Wednesday 18th January 2017

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Posts tagged ‘ontario’

Cobalt: A precarious supply chain

January 14th, 2017

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist

Cobalt: A precarious supply chain

 

How does your mobile phone last for 12 hours on just one charge? It’s the power of cobalt, along with several other energy metals, that keeps your lithium-ion battery running.

The only problem? Getting the metal from the source to your electronics is not an easy feat, and this makes for an extremely precarious supply chain for manufacturers.

This infographic comes to us from LiCo Energy Metals TSXV:LIC and it focuses on where this important ingredient of green technology originates from, and the supply risks associated with its main sources.

What is cobalt?

Cobalt is a transition metal found between iron and nickel on the periodic table. It has a high melting point (1493° C) and retains its strength to a high temperature.

Similar to iron or nickel, cobalt is ferromagnetic. It can retain its magnetic properties to 1100° C, a higher temperature than any other material. Ferromagnetism is the strongest type of magnetism: it’s the only one that typically creates forces strong enough to be felt and is responsible for the magnets encountered in everyday life.

These unique properties make the metal perfect for two specialized high-tech purposes: superalloys and battery cathodes.

Superalloys

High-performance alloys drive 18% of cobalt demand. The metal’s ability to withstand intense temperatures and conditions makes it perfect for use in:

  • Turbine blades

  • Jet engines

  • Gas turbines

  • Prosthetics

  • Permanent magnets

Lithium-ion batteries

Batteries drive 49% of demand—and most of this comes from cobalt’s use in lithium-ion battery cathodes:

Type of lithium-ion cathode Cobalt in cathode Spec. energy (Wh/kg)
LFP 0% 120
LMO 0% 140
NMC 15% 200
LCO 55% 200
NCA 10% 245

The three most powerful cathode formulations for li-ion batteries all need cobalt. As a result, the metal is indispensable in many of today’s battery-powered devices:

  • Mobile phones (LCO)

  • Tesla Model S (NCA)

  • Tesla Powerwall (NMC)

  • Chevy Volt (NMC/LMO)

The Tesla Powerwall 2 uses approximately seven kilograms and a Tesla Model S (90 kWh) uses approximately 22.5 kilos of the energy metal.

The cobalt supply chain

Cobalt production has gone almost straight up to meet demand, more than doubling since the early 2000s.

But while the metal is desired, getting it is the hard part.

1. No native cobalt has ever been found.

There are four widely distributed ores that exist but almost no cobalt is mined from them as a primary source.

2. Most cobalt production is mined as a byproduct.

Mine source % cobalt production
Nickel (byproduct) 60%
Copper (byproduct) 38%
Cobalt (primary) 2%

This means it is hard to expand production when more is needed.

3. Most production occurs in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country with elevated supply risks.

Country Tonnes %
Total 122,701 100.0%
United States 524 0.4%
China 1,417 1.2%
DRC 67,975 55.4%
Rest of World 52,785 43.0%

(Source: CRU, estimated production for 2017, tonnes)

The future of cobalt supply

Companies like Tesla and Panasonic need reliable sources of the metal and right now there aren’t many failsafes.

The United States hasn’t mined cobalt in significant volumes since 1971 and the USGS reports that the U.S. only has 301 tonnes of the metal stored in stockpiles.

The reality is that the DRC produces about half of all cobalt and it also holds approximately 47% of all global reserves.

Why is this a concern for end-users?

1. The DRC is one of the poorest, most corrupt and most coercive countries on the planet.

It ranks:

  • 151st out of 159 countries in the Human Freedom Index

  • 176th out of 188 countries on the Human Development Index

  • 178th out of 184 countries in terms of GDP per capita ($455)

  • 148th out of 169 countries in the Corruption Perceptions Index

2. The DRC has had more deaths from war since WWII than any other country on the planet.
Recent wars in the DRC:

  • First Congo War (1996-1997)—An invasion by Rwanda that overthrew the Mobutu regime.

