Sunday 22nd September 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘REE’

Commerce Resources president Chris Grove comments on metallurgical advances for his company’s Quebec rare earths project

September 19th, 2019

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The Red Lake resurgence

September 16th, 2019

Miners and explorers seek ever more gold from this busy Ontario district

by Greg Klein

Miners and explorers seek ever more gold from this busy Ontario district

Benefiting from reinterpretation of past work, Great Bear now
has three rigs drilling Dixie Lake. (Photo: Great Bear Resources)

 

A new gold producer on the way, attention-grabbing assays from a well-financed junior and high hopes for the price of gold—could that in any way explain the current excitement at Red Lake? A region that’s produced 30 million ounces since its first rush in 1926 still has more gold to mine and, explorers believe, more mines to find.

Just as Newmont Goldcorp TSX:NGT was considering the sale of its Red Lake operations, Pure Gold Mining TSXV:PGM began building Madsen Red Lake, billed as Canada’s highest-grade gold development project. But, as far as juniors are concerned, the district’s biggest newsmaker has been Great Bear Resources’ (TSXV:GBR) Dixie Lake property.

While focused on British Columbia’s Golden Triangle in 2017, Great Bear optioned Dixie from Newmont, also getting decades of data from over 160 historic holes. Given the succession of companies that drilled and departed, the data might have seemed more encumbrance than encouragement. Undeterred, Great Bear geologists began relogging core to “resolve geological differences between generations of work dating back to the 1980s and provide a coherent framework for the company’s own drilling.”

The prepping paid off. That summer’s Phase I program found success with its first hole and reached up to 16.84 g/t gold over 10.4 metres in hole #5 at the Dixie Limb zone. As the campaign progressed, the company tripled its turf to cover a potential gold-bearing structure of regional significance.

Miners and explorers seek ever more gold from this busy Ontario district

Pure Gold conducts underground test mining at Madsen Red Lake.
(Photo: Pure Gold Mining)

More expansions followed, with assays reaching up to 26.91 g/t over 16.35 metres at the newly discovered and near-surface Hinge zone. Financings came through too, most notably with an $11.1-million infusion that included a total of $5.7 million from McEwen Mining TSX:MUX and Rob McEwen himself, progenitor of Red Lake’s last renaissance. The Canadian Mining Hall of Fame credits him with transforming the Goldcorp mine “from a 50,000-ounce producer in 1997 to a 500,000-ounce producer in 2001, while cash costs fell from $360 per ounce to $60 per ounce over this period.”

The stock soared past $2 from about $0.58 pre-McEwen. The grades, discoveries and financings continued, even with what president/CEO Chris Taylor called “the cheapest discovery hole we’ve ever had.” That happened after a keen-eyed geo spotted high-grade visible gold on unassayed core that had been neglected for 12 years. Clearly, the company was on to something when its management decided past operators had overlooked Dixie’s promise.

Great Bear now has three rigs at work.

But this is no spectator sport, as the inevitable influx demonstrated. One of the more recent arrivals was Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA, which earlier this month optioned about 6,700 hectares from Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST. But the attraction was base metals more than the yellow stuff. Belmont’s new Fredart/Gerry Lake and adjoining claims show a geological setting similar to Pistol Bay’s Garnet Lake, the companies stated. Using a 3% zinc-equivalent cutoff, Garnet’s 2017 inferred resource showed 2.1 million tonnes averaging 5.78% zinc, 0.72% copper, 19.5 g/t silver and 0.6 g/t gold. 

Miners and explorers seek ever more gold from this busy Ontario district

Visible gold attests to Great Bear’s confidence in Dixie Lake.
(Photo: Great Bear Resources)

An historic, non-43-101 resource for Belmont’s Fredart zone estimated 385,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver. Historic drilling on the acquisition’s Joy-Caravelle area shows non-43-101 results including 21.6% zinc and 0.13% copper over 0.25 metres.

Up to recently, Pistol Bay’s portfolio had been about 25 kilometres northeast of Dixie Lake. But the company moved closer in July, with an option on 2,130 hectares southeast of Great Bear. Part of the former Goldpines claims, the property’s past work consisted mainly of geochemical sampling.

An NSR held by Perry English on Fredart hints at the prospector’s impact on the district. English sold the Dixie and Packwash properties to Great Bear and, under an LOI signed earlier this month, will vend Red Lake’s Camping Lake and Bruce Lake projects to Prime Meridian Resources TSXV:PMR.

Spurred on by recent grab samples as high as 19 g/t, 23.3 g/t and 126.5 g/t gold, Pacton Gold TSXV:PAC plans 10,000 metres of drilling to begin next month at its Red Lake project. Historic work included sampling, trenching and drilling.

