Monday 18th June 2018

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘ontario’

Pistol Bay Mining releases zinc-copper assays from Ontario, prepares for new drilling

June 13th, 2018

by Greg Klein | June 13, 2018

As a long-overdue modern exploration program continues on northwestern Ontario’s Confederation Lake, Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST released assays for an initial three-hole 1,555-metre program on the property’s Arrow zone. The results “confirm the consistent nature of mineralization in the Arrow zone and give us more confidence in the existing mineral resource estimate,” noted president/CEO Charles Desjardins. The assays show:

Hole GL18-01

  • 0.73% copper, 2.22% zinc, 12 g/t silver, 0.307 g/t gold and 0.03% lead for 4.34% zinc-equivalent over 10.9 metres, starting at 432.7 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 0.69% copper, 4.49% zinc, 22.2 g/t silver, 0.217 g/t gold and 0.1% lead for 6.65% zinc-equivalent over 2.9 metres)
  • (and including 1.16% copper, 1.48% zinc, 12.8 g/t silver, 0.64 g/t gold and 0.01% lead for 4.91% zinc-equivalent over 3 metres)
Pistol Bay Mining releases zinc-copper assays from Ontario, prepares for new drilling

Drilling will soon resume
at Confederation Lake’s
Fredart zone.

GL18-03

  • 0.13% copper, 1.13% zinc, 3.3 g/t silver, 0.044 g/t gold and 0.02% lead for 1.54% zinc-equivalent over 12.9 metres, starting at 563.1 metres
  • (including 0.2% copper, 1.93% zinc, 4.3 g/t silver, 0.083 g/t gold and 0.04% lead for 2.54% zinc-equivalent over 3.8 metres)
  • (which includes 0.11% copper, 2.69% zinc, 3.4 g/t silver, 0.04 g/t gold and 0.07% lead for 3.09% zinc-equivalent over 1.5 metres)
  • (and also includes 0.48% copper, 2.92% zinc, 8.5 g/t silver, 0.15 g/t gold and 0.05% lead for 4.28% zinc-equivalent over 1.3 metres)

True widths weren’t provided.

In early May the company released the program’s first hole, showing 5.15% zinc-equivalent over 12.85 metres.

Last year Pistol Bay filed a 43-101 resource for Arrow, with a base case 3% zinc-equivalent cutoff for an inferred category showing:

  • 2.1 million tonnes averaging 5.78% zinc, 0.72% copper,19.5 g/t silver and 0.6 g/t gold, for a zinc-equivalent grade of 8.42%

Contained amounts come to:

  • 274 million pounds zinc, 34.3 million pounds copper, 1.33 million ounces silver and 41,000 ounces gold

As the rig moves to the project’s Fredart copper-gold zone, the team keeps busy re-compiling all Arrow drill results and incorporating new surveys of collar locations and azimuths using differential GPS equipment, Pistol Bay stated.

Although Fredart underwent extensive drilling between 1965 and 1985, the zone lacks a 43-101 resource due to uncertainty about drill hole locations and the lack of previous core to confirm historic assays, the company added.

The drill campaign follows the 15,000-hectare property’s first survey by modern geophysics which, in another first for Confederation Lake, was conducted on a regional scale.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.

The Ontario election: What does Ford’s nation have in store for mining?

June 7th, 2018

by Greg Klein | June 7, 2018

He reportedly promised to get Ring of Fire development started even if he had to climb onto a bulldozer to blaze a trail himself. Now Doug Ford and Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives have won a resounding majority, already apparent less than half an hour after polls closed and five days after Liberal leader Kathleen Wynne conceded defeat.

The Ontario election: What does Ford’s nation have in store for mining?

As a popular newcomer facing an increasingly unpopular incumbent,
Doug Ford needed few details to back up his platform.
(Photo: Ontario Progressive Conservatives)

Canada-wide, this has probably been the most closely watched provincial election outside Quebec for many years.

Celebrated by some as a populist and disliked by the establishment for the same reason, Ford was nevertheless granted a degree of civility that the media generally begrudged his late brother, former Toronto mayor Rob Ford. Although a veteran of municipal politics and a long-time PC member, this marks Doug Ford’s first foray as a provincial candidate.

