Sunday 25th June 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘ontario’

Castle Silver Resources samples 1.8% cobalt and 8.6% nickel at former silver mine

June 12th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 12, 2017

High-grade silver distracted previous operators of Ontario’s Castle mine from high-grade cobalt and nickel, says the current project operator. Among the evidence are initial chip sample results from an underground program at Castle Silver Resources’ (TSXV:CSR) property, about 80 kilometres northwest of the historic Cobalt camp. The first five samples averaged 1.06% cobalt, 5.3% nickel and 17.5 g/t silver, with the three best assays showing:

  • 1.8% cobalt, 8.6% nickel and 25.2 g/t silver

  • 1.6% cobalt, 7.6% nickel and 32 g/t silver

  • 0.81% cobalt, 5.9% nickel and 4.1 g/t silver
Castle Silver Resources samples 1.8% cobalt and 8.6% nickel at former silver mine

Pinkish alteration reveals cobalt mineralization
just inside an adit at the former Castle silver mine.

The samples were selective “and should not be considered representative of the mineralization hosted within the target area,” the company pointed out. The samples were composites taken from a 200-kilogram bulk sample extracted a short distance inside the adit.

As reported last week, the remainder will go through the company’s proprietary Re-2OX hydrometallurgical process to produce cobalt powder samples for battery manufacturers.

Castle Silver has also been testing Re-2OX for its recycling potential in recovering lithium-cobalt from Li-ion batteries. The process “is designed for high recovery of multiple metals and elements, opening opportunities that simply didn’t exist decades ago at this mine or throughout the northern Ontario silver-cobalt district,” said president/CEO Frank Basa.

The 3,252-hectare project’s former mine consists of “11 levels covering a footprint 727 metres east-west, 455 metres north-south and 258 metres deep,” he added.

Lying under much of the property is the 300‐metre-thick Nipissing diabase intrusive, which Castle Silver interprets as a potential heat source “that mobilized various metals—notably, of course, silver intimately associated with cobalt, but also gold, copper, zinc and nickel.”

Underground bulk sampling continues as the company also builds a 3D model from historic data.

With an oversubscribed second tranche that closed last month, Castle Silver has so far raised a total of $966,500 from a private placement offer that’s been increased to $1.2 million.

Castle Silver also holds a 100% option on the Beaver and Violet cobalt-silver properties hosting former mines near the town of Cobalt, 80 kilometres southeast.

Read about cobalt supply and demand.

Numismatic news: Loonie turns 30, Rio Tinto unveils precious metal/diamond coins

June 8th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 8, 2017

Its size and weight wore out pockets, its value raised panhandlers’ expectations and its name puzzled foreign visitors. But following its appearance 30 years ago this month, the loonie “found its way into our hearts,” the Royal Canadian Mint maintains. To celebrate this anniversary, the Mint released a limited edition set of two silver dollars. One depicts the loon, the other shows the originally intended canoe, a design that graced Canadian silver dollars from 1935 to 1986. The two $1 coins will cost collectors $79.95.

Numismatic news: Loonie turns 30, Rio Tinto unveils precious metals/diamond coins

The originally intended design for Canada’s dollar coin
distinguishes one of the anniversary set’s two silver pieces.
(Photo: Royal Canadian Mint)

The original voyageur design’s fate comprises a minor legend of numismatic history and bureaucratic bungling. The dies disappeared in November 1986 en route from Ottawa to Winnipeg, where they were supposed to generate an initial 450 million coins. But the Mint did save nearly $80 by using regular courier instead of an armoured courier.

According to media reports at the time, federal officials covered up the suspicious loss and made excuses for the new coin’s delayed appearance. Finally, to foil counterfeiters, the Mint replaced the canoe with an uninspiring Plan B.

The missing dies never did turn up, Mint spokesperson Alex Reeves informs ResourceClips.com.

With no embarrassment in calling the loonie one of Canada’s “most recognizable symbols,” Mint president/CEO Sandra Hanington said it’s “also known around the world as an innovative trailblazer for its composition and cutting-edge security features.”

Additionally the loonie “changed stripping forever,” according to the National Post. Those who’ve experienced pre-1987 peelers’ bars might agree. But the NP writer’s expertise sounds less certain when he claims the loonie amounts to a hidden tax because “banknotes get spent almost immediately, whereas coins get stashed into jars and piggy banks.”