  • Second Congo War (1998-2003)—The bloodiest conflict in world history since WWII, with 5.4 million deaths.

3. Human rights in mining

The DRC government estimates that 20% of all cobalt production in the country comes from artisanal miners—independent workers who dig holes and mine ore without sophisticated mines or machinery.

There are at least 100,000 artisanal cobalt miners in the DRC and UNICEF estimates that up to 40,000 children could be in the trade. Children can be as young as seven years old and they can work up to 12 hours with physically demanding work earning $2 per day.

Meanwhile, Amnesty International alleges that Apple, Samsung and Sony fail to do basic checks in making sure the metal in their supply chains did not come from child labour.

Most major companies have vowed that any such practices will not be tolerated in their supply chains.

Other sources

Where will tomorrow’s supply come from and will the role of the DRC eventually diminish? Will Tesla achieve its goal of a North American supply chain for its key metal inputs?

Mining exploration companies are already looking at regions like Ontario, Idaho, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories to find tomorrow’s deposits.

Ontario: Ontario is one of the only places in the world where cobalt-primary mines have existed. This camp is near the aptly named town of Cobalt, which is located halfway between Sudbury, the world’s nickel capital, and Val-d’Or, one of the most famous gold camps in the world.

Idaho: Idaho is known as the Gem State while also being known for its silver camps in Coeur d’Alene—but it has also been a cobalt producer in the past.

B.C.: The mountains of B.C. are known for their rich gold, silver, copper, zinc and met coal deposits. But cobalt often occurs with copper and some mines in B.C. have produced cobalt in the past.

Northwest Territories: Cobalt can also be found up north, as the NWT becomes a more interesting mineral destination for companies. One hundred and sixty kilometres from Yellowknife, a gold-cobalt-bismuth-copper deposit is being developed.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

$6.6-million gold mining scam nets four-year jail terms

December 20th, 2016

by Greg Klein | December 20, 2016

Two conmen who touted a Tanzanian gold mining stock now face prison time and restitution orders, the Ontario Securities Commission announced December 20. William Wallace and Robert Heward were each sentenced to four years and ordered to pay back $6.67 million to approximately 105 people who invested in Londoni Gold Corp. The pair were convicted of fraud, illegal distribution and unregistered trading. The last two charges brought concurrent 18-month sentences.

We will continue to seek prison sentences for individuals who commit crimes like these, which have a devastating impact on the lives of people and their families.—Jeff Kehoe,
OSC director of enforcement

Despite never having been registered with the OSC and having no prospectus for their company, the two sold Londoni shares between December 2009 and December 2013. In doing so they misrepresented the project’s operations, management, viability and production potential, the court heard. “A significant portion” of the money they raised financed their personal lifestyles.

They first appeared in a Toronto court in September 2014.

“This case sends a strong message to individuals engaged in securities fraud and illegal distributions that they will be held accountable for their misconduct,” said OSC director of enforcement Jeff Kehoe. “We will continue to seek prison sentences for individuals who commit crimes like these, which have a devastating impact on the lives of people and their families.”

The charges followed an investigation by the Joint Serious Offences Team, a partnership of the OSC, RCMP Financial Crime program and Ontario Provincial Police Anti-Rackets Branch.

Polymetallic promise

December 16th, 2016

Pistol Bay Mining brings regional exploration to Ontario’s VMS-rich Confederation Lake

by Greg Klein

During the doom and gloom of mid-2015 Charles Desjardins saw a hopeful sign in zinc. A search for prospective sources led the president of Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST to the volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits of western Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt. There he found different operators left what he considered a mixed legacy—work that was very impressive but carried out in a rather unco-ordinated manner. Now, with a commodity that’s justified his optimism and a portfolio that’s poised to be the belt’s largest, his company’s launching an ambitious new program to take a region-wide approach to Confederation Lake.

