Wednesday 23rd August 2017

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Posts tagged ‘u3o8’

Nevada’s new-era fuel

July 7th, 2017

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

by Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel: I would like to introduce Gary Musil, CFO and director of Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA. Hi Gary, it is a pleasure to talk to you again.

Gary: Likewise, always a pleasure to talk to you.

Isabel: To get started, tell us a little bit about your background and how you got involved with Belmont Resources.

Gary: Belmont was a client of mine, and in 1992 they asked me to get more involved by joining the board of directors and later as a full-time chief financial officer in 1999.

Isabel: Belmont Resources has two different locations that you are involved with. Could you tell us a bit more about these two?

Gary: Belmont holds 50% interest in a large uranium land package (12,841 hectares) in the northern Athabasca Basin near Uranium City, Saskatchewan, Canada. Approximately $2 million was incurred on the claims from magnetic, radiometric, electromagnetic and radon gas surveys through to a successful 20-hole diamond drill program totalling 3,075 metres. The project is available for a joint venture partner or acquisition. Belmont’s current focus is on its 2,760-hectare Kibby Basin-Monte Cristo Valley, Nevada lithium project.

Isabel: So your focus is on the Kibby Basin lithium project. What makes that project so appealing?

Gary: The demand and price of lithium continues to increase as we move into a new era of electric vehicles and other technology that is requiring lithium. In addition, we are near the construction of a large facility, the Tesla Motors Gigafactory #1, near Sparks, Nevada, which will be a huge consumer of the end product. Secondly, expansion of a large electric bus factory in California to the south will also see increased consumption of lithium production for batteries. Furthermore, our Kibby Basin hosts several key features that are similar to the nearby and only operating lithium mine in North America, the area at Silver Peak-Clayton Valley, Nevada.

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

Lithium assays from last spring’s campaign have
Belmont Resources returning for additional geophysics and drilling.

Isabel: What is the most exciting thing about the Kibby Basin property up to now—what work have you accomplished there?

Gary: We commenced last year with all the baseline work, such as a NI 43-101 geological technical report, followed by a ground geophysical survey and then a detailed gravity survey to map the central basin. This generated a 3D model of the basin which provided the coverage to enhance the potential of the Kibby Basin to host a lithium-bearing brine structure.

The basin model revealed the basin to be in the order of 4,000 metres deep and approximately 7.4 kilometres long. In June Belmont drilled two diamond drill core holes, KB-1c to 548 feet [167 metres] on the eastern basin-bounding fault and KB-2c to a depth of 1,498 feet [457 metres] in the playa-dry lake bed, in the area.

The company was pleased with the core sample assays, to discover the presence of lithium ranging from 70 ppm to 200 ppm lithium with 13 of 25 core samples assaying over 100 ppm lithium, indicating that the sediments could be a potential source of lithium for the underlying aquifers.

Isabel: What are your experiences working in the U.S.A.? It is known that a lot of lithium comes from China and we’ve heard Donald Trump wants to “make America great again.” Has there been any changes in regard to working on a project that could produce lithium in the U.S.A.?

Gary: Belmont’s original mineral project, going back over 30 years ago, was a joint venture in a silver-producing mine in Nevada. We usually contract out work, i.e. geologists, geophysics work, surveys, drilling contractors, etc., to local reputable contractors. This saves costs and develops a good working relationship with the state and county officials. Any changes from the federal and state governments in regards to working on a project that could produce lithium in the U.S.A. should be positive for Belmont Resources. We anticipate governments could add incentives to mining exploration and producing companies to encourage them to expand the mineral resources and sell the end products to factories being built in Nevada, rather than importing lithium and other minerals from foreign countries.

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

Thirteen of 25 Kibby Basin core
samples surpassed 100 ppm lithium.

Isabel: What are the plans for the rest of 2017?

Gary: Belmont’s next stage of evaluation will consist of carrying out a further geophysical survey, i.e. electromagnetic resistivity survey and possibly seismic surveys, of the property, which should generate higher aquifer probability targets for further drilling this year.

Isabel: How much money do you have in the bank right now?

Gary: Belmont recently completed a four-million-unit private placement at $0.05 per share complete with a two-year transferable warrant (eight-cent warrant in year one and 10-cent warrant in year two) which generated $200,000. We will continue to raise further financing in order to continue exploration of the Kibby Basin throughout the year.