Elegant for its simplicity was his party’s five-point plan, starting with “scrap the carbon tax.” He’d “cut gas prices by 10 cents a litre, reduce middle class income taxes by 20%, cut your hydro bills by 12%,” create “quality” jobs, slash government waste and “end hallway health care” with new beds and additional treatment.

No doubt more details will come. But his Ring of Fire rhetoric drew criticism for a lack of specifics. At a debate on Northern issues last month, the Ottawa Citizen quoted him saying, “For years, all we’ve heard is talk, talk, talk. No action whatsoever. We’re going to work with the people of the North, we’re going to work with the First Nations, we’re going to respect the treaties that are in place right now. But we’re not going to talk. We’re going to get in there, after the agreements, and get to work.”

According to the Citizen, the Liberal leader “practically threw up her hands. Doing things right takes time, she said, and the agreements you just mentioned are made by talking. ‘You’re just going to drive a bulldozer right across northern Ontario,’ she said.”

Earlier that month Ford announced a revenue-sharing plan for Northern communities, including natives, using provincial revenue from forestry and mining. Again, specifics were scarce but he beat a similar, more detailed, announcement from the Liberals by a few days.

Yet the issues that all parties either neglected in detail or ignored altogether have been documented by mining commentator Stan Sudol at The Republic of Mining and serialized in the Sudbury Star. Sudol wrote the piece with the election in mind, but it’s worth bookmarking for future reference. If the PCs were really serious about mining, they might even hire him as a special adviser.

In other election notes, leaders of all three main parties—plus the Greens—won their own ridings. But Wynne, who edged out her PC challenger by less than 200 votes and dragged the Liberals down to third-place status, announced her resignation as party leader.

Guelph elected Ontario’s first Green Party MPP, Mike Schreiner. Canada has just five other Greens elected provincially (three in British Columbia and one each in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island), along with a sole MP from B.C.

Ottawa Centre elected NDP candidate Joel Harden, who publicly supports the party’s extremist Leap Manifesto.

Lanark-Frontenac-Kingston re-elected PC Randy Hillier, defeating a challenge by NDPer and former MiningWatch activist Ramsey Hart.

The huge new northern riding of Mushkegowuk-James Bay—which hosts the Ring of Fire—elected the NDP’s Guy Bourgouin, maintaining a longstanding NDP tradition from the region’s former riding of Timmins-James Bay.

Kiiwetinoong, the massive new riding to the west, had no results available as of 10:30 p.m. local time.

While the election was considered “seismic” by some commentators, the most historic significance might have been high voter turnout on the last game of the Stanley Cup series.

Stan Sudol: Ontario politicians disregard mining issues, to the province’s peril

June 1st, 2018

by Greg Klein | June 1, 2018

One of Canada’s greatest mineral discoveries since 1883, the Ring of Fire offers tremendous potential to a region plagued by endemic poverty and to a province burdened with the world’s largest sub-national debt. Meanwhile Ontario law requires mining companies to monitor carbon emissions from portable toilets. With a provincial election coming on June 7, something’s terribly lacking in campaign discussion, not to mention political vision, says Stan Sudol. Backing up his insights with factual detail, the Sudbury native, former mine worker, communications consultant and mining commentator presents a highly informed perspective at his website, The Republic of Mining.

Stan Sudol: Ontario politicians disregard mining issues, to the province’s peril

(Photo: Elections Ontario)

Are the hurdles to Ring of Fire development insurmountable? Sudol points out:

In contrast, the equally isolated territory of Nunavut has built two gold mines (Agnico-Eagle’s Meadowbank and TMAX Resources’ Doris) and one iron ore operation (Baffinland’s Mary River) in some of the most hostile terrain on the planet. A fourth gold mine (Agnico Eagle) should be in operation in 2019 and junior miner Sabina Gold and Silver Corp has been given continued development approvals by the Nunavut Impact Review Board.

Economic benefits to the indigenous population have been powerful enough to include the bemusing effect of insufficient parking spots in the hamlet of Baker Lake.

Do decision-makers realize, let alone appreciate, the world-class technical expertise centred around Sudbury? Canada’s tallest skyscraper, for example, is downtown Toronto’s 72-storey Bank of Montreal building. But consider this:

The deepest mines in northeastern Ontario and northwestern Quebec are roughly equal to 650 stories underground! It takes an amazing amount of advanced technology to safely bring workers to those depths. A tidal wave of innovation is engulfing a new era of the digital underground.

