Friday 18th September 2020

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘u3o8’

Dev Randhawa leaves Fission Uranium

September 8th, 2020
Dev Randhawa leaves Fission Uranium

Dev Randhawa

by Greg Klein | September 8, 2020

Chairperson/CEO Devinder Randhawa “has elected to retire from management and the board of directors of the company and has moved to its advisory board,” Fission Uranium TSX:FCU announced early September 8.  Geologist Ross McElroy takes over as CEO while Darian Yip becomes chairperson.

Read more about this elsewhere.

Read some early Patterson Lake South history.

Now all we need are mines

August 28th, 2020

The Saskatchewan Research Council plans commercial rare earths separation in 2022

by Greg Klein | August 28, 2020

Saskatchewan to offer commercial rare earths separation in 2022

This nondescript building will host a $31-million commercial REE facility in two years.
(Image: Saskatchewan Research Council)

 

Given China’s near-monopoly of these critical elements, the news from Saskatchewan is enormous—a commercial-scale rare earths separation facility up and running in two years. But the development is hardly sudden. The operator already boasts longstanding experience and world-leading expertise with the almost arcane endeavour. Moreover the August 27 announcement just confirms one of the ambitious mining-related goals in the province’s growth plan released last November.

Work begins this fall in Saskatoon on a $31-million processing and separating plant funded by the province. Canada’s only such facility, it constitutes a major step towards expanding REE supply chains independent of China. Operating the Saskatoon plant will be the Saskatchewan Research Council, a Crown corporation with 75 years of experience in mining-related research and technology, over 290 staff, $91 million in annual revenue and about 1,500 clients in 27 countries.

Saskatchewan to offer commercial rare earths separation in 2022

SRC assets include the world’s largest potash, uranium and diamonds labs, and its research extends to the oil and gas sector as well as to environmental studies.

The SRC has already been separating rare earths at the bench and pilot scale level. Its REE team currently employs 10 full-time-equivalent positions. The plan calls for staffing to reach 24 highly qualified FTEs in the facility, along with at least 10 more in R&D.

“SRC is a leader in the development of REE extraction and processing technologies and has worked closely with individual mining companies in Saskatchewan, Canada and globally on the concentration of REE ore for over a decade now,” points out president/CEO Mike Crabtree. “We employ world-leading experts on REEs who literally wrote the book on REE processing.”

That book—Separation Hydrometallurgy of Rare Earth Elements—was written by Jack Zhang, Baodong Zhao and Bryan Schreiner, SRC scientists of international stature.

The SRC anticipates ore or crushed sand will arrive by truck or rail from producers in Canada and the U.S., as well as potential overseas clients. Location of the tailings facility has yet to be determined.

One obvious caveat, however, is the current lack of North American primary producers. The sole exception is California’s Mountain Pass mining and processing operation. Although operator MP Materials has professed its commitment to an American supply chain, the company has been exporting its entire output to China.

Saskatchewan to offer commercial rare earths separation in 2022

New separation capabilities bring considerable advantages
to rare earths projects in Canada and elsewhere.
(Photo: Saskatchewan Research Council)

Demonstrating a non-Chinese commitment, however, is Australia’s Lynas Corp. The company operates a refining and separation facility in Malaysia to process rare earths ore from its Mount Weld mine in Western Australia. Lynas plans to open a WA cracking and leaching plant by 2023 to quell Malaysian concerns about low-level radioactive material shipped to the country. In the U.S., meanwhile, the company and its American JV partner Blue Line signed a contract last month with the Department of Defense, which would fund studies for a proposed American plant to separate heavy rare earths from Mount Weld.

But the SRC plant opens doors for potential North American sources, which last year totalled measured and indicated resources of 2.7 million tons in the U.S. and over 15 million tons in Canada, according to U.S. Geological Survey data.

Fitting for the world’s second-largest uranium-producing jurisdiction, Saskatchewan will process rare earths from uranium raffinate as well as from bastnasite and monazite, the most common mineralogical sources of rare earths.

But the Chinese challenge remains formidable. Chinese domestic mining accounted for nearly 63% of last year’s global production, a drop from 70% in 2018 but a number that doesn’t include Chinese control over foreign sources. Moreover the country’s dominance of separation facilities and expertise extends its control to an estimated 70% to 95% of various points along the supply chain.