Australian icons got more majestic treatment when Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO teamed up with the Perth Mint to produce three magnificent coins celebrating that country’s unique fauna and rich resources. Although declared legal tender, they’re not likely to see circulation. Weighing a kilo each, respectively made of gold, platinum and rose gold (an alloy used in jewelry) and set with coloured diamonds from Rio’s Argyle mine, the three-coin Australian Trilogy comes with a price tag of AU$1.8 million.

Just one set has been struck.

Argyle, by the way, “produces virtually the world’s entire supply of rare pink diamonds, and yet less than 0.1% of the diamonds produced by the Argyle mine are pink,” Rio stated.

Numismatic news: Loonie turns 30, Rio Tinto unveils precious metals/diamond coins

Gold, platinum and rose gold combine with pink, violet and
purple-pink diamonds in this one-of-a-kind set. (Photo: Perth Mint)

Related:

Castle Silver Resources readies bulk cobalt extraction, end-user samples and lithium-cobalt recycling

June 6th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 6, 2017

Pursuing the cobalt potential of a former high-grade silver mine, Castle Silver Resources TSXV:CSR keeps busy on a number of fronts. With underground bulk extraction in progress at Ontario’s Castle past-producer, the company has sent part of its first sample containing visible cobalt to an assay lab. The rest of the sample will go through the company’s proprietary Re-2OX hydrometallurgical process to produce cobalt powders for evaluation by battery manufacturers.

Castle Silver Resources readies bulk cobalt extraction, end-user samples and lithium-cobalt recycling

Previously collected samples show the pinkish cobalt
oxidation typically found on Castle Silver’s project.

Located about 80 kilometres northwest of Ontario’s historic Cobalt camp, the mine operated on and off between 1917 and 1988, producing 9.5 million ounces of silver and 299,847 pounds of cobalt. This Phase I program on the 3,252-hectare project has more bulk sampling planned, while 3D modelling is underway using the historic info.

With an eye on recycling opportunities, Castle Silver has also been testing its “highly adaptable” Re-2OX process for cobalt-lithium recovery from Li-ion batteries. Re-2OX strips battery casings to leach the cathodes and create a high-purity precipitate containing the metal. The company expects to release first-stage results soon from SGS Lakefield.

Last month Castle Silver closed an oversubscribed second tranche of a private placement that has so far totalled $966,500. The company has since raised the total offer to $1.2 million.

Within the Cobalt camp 80 kilometres southeast, Castle Silver holds a 100% option on the Beaver and Violet cobalt-silver properties.

Read about cobalt supply and demand.

New gold zone helps BonTerra Resources establish continuity at Gladiator

June 6th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 6, 2017

Known as the Rivage Gap, some 600 intriguing metres separating BonTerra Resources’ (TSXV:BTR) Gladiator deposit and the Rivage zone to the west has been a focus of current drilling. Now assays reveal a new zone south and west of the deposit that could help close the gap.

BonTerra has committed at least four rigs to sink up to 40,000 metres on its 8,126-hectare property that’s adding to the excitement that Osisko Mining’s (TSX:OSK) Windfall project has generated in Quebec’s Urban-Barry camp.

BonTerra announced results for three holes on June 6, showing:

Hole BA-17-06

  • 7.1 g/t gold over 1 metre, starting at 37 metres in downhole depth (Footwall zone)

  • 1.4 g/t over 2 metres, starting at 477 metres (Main zone)

BA-17-11

  • 12.7 g/t over 3.6 metres, starting at 424 metres (Main zone)

BA-17-12

  • 11.1 g/t over 2 metres, starting at 17 metres (Main zone)

  • 3.5 g/t over 2 metres, starting at 32 metres (Mid zone)

  • 8.8 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 346.7 metres (new South zone)
New gold zone helps BonTerra Resources establish continuity at Gladiator

With at least four rigs in action, BonTerra
Resources keeps its Gladiator camp busy.

True widths were estimated between 60% and 80%.

BA-17-12, “the most predominant and westerly hole,” was the fourth hole so far to hit the new South zone, which has approximately 500 metres in strike. Drilling has also extended other zones to the west, with the Main and Footwall zones reaching over one kilometre each in strike. Gladiator itself has been drilled to 850 metres in depth and 1.2 kilometres in strike, remaining open in all directions.