A more advanced project towards the district’s eastern reaches, First Mining Gold’s (TSX:FF) Springpole reached PEA in 2017 with an indicated 4.67 million gold ounces and 24.19 million silver ounces, along with an inferred 230,000 gold ounces and 1.12 million silver ounces.

Proximal to both Newmont Goldcorp and Pure Gold, Nexus Gold’s (TSXV:NXS) McKenzie project underwent a spring field program that scored a sample result of 135.4 g/t gold. In August the company signed an LOI with privately held Hawkmoon Resources that could have the latter company acquire or JV on Nexus’ Canadian projects.

With a Phase I drill program of at least 2,500 metres well underway, BTU Metals TSXV:BTU hopes to find evidence that Great Bear’s high-grade LP fault structure crosses BTU’s Dixie Halo property.

Under an LOI signed last week, Maxtech Ventures CSE:MVT would acquire the Panama Lake project from Benton Resources TSXV:BEX. The latter company assembled the property by staking, last year adding the former Goldcorp Ben Lake project. This year’s drilling produced assays up to 1.23 g/t gold over 6.5 metres.

Some other companies in the district include Confederation Minerals TSXV:CFM, which last May added the Leo property to its Red Lake portfolio with the company’s 70%-held Newman Todd property.

This month GoldON Resources TSXV:GLD completed prospecting and soil sampling on its West Madsen project optioned from Great Bear last May. GoldON sees rare earths as well as gold potential in the property.

Meanwhile Madsen begins construction, with commercial production expected by the end of 2020. The project came together quickly after Pure Gold, then called Laurentian Goldfields, assembled claims including the former Madsen mine in late 2013 and early 2014. Within five years Pure Gold built a resource of 2.06 million ounces indicated and 467,000 ounces inferred. That includes a probable reserve of 3.51 million tonnes averaging 8.97% for 1.01 million ounces that’s expected to keep the mine busy for 12 years.

Deep-pocketed support comes from AngloGold Ashanti NYSE:AU, Eric Sprott, Rob McEwen and Newmont Goldcorp, who collectively hold over 30% of Pure Gold.

Although the district’s success stories encourage enthusiasm, Red Lake also spawned a cautionary tale. Rubicon Minerals TSX:RMX notoriously skipped feasibility to take its Phoenix project directly from PEA to production in 2015. Six months later the mine shut down. The explanation: Unexpectedly complex geology. The resource shrank dramatically, from 1.13 million gold ounces measured and indicated in 2013 to just 106,000 ounces in 2016. Inferred fell from 2.22 million ounces to 307,000 ounces.

Later that year the company sought creditor protection.

But last month Rubicon bravely unveiled a new PEA with “a lower margin of error and risk.” Still a far cry from the 2013 estimate, however, are the current numbers of 589,000 ounces measured and indicated, along with 540,000 ounces inferred. Chastened, the company plans to begin feasibility studies in Q1 2020.

Saville Resources plans Phase II drilling on Quebec niobium-tantalum-phosphate project

September 16th, 2019

by Greg Klein | September 16, 2019

A detailed analysis of last spring’s drill program along with other data has Saville Resources TSXV:SRE looking forward to a Q1 return engagement. Activity on the Niobium Claim Group in Quebec’s Labrador Trough occurs as the U.S. takes steps to secure reliable supplies of critical minerals including niobium and tantalum. The country relies on imports for its entire supply of both metals.

Near-surface assays previously released for this year’s five-hole, 1,049-metre campaign reached as high as 0.79% Nb2O5, 163 ppm Ta2O5 and 8.1% P2O5 over 37 metres, as well as 0.8% Nb2O5, 81 ppm Ta2O5 and 9% P2O5 over 31.5 metres. The latter intercept, the final hole of the season, featured a sub-interval showing 1.36% Nb2O5, 70 ppm Ta2O5 and 12.3% P2O5 over 4.5 metres.

Saville Resources plans Phase II drilling on Quebec niobium-tantalum-phosphate project

Saville’s drilling targeted the project’s Mallard prospect, where three programs so far have totalled 14 holes and 3,537 metres. Each campaign excelled its predecessor for grades and widths, expanding three known zones of mineralization which remain open in all directions, the company reported.

Predominating the host material are pyrochlore-group minerals and/or ferrocolumbite, familiar to the industry as the world’s main source of niobium production, Saville added.

“We appear to have only scratched the surface at Mallard and have yet to drill-test our other high-priority targets including Spoke and Miranna,” said president Mike Hodge.

Although work will focus on building an initial Mallard resource, Spoke and Miranna might also get rig attention to determine their potential for connecting with Mallard.

Saville operates the project under a 75% earn-in from Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE. On another critical minerals project two kilometres away, Commerce advances its Ashram rare earths deposit towards pre-feasibility.