Isabel: How much of Belmont Resources is held by the management?

Gary: Belmont’s management currently owns 5.5% of the issued and outstanding shares and is increasing its position as demonstrated in participation in the recently completed private placements, as well as exercising of warrant and stock option shares. Including friends, relatives and close associates, these holdings increase to over 25%.

Isabel: What do you like about the mineral exploration business?

Gary: The anticipation of drilling results and then the discovery of minerals in a new area is always exciting. Also, travelling to new areas of the world and meeting new people there.

Isabel: What is your favourite commodity and why?

Gary: Belmont has explored for silver, antimony, gold, uranium, as well as oil and gas. Lithium will be my favourite for years to come, as I see the uses of this commodity expanding, as technology continues to develop and expand along with it.

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

Gary Musil, CFO/director
of Belmont Resources

Fun facts

Your hobbies: Golf, cycling, hiking

Sources of news you use: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and CNN through TV and the Vancouver Sun/Financial Post newspapers

Your favourite airport: Vancouver International Airport and Phoenix, Arizona, as that usually means a golf vacation during the winter months

Your favourite tradeshow: Outdoor Recreation and Golf Show in Vancouver

Favourite commodity besides the ones in your company: Gold, especially placer gold

People you’d most like to have dinner with: Ha—Fred Couples, senior professional golfer; So Yeon Ryu, ladies’ professional golfer; Shania Twain, country music star; and of course having dinner with my wife in many new places in the world where we have been and not been to yet

If you could have a superpower, it would be: Healing

B.C. election: Inconclusive result puts focus on Green Party

May 10th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 10, 2017

What looks like British Columbia’s first minority government since 1952 will evoke plenty of speculation, not the least from miners. As cliff-hanger metaphors competed with seesaw comparisons throughout the night of May 9, the B.C. election came to an inconclusive result by ResourceClips.com press time. While the B.C. Elections website took most of the day and night off, CBC pegged the post-midnight results at 43 Liberals elected, 41 New Democrats elected and three Greens in the upper echelons (two elected and one leading, compared with just one seat last time).

B.C. election: Inconclusive result puts focus on Green Party

During the campaign all three parties professed support for mining, especially the continuation of flow-through tax credits. But the much more vexatious issue of permitting drew largely euphemistic responses.

Quoted by the Association for Mineral Exploration, NDP leader John Horgan pledged his party would address the uncertainty of permitting by working with Geoscience B.C., the B.C. Geological Survey and First Nations “to develop comprehensive mineral land use plans.”

In the same publication Green leader Andrew Weaver professed his commitment to fix B.C.’s “structurally broken” environmental review process, in which the “professional reliance model” has lost the confidence of First Nations and the general public.

Former mines minister Bill Bennett, who retired as the writ was dropped, reminded AME about his government’s inducements to native support, including royalty sharing and training programs.

But the mining-related issue that unexpectedly gained most prominence was thermal coal and its trans-shipment from the U.S. to Asia via B.C. The stuff “fouls the air. It fouls the oceans. It’s terrible for the environment,” Canadian Press quoted BC Liberal leader Christy Clark.

She spoke in response to the U.S. president’s 20% tariff on softwood lumber imports, most of which come from B.C.

Her proposed $70-a-tonne penalty would not only cripple thermal coal exports from the U.S., but also from Alberta, to the detriment of that province’s mines and this province’s ports. Clark’s comments didn’t acknowledge B.C.’s reliance—notwithstanding its hydro resources—on Alberta’s coal-generated electricity. That’s not to mention B.C.’s dependency on nuclear-generated power from Washington state. B.C. has banned uranium exploration.

Additionally Clark’s proposal would hammer the final nail in the coffin of Quinsam, B.C.’s last thermal coal mine. Hillsborough Resources suspended the Vancouver Island underground operation in January 2016 due to low prices.

A coal mining topic unacknowledged in the campaign was the election’s coincidence with the 25th anniversary of Nova Scotia’s Westray disaster, which killed 26 miners. Down Easterners marked that anniversary as a former director of mine-owner Curragh Inc, 83-year-old BC Liberal Ralph Sultan, swept to his fifth straight victory in the affluent riding of West Vancouver-Capilano.

