Tuesday 6th December 2016

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘nunavut’

Peregrine Diamonds outlines Nunavut spending plans as Chidliak moves to pre-feas

November 25th, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 25, 2016

Having poured about $23 million into Nunavut so far, Peregrine Diamonds TSX:PGD plans to spend another $15.5 million to $17 million next year on its Chidliak project, the Nunatsiaq News reported November 25. Most of the $23 million went to Iqaluit, home to an estimated 7,590 people. “It will cost between $50 and $75 million to go from here to where we need to get to,” the journal quoted president/CEO Tom Peregoodoff.

Peregrine Diamonds outlines Nunavut spending plans as Chidliak moves to pre-feas

Chidliak would have a 10-year lifespan,
according to last summer’s PEA.

The Baffin Island project reached PEA in July, calling for a capex of $434.9 million, an amount relatively modest for an isolated operation but considerable for a territory of about 37,082 people. The company hopes to reach feasibility by H2 2019, complete permitting by the end of that year and begin construction in H2 2019. Should hopes, financing and feasibility fall into place, Peregrine might be digging diamonds by 2021.

Brothers Robert and Eric Friedland own about 25% and 21% of the company respectively.

New infrastructure would include an all-season road to Iqaluit, about 120 kilometres southwest. The government of Nunavut hopes to have an $85-million deep sea port built there by 2020.

The territory currently has two other mines in production, Agnico Eagle’s (TSX:AEM) Meadowbank gold mine about 300 kilometres west of Hudson Bay and Baffinland Iron Mines’ Mary River iron ore operation roughly 800 kilometres north of Chidliak. Baffinland trucks ore to its own port, 100 kilometres north of the mine.

Peregoodoff said the company has yet to negotiate an Inuit Impact and Benefits Agreement, but stated such a deal would probably resemble agreements signed with Northwest Territories diamond producers, the News added.

In October the paper reported Nunavut’s 14,000-member Qikiqtani Inuit Association received more than $24 million over two years from Mary River.

Should Peregrine meet its goal, Chidliak wouldn’t be Nunavut’s first diamond operation. Just across the border from the NWT’s Lac de Gras camp, Nunavut’s Jericho mine produced gems between 2006 and 2008. Shear Minerals gave up on its restart attempt in 2012, leaving taxpayers with a large part of an estimated $10.5-million clean-up bill.

Yet diamond mining transformed the NWT economy. According to figures supplied by the NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines, between 1996 and 2015 the industry provided over 50,000 person-years of employment, 49% northern and 24% aboriginal. By far the territory’s largest private sector industry, diamond mining created 29% of the NWT’s GDP in 2014. Direct and indirect benefits bring the number up to 40%, according to chamber data.

Read how diamond mining supports the NWT economy.

Peregrine Diamonds outlines Nunavut spending plans as Chidliak moves to pre-feas

NWT Premier Bob McLeod, far right, celebrates aboriginal governments’ contributions to diamond mining
on the industry’s 25th anniversary in the territory. From left are Stanley Anablak (Kitikmeot Inuit Association),
Darryl Bohnet (Northwest Territory Métis Nation), Don Balsillie (Deninu Kué First Nation), Felix Lockhart
(Lutsel K’e and Kache Dene First Nation), Bill Enge (North Slave Métis Alliance), Chief Ernest Betsina and
Chief Edward Sangris (Yellowknives Dene First Nation), Chief Alfonz Nitsiza and Chief Clifford Daniels
(Tłı ̨chǫ Government), and Premier McLeod. (Photo: NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines)

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures to create gold-copper spinco

November 23rd, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 23, 2016

With a gold-copper asset in British Columbia and a diamond project with gold prospects in Nunavut, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI proposes to distribute its portfolio between two companies. On November 23 Dunnedin announced plans to spin out the non-diamond assets into a new listing.

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures to create gold-copper spinco

The company currently holds the 60,000-hectare Kahuna diamond project in Nunavut, where an inferred resource for two kimberlites totals 4.02 million carats, using a +0.85 mm cutoff. Till samples collected last year also showed anomalous gold of 50 ppb or more in 84 of 129 samples.

Meanwhile previous drill results from Dunnedin’s 4,000-hectare Trapper porphyry project in northwestern B.C. showed strong gold intercepts, with silver, lead and zinc showings as well.

“We believe that separate corporate vehicles for diamond and metal assets will yield the best long-term value to shareholders,” said CEO Chris Taylor.

Subject to approvals, Trapper and rights to gold at Kahuna would go to a newly created subsidiary with working capital for exploration. The new company’s shares would be distributed to Dunnedin shareholders on a pro rata basis. The new company would apply for a TSXV listing.

Dunnedin shareholders will vote on the proposed spinout early next year.