Ontario politicians show inadequate concern, let alone leadership, on issues ranging from community consultation, public awareness, problematic regulations and the need for infrastructure. These often intertwined issues remain crucial to an industry that can deliver much more to Ontario than it already does, Sudol explains.

In compiling this call to action he chose thoroughness over brevity, and has no doubt exceeded the typical politician’s attention span. But each party should have someone write a précise for their leader to study. Their federal counterparts would learn something too.

Meanwhile others can learn a lot about the mining industry, its challenges and contributions, by reading Sudol’s post here.

Pistol Bay drills 5.15% zinc-equivalent over 12.85 metres at NW Ontario’s Confederation Lake

May 3rd, 2018

by Greg Klein | May 3, 2018

With three holes totalling 1,525 metres now complete out of a 3,500-metre winter-spring campaign, Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST released the first assay on May 2. The initial holes targeted the Arrow zone, part of the 100%-optioned, 15,000-hectare Confederation Lake project in northwestern Ontario.

Sunk on Arrow’s main sulphide zone, hole DDH GL18-02 gave up Russian doll interval-within-interval assays as follows:

Pistol Bay drills 5.15% zinc-equivalent over 12.85 metres at NW Ontario’s Confederation Lake

Pistol Bay hopes to upgrade last year’s
resource estimate for the project’s Arrow zone.

  • 3.07% zinc, 0.42% copper, 0.12% lead, 22.2 g/t silver and 0.59 g/t gold for 5.15% zinc-equivalent over 12.85 metres, starting at 422.95 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 3.82% zinc, 0.5% copper, 0.15% lead, 27.3 g/t silver and 0.71 g/t gold for 6.33% zinc-equivalent over 9.8 metres)
  • (which includes 4.83% zinc, 0.56% copper, 0.15% lead, 26.4 g/t silver and 0.45 g/t gold for 7.13% zinc-equivalent over 7.3 metres)
  • (which includes 8.88% zinc, 0.92% copper, 0.38% lead, 44.3 g/t silver and 0.38 g/t gold for 12.3% zinc-equivalent over 2 metres)
  • (which includes 22% zinc, 0.28% copper, 0.77% lead, 74.9 g/t silver and 0.77 g/t gold for 24.8% zinc-equivalent over 0.6 metres)

Overlapping some of these intervals was a three-metre section described as “conspicuous gold enrichment towards the top of the main sulphide zone”:

  • 0.83% zinc, 0.33% copper, 0.17% lead, 40.4 g/t silver and 1.65 g/t gold for 4.41% zinc-equivalent over 3 metres, starting at 426 metres

A 43-101 resource released last year for Arrow used a base case 3% zinc-equivalent cutoff for an inferred category showing:

  • 2.1 million tonnes averaging 5.78% zinc, 0.72% copper,19.5 g/t silver and 0.6 g/t gold, for a zinc-equivalent grade of 8.42%

Contained amounts come to:

  • 274 million pounds zinc, 34.3 million pounds copper, 1.33 million ounces silver and 41,000 ounces gold

But recent drilling suggests Arrow might consist of “two separate zones arranged en echelon or that the southwestern part is displaced from the northeastern part by a fault,” Pistol Bay stated.

Still to come are assays for the two remaining holes.

From Arrow, the rig moves about eight kilometres west to sink three more holes on the property’s Fredart A zone, also known as Copperlode A. Work dating to the 1960s resulted in two conflicting historic, non-43-101 estimates of 386,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver, or 219,500 tonnes averaging 1.95% copper and 41.8 g/t silver.

The drill program follows last year’s VTEM-Plus survey, the area’s first exposure to state-of-the-art regional geophysics.

Pistol Bay Mining begins drilling its expanded zinc-copper-polymetallic Ontario VMS project

March 22nd, 2018

by Greg Klein | March 22, 2018

With about 3,500 metres planned, Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST has drilling now underway at northwestern Ontario’s VMS-rich Confederation Lake greenstone belt. Three holes of about 500 metres each will supply material from the project’s Arrow zone for preliminary metallurgical tests. From there the rig shifts roughly eight kilometres west to the Fredart zone, aka the Copperlode A zone.