SRC is a leader in the development of REE extraction and processing technologies and has worked closely with individual mining companies in Saskatchewan, Canada and globally on the concentration of REE ore for over a decade now. We employ world-leading experts on REEs who literally wrote the book on REE processing.—Mike Crabtree,
president/CEO,
Saskatchewan Research Council

Trade and other geopolitical tensions have brought fears—backed by implied threats—that the country will “weaponize” its rare earths dominance, repeating the 2010 machinations that staggered non-Chinese manufacturing industries.

The elements are vital to clean energy, electronics, transportation, defence, medical equipment and other necessities. American concern about rare earths and other critical minerals has triggered a number of initiatives including the Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration with Canada announced in January and reaffirmed in June.

But encouraging as the Saskatchewan initiative is, it hardly constitutes a slingshot to the Chinese Goliath. That country’s advantages include seemingly bottomless government subsidies, free use of black market or conflict material, and the backing of a savvy totalitarian government, according to Clint Cox. Speaking in Vancouver last January, the analyst and rare earths specialist with The Anchor House warned that Chinese dominance can’t be underestimated.

Nevertheless, the Saskatoon facility can only encourage junior mining activity. “The juniors are definitely the place where the last crop of potential mines came from, and it looks like they might be the next out there,” Cox told his January audience. “There’s some out there today.”

Among other goals, the Saskatchewan Growth Plan calls for studies into extracting lithium from the province’s brines as well as from oil and gas wastewater. The plan also considers adding nuclear energy to the province’s electrical mix from small modular reactors. Earlier this month Alberta joined Saskatchewan, Ontario and New Brunswick in a memorandum of understanding to co-operate on SMR studies.

Read more about the Saskatchewan Research Council.

Mining Association of Canada CEO Pierre Gratton sees additional opportunities for this country’s resources

July 21st, 2020

…Read more

International Montoro Resources and Falcon Gold bolster their Red Lake presence

July 14th, 2020

by Greg Klein | July 14, 2020

Demonstrating there’s still ground to stake in this busy Ontario mining camp, two companies have seized the opportunity to expand their Camping Lake gold project. International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT and Falcon Gold TSXV:FG claimed another 1,200 hectares, increasing the property to 3,400 hectares. The expansion covers a mineralized fault zone found during last spring’s sampling and mapping program that confirmed historical gold-in-soil anomalies. Soil and till anomalies have led to discoveries by Red Lake explorers BTU Metals TSXV:BTU and Golden Goliath Resources TSXV:GNG.

International Montoro Resources and Falcon Gold bolster their Red Lake presence

Under an October 2019 agreement with Falcon, International Montoro may earn 51% of Camping Lake. Terms include spending commitments of $100,000 by October 31, 2020, and another $200,000 within the following year.

The companies plan a till sampling and analysis program similar to that conducted by Golden Goliath on its property immediately west of Camping Lake.

Last May International Montoro released an analysis of 535 soil samples taken from the company’s Wicheeda North property in east-central British Columbia, adjacent to Defense Metals’ (TSXV:DEFN) Wicheeda rare earths deposit.

International Montoro also holds the Serpent River property in Ontario’s Elliot Lake camp, where exploration has found polymetallic massive sulphide potential. Other holdings include the Duhamel polymetallic project in Quebec’s Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region and two northern Saskatchewan uranium properties held 50/50 with Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA.

Last week International Montoro announced Karim Rayani’s appointment as president/CEO/director. Currently CEO of Falcon, he brings 15 years of experience financing exploration and development projects in Canada and abroad. Rayani replaces Gary Musil, who’s spent 20 years with International Montoro and remains chairperson.

Also this month the company closed an over-subscribed private placement of $197,000.

The U.S. Nuclear Fuel Working Group warns of Chinese and Russian supremacy in domestic and exported nuclear energy capacity

July 7th, 2020

…Read more

Belmont Resources to begin summer program on historic southern B.C. gold property

June 23rd, 2020

by Greg Klein | June 23, 2020

Now that data on the new acquisition has been digitized and analyzed, this company’s ready to get boots on the ground, wings in the air and possibly drill bits turning. Since picking up the Athelstan-Jackpot property in southern British Columbia’s Phoenix-Greenwood camp earlier this year, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA has been busy compiling a GIS database, a process that involved “geo-referencing, digitization and interpretation of various layers of geological data, in addition to a 3D modeling exercise aimed at generating drill targets at several mineralized zones.” As a result, this year’s agenda calls for induced polarization and airborne imagery surveys, with a hoped-for drill program before the season ends.