Meanwhile preliminary results offer the Greens potential power that’s unprecedented for their party in Canada. All three projected Green seats are on southern Vancouver Island, also home to Canada’s sole Green MP, Elizabeth May. Apart from B.C., only New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island have Green MLAs, one each in those two provinces.

However B.C. Green leader Andrew Weaver stands apart from the other parties’ undistinguished professional politicians. A University of Victoria professor, he shared in the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize for his participation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

His influence, with maybe two other Greens, could be formidable. That might be especially true since this election will mark the first new government after the 2014 Mount Polley tailings dam disaster that challenged public support for mining.

Pistol Bay signs LOI on Confederation Lake property, expands airborne geophysics

May 5th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 5, 2017

Update: On May 8 Pistol Bay announced a further expansion of the airborne VTEM Plus survey, from 1,128 to 2,100 line-kilometres, covering a 40-kilometre length of the Confederation Lake greenstone belt.

An upcoming geophysical program has been extended to fly a potential land acquisition under consideration by Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST. The company announced a letter of intent on the 496-hectare Copperlode property, about four kilometres along strike from Pistol Bay’s Arrow zone in Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt. Having already assembled the area’s largest land package, the company plans region-wide, state-of-the-art exploration over neglected but VMS-rich ground.

Copperlode would bring Pistol Bay two more historic, non-43-101 estimates:

  • D zone: 32,600 tonnes averaging 7.58% zinc and 0.26% copper

  • E zone: 145,000 tonnes averaging 8.28% zinc, 1.02% copper and 24 g/t silver
Pistol Bay signs LOI on Confederation Lake property, expands airborne geophysics

Additionally, some historic, non-43-101 drill intercepts include:

  • B zone: 2.5% zinc and 1.68% copper over 6.3 metres

  • C zone: 0.21% zinc and 6.02% copper over 1.5 metres

  • Hornet zone: 7.56% zinc and 0.08% copper over 6.6 metres
  • 4.07% zinc and 1.13% copper over 5.03 metres

Hornet remains open at depth and along strike.

On finishing the region-wide airborne VTEM Plus campaign Pistol Bay may acquire an initial 65% option on Copperlode from Frontline Gold TSXV:FGC, which holds an option on the claims from another vendor. Pistol Bay would pay Frontline $26,000 and issue 450,000 shares over two years and spend $150,000 over three years. Another $50,000 and 300,000 shares would boost Pistol Bay’s stake to 80%.

Pistol Bay’s current Confederation Lake portfolio consists of 9,450 hectares with a number of historic estimates, including the 2007 Arrow resource on which the company began a 43-101 update last month.

Also last month, the company closed a $336,000 private placement that followed a $548,436 placement in March. April brought more money with $750,000 from a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary as part of its 100% option on Pistol Bay’s uranium properties in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.

Belmont Resources has drilling imminent for Nevada lithium

April 19th, 2017

by Greg Klein | April 19, 2017

In search of lithium-bearing brines similar to those of the Clayton Valley, 65 kilometres south, drilling could resume any day now at Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) Kibby Basin project. Having attempted sonic drilling in February, the company now has Harris Exploration Drilling and Associates mobilizing a track-mounted rig for an HQ program to possible depths of about 300 metres.

Belmont Resources has drilling imminent for Nevada lithium

A new drilling contractor brings considerable Clayton Valley experience
and proprietary techniques to Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin.

The contractor brings extensive Clayton Valley experience in recovering core from unconsolidated lakebed sediments and in testing lithium brine with Harris’ proprietary instrumentation, Belmont stated.

Based on last year’s gravity survey on the 2,760-hectare property, initial holes “are designed to test the eastern basin-bounding fault, where lithium brines are likely to well up in the structural zone, analogous to the concentration of lithium brines along the Paymaster fault in Clayton Valley, and to test the stratigraphy near the central axis of the basin,” the company added. “The holes will test for porous basin sediments, which could serve as aquifers for lithium brines.”

In Saskatchewan’s Uranium City region, Belmont holds a 50/50 JV with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT in the 12,091-hectare Crackingstone and Orbit claims.

Belmont also has international arbitration proceedings underway regarding the revocation of mining rights at a talc project in Slovakia.

During February and March the company closed private placements totalling $467,500.