Pistol Bay Mining resumes drilling at its expanded zinc-polymetallic Ontario VMS project

Last year the company released a 43-101 resource for Arrow that used a base case 3% zinc-equivalent cutoff for an inferred category showing:

  • 2.1 million tonnes averaging 5.78% zinc, 0.72% copper,19.5 g/t silver and 0.6 g/t gold, for a zinc-equivalent grade of 8.42%

Contained amounts come to:

  • 274 million pounds zinc, 34.3 million pounds copper, 1.33 million ounces silver and 41,000 ounces gold

Obviously overdue for renewed attention is Fredart. The zone has conflicting historic, non-43-101 estimates of 386,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver, or 219,500 tonnes averaging 1.95% copper and 41.8 g/t silver.

A January option agreement expands Pistol Bay’s Confederation Lake package by 3,700 hectares, for a total of about 20,700 hectares. The new turf comprises part of last year’s VTEM-Plus survey, the area’s first state-of-the-art regional geophysics. Some of the available, non-43-101 past intercepts from the acquisition’s Wasp Lake trend include 2.96% zinc and 0.04% copper over 2.79 metres, as well as 1.12% zinc and 0.04% copper over 7.19 metres. The same trend showed a strong conductive response on the VTEM-Plus results, Pistol Bay reported.

Another positive geophysical response came from the acquisition’s Fly Lake zone, where historic, non-43-101 assays reached as high as 1.36% zinc and 0.17% copper over 11.5 metres, along with 1.51% zinc and 0.08% copper over 8.9 metres. The zone appears to remain open along strike and at depth, the company stated. Nine other geophysical anomalies, meanwhile, appear to lack previous drilling.

The January option follows 5,860 hectares of staking last September that covers multiple conductors and IP anomalies identified in the airborne survey, as well as parallel conductors or extensions of known conductors.

Last month the company announced an amended agreement with a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary which will increase its hold on the C4, C5 and C6 uranium properties in Saskatchewan from 75% to 100%. The deal will bring Pistol Bay $1 million.

In January the company also announced progress with its PB Blockchain subsidiary as it builds “a suite of blockchain products to address needs that are particular to the data management and security of mining/oil and gas companies.”

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining here and here.

Selected bulk sample hits 2.46% cobalt, 6,173 g/t silver for Canada Cobalt Works’ Ontario project

March 16th, 2018

by Greg Klein | March 16, 2018

High grades continue as Canada Cobalt Works TSXV:CCW conducts underground bulk sampling at the past-producing Castle mine in eastern Ontario. A pulp assay on a 35-kilogram sample released March 16 showed 2.46% cobalt, 1% nickel and 6,173 g/t or 198.5 ounces per tonne silver.

Selected bulk sample hits 2.46% cobalt, 6,173 g/t silver for Canada Cobalt Works’ Ontario project

Visible cobalt mineralization can be seen
in the former Castle mine’s first level.

A metallic screen fire assay on a 66-gram native silver sample not included in the previous assay brought “a head grade of 818,254 g/t (26,307 ounces per tonne),” Canada Cobalt stated. The samples were selective and not representative, the company emphasized.

Samples came from the historic mine’s first level, where rehab engineers have observed cobalt mineralization in the stopes, Canada Cobalt added. In operation off and on between 1917 and 1989, Castle’s underground workings extend through 11 levels totalling about 18 kilometres.

Last month the company reported two mini-bulk samples, with one assaying 2.47% cobalt, 23.4 g/t silver, 0.68% nickel and 1.83 g/t gold, and the other showing 0.91% cobalt and 460 g/t silver. That followed two mini-bulk samples of 3.124% and 1.036% cobalt released in December. The company also has assays pending from a 2,405-metre surface drill program conducted last summer.

As for the former Beaver mine in Ontario’s Cobalt camp 80 kilometres southeast of Castle, in December Canada Cobalt released three composite samples averaging 4.68% cobalt, 3.09% nickel and 46.9 g/t silver.

Canada Cobalt appointed Ron Molnar as an adviser on the company’s proprietary Re-2OX process for extracting cobalt and lithium from used Li-ion batteries. “Molnar has designed, built and operated over 60 pilot plant circuits extracting, separating and purifying a wide range of metallic elements from cobalt to rare earths,” the company stated.