Belmont Resources to begin summer program on historic southern B.C. gold property

IP would cover some or all of A-J’s nine mineralized zones with 100-metre linespacing reaching depths of about 300 metres to add detail to the 3D geophysical model. Planned for early July, an airborne low-level, high-resolution imagery survey would help locate and detail previous workings, showings and rock exposures over the entire property. Following that, first-pass drilling could test one or more targets.

Although “initially very excited” about the acquisition, president/CEO George Sookochoff said that having completed “the arduous task of digitizing, compiling and reviewing all the historic data, I am only now able to fully appreciate the tremendous potential the A-J property holds for the discovery and development of both near-surface and deeper gold deposits.”

Intermittent operation at the two mines between 1900 and 1940 produced about 6,979 ounces of gold and 8,234 ounces of silver from 38,665 tons of material, according to historic records. Historic, non-43-101 trench intervals from 2003 featured 6.6 g/t gold and 12 g/t silver over 3.7 metres. Other historic 2003 results graded up to 28.4 g/t gold and 166 g/t silver over 0.3 metres.

A-J forms part of the historic Phoenix-Greenwood camp roughly 500 highway kilometres east of Vancouver. Adjacently across the 49th parallel is Washington’s Republic mining district, where Belmont signed an LOI for the Lone Star property. Back on the B.C. side, the company optioned the Come By Chance claims last month, adding them to a regional portfolio that also includes the Glenora, Pride of the West and Great Bear claims, as well as the Pathfinder project.

Belmont also holds a stake in the Crackingstone uranium property in northern Saskatchewan and the Kibby Basin lithium property in Nevada.

Earlier this month the company offered a private placement up to $25,000. In May Belmont closed the final tranche of an over-subscribed placement that totalled $199,665.

Poll shows Canadians back sustainable production of critical minerals

May 13th, 2020

by Greg Klein | May 13, 2020

A Mining Week announcement from the Mining Association of Canada expresses public opinion on an issue of increasing prominence. A survey by Abacus Data shows almost 90% of respondents “like the idea of Canada being a preferred source for critical minerals and would like to see government take a number of steps to support this approach,” MAC reported.

Poll shows Canadians back sustainable production of critical minerals

Increasing demand, supply chain weaknesses, and rivalries in trade and geopolitics have heightened concern for raw materials necessary for the aerospace industry, defence, communications, computing, medicine and clean energy.

“China has been a major supplier of these minerals but Canada has an opportunity to play a larger role in this marketplace as customers look for products made to high environmental standards,” MAC stated, pointing to its Towards Sustainable Mining program.

Among the survey’s findings:

  • 88% of respondents want Canada to increase its role in producing critical minerals for world markets

  • 86% want to encourage international investment in Canadian critical minerals and metals companies that are sustainability leaders

  • 83% want to encourage Canadian production of critical minerals to compete with China

  • 81% want to promote interest in Canadian critical minerals by drawing attention to Canada’s high standards of sustainability

MAC commissioned the online nationwide poll. Conducted between March 3 and 11, it surveyed 2,600 people weighted according to census data. Abacus gave the results a margin of error of plus or minus 1.92%, 19 times out of 20.

Canada is a top five country in global production of 15 minerals and metals, including several critical minerals essential to new technologies such as cobalt, copper, precious metals, nickel, uranium. We have the potential to expand in lithium, magnesium and rare earths.—Pierre Gratton, president/CEO,
Mining Association of Canada

“More than a decade of Canadian leadership in responsible mining practices is giving us an additional edge, and we see more investors and customers examining how their suppliers approach environmental responsibility,” said MAC president/CEO Pierre Gratton. “The market is growing and Canada’s opportunity is clear.”

In January Canada and the U.S. announced their Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration, which the Canadian industry expects will attract investment and encourage further development of supply chains. The plan follows a number of American initiatives to reduce its dependence on rival countries, especially China.

MAC also pointed to the Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan, a federal-provincial effort intended to enhance competitiveness, innovation and native participation in mining.