Saville’s portfolio also includes the Bud project in southern British Columbia’s busy Greenwood camp. Grab sample assays released last April showed grades up to 4.57 g/t gold, 27.7 g/t silver and 6.7% copper; as well as 4.44 g/t gold, 17 g/t silver and 6.84% copper.

Read more about Saville Resources.

Donald Trump employs the U.S. Defense Production Act to support reliable supplies of rare earth elements

September 12th, 2019

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International Montoro Resources employs high-tech analysis of Elliot Lake-region nickel-copper prospect

September 10th, 2019

by Greg Klein | September 10, 2019

A geophysical analysis on the property released last March found targets described as “good candidates for semi-massive nickel-copper mineralization.” Now International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT has contracted Mira Geoscience to compile and analyze a much larger data set for the Pecors Lake project, part of the 1,840-hectare Serpent River property in Ontario’s Elliot Lake district.

International Montoro Resources employs high-tech analysis of Elliot Lake-region nickel-copper prospect

Nickel-copper potential brings new interest to
International Montoro Resources’ Serpent River property.

Historic drilling on Serpent’s southwestern area found uranium-rare earths mineralization. But extensive geophysical programs completed last year alerted Montoro to nickel-copper-PGE potential as well. A 3D model revealed that three assumed magnetic anomalies at Pecors actually comprise one contiguous anomaly estimated to be five kilometres long, two kilometres wide and two kilometres deep.

Considered pioneers of advanced geological and geophysical 3D and 4D modelling, Mira Geoscience will enter a library of data into its Geoscience Analyst 3D interactive platform. Included will be Ontario Geological Survey geochem and petrographic studies; OGSEarth data from drilling conducted by Teck Resources TSX:TECK.A/TSX:TECK.B, Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO, BHP Billiton NYSE:BHPand others on or near the property; federal government regional gravity and magnetic surveys; Montoro’s 22 drill holes; and downhole EM data for two holes reaching depths of one and 1.3 kilometres respectively.

In central British Columbia, Montoro had a 43-101 technical study completed in April for its recently acquired Wicheeda North property, adjacent to the Wicheeda rare earths deposit currently being drilled by Defense Metals TSXV:DEFN under option from Spectrum Mining. The report states that Wicheeda North “has the potential to host, and should continue to be explored for, rare earth element mineralization because it occurs within a favourable geological belt known to contain carbonatite-hosted REE mineralization.”

A 3D magnetic inversion was completed in June for the property, which Montoro has expanded to 2,138 hectares.

The company’s portfolio also includes the 2,300-hectare Duhamel property in central Quebec, considered prospective for nickel-copper-cobalt, as well as titanium-vanadium-chromium.

Along with Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA, Montoro shares 50/50 ownership of two uranium properties in northern Saskatchewan’s Uranium City area.

Last month Montoro closed a private placement first tranche of $47,500.

Maria Holuszko and her Geoscience BC team look at coal as a possible source of REEs

September 5th, 2019

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Update: Lynas responds to Malaysia’s six-month extension for rare earths processing plant

August 16th, 2019

by Greg Klein | August 15, 2019, updated August 16, 2019

Lynas gets a six-month reprieve to continue rare earths processing in Malaysia

Lynas expressed confidence in meeting government-imposed conditions
for its rare earths processing facility in Malaysia. (Photo: Lynas Corp)

 

Even a six-month reprieve augers well for Lynas Corp, the company emphasized on August 16. The Malaysian government granted an extension the previous day after threatening to shut down a plant that refines and separates material from Lynas’ Mount Weld rare earths mine in Western Australia.

The government’s original conditions called for Lynas to render the mine’s output non-radioactive before shipping it to Malaysia and to remove the low-level radioactive waste that has accumulated since 2012. The deadline was September 2, the former licence expiry date.

Lynas said yesterday’s decision was consistent with a science-based government report released last December and the company remains confident of meeting conditions.

The decision’s only significant divergence from the report, Lynas stated, was the requirement that cracking and leaching operations be moved out of Malaysia within four years. Earlier this month CEO Amanda Lacaze said the company hopes to have a C&L facility operating in Western Australia by 2022, part of the company’s $500-million expansion planned by 2025. The new facility would allow Lynas to ship non-radioactive material to Malaysia for further processing and separating.

As for the presence in Malaysia of radioactive water leach purification residue—a reported 580,000 tonnes has piled up so far—the company has six months to find a location and obtain consent for a permanent deposit facility.

Although the government rejected Lynas’ proposal to convert WLP residue into soil conditioner for agricultural use, the company vowed to continue R&D into other possible outcomes.