Canada Cobalt also plans to build a 600-tpd gold processing facility to be financed by Granada Gold Mine TSXV:GGM, which holds a project near Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. The two companies share overlapping management and directors.

Canada Cobalt closed a private placement of $1.03 million in January.

Canadian exploration spending projected to rise 6%; Manitoba contradicts its Fraser Institute ranking

March 14th, 2018

by Greg Klein | March 14, 2018

It’s hardly a boom time scenario but mineral exploration within Canada should see a healthy 6% spending increase this year, according to recent federal government figures. Info supplied by companies shows an estimated total of $2.238 billion planned for exploration and deposit appraisal this year, compared with $2.111 billion in 2017. The second annual increase in a row, it’s far less dramatic than last year’s 29.6% leap.

Canadian exploration spending projected to rise 6% Manitoba contradicts its Fraser Institute ranking

The Natural Resources Canada survey compares preliminary numbers for metals and non-metals from last year with projected budgets for 2018.

Together Quebec and Ontario account for more than half the spending, with la belle province getting 27.3% of last year’s total and 29.3% of this year’s, while Ontario got 24.9% and 26.5%.

Some runners-up were British Columbia (12.2% of Canada’s total in 2017 and 13% in 2018), Saskatchewan (9% and 7.4%) and Yukon (7.8% and 7.7%).

Proportionately Manitoba enjoyed the greatest increase, a 42% jump from $38.5 million to $54.7 million, in a performance at odds with the province’s most recent Fraser Institute ranking. Less spectacularly but still impressive, the figures show Quebec climbing 13.9% from $576.5 million to $656.7 million. British Columbia gets a 12.9% increase from $257.7 million to $290.9 million, and Ontario 12.7% from $526.2 million to $593 million.

Some disappointments include Saskatchewan, falling 13% from $189.9 million to $165.1 million. Nunavut plunged 34.6% from $169.3 million to $110.7 million.

Nunavut has to address its land access issues. In the NWT, work on the proposed Mineral Resources Act and other legislation must be to improve the investment climate. Settling long-outstanding land claims and reducing the over 30% of lands off limits to development would also help, as would proactive marketing by indigenous governments.—Gary Vivian, president, NWT and
Nunavut Chamber of Mines

Addressing the territory’s performance along with its neighbour’s 10% drop, Northwest Territories and Nunavut Chamber of Mines president Gary Vivian said, “Nunavut has to address its land access issues. In the NWT, work on the proposed Mineral Resources Act and other legislation must be to improve the investment climate. Settling long-outstanding land claims and reducing the over 30% of lands off limits to development would also help, as would proactive marketing by indigenous governments.”

Combining figures for mine complex development with exploration and deposit appraisal, this year’s projected country-wide total rises 8.9% to $14.9 billion, the highest number in the four years of data released in this survey.

Commodities getting the most money are precious metals, although at a nearly 1.5% decrease to $1.35 billion this year from $1.37 billion last year. A more drastic drop was uranium, down 23.4% to $103.7 million. Base metals saw a 38.4% surge to $406.9 million. Coal’s projected for a 31.1% boost to $70.8 million.

Exploration and deposit appraisal expenses considered for the survey include field work, engineering, economics, feasibility studies, the environment, land access and associated general expenses. Natural Resources Canada did not consider work for extensions of known reserves.

Recent studies from PricewaterhouseCoopers showed a marked improvement in junior mining company finances and a relatively stable, if cautious, ambience for more senior Canadian companies.

Covering a different period with different methodology than Natural Resources Canada, a study by EY, the B.C. government and the Association for Mineral Exploration calculated a 20% increase in B.C. exploration spending from 2016 to 2017.

See the Natural Resources Canada survey here.

Fraud Awareness Month begins amid criticism of lax enforcement against serial scammers

March 7th, 2018

by Greg Klein | March 7, 2018

Education more than deterrence seems to be the focus of Canadian securities commissions as Fraud Awareness Month begins. Two series of articles by Postmedia and the Globe and Mail reveal numerous examples of con artists evading administrative penalties and criminal charges, leaving victims powerless to recover losses.

Fraud Awareness Month begins amid criticism of lax enforcement against serial scammers

The British Columbia Securities Commission kicked off the annual awareness campaign by releasing results of a survey. The people most susceptible to investment scams, the poll found, are millennials. Over 500 respondents were tested on their reaction to a fictional investment offer that guaranteed no-risk returns of 14% to 25%.