“Even though there’s been a lot of money spent in that region there really hasn’t been a lot of continuity in exploration programs,” says Desjardins. “For example we found 8,000 rock geochemistry samples that Noranda did. In today’s terms that’s about $300,000 worth of work just for the analysis, never mind actually acquiring all those samples. We don’t know if Noranda did anything with this, it might have been right when they were getting out of there. But it showed us some obvious things, including a couple of new, big, big targets and extensions of known targets.”

Pistol Bay Mining brings regional exploration to VMS-rich Confederation Lake

That’s just part of the inspiration for a two-tiered program to begin in January. Drilling would start with about six holes and a few thousand metres, he says. “Beyond that, the plan is to do a regional airborne survey with new technology that can see VMS-style mineralization at 600 to 700 metres. When you look at Flin Flon and Snow Lake, geophysics there found two major deposits at the 500-metre level.”

Confederation Lake characterizes the tendency of VMS deposits to appear in clusters, Desjardins points out. He attributes the region’s largest mine, South Bay, for around 354 million pounds of zinc, 57.6 million pounds of copper and 3.74 million ounces of silver produced between 1972 and 1981. Grades averaged about 11.06% zinc, 1.8% copper and 72.7 g/t silver.

Pending exchange approval for a four-year option on AurCrest Gold’s (TSXV:AGO) regional holdings, Pistol Bay’s turf comprises 7,050 hectares along a 43-kilometre stretch of the 60-kilometre-long belt. The projects include four historic deposits.

Already under a four-year option is a contiguous group of properties named Dixie 17, 18, 19 and 20 that’s been consolidated into a single project. Dixie comes with a 1992 historic, non-43-101 “mineral inventory” from Noranda estimating 150,000 short tons with an average 14% zinc.

Some eight kilometres southeast, the Dixie 3 property, formerly called Snake Falls, hosts another historic, non-43-101 Noranda estimate, this one 91,000 short tons averaging 1% copper and 10% zinc.

Roughly 20 kilometres northeast sits the Arrow zone, one of the acquisitions waiting approval. Arrow comes with a 2007 resource compiled by AurCrest predecessor Tribute Minerals that Pistol Bay isn’t treating as 43-101 and intends to re-do. Using three cutoff grades, the estimate showed:

3% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 2.07 million tonnes averaging 5.92% zinc, 0.75% copper, 21.1 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

  • inferred: 120,552 tonnes averaging 2.6% zinc, 0.56% copper, 18.6 g/t silver and 0.4 g/t gold

5% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 1.76 million tonnes averaging 6.75% zinc, 0.79% copper, 22.3 g/t silver and 0.61 g/t gold

  • inferred: 51,631 tonnes averaging 3.86% zinc, 0.79% copper, 23.9 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

10% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 633,000 tonnes averaging 14.3% zinc, 1.11% copper, 31.7 g/t silver and 0.85 g/t gold

That acquisition includes the contiguous Copperlode A or Fredart zone, with its historic, non-43-101 estimate of 425,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver.

Even though there’s been a lot of money spent in that region there really hasn’t been a lot of continuity in exploration programs.—Charles Desjardins,
president of Pistol Bay Mining

Obviously these deposits cry out for 43-101 treatment. Pistol Bay intends to begin with Arrow, the most recent resource but with another 16 holes to consider. Desjardins hopes to have that done within six months.

He points to assays that followed historic estimates on the other deposits, like 7.34% zinc and 1.4% copper over 9.5 metres, and another 15.44% zinc and 0.43% copper over 4.3 metres at Dixie. Intriguing zinc-copper intercepts also came from the Joy-Caravelle area, part of the AurCrest package. Historic sampling at Copperlode A found molybdenum grading up to 1.46%.

Then there’s the 8,000 geochemistry samples left by Noranda. Additionally, Pistol Bay has MPH Consulting at work on an extensive review of previous geophysics. Add to that the new airborne and drilling to begin in January and Desjardins looks forward to a wealth of data with considerable potential waiting to be unlocked.

There’s strong community support too, he adds. “One First Nation invested I think about $600,000 in AurCrest,” he says.

