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Posts tagged ‘Strathmore Minerals Corp (STM)’

Athabasca Basin and beyond

June 1st, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 25 to 31, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Fission/Alpha outdo their best R00E-zone assay at PLS

Having previously announced their best interval yet from Patterson Lake South’s R00E zone on May 16, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW announced an even better assay on May 27: 8.57% U3O8 over 20.5 metres. Results for two closely spaced infill holes show:

Hole PLS13-059

  • 3.61% U3O8 over 6.5 metres, starting at 55.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 8.99% over 2.5 metres)
  • 8.57% over 20.5 metres, starting at 65.5 metres
  • (including 17.78% over 9.5 metres).

Hole PLS13-041

  • 0.13% over 5 metres, starting at 63.5 metres
  • 5.54% over 13.5 metres, starting at 83.5 metres
  • (including 17.08% over 3.5 metres).

Additionally hole PLS13-058, 10 metres north of a hole reported in November, showed:

  • 0.11% over 4 metres, starting at 63.5 metres
  • 0.18% over 17 metres, starting at 70.5 metres.

True widths weren’t available.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere

Last winter’s drilling continues to produce
high-grade assays for Patterson Lake South.

The results show mineralization is continuous for 120 metres along strike and open in both directions, the 50/50 joint venture partners reported. “We now have high-grade intersections in both the western and eastern areas of the zone, which demonstrates the expansive nature of the mineralization at R00E,” stated Fission president/COO Ross McElroy. “The spectacular quality of these results is further proof that the zone hosts high grades similar to those we’ve found at zone R390E.”

The previous week the JV partners announced a $6.95-million summer program for their celebrated flagship.

Fission/Alpha bolster their teams

The JV partners expanded their staff too. On May 29 Alpha announced two appointments to its advisory board. Charles E. Roy brings over 30 years of experience with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO, where he helped supervise seven discoveries.

Alan R. Graham, a former New Brunswick minister of natural resources and energy, has served on the Atomic Energy Control Board and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. He was “involved in the permitting and oversight of nearly all of the producing uranium mines in the Athabasca Basin,” Alpha stated.

Fission followed two days later with two appointments of its own. Director William V. Marsh spent 15 years working on drilling programs for Chevron. He was a director of Predator Capital, Wolf Capital and, up to its $35.18-million sale to Green Dragon Gas in 2008, Pacific Asia China Energy.

Executive advisory board member Anthony Milewski is a senior adviser to Reuben Brothers Resources, a principal at Black Vulcan Resources and a director of several private and public resource companies who has “particular interest in physical uranium trading and industry supply and demand dynamics,” Fission stated.

Yellowjacket now Athabasca Nuclear Corp, raises $310,160

The company previously known as Yellowjacket Resources TSXV:YJK announced AGM results on May 30, including a new name: Athabasca Nuclear Corp TSXV:ASC. In addition, shareholders appointed Ryan Kalt chairman, with director Tim Termuende taking his place on the audit committee.

The company also completed the first tranche of a $600,000 private placement announced April 30, raising $310,160 through 2.58 million units at $0.12. Each unit consists of one share and a warrant for a half share. Each entire warrant allows a share purchase for $0.20 for 18 months. Kalt nabbed 1.6 million units, increasing his stake to about 22.3% of the company’s outstanding shares.

Allied forces airborne over PLS region

[Lucky Strike and Noka Resources] bring valuable technical expertise, proven management teams and financial capital to help create synergies in the field and corporately. Our geological teams plan to employ the refined exploration methodology that led to the Alpha/Fission PLS discovery to further increase our chances of making a new discovery while saving costs and time.—Jim Pettit, director of
Skyharbour Resources

Following the May 24 announcement from then-Yellowjacket/now-Athabasca Nuclear, three more companies announced their participation in a joint geophysical survey on their contiguous PLS-area properties. Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN and Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC each issued separate statements this week saying the VTEM-Plus system/magnetic gradiometer survey was underway. Citing Alpha’s 43-101 technical report filed in April, Aldrin stated the Alpha/Fission team used a similar survey to define conductors associated with their high-grade, near-surface PLS intercepts.

