Saturday 10th December 2016

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘silicon dioxide’

July 8th, 2015

NYSE resumes trading after lengthy stoppage—but what happened? Stockhouse
A bullion banker sings in Berkeley Square GoldSeek
Matt Badiali’s methods for investing in “Cowboyistan” Streetwise Reports
Everything you need to know about volatility Equities Canada
Gold producers see instant advantage should Greece exit euro NAI 500
Minerals hold up in slow oil and gas recovery Industrial Minerals

July 8th, 2015

A bullion banker sings in Berkeley Square GoldSeek
Matt Badiali’s methods for investing in “Cowboyistan” Streetwise Reports
Everything you need to know about volatility Equities Canada
Gold producers see instant advantage should Greece exit euro NAI 500
The end of an era: Computers replace the trading pit’s brazen culture Stockhouse
Minerals hold up in slow oil and gas recovery Industrial Minerals

April 1st, 2015

U.S. Labor Department, ADP admit: “We’ve just been making this up!” Equities Canada
What will changing Chinese trade patterns mean for nickel? NAI 500
New stock exchange that seeks to stymie high-frequency trading set to open Stockhouse
The world’s largest gold mints GoldSeek
Ceramic challenge: Why synthetic proppants have it tough Industrial Minerals
Eric Lemieux: Quebec is back, ready for renaissance Streetwise Reports
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

March 31st, 2015

A beginner’s guide to the new SEC Reg A rules Equities Canada
What will changing Chinese trade patterns mean for nickel? NAI 500
New stock exchange that seeks to stymie high-frequency trading set to open Stockhouse
The world’s largest gold mints GoldSeek
Ceramic challenge: Why synthetic proppants have it tough Industrial Minerals
Eric Lemieux: Quebec is back, ready for renaissance Streetwise Reports
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

March 27th, 2015

New stock exchange that seeks to stymie high-frequency trading set to open Stockhouse
Rio dismisses “harebrained” Fortescue iron ore plan NAI 500
The world’s largest gold mints GoldSeek
Ceramic challenge: Why synthetic proppants have it tough Industrial Minerals
Philip Richards: Why Goldman Sachs is wrong about commodity prices Equities Canada
Eric Lemieux: Quebec is back, ready for renaissance Streetwise Reports
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

March 26th, 2015

Rio dismisses “harebrained” Fortescue iron ore plan NAI 500
The world’s largest gold mints GoldSeek
Cliffs to sell Ring of Fire chromite claims to Noront Stockhouse
Ceramic challenge: Why synthetic proppants have it tough Industrial Minerals
Philip Richards: Why Goldman Sachs is wrong about commodity prices Equities Canada
Eric Lemieux: Quebec is back, ready for renaissance Streetwise Reports
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

March 25th, 2015

The world’s largest gold mints GoldSeek
Cliffs to sell Ring of Fire chromite claims to Noront Stockhouse
Apple puts batteries at the centre of its EV master plan NAI 500
Ceramic challenge: Why synthetic proppants have it tough Industrial Minerals
Philip Richards: Why Goldman Sachs is wrong about commodity prices Equities Canada
Eric Lemieux: Quebec is back, ready for renaissance Streetwise Reports
Great deposits of the world—Hishikari, Japan Geology for Investors

The stuff of life

March 23rd, 2015

Little-known but essential commodities can offer near-term potential, says MGX Minerals

 

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Without them, modern life wouldn’t be very modern. A wide range of industrial minerals make possible so much of what we take for granted, from luxuries to conveniences to necessities. Although few of the commodities are familiar to investors, CEO Jared Lazerson of MGX Minerals CSE:XMG believes he’s found opportunities for potentially near-term domestic production to supply North American markets.

Since its trading debut last October, MGX has been busy acquiring properties in British Columbia, mostly with a goal of producing magnesite. In fact the company has tracked down and claimed most of B.C.’s significant magnesite occurrences. The province currently hosts one of the only two magnesite mines in North America.

Little-known but essential commodities can offer near-term potential, says MGX Minerals

Driftwood Creek drilling confirmed near-surface magnesite mineralization.

As a source of magnesium, magnesite—not to be confused with magnetite—meets a number of agricultural, pharmaceutical, environmental and industrial applications. Exceptionally light for a structural metal, magnesium is used to manufacture cars and planes, among other uses. As part of an alloy, it helps make more rigid metals suitable for shaping into manufactured products.

Magnesium can be mined from magnesite or dolomite and can also be extracted from seawater or natural brines, which accounted for about 69% of American domestic magnesium compounds production in 2014, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS data shows about 52% of magnesium compounds consumed in that country last year went to agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications. The remaining 48% was used for refractories.

As for magnesium metal, USGS numbers show 35% of American consumption in 2014 went to aluminum-based alloys used largely in packaging and transportation. Another 30% was used as a reducing agent in the production of titanium and other metals, 15% for structural purposes, 10% for desulfurization of iron and steel, and 10% for other applications.