In Saskatchewan’s uranium-prolific Athabasca Basin, Pistol Bay JVs with a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary on the C-5 project. Having earned 75% of its option already, Rio has stated its intention to acquire the full 100% by the end of 2019. That would bring Pistol Bay $5 million and a 5% net profit interest.

The company expects to soon close the first tranche of a private placement offered up to $810,000. Other financings would follow, as Confederation Lake’s regional exploration continues in stages.

“We already have significant deposits that might be developed with one central mill,” Desjardins says. “But we’ll be looking for an elephant too.”

BonTerra Resources hits 64.3 g/t gold over 2 metres, adds 500 metres to strike in Abitibi

December 9th, 2016

by Greg Klein | December 9, 2016

Two high-grade intercepts in separate holes merge two zones, taking BonTerra Resources’ (TSXV:BTR) Gladiator project to 1.2 kilometres in strike. Once considered a parallel body, the Rivage zone now forms a 500-metre addition to Gladiator, which has been outlined to a depth of 650 metres, the company reported December 8. A previously stated ambition to combine the zones was realized with the first two holes targeting the gap.

The two intercepts show:

Hole BA-16-40

  • 64.3 g/t gold over 2 metres, starting at 152 metres in downhole depth

BA-16-42

  • 8.7 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 507 metres
BonTerra Resources hits 64.3 g/t gold over 2 metres, adds 500 metres to strike in Abitibi

Two rigs will work through the winter
on BonTerra’s 25,000-metre campaign.

True widths weren’t provided.

These assays follow a high-grade batch released last month, featuring one intercept of 70 g/t gold over 5.5 metres. With two rigs now in action, drilling continues on a program of up to 25,000 metres that’s slated to continue through winter.

The 7,563-hectare property has a 2012 resource estimate using a 4 g/t cutoff to show:

  • inferred: 905,000 tonnes averaging 9.37 g/t for 273,000 ounces gold

BonTerra’s Larder Lake project in Ontario’s Cadillac-Larder Lake fault zone hosts two deposits with resources that the company considers historic, non-43-101:

Bear Lake

  • inferred: 3.75 million tonnes averaging 5.7 g/t for 683,000 ounces gold

Cheminis

  • indicated: 335,000 tonnes averaging 4.07 g/t for 43,800 ounces gold

  • inferred: 1.39 million tonnes averaging 5.2 g/t for 233,400 ounces

Another 59 holes totalling over 25,000 metres were drilled since the historic estimate, giving BonTerra data to evaluate for an updated resource.

Read more about BonTerra Resources.

Opportunism knocks

December 5th, 2016

First Mining Finance found bad times beneficial for good deals

by Greg Klein

Struggling junior? Not this company. Since its trading debut in April 2015, First Mining Finance TSXV:FF has compiled 25 projects covering some 300,000 hectares, from early stage to a PEA with 4.4 million gold ounces indicated. Just as aggressively, the company boosted its treasury to a current $35 million. Now First Mining looks forward to a $21-million exploration and development program for 2017 that includes 47,000 metres of drilling.

“We were able to execute on the vision of the company, which last year was to take advantage of the bear market and acquire projects,” VP of investor relations Derek Iwanaka explains. “I don’t know of any other company that was able to acquire as many projects, or projects as good as we got, during that period.”

First Mining Finance found bad times beneficial for good deals

Located in northwestern Ontario’s Birch-Uchi greenstone belt,
First Mining’s 32,448-hectare Springpole flagship has an
updated PEA scheduled for next year.

Certainly there were deals to be had for canny acquisitors. But that was while many other companies faced financing difficulties. First Mining bucked the trend last August by closing a $27-million private placement. How did they pull that off?

“Quite easily,” responds Iwanaka. “We were literally turning down millions of dollars. We had over $70 million in orders but we didn’t want that kind of dilution. So we just took the $27 million. That should carry us for at least the next few years, including all the drilling and overhead.”