In a statement accompanying his May 27 news release, Skyharbour director Jim Pettit referred to recently announced earn-ins with Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY and Noka Resources TSXV:NX. The partners “bring valuable technical expertise, proven management teams and financial capital to help create synergies in the field and corporately,” Pettit explained. “Our geological teams plan to employ the refined exploration methodology that led to the Alpha/Fission PLS discovery to further increase our chances of making a new discovery while saving costs and time. We believe this partnership and structure offer the best prospects for vectoring in on a new uranium discovery in the Athabasca region while at the same time mitigating company-specific risk.”

Zadar options five more projects, appoints adviser

In a deal including over $15 million in exploration data, Zadar Ventures TSXV:ZAD optioned an additional five Basin properties from a subsidiary of Canterra Minerals TSXV:CTM. The package totals 67,561 hectares, Zadar stated on May 29. Four projects called Pasfield Lake, Stony Road, Riverlake and Highrock live in the eastern Basin, while the west-side West Carswell property lies 11 kilometres from Shea Creek, the Basin’s third-largest resource, a 49% UEX Corp TSX:UEX and 51% AREVA Resources Canada project. All five properties have seen geophysical work and drilling.

In return Zadar pays $50,000 and issues Canterra two million shares. Canterra also gets a 2% NSR on each property, half of which Zadar may buy back for $1 million per project.

On May 30 Zadar announced the appointment of Jeremy Brett to its advisory board. A senior geophysicist with MPH Consulting, Brett’s 18 years of experience includes uranium exploration in the Athabasca, Thelon, Baker Lake and Otish basins.

Ashburton readies Sienna North and West campaign, drops CanAlaska option

Ashburton Ventures TSXV:ABR announced on May 30 Phase I plans for its Sienna North and West projects in the PLS area. The program calls for surveying and cutting grids, scintillometer tests, soil sampling, radon surveys and float prospecting. Work is expected to begin within weeks.

The news release suggested the company might also participate in the joint airborne survey now being conducted for Athabasca Nuclear, Skyharbour, Aldrin and Forum.

Not solely fixated with uranium, on May 28 Ashburton announced it staked claims adjacent to Doubleview Capital’s TSXV:DBV Hat copper-gold property in northwestern British Columbia. At the same time Ashburton said it was pulling out of an option to acquire two more PLS-area properties from CanAlaska Uranium TSX:CVV.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 25th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 18 to 24, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Alpha/Fission plan $6.95-million campaign for Patterson Lake South

A review of uranium activity from Saskatchewan and beyond

With three rigs, three barges and $6.95 million, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW have a busy summer planned for Patterson Lake South. The 44-hole, 11,000-metre campaign announced May 21 will focus on delineating and expanding three zones of high-grade, near-surface uranium mineralization. Additional targets southwest and northeast of the 850-metre trend come courtesy of a radon survey. Ground geophysics will follow up on two “highly prospective” areas spotted by an airborne survey over the property’s southwest and southeast areas. The agenda also includes environmental baseline studies and sampling for metallurgical tests.

The 50/50 joint venture partners patted each other on the back for finding mineralization in 82% of their targets during a winter campaign that attracted widespread attention in and around the Athabasca Basin’s southwestern rim. Their discoveries sit 3.8 kilometres to 4.6 kilometres from one of the Basin’s largest known high-grade boulder fields.

Companies collaborate on PLS-region flyover

Six companies are pooling their money to fund a joint airborne geophysical survey in the PLS area. A May 24 announcement from Yellowjacket Resources TSXV:YJK said Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK, Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Aldrin Resources TSXV:ALN, Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC and Canadian International Minerals TSXV:CIN will join Yellowjacket on the study that begins May 26.