“Although the claim contains several investment fraud warning signs, 26% of respondents said the offer was ‘worth looking into,’” the BCSC reported. “More troubling, 20% of the respondents who would look into the offer said they were interested because they need the money, indicating even greater vulnerability.”

Adults aged 18 to 34 showed the greatest naiveté, with 47% of women and 35% of men that age expressing interest. Just 13% of people 55 years and over gave similar answers, a decline from 26% in a similar 2012 study.

“Investors should always be skeptical of anyone offering a risk-free investment with an unusually high return, because there’s no such thing,” warned BCSC director of communications and education Pamela McDonald. “We encourage investors to look carefully at every investment they make, but also to listen to your gut. If something doesn’t make sense, or doesn’t feel right, we encourage you to contact the BCSC.”

The admonition follows criticism of weak enforcement by the BCSC and its counterparts. In December the Globe and Mail’s Grant Robertson and Tom Cardoso reported their analysis of 30 years of regulatory records, finding one in nine people pronounced guilty of securities fraud go on to re-offend, some even defying multiple lifetime trading bans through aliases and “jurisdiction-hopping.” Ill-gotten gains can far exceed penalties, which at any rate often remain unenforced.

In November a Postmedia series by Gordon Hoekstra reported numerous cases of uncollected BCSC fines and payback orders on scammers who in some cases continue to hold significant assets. Others transfer assets with relative ease.

Between the fiscal years ending in 2008 and 2017, Hoekstra stated, the BCSC collected less than 2% of $510 million in fines and payback orders. The Ontario Securities Commission did somewhat better, collecting 18% over the last decade.

In a December response to the Globe and Mail, the Canadian Securities Administrators stated that securities commissions are limited to pursuing administrative cases, with police responsible for criminal matters. But last month Hoekstra reported examples of Vancouver police and RCMP refusing to investigate fraud allegations. Vancouver cops say they typically refer cases of investment fraud to the BCSC. The RCMP declined to investigate another example on the grounds that it was a BCSC matter.

In another February story, Hoekstra revealed the BCSC “quietly” stayed more than $35 million of penalties regarding nine cases following a B.C. Court of Appeal decision on a pump-and-dump operation.

Underground mini-bulk sampling brings Canada Cobalt Works 2.47% cobalt in Ontario

February 27th, 2018

by Greg Klein | February 27, 2018

Eastern Ontario’s former Castle mine gave up more high-grade assays as Canada Cobalt Works TSXV:CCW takes initial permitting steps for dewatering the underground workings and building a processing facility for another project. A 13-kilogram sample showed 2.47% cobalt, 23.4 g/t silver, 0.68% nickel and 1.83 g/t gold. A 14-kilo sample brought 0.91% cobalt, 460 g/t silver and anomalous nickel and gold. The company, formerly Castle Silver Resources, warned that the samples are selective and not necessarily representative.

Underground mini-bulk sampling brings Canada Cobalt Works 2.47% cobalt in Ontario

Two mini-bulk samples released in early December graded 3.124% and 1.036% cobalt, along with silver and nickel. Assays are pending from last summer’s 2,405-metre surface drill campaign, from where a single intercept released so far graded 1.55% cobalt, along with nickel, gold and silver over 0.65 metres.

The company’s now preparing to apply for government permission to dewater levels two to 11 of the former mine, which operated intermittently between 1917 and 1989.

With plans to build a 600-tpd gravity flotation cyanidation mill, Canada Cobalt has retained an engineering firm to begin earthworks studies for permitting. The plant would be financed by Granada Gold Mine TSXV:GGM to process material from its project near Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec, about 200 road kilometres away. Granada’s gold project reached pre-feasibility in 2014 and a resource update in June.

Canada Cobalt also holds the former Beaver mine in Ontario’s Cobalt camp, about 80 kilometres southeast of the flagship Castle project. In December the company released assays for three composite samples that averaged 4.68% cobalt, 3.09% nickel, 46.9 g/t silver and 0.08 g/t gold.

A private placement that closed in mid-January brought the company $1.03 million.

Castle Silver Resources’ Frank Basa sees cobalt exploration bringing new interest to a former silver mine

December 12th, 2017

…Read more