First Mining seems to have something that eludes others.

“First of all we have Keith Neumeyer at the helm, who runs a multi-billion-dollar company as it stands,” says Iwanaka. “Keith has been adept at starting companies during very bad times and manoeuvring them so when times are good we can reap the rewards for our shareholders.”

Among companies founded by the First Mining director were First Quantum Minerals TSX:FM and First Majestic Silver TSX:FR, where Neumeyer’s president/CEO. First Majestic acts as a sort of mentor to First Mining, placing some FR directors in FF’s management and board, helping to get the new company started, lending it about $1 million, vending three Mexican properties and even providing office space.

Among considerations behind an acquisition are “size and quality of the project,” Iwanaka points out. “We look at projects with good grade, scalability, exploration upside. The jurisdiction’s quite important to us. We’re basically looking at North America, but not the North. We will look at South America as well. Quebec, Ontario and Newfoundland are our favourite places although we could go to other provinces too. In the U.S. we see Nevada and Arizona as fairly mining-friendly states. We could probably look at New Mexico as well. We do have some early-stage properties in Mexico, where First Majestic has its base, but we certainly focus on Canada.”

As for commodities, “we particularly like gold but silver, platinum and palladium are also attractive, as well as base metals—anything that’s exchange-tradeable.”

Other factors include “the price of the projects, the holding cost, the infrastructure. In many cases the projects we take already have roads and power lines going to them.”

If gold’s the company’s focus, the Springpole flagship explains why. Described as one of Canada’s largest undeveloped gold projects, the northwestern Ontario potential open pit came with the past owner’s 2013 PEA. Using a 0.4 g/t gold cutoff, the 2012 resource showed:

  • indicated: 128.2 million tonnes averaging 1.07 g/t gold and 5.7 g/t silver for 4.41 million ounces gold and 23.8 million ounces silver

  • inferred: 25.7 million tonnes averaging 0.83 g/t gold and 3.2 g/t silver for 690,000 ounces gold and 2.7 million ounces silver

First Mining has work underway to bring the resource and PEA up to date. But looking back at 2013, the report calculated a post-tax NPV of US$388 million using a 5% discount, with a 13.8% post-tax IRR. Initial capex came to US$438 million with payback in 35 months of an 11-year mine life.

First Mining Finance found bad times beneficial for good deals

Visible gold was one attraction of the Goldlund project,
which has another 27,000 metres of drilling planned.

“We expect the updated PEA will be even more robust,” Iwanaka says. “The U.S. dollar has appreciated since 2013, when it was at par. We’re also looking at increasing the recovery and the pit shell. Those three things could substantially improve the economics and we hope to have the new PEA out probably by the first half of next year.”

With assays pending, a four-hole, 1,712-metre fall program provided metallurgical fodder. Next summer’s agenda calls for another 6,000 metres of infill to upgrade the resource. In the meantime, pre-permitting environmental and baseline work will soon begin.

A newer acquisition gets even more rig attention next year. Goldlund, about 60 kilometres north of Dryden and roughly 200 klicks south of Springpole, has 27,000 metres planned to upgrade the resource and work towards an eventual PEA. The former open pit and underground operation came with an estimate that First Mining considers an historic non-43-101. Using a 0.4 g/t gold cutoff, it showed:

  • measured and indicated: 19.1 million tonnes averaging 1.94 g/t for 1.19 million ounces gold

  • inferred: 25.8 million tonnes averaging 2.51 g/t for 2.08 million ounces

Cameron, maybe another 100 kilometres south of Goldlund, gets up to 9,000 metres of infill to pump up the measured and indicated prior to PEA. Using a 0.5 g/t cutoff, a 2015 resource from Chalice Gold Mines TSX:CXN showed:

  • measured: 3.72 million tonnes averaging 2.64 g/t for 316,000 ounces gold

  • indicated: 4.1 million tonnes averaging 1.92 g/t for 253,000 ounces

  • inferred: 14.5 million tonnes averaging 1.92 g/t for 894,000 ounces

Moving to southwestern Newfoundland, Hope Brook will see 5,000 metres of exploration and infill. A high 3 g/t gold cutoff gives the current resource:

  • indicated: 5.5 million tonnes averaging 4.77 g/t for 844,000 ounces gold

  • inferred: 836,000 tonnes averaging 4.11 g/t for 110,000 ounces

Again, a resource upgrade precedes a PEA, this one slated for late 2017.