“While we may have preferred a longer licence … the effect is essentially the same because under either structure there will be an administrative application for renewal,” Lacaze told a briefing for analysts and investors.

In a statement issued earlier that morning, she expressed optimism “that this decision will bring an end to the politicization of Lynas over the past year.”

Last May Lacaze emphasized Lynas’ determination to keep its supply chain separate from the involvement of China, which dominates all aspects of global rare earths production and processing. Considered critical elements by the U.S. for several uses including defence, REs figure prominently in the American-Chinese trade disputes. Consequently the U.S. has implemented policies to encourage production from domestic and allied resources and technology.

Read more about Lynas Corp.

Read more about rare earths, critical elements and the U.S.-China trade dispute.

Lynas gets a six-month reprieve to continue rare earths processing in Malaysia

August 15th, 2019

This story has been updated and moved here.

Northern Minerals shifts RE offtake from China to Germany; Malaysia’s Lynas decision imminent

August 12th, 2019

by Greg Klein | August 12, 2019

A new Western Australia rare earths producer has signed an agreement with a German engineering group to take on 100% of production from the miner’s pilot plant. The deal replaces a previous 100% offtake contract with Chinese firm Lianyugang Zeyu New Materials Sales, which was cancelled last week due to breach of agreement, ASX-listed Northern Minerals announced on August 12.

Northern Minerals shifts REE offtake from China to Germany; Malaysia’s Lynas decision imminent

Browns Range production,
before and after pilot plant processing.

The agreement with thyssenkrupp Materials Trading, a company that claims to have 158,000 “colleagues” on all continents, allows the customer to buy all heavy rare earth carbonate from the Browns Range pilot plant. Future sales may involve separated heavy rare earths. The two companies will also work together on separating technology and potential expansion of the project, Northern Minerals stated. The offtake agreement includes all stockpiled product as well as future output. Production began in July 2018.

Currently in the first phase of a three-stage development plan, Northern Minerals plans to become the “first significant producer of dysprosium outside of China.”

The same day as the offtake announcement, the company reported its board is considering a $20-million investment offer from a Chinese entity. (All figures in Australian dollars.) Northern Minerals added it’s in negotiations with other potential investors. Having so far raised about $19.76 million of a previously offered $30-million private placement, the company expects to close the remainder by the end of August.

Meanwhile Australian RE producer Lynas Corp expects a decision any day now by the Malaysian government regarding the fate of the miner’s processing facility. Although the plant has operated since 2012, a new government demanded the company ensure all material sent to the country from the Mount Weld mine in Western Australia be rendered non-radioactive prior to shipment. The government also ordered the removal of radioactive tailings accumulated over seven years. Although the plant’s licence expires on September 2, Lynas officials repeatedly express confidence in the outcome.

The company added that Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad has said licence renewal would no longer require the removal of tailings. Nevertheless, Lynas plans to relocate its cracking and leaching operations to Western Australia by 2022.

Read more about Lynas Corp.

Commerce Resources’ rare earths metallurgy optimized by university lab

August 1st, 2019

by Greg Klein | August 1, 2019

Successful methods applied in separate laboratories further demonstrate the amenability of a Quebec rare earths deposit that’s progressing towards the pre-feasibility stage. Using material from Commerce Resources’ (TSXV:CCE) Ashram project in northern Quebec, l’Université Laval successfully used an alternative flowsheet approach to create a mixed REE concentrate. The tests add to the work of Hazen Research in Colorado and Merker Mineral Processing/UVR-FIA in Germany.

Commerce Resources’ rare earths metallurgy optimized by university lab

Commerce announced receipt of Laval’s final report on August 1. The university tested Ashram material on bench-scale levels of one kilogram and on larger batches of 10 to 30 kilograms. A total of about 1,500 kilograms went through Laval’s own flotation circuit and reagent scheme.

The large batches produced around 170 kilos of flotation concentrate grading 11.2% rare earth oxides, with a mass pull of 11.3% (percent of material reporting to concentrate), the company stated. Laval’s new reagent scheme offers Ashram potentially greater flotation performance, Commerce added.

“We are very happy with the results of our collaboration with Laval and look forward to continued work with local academic institutions to further develop REE expertise in the province of Quebec and, moreover, to move the Ashram deposit closer to production,” commented president Chris Grove.

The news comes amid heightened concern in the U.S. for critical minerals supply, especially rare earths.

Commerce holds interests in two other critical minerals projects. On the Niobium Claim Group, just a few kilometres from Ashram, Saville Resources TSXV:SRE drilled high-grade, near-surface niobium along with tantalum and phosphate last spring while working towards a 75% earn-in from Commerce. The latter company also holds the advanced-stage Blue River tantalum-niobium project in southern British Columbia.

Read more about Commerce Resources.