Pistol Bay readies geophysics, resource update at Ontario’s Confederation Lake

April 12th, 2017

by Greg Klein | April 12, 2017

Taking to the skies to probe deeper underground, the first airborne survey in 20 years will bring state-of-the-art technology to Pistol Bay Mining’s (TSXV:PST) Confederation Lake greenstone belt land package. Geotech Ltd will carry out an initial 1,128-line-kilometre VTEM Plus campaign, the first phase of a belt-scale helicopter-borne program. That’s part of a multi-disciplinary approach planned over the next few years for Pistol Bay’s portfolio, at 9,450 hectares the largest holdings in Confederation Lake.

Pistol Bay readies geophysics, resource update at Ontario’s Confederation Lake

VTEM Plus penetrates deeper and offers better conductor resolution than previous VTEM systems, the company stated.

“We will essentially be exploring a new depth slice of this greenstone belt, with its numerous VMS deposits and occurrences, that has never been explored before,” said president Charles Desjardins. “This newer technology increases the chances of potentially finding a new zinc-copper-silver deposit like the Arrow zone or the former producing South Bay mine.”

Last week Pistol Bay announced an update had begun on Arrow’s 2007 resource, one of the portfolio’s historic estimates.

The company’s currently financed with a $548,436 private placement that closed last month and a recent payment of $750,000 from a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary as part of its 100% option on Pistol Bay’s uranium properties in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.

The Rio deal

March 29th, 2017

Cashed-up Pistol Bay Mining consolidates and updates Confederation Lake

by Greg Klein

From a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary comes money for an unprecedented campaign in Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt. That’s where Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST has region-wide exploration with modern methods about to begin on a VMS-rich area that’s previously seen piecemeal, unco-ordinated work with old school technology. President/CEO Charles Desjardins sees plenty of promise in his portfolio’s historic resources. But he also likes the blue sky possibility of a new discovery.

Funding the campaign will be $750,000 from Rio, along with this month’s private placement of $548,436. Proceeds go to the largest land package in Confederation Lake, a region of base metals deposits that Desjardins considers to be clamouring for up-to-date exploration.

Cashed-up Pistol Bay Mining consolidates and updates Confederation Lake

Deep penetration brings blue sky potential to Pistol Bay’s
Confederation Lake portfolio. (Photo: Geotech Ltd)

Rio’s portion comes as the giant exercises more of its 100% option on the junior’s C4, C5 and C6 uranium properties in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin. The deal originally called for $5 million by the end of 2019 and a 5% net profit interest to acquire the final 25%. Now Rio pays the $750,000 along with either $1.5 million by 2017 year-end, $2 million by 2018 year-end or $2.25 million by 2019 year-end, plus the 5% NPI.

“That’s less money than the original option, but I can create so much value with it now,” says Desjardins. “And I’m doing it without dilution.”

First item on the agenda—and long overdue, Desjardins believes—will be helicopter-borne VTEM Max, penetrating to depths of 500 to 700 metres. “There have been major Canadian discoveries over the last decade with this kind of geophysics,” he points out. “But very little of this belt, less than 5% of it, has been explored beyond 200 metres. There’s only one zone examined to 300 metres and that was with downhole geophysics by Noranda.”

He expects the first of three airborne campaigns to begin within four weeks. While Pistol Bay’s package comprises 9,450 hectares, “we’re going to fly this whole belt,” he adds. “I’m looking for something bigger, something that hasn’t been found.”

As for the deposits that have been found, they’re overdue for upgrading to 43-101 status. First priority is the polymetallic Arrow deposit, which has a 2007 estimate that Pistol Bay considers historic and non-43-101:

3% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 2.07 million tonnes averaging 5.92% zinc, 0.75% copper, 21.1 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

  • inferred: 120,552 tonnes averaging 2.6% zinc, 0.56% copper, 18.6 g/t silver and 0.4 g/t gold

5% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 1.76 million tonnes averaging 6.75% zinc, 0.79% copper, 22.3 g/t silver and 0.61 g/t gold

  • inferred: 51,631 tonnes averaging 3.86% zinc, 0.79% copper, 23.9 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

10% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 633,000 tonnes averaging 14.3% zinc, 1.11% copper, 31.7 g/t silver and 0.85 g/t gold

Desjardins expects about a month to redo the resource, incorporating another 20 holes.