“Canadians may not all have a detailed knowledge about the mining sector,” added Gratton, “but they can clearly spot the chance to leverage our advantages in terms of abundant resources and the high standards of responsibility that our industry is known for. They know that winning a bigger share of this growing market means more well-paying jobs and stronger communities.”

According to figures supplied by MAC, mining contributes $97 billion to national GDP and 19% of total domestic exports. Employing 626,000 people directly and indirectly, the industry is proportionally Canada’s largest private sector employer of natives and a major customer of native-owned businesses.

Update: Belmont Resources plans to expand portfolio in B.C.’s Greenwood camp, add nearby claims in Washington

May 11th, 2020

Update: On May 11, 2020, Belmont Resources announced a definitive agreement to acquire the Athelstan-Jackpot claims from Forty Ninth Ventures under terms reported in February. Earlier in May Belmont closed the final tranche of an oversubscribed private placement that totalled $199,665.

 

by Greg Klein | February 27, 2020

An international border runs through this historic mining region, but geology knows no such barriers. Two recently signed letters of intent would build Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) presence in southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp and extend into Washington’s adjacent Republic area.

Belmont Resources plans to expand portfolio in B.C. Greenwood camp, add nearby claims in Washington

Greenwood gave up plenty of gold despite using, by today’s standards, primitive techniques. Now Belmont hopes more sophisticated analysis will help rejuvenate regional mining. The company’s proposed Athelstan-Jackpot acquisition sits adjacent to the Republic district, where Kinross Gold TSX:K applied newly developed metallogenic models that led to discovery and mining of several epithermal gold deposits. Although a “similar geologic regime” applies to Greenwood, Belmont stated, previous exploration and development on the B.C. side of the border focused on skarn-type copper-gold deposits with little attention to epithermal-type gold.

Bringing impressive credentials for a more contemporary approach, president/CEO George Sookochoff comes from a mining family in Grand Forks, about eight kilometres east of Athelstan-Jackpot, and has an extensive Greenwood background as well as GIS database expertise. He’s spent years building a digital database storing more than a century of Greenwood geoscientific info. This digital library would allow him to assess the probability of regional epithermal gold deposits by searching for characteristics comparable with those in Washington, the company added.

The review would precede recommendations for a 2020 exploration program on Athelstan-Jackpot. Intermittent mining on the property between 1901 and 1940 produced around 33,200 tonnes averaging about 5.4 g/t gold and 6.3 g/t silver for approximately 6,324 ounces of gold and 7,378 ounces of silver, according to historic records. Trenching and sampling took place in 2003, with historic, non-43-101 trench intervals up to 6.6 g/t gold and 12 g/t silver over 3.7 metres. Other historic 2003 grades reached as high as 28.4 g/t gold and 166 g/t silver over 0.3 metres.

Maybe the cross-border geological interest spanning Greenwood and Republic attracted Belmont to a nearby former mine in Washington. Just two days after reporting the proposed Athelstan-Jackpot acquisition, Belmont announced an LOI to pick up Lone Star, in operation from 1897 to 1918 and 1977 to 1978. Using a 1.5% copper-equivalent cutoff, an historic, non-43-101 report from 2007 estimated:

  • indicated: 63,000 tonnes averaging 1.28 g/t gold and 2.3% copper for 2,600 ounces gold and 3.19 million pounds copper

  • inferred: 682,000 tonnes averaging 1.46 g/t gold and 2% copper for 32,000 ounces gold and 30.07 million pounds copper

Should the deal close, Belmont plans to compile a 43-101 resource and prepare an IP survey prior to infill drilling for a potential deposit upgrade.

A 100% interest in Athelstan-Jackpot would cost Belmont 200,000 shares on signing. After a year Belmont would issue another 200,000 shares, and also pay US$50,000 in cash or US$25,000 in cash and the equivalent of US$25,000 in shares. The vendor would retain a 2% NSR, half of which Belmont could buy back for US$500,000.

A 100% stake in Lone Star would call for C$25,000 on signing and 1.5 million shares issued in three installments over two years. An additional C$100,000 payment would follow a major financing to be completed by Belmont.

Other recent Greenwood forays have already strengthened the company’s regional standing. In November the company picked up the 45-hectare Pride of the West and Great Bear claims, following the October acquisition of the 127-hectare Glenora property.

