3.0, Brades report initial radiometric and VTEM results from Clearwater West

Fission 3.0 and Brades Resource TSXV:BRA reported initial interpretations of two airborne surveys over their Clearwater West project on April 15. A radiometric survey using patent-pending equipment and methodology found a cluster of anomalies on the eastern 10 kilometres of the property where historic data shows EM conductors, the partners stated. Ground prospecting will follow up this summer.

A VTEM survey suggests the property’s east side hosts EM conductors that might continue from the PLS property bordering to the north. More detailed evaluation will follow.

The project’s $700,000 first-year program will also include ground geophysics and geochemical surveys including radon measurements. Fission 3.0 acts as operator on the 11,835-hectare property. Brades holds a three-year option to earn 50%.

Western Athabasca Syndicate to expand Swoosh drill program

The four-company Western Athabasca Syndicate reported preliminary drill results from its Preston property on April 15. Five holes totalling 986 metres tested the Swoosh target, a six-kilometre corridor identified by gravity, magnetic and EM surveys, and coinciding with surficial geochemical anomalies, the alliance stated. The group consists of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY.

All five holes hit a hydrothermally altered and reactivated structural zone. A downhole probe found elevated radioactivity in three holes, including one interval of 802 cps over 1.95 metres (not true width) starting at 186.68 metres in downhole depth. Four holes reached depths between 200 and 275 metres. A fifth was abandoned due to poor conditions. More detailed evaluation is expected in May.

Backed by an expanded budget, drilling will continue at Swoosh until late April. The following month the syndicate will test two other targets, CHA and Fin. Athabasca Nuclear acts as operator on the 246,643-hectare property.

On April 14 Ryan Kalt formally became Athabasca Nuclear’s CEO, having already held the position on an interim basis. Kalt has been prominent in acquiring Basin properties, including Preston, and as a director shifted the company to uranium exploration. With a 21.25% stake, he’s also the company’s largest shareholder. On April 15 Athabasca Nuclear announced an advance notice bylaw.

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