About eight kilometres west of Arrow, the Fredart zone, also known as Copperlode A, has an historic, non-43-101 estimate showing 385,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver.

Roughly 24 kilometres farther west, the Dixie property’s historic, non-43-101 estimate comes to 136,000 tonnes averaging 14% zinc.

Estimates for other zones, all with historic, non-43-101 caveats, include:

  • Dixie 3: 83,000 tonnes averaging 10% zinc and 1% copper

  • Diamond Willow: 270,000 tonnes averaging 4% zinc

There have been major Canadian discoveries over the last decade with this kind of geophysics. But very little of this belt, less than 5% of it, has been explored beyond 200 metres.—Charles Desjardins, president/CEO of Pistol Bay Mining

Past work has left an extensive legacy of other data too. Historic records for the recently optioned Joy North property show intriguing electromagnetic and geochemical anomalies. Pistol Bay’s team has been poring over details of about 850 Confederation Lake holes sunk between 1962 and 2007. A Noranda database of rock chemical analysis, meanwhile, could offer insight into the belt’s VMS mineralizing process and help define zinc-copper targets.

Along with February’s Joy North option, Pistol Bay’s acquisitions continue with the Lucky 7 and Moth properties picked up this month. Now yellow metal shows its Confederation Lake potential with one 2016 grab sample assaying 13.84 g/t gold and 3.21% copper.

As for drilling, the already-permitted Joy North might be first, depending on the review of historic info. Eight other areas have permitting underway. The rigs will take part in Pistol Bay’s threefold near-term agenda: the Arrow resource, the VTEM Max and a drill program, all of which should fuel a steady news flow. “We’ve got lots of work coming up and, thanks to the Rio payment, money to do it with no dilution,” says Desjardins.

Apart from growing the existing deposits, he clearly believes in the potential for a new discovery. “The opportunity here is in consolidating the belt and exploring the whole thing at depth, which hasn’t been done. There’s lots of blue sky at Confederation Lake.”

Pistol Bay expands Confederation Lake package, adding gold to base metals potential

March 22nd, 2017

by Greg Klein | March 22, 2017

The largest portfolio in western Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt just got larger as Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST increased its holdings to about 9,450 hectares. Two claim groups, Lucky 7 and Moth, cover “a 53-kilometre length of favourable volcanic geology,” the company stated.

Pistol Bay expands Confederation Lake package, adding gold to base metals potential

Neighbouring Pistol Bay’s Garnet Lake and Garnet East properties, the 640-hectare Lucky 7 hosts a copper-gold sulphide zone that was drilled in 1980 and 2002. A zone of massive to disseminated sulphides, the Hilltop copper-gold zone, was trenched but apparently never drilled. One of two Hilltop grab samples taken last year assayed 13.84 g/t gold and 3.21% copper.

Five kilometres from Lucky 7, the 1,360-hectare Moth claims underwent at least 14 holes between 1970 and the mid-1990s, revealing widespread hydrothermal alteration and numerous cases of zinc and/or copper mineralization, Pistol Bay stated. One interval graded 2.86 g/t gold over 0.3 metres. Located two kilometres from the former South Bay zinc-copper-silver mine, Moth sits near the Confederation belt’s most accessible area.

[Assays] suggest that we might be getting into an area with a potential for gold as well as base metals. This is something that hasn’t been widely recognized before in the Confederation Lake belt.—Charles Desjardins,
CEO of Pistol Bay Mining

Assays from both properties “suggest that we might be getting into an area with a potential for gold as well as base metals,” said CEO Charles Desjardins. “This is something that hasn’t been widely recognized before in the Confederation Lake belt.”

Together, the two properties will cost $72,000 and 2.3 million shares over three years. Pistol Bay may buy half of the 1.5% NSR for $400,000.

Last month the company acquired an historic data set for its recently optioned Joy North copper-zinc project. Mostly consisting of drill logs and ground geophysics maps, the info will go into a digital database including drill information, geology, assays, rock chemistry, petrology and geophysics. Now under consideration is an airborne EM and mag survey to penetrate deeper than earlier systems and better discriminate bedrock from overburden conductivity.

Pistol Bay’s overall strategy is to apply modern methods and a regional approach to properties that had previously been explored individually by different companies using earlier techniques.