Yellowjacket will focus a 2,000-line-kilometre VTEM-Plus time domain system and 2,000-line-kilometre radiometric survey on parts of its 83,600-hectare Preston Lake project 26 kilometres southeast of the PLS discovery area. VTEM-Plus will search for basement conductors similar to the structures hosting the PLS discoveries while radiometrics will hunt down uranium boulder trains and in-situ mineralization. Although reports will come in daily, full results along with interpretation are scheduled for late July.

Historic Preston Lake work found anomalous uranium in lake sediment, as well as graphitic faults associated with sulphides and anomalous radioactivity. Rock samples of up to 5.4 parts per million uranium might indicate “either the down-ice glacial transport of uranium boulders from source or an in-situ source of uranium,” Yellowjacket stated.

The company’s Preston Lake and Patterson East properties total over 158,200 hectares, making Yellowjacket the PLS area’s largest claim holder. YJK also holds six other Basin properties. On the agenda for its May 29 AGM is a proposed name change to Athabasca Nuclear Corp. (Update: On June 6, 2013, Yellowjacket Resources began trading as Athabasca Nuclear Corp TSXV:ASC.)

We have a plan in place to attack this as a team. With the three companies combined we have a number of highly qualified geologists who have collectively been up in this part of Canada for a long time, so we have many, many years of exploration expertise behind us.—Jordan Trimble, Skyharbour Resources manager of corporate development and communications

Survey participant Skyharbour benefits from the money and expertise of two additional companies, SYH manager of corporate development and communications Jordan Trimble points out. The earn-ins announced last week allow Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY and Noka Resources TSXV:NX each a 25% interest in Skyharbour’s portfolio of seven Basin properties, six in the PLS region. In return Lucky Strike and Noka each pay Skyharbour $100,000 and fund $500,000 of exploration a year for two years.

“In this market especially, the financial capital they’re providing is hugely beneficial,” Trimble says. “We have a plan in place to attack this as a team. With the three companies combined we have a number of highly qualified geologists who have collectively been up in this part of Canada for a long time, so we have many, many years of exploration expertise behind us. This is just the start of the program. There’ll be lots more news to come.”

UEX offers $3.175-million private placement

Already holding about $10.6 million in cash, UEX Corp TSX:UEX announced on May 24 a private placement of 6.35 million flow-through shares at $0.50 for proceeds of $3.175 million. An additional 1.85 million flow-through shares may be issued under the same terms should Cameco Corp TSX:CCO exercise its right to maintain an approximately 22.58% interest in UEX. The company hopes to close the placement by June.

UEX holds 17 Basin projects totalling 264,363 hectares including its 49.9% interest in Shea Creek, the Basin’s third-largest uranium resource. The UEX portfolio includes nine other JVs with AREVA and one with both AREVA and Japan-Canada Uranium (JCU). UEX holds a 100% interest in the other six.

NexGen hires ex-Hathor/Rio geos, plans Radio drill campaign

NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE snagged more expertise with two new hires announced May 22. Senior geologist James Sykes moved from Denison Mines TSX:DML to Hathor Exploration and from Hathor to Rio Tinto when the latter bought Hathor and its Roughrider deposit in 2011 for $654 million. Sykes is credited with building the 3D geological model of the Roughrider system that led to the discovery of the Roughrider East and Far East deposits.

Exploration geologist Matthew Schwab has a similar background. A member of the Hathor team that explored Roughrider and defined its mineralized zones, he also comes to NexGen via Rio.

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Athabasca Basin updated

May 18th, 2013

A review of Saskatchewan uranium activity from May 11 to 17, 2013

by Greg Klein

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More high-grade, near-surface results from Fission/Alpha’s Patterson Lake South

The best assay yet from Patterson Lake South’s R00E zone hit the news on May 16. That’s when the Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW joint venture reported nine more holes from last winter’s 46-hole program. Some highlights include:

  • 4.8% U3O8 over 22 metres, starting at 67.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 20.73% over 4 metres)
  • 3.56% over 18 metres, starting at 75.5 metres
  • (including 11.95% over 4.5 metres)
  • 1.93% over 18.5 metres, starting at 64.5 metres
  • (including 8.04% over 2.5 metres)
  • 0.87% over 10.5 metres, starting at 62 metres
  • (including 2.01% over 3.5 metres)
  • 0.23% over 21 metres, starting at 64 metres.