That outlines Gladiator well beyond its 2012 resource which, using a 4 g/t cutoff, showed an inferred 905,000 tonnes averaging 9.37 g/t for 273,000 ounces gold.

Apart from the Rivage Gap, drilling also targets the Deep East zone and additional areas described as “large gaps or voids with currently little drill information.”

The assays follow a batch released in mid-May, strengthening the presence of four other areas in the gap, the North, Footwall, Porphyry/Main and Mid zones. Footwall gave up a standout intercept of 10 g/t gold over 4 metres, while North followed closely with 9.5 g/t over 4.2 metres.

In March BonTerra optioned Durango Resources’ (TSXV:DGO) Trove property, described as a direct extension of the Gladiator/Coliseum southwest mineralized trend.

Financings in February and March raked in $5.2 million from Kinross Gold TSX:K, as well as nearly $15 million that came with the participation of Sprott Capital Partners.

In Ontario’s Cadillac-Larder Lake fault zone, meanwhile, BonTerra has drilling planned to update historic, non-43-101 resources. VP of exploration Dale Ginn believes three historic deposits could comprise a single deposit.

Read more about BonTerra Resources.

‘Everyone’s hiring again’

May 24th, 2017

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting presages a wave of M&A

by Greg Klein

As an executive search firm, the Mining Recruitment Group might serve as a bellwether for the industry. Founder and self-described mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says, “I put together management teams for companies, I connect people with opportunities and opportunities with people.” In that role, he experienced the upturn well before many industry players did.

To most of them, the long-awaited resurgence arrived late last year. Pollard saw it several months earlier.

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting could presage a wave of M&A

“The market came back in a huge way, at least in the hiring side, early last year when my phone started ringing a hell of a lot more,” he explains. “There was a huge volume. And what I’ve found is that the available talent pool for executives shrank in a period of about six months. In January 2016, for example, I was working on a search and there was almost a lineup out the door of some really big-name people. What I’m finding now, a year and a half later, is that the available talent has almost evaporated. It’s much harder to recruit for senior positions.”

Lately his work suggests another industry development. “The major upturn I’m seeing in the market now is a huge demand for corporate development people who can do technical due diligence on projects. Over the last few years large mining companies and investment banks cut staff almost to the bone in that regard because no one was interested in doing deals or looking at acquisitions.”

Just completed, his most recent placement was for Sprott. “They had me looking for someone with a technical background who can do due diligence for their investments. In doing so I spoke with everyone on the street, from investment banks to some big name corporate development people and they all said the same thing: Everyone’s hiring again. These are people who couldn’t get job offers a year ago, now every single candidate on the short list for this last search has multiple offers from companies looking to get them. I haven’t seen that in five years.

“So that leads me to believe companies have been staffing up their corporate development teams. I see that as a major sign that you’re going to see M&A pick up in a huge, huge way, probably over the next three to six months.”

An early example would be last week’s Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD buyout of Integra Gold TSXV:ICG—“one of my best clients over the years”—in a deal valued at $590 million.

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting could presage a wave of M&A

Andrew Pollard: Executive recruiting “leads me to believe companies have been staffing up their corporate development teams.”

“I think there’s leverage for other companies to start pulling the trigger faster because they’re adding the expertise to get these things done.”

Having founded the Mining Recruitment Group over a decade ago at the age of 20, “a snotty kid” with only a single year of related experience, he’s placed people in companies with market caps ranging from $5 million to well over $200 million. Now in a position to pick and choose his assignments, Pollard’s business concentrates on “the roles that will have the most impact on a company’s future.” That tends to be CEO, president, COO and board appointments.

Last year he placed five CEOs, as well as other positions. Among those assignments, Pollard worked with Frank Giustra on a CEO search for Fiore Exploration TSXV:F and filled another vacancy for Treasury Metals TSX:TML as it advances Goliath toward production.

But the hiring surge coincides with an industry-wide recruitment challenge. Pollard attributes that to a demographic predicament complicated by mining’s notorious cyclicality.

During the 1990s, he points out, fewer people chose mining careers, resulting in a shortage of staffers who’d now be in their 40s and 50s. Greater numbers joined up during the more promising mid-2000s, only to “get spat out” when markets went south. Now Pollard gets a lot of calls to replace baby boomers who want to retire. Too many of those retirements are coming around the same time, he says, because stock losses during the downturn had forced executives to postpone their exit.