Back in Ontario and roughly 110 kilometres northeast of the Springpole flagship, autumn drilling has wrapped up at Pickle Crow. Assays from the nine-hole, 1,319-metre campaign are expected in early 2017. The former mine came with a 2011 inferred resource that used a 2.25 g/t gold cutoff for an underground deposit and a 0.35 g/t cutoff for an open pit deposit:

Underground

  • 6.52 million tonnes averaging 5.4 g/t for 1.14 million ounces gold

Open pit

  • 3.63 million tonnes averaging 1.1 g/t for 126,000 ounces

Total

  • 10.15 million tonnes averaging 3.9 g/t for 1.26 million ounces

With assays to come, drilling to do and announcements for other North American projects anticipated, First Mining plans a steady news flow, says Iwanaka.

Absolutely Abitibi

November 18th, 2016

BonTerra Resources gets aggressive in Quebec gold country

by Greg Klein

BonTerra Resources gets aggressive in Quebec’s gold country

A diagram shows how far the company has progressed
beyond the 2012 resource area, outlined in blue.

 

With a standout interval of 70 grams per tonne gold over 5.5 metres, BonTerra Resources’ (TSXV:BTR) November 16 batch of assays brought further evidence of a good Abitibi address. As president/CEO Nav Dhaliwal emphasizes, “This is all new drilling, well outside the resource area, and we’re going to continue expanding.” Primed with enthusiasm, financing and a better understanding of the geology, BonTerra now hopes to connect its Gladiator project’s zones across a potential strike length of 1,200 metres.

Some highlights from the most recent seven holes show:

Hole BA-16-26

  • 19.6 g/t gold over 1 metre, starting at 412 metres in downhole depth

BA-16-30

  • 4.7 g/t over 3 metres, starting at 370 metres

BA-16-38

  • 12.4 g/t over 4 metres, starting at 769 metres
  • (including 24.3 g/t over 2 metres)

BA-16-39

  • 1.5 g/t over 10 metres, starting at 723 metres

  • 70 g/t over 5.5 metres, starting at 813.5 metres
  • (including 191.4 g/t over 2 metres)

  • 3.1 g/t over 5 metres, starting at 846 metres

True widths weren’t available.

BonTerra Resources gets aggressive in Quebec’s gold country

A cold climate will complement Bonterra Resources’ drill campaign.

The drill season started on a 600-metre strike reached last May with an intercept of 137.4 g/t over 2.5 metres. This week BA-16-39 revealed its star interval at the eastern extent of the east-plunging structure, below 600 metres in vertical depth. BA-16-38 extended the zone another 50 metres deeper and 100 metres to the east. That outlines Gladiator’s zones to 650 metres in depth and 700 metres in strike. Meanwhile, assays are pending for other completed holes.

But as Dhaliwal says, “We’re not stopping there.” Now with a second rig at work, drilling will sink deeper, as well as farther east and west. Should the program succeed in connecting the eastern zones with the Rivage zone, currently over 300 metres away, the 7,563-hectare property would have the potential 1.2-kilometre strike.

With a 4 g/t cutoff, Gladiator’s 2012 resource estimate shows:

  • inferred: 905,000 tonnes averaging 9.37 g/t for 273,000 ounces gold

A resource update might arrive in late spring or early summer, Dhaliwal says. Well into a 25,000-metre 2016 program, drilling will continue through the winter. “That’s the most efficient time to work,” he points out. “This property is covered in a foot to six feet of water. Right now we’re land-based, so we’re shooting down towards it. So winter gives us an advantage, we’ll be able to get right on top of the structure.”