True widths weren’t available. Further assays are pending.

The shallowest of the project’s three discovery zones, R00E shows continuous mineralization for 120 metres of strike and remains open in all directions. The 50-50 partners consider it a priority for next season’s drilling on the property that caused so much activity in and around the Athabasca Basin’s southwestern rim.

Noka, Lucky Strike earn-ins finance Skyharbour exploration in PLS region

Two option agreements have Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH financed to explore one of the PLS region’s largest land packages. The company granted Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY and Noka Resources TSXV:NX each a 25% earn-in on seven properties totalling 161,755 hectares. In deals announced May 14 and 16 respectively, each company pays Skyharbour $100,000 and funds $500,000 of exploration a year over two years. Noka issues Skyharbour 640,000 shares, while Lucky Strike issues the optionor two million shares. Skyharbour remains project operator and retains a 2% NSR on approximately 46,000 hectares the company staked directly while a vendor holds a 2% NSR on the rest of the package.

We had our foot to the pedal to do these deals with Noka and Lucky Strike so we can get to work without having to go back to the market.—Jordan Trimble, manager of corporate development and communications for
Skyharbour Resources

Events have moved quickly since March, when the company announced its entry into the region. “Now that we’ve brought in these two partners we’ve recuperated the $200,000 all-in costs in the initial outlay, we have a 10% equity position in both companies and their work commitment is half a million each for a total of $1 million a year for two years,” says Jordan Trimble, Skyharbour’s manager of corporate development and communications. The seven properties involved in the agreements include Wheeler, on the Basin’s eastern flank.

But exploration will focus on the PLS area, starting with a joint airborne survey that will fly properties held by Skyharbour and at least three other companies. “Given that we have such a large land package, the most effective way to do the geophysics is to put together a team to share expenses,” Trimble says.

He expects the survey to take two or three weeks, followed by a few weeks of interpretation and a summer of fieldwork. “You can work there until October and then winter is the best time to drill.”

He sees other advantages too. “We’ll be using the same methodology that Alpha and Fission employed. They spent the last four or five years refining the exploration methodology in this area. It’s unique because it’s outside the Basin. If you read their technical report, they have a very refined process and specific geophysical targets that they look for in conjunction with radon anomalies and boulder fields, etc. Given that we don’t have to re-invent the wheel, we’re hoping to have drill targets by the end of the year.”

He adds, “We had our foot to the pedal to do these deals with Noka and Lucky Strike so we can get to work without having to go back to the market.”

Alpha’s PLS discovery team looks north

While Fission toils as PLS project operator, the Alpha team has turned its attention farther north. Along with JV partner Acme Resources TSXV:ARI, Alpha’s studying reports from previous operators on their Skull Lake claim adjacent to the former Cluff Lake mine, which gave up 60 million pounds of uranium by 2005.

The data shows four radon anomalies on the 2,416-hectare property, one over two kilometres long and in the direction of glacial drift from three historic holes. Scintillometer readings from one hole found gamma ray particles percolating as high as 900 counts per second.

Plans for summer include re-sampling the anomalies and searching for radioactive rocks and debris from a potential up-ice source. Alpha holds an 80% interest in the JV.

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The uranium rush is on

March 22nd, 2013

Saskatchewan’s southwestern Athabasca Basin hosts a staking stampede

by Greg Klein

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This could be just what the beleaguered exploration sector needs—a good old-fashioned staking rush. And that’s exactly what’s going on in northern Saskatchewan’s uranium-rich Athabasca Basin. Although the market hasn’t fully caught on, companies are flocking into the area, drawn by the sensational Fission Energy TSXV:FIS and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW discovery at Patterson Lake South.