By far the largest global supplier, China accounted for about 89% of the world’s magnesium metal production last year, according to the USGS. Israel and Russia managed to make up about 3.3% and 3.1% respectively.

As for magnesium compounds, China again dominated world production with about 70% last year. Russia came up with about 5.7% and Turkey 4.3%.

A new North American producer, especially one that’s close to existing transportation infrastructure, could offer the continent’s market considerable advantages, says Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC president Dave Hodge.

“MGX is a fairly unique story,” he points out. “It’s had a very recent IPO but it’s already in the permitting process. Magnesium comes in a variety of forms and one of the things they’re working on now is determining what form they would produce at what cost, versus the size of the market for that specific commodity. Those markets take different grades and different grades are produced at different costs. The opportunity here is to determine what’s the best product to produce and create value for their shareholders.”

Hodge adds, “In many respects this is not so much a mining story but more of a business story.”

Last July Lazerson signed a three-year cash, share and expenditure deal that would give the company a 100% interest in the 326-hectare Driftwood Creek project. Now MGX’s flagship, it’s located in southwestern B.C.’s Kootenays, a region that also hosts Baymag Inc’s Mount Brussilof magnesite mine. With logging roads on the property itself, Driftwood sits about 15 kilometres from highway, power and a CP spur line.

Lazerson sees near-term potential for a relatively simple quarry operation with a low strip ratio.

MGX also gained considerable expertise in CFO Michael Reimann and VP of exploration Andris Kikauka. Reimann, with a PhD in physics, has served over 45 years in senior corporate management positions, most recently with Skana Capital and PNG Gold TSXV:PGK. Kikauka’s 30-year background includes service as project geologist for the exploration and geotechnical consulting firm Rio Minerals. He’s currently a director of American Manganese TSXV:AMY.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 23rd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 9 to 22, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission widens main zone, plans more step-outs, arranges $12.5-million bought deal

Although infill drilling has been the priority for Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) summer program, two step-outs have widened Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone, inspiring a 10-hole addition to the campaign. Radiometric results for nine holes released August 18 include one that extended the zone about 30 metres north and another 15 metres south. All nine holes returned wide mineralization, the company stated.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 9 to 22, 2014

R780E is the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open to the east and west.

These results, which are no substitute for assays, come from a handheld scintillometer that measures drill core for radiation in counts per second. Last month Fission replaced its old model, which maxed out at 9,999 cps, with a new-fangled gadget capable of measuring up to 65,535 cps. But the company still refers to anything above four nines to be “off-scale.”

By that standard several intervals were well off-scale, with a few reaching past 60,000 cps.

Another innovation introduced last month is barge-based angled drilling, allowing a better understanding of the geometry of mineralization beneath the lake. Encouraged by the widening of R780E, Fission plans another 10 step-outs. That adds 4,700 metres to a summer agenda now expected to total 25,000 metres in 73 holes.

There seems to be little worry about paying for all that. On August 18 Fission announced a $12.52-million bought deal that’s expected to close around September 23. Roughly three months later comes the maiden resource’s due date.

Winter assays reported August 13 further boosted confidence in R780E, while a summer exploration hole released two days earlier showed interesting radiometric results 17 kilometres away. Read more.

NexGen steps out to widen Rook 1’s Arrow zone

If any company can compete with Fission’s top spot as the Athabasca Basin’s number one newsmaker, it might be next-door neighbour NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE. Four “aggressive” step-out holes have extended the company’s Rook 1 Arrow zone from 180 metres to 215 metres in width for a zone that’s 515 metres in strike and open in all directions. The northwest-southeast fence of drilling announced August 20 has also revealed “multiple sub-vertical stacked mineralized shear zones” increasing the company’s hopes of finding additional high-grade areas.

One of the five holes failed to find significant mineralization.

Like Fission’s August 18 news, the results come from scintillometer readings that don’t substitute for assays, which are pending.

So far 25 of 27 Arrow holes totalling 15,318 metres have shown mineralization. Another three holes at Area A, however, failed to find anomalous radioactivity. They tested an electromagnetic conductor that NexGen interprets to be PL-3B, which hosts the PLS discovery.

Lakeland Resources updates three projects, appoints uranium veteran to board

As a busy summer progresses, Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK reported a new addition to its board and further work on one of the largest portfolios in and around the Basin. On August 20 the company announced the appointment of director Steven Khan, a veteran of Canadian investment and corporate governance with specific experience in raising funds and forging joint ventures for uranium companies. The next day Lakeland released a progress update for three of its projects.

The projects are Star, Lazy Edward Bay and Fond du Lac on the northern, southern and eastern margins of the Basin respectively. “That’s the shallowest depth—the depth to the unconformity becomes more shallow as you get closer to the Basin’s margin,” explains president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “At Gibbon’s Creek our target depths are between about 80 and 120 metres below surface. We hope the others will fall into that kind of range so we’ll be drilling 150- to 200-metre holes.”