Describing the crew as “lean and mean,” Dhaliwal adds, “I couldn’t be prouder of our geological team, headed by a very experienced individual, Dale Ginn.” The VP of exploration’s more than 30-year career includes service with Kerr Mines, SGX Resources, San Gold, Harmony Gold Canada, Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting, and Goldcorp TSX:G, among others.

Last winter’s relative warmth limited BonTerra to about 20 holes, but Dhaliwal’s hoping this year’s temperatures favour a more aggressive campaign.

Looking southwest from Gladiator’s position on the Casa Berardi fault zone to the Cadillac-Larder Lake fault zone just inside Ontario, BonTerra holds the 2,165-hectare Larder Lake project. The property came with estimates, which BonTerra treats as historic and non-43-101, for two deposits just over a kilometre apart. Using 2.5 g/t gold cutoffs, they show:

Bear Lake

  • inferred: 3.75 million tonnes averaging 5.7 g/t for 683,000 ounces gold

Cheminis

  • indicated: 335,000 tonnes averaging 4.07 g/t for 43,800 ounces gold

  • inferred: 1.39 million tonnes averaging 5.2 g/t for 233,400 ounces

As a past-producer, Cheminis reportedly turned out 7.6 million gold ounces at an average 3.7 g/t from depths to 315 metres.

The historic estimates predate some 59 holes totalling over 25,000 metres sunk by Gold Fields NYSE:ADR. Dhaliwal says the South African miner worked the property up to 2012, when the company slashed international exploration spending. “They left just under $6 million of work—of clean work, mind you. We’ve seen the logs and core. Dale’s hired a project manager for the Ontario side and we’ll get started on a 43-101.”

The property’s Fernland area adds a third mineralized body, with all three open at depth and within a 3.2-kilometre potential strike.

While talking about either property, Dhaliwal at times can barely contain his enthusiasm. Financing suggests he’s hardly alone in his confidence. Between December 2015 and last June, the company raised over $10.38 million. “We’re fully cashed up and we’re moving forward so stay tuned—we’re going to show you more.”

See an infographic about BonTerra Resources.

First Mining Finance drilling two Ontario gold projects

November 16th, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 16, 2016

A well-financed company with an opportunistic approach to low valuations, First Mining Finance TSV:FF has begun another Ontario drill program. Announced November 15, the Pickle Crow gold project gets up to eight holes totalling 1,100 metres. The company began drilling its Springpole gold project last month.

First Mining Finance drilling two Ontario gold projects

Infrastructure remains from over
30 years of mining at Pickle Lake.

The first such program on Pickle Crow since First Mining took over PC Gold a year ago, the rig will target the western extension of the project’s Core mine trend in hopes of finding high-grade, vein-type gold.

Pickle Crow produced 1.45 million ounces of gold and 168,757 ounces of silver between 1935 and 1966.

A 2011 inferred resource used a 2.25 g/t gold cutoff for an underground deposit and a 0.35 g/t cutoff for an open pit deposit:

Underground

  • 6.52 million tonnes averaging 5.4 g/t for 1.14 million ounces gold

Open pit

  • 3.63 million tonnes averaging 1.1 g/t for 126,000 ounces

Total

  • 10.15 million tonnes averaging 3.9 g/t for 1.26 million ounces

The property lies about seven kilometres from a provincial highway, about 400 kilometres north of Thunder Bay.

“With drilling at our Springpole gold project well underway, and with drill programs planned for our other mineral properties in the coming months, this is an exciting time for First Mining as we take the initial steps toward enhancing the value of the assets we have accumulated over the past year and a half,” said president Patrick Donnelly.