Saskatchewan’s southwestern Athabasca Basin hosts a staking stampede

A major uranium discovery has diverted explorers’ attention
to an under-explored region of northern Saskatchewan.

The Basin’s no stranger to frenetic activity. It last happened in the early and mid-part of the century’s first decade. But that was on the east side, whose mines now comprise one of the world’s most important sources of uranium. This time the stampede is to the west side, some of it a little outside the Basin. Among the driving forces are Saskatchewan’s new online staking system, an increasingly optimistic supply-demand scenario and an escalating stream of news from the Fission/Alpha 50/50 JV.

That started in July 2011, when boulder field samples brought assays as high as 39.6% U3O8. By November 2012, drilling confirmed the discovery not only with high grades but—in glaring contrast to the Basin’s east side—shallow mineralization. This year’s step-outs have the sector wondering just how big this might be. Not surprisingly, other explorers aren’t content to watch from the sidelines.

“We were quick to jump in there,” says Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH manager of corporate development and communications Jordan Trimble. His company snapped up five properties totalling nearly 80,000 hectares, one of the area’s largest packages according to a March 20 announcement. Two of the properties lie 27 kilometres and 35 kilometres north of the PLS discovery, another two 15 kilometres south and the fifth 90 kilometres east.

“We have a connection with a guy from Calgary who was one of the first prospectors in there,” Trimble points out. “Given that you can now stake online, it’s incredibly cheap. We got that land package for about 30 cents an acre. Packages of land have been offered to me in the last few days in the same area, comparable properties for upwards of $10 an acre. So already I think we’ve created value just with the acquisition at the cost we did.”

Last December’s inauguration of Saskatchewan’s e-registry was “certainly part of it,” he says. “But online staking or no online staking, there’s no shadow of doubt in my mind that this area would have seen a staking rush, given the [PLS] discovery. It’s a one-of-a-kind discovery.”

Michael Schuss concurs. The president/CEO of Canadian International Minerals TSXV:CIN says Patterson Lake South “is probably going to be one of the biggest discoveries in Canadian history. I wouldn’t call us ambulance-chasers by nature, but we saw the opportunity and thought we better move on it.”

Just one day before Skyharbour’s announcement, CIN revealed it nabbed a 20-claim, 25,225-hectare package in the same district. Like Skyharbour, the company’s looking at further nearby acquisitions.

Of all the news pouring out of the Fission/Alpha project, Schuss singles out the February 19 announcement of 57.5 metres of mineralization from a step-out 385 metres on strike. The JV partners were “either extremely lucky or it’s so big you couldn’t miss it. I think that’s what kicked off the staking rush.

“The excitement of Patterson Lake South is a discovery outside the traditional Athabasca Basin,” Schuss maintains. “It shouldn’t have been there. The staking has gone way beyond south of the basin. That’s something we haven’t seen before. It’s an exciting time in the industry.”

He credits people like Fission director Jody Dahrouge and Alpha director Warren Stanyer, who were among the PLS visionaries. “At first it was wildcatting at best,” Schuss says. “To go from concept to discovery in four years is an exceptional timetable. That’s part of the excitement. It also shows that in Canada you can still find major deposits in places that people drive right over.” Highway 955 cuts through PLS on its way to the former Cluff Lake uranium mine.

Schuss adds, “The staking rush is a nice feeling for a change because we probably haven’t had one in Canada since Voisey’s Bay, about 20 years ago.”

And the excitement brings a new focus to some companies.

“Skyharbour had been dormant for two years, looking for deals,” explains Trimble. “We waited patiently through a real tough market, researched uranium, saw it from the perspective of both current equity valuations in the space and the lack of what you could call saturation. You don’t have as many uranium companies clamouring for investor dollars.”

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