Pathfinder, another Greenwood-area Belmont holding, underwent two sampling programs last year. Assays reached up to 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 2.07% copper and 45.1 ppm cobalt, along with other results as high as 29.2 g/t gold.

Greenwood sits about 500 highway kilometres east of Vancouver.

The company’s portfolio also includes a 75% interest in the Kibby Basin lithium project in Nevada and, in northern Saskatchewan, two uranium properties shared 50/50 with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Mining resumes under COVID-19 but faces slow return: GlobalData

April 28th, 2020

by Greg Klein | April 28, 2020

Mining resumes under COVID-19 but faces slow return GlobalData

 

As of April 27 some 729 mines worldwide remain suspended, down from more than 1,600 shutdowns on April 3. The numbers, released by GlobalData, reflect government decisions to declare the industry an essential service, as well as implementation of new health standards and procedures. Those efforts, often involving staff reductions, contribute to “a slow return for the industry,” stated the data and analytics firm.

“Silver production is currently being severely damaged by lockdown measures,” pointed out GlobalData mining analyst Vinneth Bajaj. “As of 27 April, the equivalent of 65.8% of annual global silver production was on hold. Silver mining companies such as First Majestic, Hochschild, Hecla Mining and Endeavour Silver have all withdrawn their production guidance for 2020 in the wake of the outbreak.

Mining resumes under COVID-19 but faces slow return GlobalData

“Progress has also been halted on 23 mines under construction, including the US$5.3-billion Quellaveco copper mine in Peru, which is one of the world’s biggest copper mines currently under development…. In Chile, while a lockdown is not in force, Antofagasta has halted work on its Los Pelambres project and Teck Resources has suspended work on the Quebrada Blanca Phase II mine.”

Jurisdictions that have lifted suspensions include Quebec, India, Argentina, Zimbabwe and South Africa, GlobalData added. Countries with government-ordered lockdowns still in force include Bolivia (until April 30), Namibia (May 4), Peru (May 10) and Mexico (May 30).

At least one Mexico operator, Argonaut Gold TSX:AR, plans to re-open on May 18 under an exception for businesses operating in municipalities with few or no cases of COVID-19.

Quebec’s resumption of mining drew strong criticism from Makivik Corporation, which represents the Inuit of the province’s Nunavik region.

“Makivik will not entertain the opening of any mines at this time in Nunavik. This is very dangerous,” said corporation president Charlie Watt on April 17. “The Inuit-elected officials in the communities and in the different regional organizations need to be heard and need to make the decisions and call the shots.”

One day later production resumed at Glencore’s Raglan nickel mine. The company stated that Nunavik authorities have banned travel between the mine and regional villages to protect the local population. Local workers stay home with compensation, while the mine employs workers from the south, including Inuit who live in the south.

Without question this is taking a toll on all of our mines and service/supply companies.—Ken Armstrong, NWT and
Nunavut Chamber of Mines

Six mines still operating in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories use similar staffing precautions. “The mines are operating with reduced workforces which they must fly in by charter from as far away as eastern Canada,” said NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines president Ken Armstrong. “To protect vulnerable northern communities from the virus they have sent their local employees home with pay and they are maintaining costly and unplanned virus protection measures.”

Meanwhile Labrador politicians expressed concern about renewed operations at Champion Iron’s (TSX:CIA) Bloom Lake mine on the Quebec side of the Labrador Trough. On April 28 VOCM radio reported that MP Yvonne Jones asked the company to avoid the Wabush airport in her riding and transport employees entirely through Quebec. Member of the House of Assembly Jordan Brown said contractors were making unnecessary trips to the Newfoundland and Labrador side.

Another pandemic-caused Quebec mining suspension will stay on care and maintenance due to market forces. Renard owner Stornoway Diamond stated, “Despite positive signs in the diamond market in early 2020, the recent COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the entire marketing chain and diamond price collapse.”

Prior to the suspension, Renard operated only through creditor support.

Another diamond casualty has been the Northwest Territory’s Ekati mine, which suspended operations last month. Majority owner Dominion Diamond Mines received insolvency protection on April 22.

Discovered in 1991 and opened in 1998, Ekati “provided nearly 33,000 person-years of employment, and $9.3 billion in business spending, with over half the benefits (51% of jobs and 69% of spending) going to northern residents and businesses,” the Chamber stated. “Billions of dollars in various taxes and royalties have also been paid to public and indigenous governments by the mine.”