Now, with a wave of retirements coinciding with a demographic gap, Pollard sees a “perfect storm to identify the next batch of young leaders.”

But he also sees promise in a new generation. That inspired him to assemble Young Leaders, one of two panel discussions he’ll present at the International Metal Writers Conference in Vancouver on May 28 and 29.

“By talking with some very successful executives age 35 and under, I want to show that we need to look at people one generation younger, and foster and develop this talent.”

By talking with some very successful executives age 35 and under, I want to show that we need to look at people one generation younger, and foster and develop this talent.

Well, it’s either talent or a precocious Midas touch that distinguishes these panel members. Maverix Metals TSXV:MMX CEO Dan O’Flaherty co-founded the royalty/streaming company just last year, already accumulating assets in 10 countries and a $200-million market cap.

As president/CEO of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Jordan Trimble proved adept at fundraising and deal-making while building a 250,000-hectare uranium-thorium exploration portfolio in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin. Integra president/CEO Steve de Jong raised the company from a $10-million market cap in 2012 to last week’s $590-million takeout.

And, demographic gap notwithstanding, Pollard’s second panel features three other success stories, just a bit older but with lots of potential left after guiding three of last year’s biggest M&A deals. They’ll take part in the Vision to Exit discussion, which closes the conference on May 29.

Eira Thomas burst into prominence at the Lac de Gras diamond fields where she discovered Diavik at age 24. Her most recent major coup took place last year on the Klondike gold fields with Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) $520-million buyout of Kaminak Gold.

Featherstone Capital president/CEO Doug Forster founded and led Newmarket Gold, producing over 225,000 ounces a year from three Australian mines and enticing Kirkland Lake Gold’s (TSX:KL) billion-dollar offer.

Now chairperson of Liberty Gold TSX:LGD and a director of NexGen Energy TSX:NXE, Mark O’Dea co-founded and chaired True Gold Mining, acquired in April 2016 by Endeavour Mining TSX:EDV. Three other companies that O’Dea co-founded, led and sold were Fronteer Gold, picked up by Newmont Mining NYSE:NEM in 2011; Aurora Energy, sold to Paladin Energy TSX:PDN in 2011; and True North Nickel, in which Royal Nickel TSX:RNX bought a majority interest in 2014.

“We’ll be looking at how they go into deals, what their philosophy is, what’s their current reading of the market and what they’re going to do next. They each have a big future ahead of them.”

Pollard’s two panel discussions take place at the International Metal Writers Conference on May 28 and 29 at the Vancouver Convention Centre East. Pre-register for free or pay $20 at the door.

In all, the conference brings generations of talent, expertise and insight to an audience of industry insiders and investors alike.

Read more about the International Metal Writers Conference.

Pistol Bay Mining president Charles Desjardins begins a state-of-the-art re-examination of Ontario’s Confederation Lake

May 24th, 2017

…Read more

High-grade gold helps BonTerra Resources close the Rivage gap

May 16th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 16, 2017

With a goal of demonstrating continuity along a 1.2-kilometre potential strike—and maybe stealing some of Osisko Mining’s (TSX:OSK) Urban Barry glory—BonTerra Resources TSXV:BTR released another batch of high-grade assays May 16. Results so far show the Gladiator deposit open in all directions but much of the drilling has focused on closing its gap with the Rivage zone to the west.

Intercepts released for the Rivage gap’s four zones show:

Hole BA-17-04

  • 9.5 g/t gold over 4.2 metres, starting at 88.8 metres in downhole depth, North zone

  • 10 g/t over 4 metres, starting at 233 metres, Footwall zone

  • 1.4 g/t over 25 metres, starting at 272 metres, Porphyry/Main zone
  • (including 3.6 g/t over 3 metres)
High-grade gold helps BonTerra Resources fill the Rivage gap

Fortified by money and high grades, BonTerra Resources
plans up to 40,000 metres for Gladiator’s current program.