Roughly 110 kilometres southwest, the company began Springpole’s 1,500-metre program last month for metallurgical tests. First Mining plans an updated PEA for H1 2017. Springpole comes with a 2012 resource that used a 0.4 g/t gold cutoff for an open pit deposit:

  • indicated: 128.2 million tonnes averaging 1.07 g/t gold and 5.7 g/t silver for 4.41 million ounces gold and 23.8 million ounces silver

  • inferred: 25.7 million tonnes averaging 0.83 g/t gold and 3.2 g/t silver for 690,000 ounces gold and 2.7 million ounces silver

First Mining’s portfolio holds 25 North American assets. Five projects in Ontario, Quebec and Newfoundland have resource estimates. The company closed a $27-million private placement in August, raising its treasury to $37.3 million at the time.

Charles Desjardins outlines his company’s plans on becoming the largest claimholder in Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt

November 14th, 2016

…Read more

Ontario backs deep-mining research with $2.5-million grant

November 2nd, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 2, 2016

Sudbury’s status as a global capital of mining R&D gained additional recognition with a $2.5-million provincial grant. Announced at the Mining Innovation Summit on November 1, the money goes to the non-profit Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation and its Ultra Deep Mining Network.

Ontario backs deep-mining research with $2.5-million grant

The UDMN works to improve safety, efficiency and sustainability of operations at depths below 2.5 kilometres. While China has announced support for deep-mining research as part of its Three Deep program, the alarming accident rate at South African mines has been attributed partly to the unprecedented depths of some operations, one breaching the four-kilometre mark.

Ontario hosts two of the world’s 10 deepest mines, according to Mining-Technology.com. Vale’s Creighton nickel-copper mine in Sudbury holds tenth place, at about 2.5 kilometres’ depth. Glencore’s Kidd copper-zinc mine in the Timmins region holds eighth place at slightly more than three kilometres. The other eight mines are all South African gold operations.

Another type of research goes on at Creighton, which hosts the SNOLAB physics experiments including the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory that won Art McDonald a Nobel Prize in 2015.

Why Creighton? As quantum physicist Damian Pope told the National Post, the lab’s two kilometres of rock shields neutrinos from other sub-atomic particles, allowing them to be studied in relative isolation. That research, conducted where the sun don’t shine, somehow helped eggheads understand how the sun shines.

As for mining research, Sudbury hosts nine institutes dedicated to innovation, the province stated. Ontario now has 42 operating mines supporting 26,000 direct jobs and 50,000 additional jobs associated with mining and processing, according to a statement from mines minister Michael Gravelle. He valued Ontario’s 2015 mineral production at $10.8 billion.

The Ministry of Northern Development and Mines hosted the two-day Sudbury summit to bring together “government, industry, academia, thought leaders, entrepreneurs, as well as research and innovation organizations” to further encourage mining innovation.

Read about Laurentian University’s Metal Earth project.

Pistol Bay Mining plans November drilling on Dixie zinc projects in Ontario

October 26th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 26, 2016

It’s neither the land of cotton nor of traditional jazz, but of zinc with additional metals. And that’s why Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST has a November drill program planned for three of its western Ontario Dixie properties. Totalling about 1,900 hectares, Dixies 17, 18 and 19 host lenses of volcanogenic massive sulphides with zinc, copper, silver and minor gold in the Confederation Lake greenstone belt southeast of Red Lake.

Pistol Bay Mining plans November drilling on Dixie zinc projects in Ontario

All three have historic zinc-copper assays.

A review of previous geophysics will help determine drill targets for the three zones. Additionally, Pistol Bay proposes confirmation holes for Dixie 17 and 18.

Also on October 25, the company announced a private placement of up to $820,000. Pistol Bay closed a $563,450 placement in August.

Earlier this month the company announced a letter of intent to acquire regional properties from AurCrest Gold TSXV:AGO, which would make Pistol Bay the greenstone belt’s largest claimholder. The 5,136-hectare package includes a zinc-copper-silver resource and an historic, non-43-101 estimate.

In Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin, the company has a joint venture with a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary on the C-5 uranium property. Having earned 75% of its option so far, Rio intends to acquire the full 100%.

See an infographic: Eleven things every metal investor should know about zinc.