The company also holds the C4, C5 and C6 uranium properties in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin, where a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary advances towards a 100% interest.

On March 20 Pistol Bay closed a private placement totalling $548,436.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.

Pistol Bay Mining adds new property to Confederation Lake portfolio

February 16th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 16, 2017

Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST hopes to unlock one of the puzzles of western Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt with its 100% option on the Joy North property. The 64-hectare claim lies contiguous with the company’s previously acquired Joy group of claims, which include five mineralized VMS zones. Pistol Bay’s Dixie zone is located about 11 kilometres east of Joy North.

Pistol Bay Mining adds new property to Confederation Lake portfolio

The new property covers a 1,000-metre-long conductive zone where a geochem survey found anomalous zinc, copper and gold. The conductor’s stronger areas also showed stronger magnetic responses.

In 1970 a single 48-metre hole found metavolcanic rocks with the intense alteration associated with volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits. The hole also revealed calc-silicate rocks “suggesting the property may lie at the same stratigraphic horizon as the Dixie zone,” Pistol Bay stated.

The previously acquired Joy group includes the Diamond Willow zone, with an historic, non-43-101 estimate of 270,000 tonnes averaging 4% zinc.

Past drilling highlights from the other four zones have included:

  • Joy Zone: 3.1% copper and 0.2% zinc over 5.7 metres
  • 4.01% copper and 0.17% zinc over 3.35 metres

  • Creek Zone: 2.33% copper and 0.27% zinc over 0.95 metres

  • South Zone: 0.28% copper and 17.17% zinc over 0.6 metres
  • 0.17% copper and 8.36% zinc over 0.25 metres

  • Caravelle Zone: 0.13% copper and 21.6% zinc over 0.25 metres
  • 0.22% copper and 4.44% zinc over 1.1 metres

The new acquisition “includes one of the very few electromagnetic anomalies in the prolifically mineralized Confederation Lake greenstone belt that has not been satisfactorily explained by diamond drilling,” commented CEO Charles Desjardins. The geochemical anomalies also “make it a prime exploration target,” he added.

Subject to approvals, Joy North’s price tag comes to a total of one million shares and $40,500 over four years. A 2% NSR applies, half of which may be bought back for $500,000 and the other half for $1.5 million. Pistol Bay must also drill at least two holes totalling 600 metres. The company intends to drill the project this year.

Last month Pistol Bay updated plans for a regional, multi-disciplinary approach to its Confederation Lake portfolio, which hosts properties that were previously explored by different companies in an inconsistent manner.

In Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin, Pistol Bay also holds the C4, C5 and C6 uranium properties, currently being drilled by a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary earning a 100% interest.

Two days before the Joy North announcement, the company appointed geologist Jody Dahrouge to its advisory board.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.

Pistol Bay Mining appoints Jody Dahrouge to advisory board

February 14th, 2017

by Greg Klein | February 14, 2017

Geologist Jody Dahrouge has joined Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST as an adviser, the company announced February 14. With a CV spanning over a quarter of a century in Canada and abroad, he brings a successful background in base metals, industrial minerals, rare metals and uranium exploration.

Pistol Bay Mining appoints Jody Dahrouge to advisory board

Jody Dahrouge

As president of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, he and his staff have worked with a broad range of exploration and mining companies. Until 2007, Dahrouge served as president/COO of Fission Energy, a predecessor of Fission Uranium TSX:FCU. While there he played a key role in the acquisition of Waterbury Lake and Patterson Lake South, both of which yielded significant discoveries. Dahrouge has also served as a director and VP of exploration for Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE since 2000.

“We are excited to be able to benefit from the knowledge and expertise of Mr. Dahrouge and look forward to working with him,” said Pistol Bay CEO Charles Desjardins.

Last month the company outlined plans for a regional and multi-disciplinary exploration approach to its Confederation Lake portfolio, the largest land package in the western Ontario greenstone belt. Pistol Bay expects to file a 43-101 technical report on Confederation Lake’s Arrow zone by mid-March.

In Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin, the company holds the C4, C5 and C6 uranium properties, now being drilled by a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary as it advances towards its 100% option.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.

Pistol Bay Mining president Charles Desjardins discusses the VMS potential of his company’s portfolio in Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt

January 30th, 2017

…Read more