At the Star property, crews from Dahrouge Geological Consulting have just wrapped up six days of sampling and mapping. They picked up some 73 rock samples and 124 soil samples around a basement outcrop that’s shown anomalous concentrations of gold, platinum group elements and rare earth elements, as well as highly anomalous uranium. The combination suggests a strong hydrothermal system.

“Those are typical pathfinders for uranium in the Basin,” says Armes. “At Patterson Lake South they had gold grades running two or three grams. So with the first pass on our exploration program in late 2013 we had gold grades of four or five grams.”

Lakeland holds a 100% earn-in option on Star, which has year-round road access from the town of Stony Rapids a few kilometres away.

Now that permits have arrived, mobilization to Lazy Edward Bay should begin ASAP, he adds. Under initial scrutiny will be the BAY trend, actually two parallel conductive trends, which will undergo a RadonEx survey. Field crews will also search out boulders or other signs of unconformity-style mineralization.

“We have Lazy Edward drill targets already but a lot of them were defined by yesterday’s technology,” Armes explains. “We’ll use RadonEx and other work to re-interpret the historic data to better define targets.” In all, the property has six known trends.

Lakeland adviser Rick Kusmirski knows the property from his time as president/CEO of JNR Resources. “He dug up some historic data which is very helpful to identify areas to focus on. There’s some historic areas we want to re-visit.”

Also in line for RadonEx is Fond du Lac, initially targeting a coincident geochemical and conductive target. Geologist and Lakeland director Neil McCallum thinks historic work “missed it by a couple of hundred metres,” Armes says.

But while the summer activity continues, he also looks further ahead “from a treasury standpoint as well as our projects. We’re convinced that 2015 is going to see a significant move in uranium prices. If we ever re-visit 2006 and 2007 levels, when there were 50, 60, 70 juniors active, we hope to be ready and get as many drill programs going as possible through the joint venture and prospect generator model, along with any programs we focus on 100% ourselves.”

[Khan’s JV work with Sumitomo and Kepco] was certainly a great experience in negotiating and concluding contracts, and working with them on the joint management committees. That built long-term relationships but also gave me insight into the Asian psyche and some of the issues they have to deal with.—Steven Khan, director
of Lakeland Resources

Just one day before the exploration update, Lakeland announced Steven Khan’s appointment as director. His background includes key positions with uranium companies Energy Fuels TSX:EFR, Strathmore Minerals and Fission Uranium’s predecessor, Fission Energy. He helped found the latter company, holding the role of executive VP. Khan served as president/chairperson of Strathmore Minerals until last year’s takeover by Energy Fuels, where he stayed on as a director until recently.

Khan played an instrumental part in the negotiating team that brought Japan’s Sumitomo Corp into a JV on Strathmore’s Roca Honda project in New Mexico. He also helped bring the Korea Electric Power Corp into two other JVs, with Strathmore on the Gas Hills project in Wyoming and with Fission, leading to the Waterbury Lake discovery.

Khan has nearly 20 years of experience in all aspects of the Canadian investment industry, including fundraising for early-stage private and public companies.

A confluence of factors convinced him to join Lakeland, he says. “I’ve had a long-term relationship with some of the company’s principals and I’ve always been interested in returning to the Athabasca Basin arena after I left Fission Energy in 2010. Strathmore was more focused on the U.S., where I spent the last number of years. That combination of moving back to the Basin, working with a group of people I respect and seeing a number of properties that have potential presented an opportunity for me.”

He says his work with Sumitomo and Kepco “was certainly a great experience in negotiating and concluding contracts, and working with them on the joint management committees. That built long-term relationships but also gave me insight into the Asian psyche and some of the issues they have to deal with.”

Khan thinks Asian companies might revive their previous interest in early-stage explorers. “Before Fukushima they were attracted to earlier-stage projects like Fission had at the time, as well as more advanced projects like those of Strathmore in the U.S. When uranium prices come back I think they’ll be forced to return to earlier-stage projects because most of the advanced projects will have been tied up.”

As for uranium’s current price, “its resurgence has been muted and is taking longer than expected. But I think that in the medium to longer term, demand will certainly outstrip supply.”

“I’m quite excited about getting involved with the Lakeland team and I think the opportunity for the sector is attractive,” Khan emphasizes. “I think there’s going to be more Athabasca Basin discoveries and that bodes well for companies like Lakeland that are properly positioned and properly financed. So for me the timing is good and the interplay of several factors is favourable.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

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July 24th, 2014

Minerals on the edge—plate boundaries and minerals Geology for Investors
Will the economy’s fate be set by the next two weeks’ earnings? VantageWire
When nations unite against the West: The BRICS development bank Equedia
Byron King: Miners must control costs to improve share prices Streetwise Reports
Eric Sprott: The ongoing rot in the economy GoldSeek
Ottawa states Canadian national securities regulator may soon be reality Stockhouse
Oilfield Minerals Outlook Houston: The shale gale continues Industrial Minerals