BA-17-07

  • 12 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 355 metres, Main zone

BA-17-08

  • 7.5 g/t over 1 metre, starting at 210 metres, North zone

  • 8 g/t over 1 metre, starting at 264 metres, Mid zone

  • 6.4 g/t over 1.8 metres, starting at 300.2 metres, Footwall zone

  • 3.4 g/t over 5.7 metres, starting at 390 metres, Main zone

BA-17-09

  • 9 g/t over 1.8 metres, starting at 67 metres, Footwall zone

BA-17-10

  • 5.6 g/t over 1.5 metres, starting at 177.5 metres, North zone

  • 8.4 g/t over 3.5 metres, starting at 198.5 metres, Footwall zone

  • 5.2 g/t over 2.5 metres, starting at 212.5 metres, Mid zone

  • 5.3 g/t over 2 metres, starting at 237 metres, Main zone

True widths were estimated between 60% and 80%.

Continued high grades add to the anticipation of an update to Gladiator’s 2012 resource, which used a 4 g/t cutoff to show an inferred 905,000 tonnes averaging 9.37 g/t for 273,000 ounces gold.

With up to 40,000 metres planned for this campaign, drilling has so far hit multiple high-grade intercepts between Gladiator and Rivage, confirmed over one kilometre in strike for each of the Main and Footwall zones, and sought extensions of the Gladiator deposit to 850 metres in depth and 1.2 kilometres in strike, BonTerra stated. Drilling also focuses on the Deep East zone “and within large gaps or voids with currently little drill information” on the 8,126-hectare property.

In late March the company took out a 100% option on Durango Resources’ (TSXV:DGO) Trove property, which BonTerra described as a direct extension of its Gladiator/Coliseum southwest mineralized trend.

A few days earlier the company gained another large cash injection, this one a $5.2-million private placement that gave Kinross Gold TSX:K an approximately 9.5% stake in BonTerra. That followed nearly $15 million raised over February and March with the participation of Sprott Capital Partners.

BonTerra also holds the 2,165-hectare Larder Lake gold project in Ontario’s Cadillac-Larder Lake fault zone, where drilling’s planned to bring historic, non-43-101 resources for two zones up to date.

Read more about BonTerra Resources.

Pistol Bay Mining CEO Charles Desjardins brings modern techniques and a region-wide approach to Confederation Lake

May 15th, 2017

…Read more

Pistol Bay Mining CEO Charles Desjardins prepares for state-of-the-art, regional exploration of his polymetallic Ontario projects

May 11th, 2017

…Read more

Pistol Bay signs LOI on Confederation Lake property, expands airborne geophysics

May 5th, 2017

by Greg Klein | May 5, 2017

Update: On May 8 Pistol Bay announced a further expansion of the airborne VTEM Plus survey, from 1,128 to 2,100 line-kilometres, covering a 40-kilometre length of the Confederation Lake greenstone belt.

An upcoming geophysical program has been extended to fly a potential land acquisition under consideration by Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST. The company announced a letter of intent on the 496-hectare Copperlode property, about four kilometres along strike from Pistol Bay’s Arrow zone in Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt. Having already assembled the area’s largest land package, the company plans region-wide, state-of-the-art exploration over neglected but VMS-rich ground.

Copperlode would bring Pistol Bay two more historic, non-43-101 estimates:

  • D zone: 32,600 tonnes averaging 7.58% zinc and 0.26% copper

  • E zone: 145,000 tonnes averaging 8.28% zinc, 1.02% copper and 24 g/t silver
Pistol Bay signs LOI on Confederation Lake property, expands airborne geophysics

Additionally, some historic, non-43-101 drill intercepts include:

  • B zone: 2.5% zinc and 1.68% copper over 6.3 metres

  • C zone: 0.21% zinc and 6.02% copper over 1.5 metres

  • Hornet zone: 7.56% zinc and 0.08% copper over 6.6 metres
  • 4.07% zinc and 1.13% copper over 5.03 metres

Hornet remains open at depth and along strike.

On finishing the region-wide airborne VTEM Plus campaign Pistol Bay may acquire an initial 65% option on Copperlode from Frontline Gold TSXV:FGC, which holds an option on the claims from another vendor. Pistol Bay would pay Frontline $26,000 and issue 450,000 shares over two years and spend $150,000 over three years. Another $50,000 and 300,000 shares would boost Pistol Bay’s stake to 80%.

Pistol Bay’s current Confederation Lake portfolio consists of 9,450 hectares with a number of historic estimates, including the 2007 Arrow resource on which the company began a 43-101 update last month.

Also last month, the company closed a $336,000 private placement that followed a $548,436 placement in March. April brought more money with $750,000 from a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary as part of its 100% option on Pistol Bay’s uranium properties in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin.

Read more about Pistol Bay Mining.