U.S. calls for expanded domestic uranium supply, nuclear R&D and infrastructure exports

April 23rd, 2020

by Greg Klein | April 23, 2020

US calls for expanded domestic uranium supply, nuclear R&D and foreign infrastructure competition

Nuclear energy provides about 20% of American electricity,
serves vital military purposes and offers geopolitical opportunities.

 

The strategy vows to pull the American industry “back from the brink of collapse and restore our place as the global leader in nuclear technology.” An advisory group established by U.S. President Donald Trump last July has issued recommendations to revive the country’s nuclear supply chain, end foreign reliance, encourage R&D, and compete globally with Russia and China to supply nuclear energy infrastructure.

Stating the U.S. Congress “has provided broad bipartisan and bicameral support for U.S. nuclear energy,” the Nuclear Fuel Working Group starts with proposals for a revitalized mining, milling and conversion chain. In addition to streamlined permitting and licensing, the report calls for government purchases of uranium to expand the national reserve. Such quantities would “directly support the operation of at least two U.S. uranium mines and the re-establishment of active domestic conversion capabilities.”

The working group estimates the reserve would need 17 to 19 pounds of U3O8 beginning this year and domestic conversion providing 6,000 to 7,500 tons of UF6 beginning no later than 2022. Beginning possibly in 2023, 25% of domestic enrichment should be available for defence.

The military needs low-enriched uranium to produce tritium for nuclear weapons and highly enriched uranium to fuel navy nuclear reactors. Current stockpiles hold sufficient uranium to 2041 for weapons and into the 2050s for navy propulsion.

The report also foresees the development of micro-nuclear reactors for military bases in the U.S. and abroad, strategically ending their dependence on the grid. “In a future of increasingly electrified warfare, power delivery becomes increasingly critical to mission success.”

A far-reaching goal would enhance international stature by competing with Russia and China to install nuclear energy globally. “Establishment of nuclear infrastructure incorporates large-scale cross-cutting economic, security and geopolitical relationships between the purchasing nation and the technology-providing nation for the ensuing 100 years,” the working group points out. American neglect “has empowered Russia and China to establish long-term relationships with nations, inimical to U.S. national interests.”

Using state-owned and supported enterprises, the rivals bolster their geopolitical advantage.

Russia—a nation that has “weaponized” its energy supply as an instrument of coercion—dominates nuclear markets. Russia is advancing its economic and foreign policy influence around the world with $133 billion in foreign orders for reactors, with plans to underwrite the construction of more than 50 reactors in 19 countries. China, a strategic competitor that uses predatory economics as a tool of statecraft, is currently constructing four reactors abroad, with prospects for 16 more reactors across multiple countries, in addition to the 45 reactors built in China over the past 33 years, and the 12 reactors currently under construction in China.

Meanwhile, the United States is entirely absent from the global new build nuclear reactor market with no foreign orders. The United States is missing out on a nuclear reactor market that the U.S. Department of Commerce estimates is valued at $500 billion to $740 billion over the next 10 years.

Nowhere are the predatory tactics of state-owned enterprises more evident than in the realm of export financing.—U.S. Nuclear Fuel Working Group

The group urges American financing institutions to support the civilian industry against foreign state financing. “Nowhere are the predatory tactics of state-owned enterprises more evident than in the realm of export financing.” The report also encourages expanded, government-funded R&D in co-operation with private projects, along with education and training.

“The decline of the U.S. industrial base in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle over the past few decades has threatened our national interest and national security,” commented U.S. Secretary of Energy Dan Brouillette. “As a matter of national security, it is critical that we take bold steps to preserve and grow the entire U.S. nuclear energy enterprise.”

Predictably, the report drew praise from U.S. producers. With two mines and a mill, Energy Fuels TSX:EFR noted it’s the country’s biggest uranium producer “and holds more uranium production capacity and more permitted uranium resources than any other U.S. company.” Another domestic producer, Ur-Energy TSX:URE operates the Lost Creek ISR mine and moves its Shirley Basin project through advanced licensing.

In the wake of pandemic-caused mining suspensions around the world, uranium prices have surged past $33 a pound from approximately $27.35 at the end of March.