Dunnedin also plans to accelerate expiration of over six million warrants to December 23. Should all warrants be exercised, proceeds would come to about $632,708.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

A transformational discovery

November 10th, 2016

Lac de Gras glitter became the backbone of the NWT economy

by Greg Klein

This is the second of a two-part feature. See Part 1.

The greatest staking rush the world’s likely seen, a shakeup of the global diamond industry and a tremendous boost to Northwest Territories finances—all that started with the Ekati discovery announced by Chuck Fipke 25 years ago this week. The effects on the NWT alone were momentous. The exploration sector boomed like never before, reaping four discoveries in six years that became working mines, while communities and individuals realized benefits both tangible and intangible.

Exploration fervour “certainly caused an injection into the economy,” notes Tom Hoefer, NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines executive director. “But where it really made a difference was when we had mines developed.”

Lac de Gras glitter became the backbone of the NWT economy

The Ekati mine began a transformation that
out-performed all other resources and sectors in the NWT.

It actually took two operations, Ekati and Diavik, to offset the territory’s 1990s economic malaise, he says. Yellowknife’s Giant and Con mines were winding down their 50 to 60 years of gold production. Around the same time, Nunavut’s 1999 separation dealt a blow to NWT revenue. “So there was a double hit on the economy. When Ekati went into production, it wasn’t enough to offset that economic downturn. It wasn’t until Diavik that the economy turned around significantly.

“It was almost palpable when Diavik got its approval. You could cut it, you could just feel it, all of a sudden people were saying, ‘Now we’re set.’ Those turned out to be world-class diamond mines, so in hindsight people were right.”

Of more than $60 billion worth of NWT mining output since 1932, gold provided 18%. It’s sometimes forgotten that the territory was a major base metals producer too, with zinc accounting for 30% of that $60-plus billion. But less than two decades of diamond production contributed 38%. The value of annual diamond production has topped $2 billion in the past “and I think we’re around $1.7 billion now,” Hoefer says. “That’s pretty significant when you consider that the NWT government’s entire budget is about the same.”

With last year’s shutdown of the Cantung tungsten operation, the territory has no mining but diamond mining. The three mines now in operation rank Lac de Gras as the world’s third-largest producer by value.

Figures from 2014 credit diamond mining with a 29% direct contribution to territorial GDP, by far the largest private sector portion. Chamber data attributes direct and indirect benefits to about 40% .

Taking another perspective, Hoefer points to a 2014 Canada-wide survey on aboriginal perceptions of the mining industry. Outside the NWT and Nunavut, favourable ratings ranged from 25% in Quebec to 45% in the Yukon. NWT responses were 55% favourable compared to 33% unfavourable, with 12% undecided. The territory ranked second only to Nunavut, which had 59/32/9 ratings.

“I would say the reason is all the aboriginal participation we’ve had in mining,” Hoefer says.

An NWT-specific survey taken this year shows overwhelming support. About 80% of respondents expressed positive feelings about the territory’s mining and exploration companies, 83% said regulation works well and 82% want more mining projects.

Those responses might partly result from the way benefits are distributed. Territorial legislation requires mining proposals to address not only environmental impacts but also positive socio-economic effects, Hoefer explains. Companies sign agreements with the government that address training, employment and local spending. The miners then file annual reports stating what they’ve accomplished.

“Put the clock back to before diamonds were discovered and the first mine built, there was maybe just a handful of aboriginal companies that could work with mining.” Now the Chamber lists over 60 NWT aboriginal companies created since Ekati began construction in 1996. They’ve shared over $5 billion of the $12 billion that diamond miners have spent in the territory.

The mines have also contributed over $100 million to communities under Impact Benefit Agreements.

And of course there are the jobs. Lac de Gras diamonds have provided over 24,000 person-years of mine employment.

That’s really in essence what I think a government would want to do with its resources—generate wealth for people who don’t have it.—Tom Hoefer,
executive director of the NWT
and Nunavut Chamber of Mines

“That’s really in essence what I think a government would want to do with its resources—generate wealth for people who don’t have it.”

Looking to the future, Lac de Gras explorers continue the quest for more deposits. Among existing miners, the Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO/Dominion Diamond TSX:DDC 60/40 JV expects Diavik to last until 2024. Plans to add a fourth deposit won’t extend the lifespan but will keep production robust until shutdown, Hoefer says.

De Beers’ technically challenged Snap Lake shut down last year, at a cost of about 750 jobs. Some of them were saved by Gahcho Kué, which last summer became the world’s largest diamond mine to open in 13 years. But despite output that’s expected to be about two and a half times greater than Snap, the open pit will employ fewer people, currently 441. The De Beers/Mountain Province Diamonds TSX:MPV 51%/49% JV sees an initial 12-year mine life, but Mountain Province talks optimistically of extensions.

Getting back to the genesis of all this economic activity, Dominion’s majority-held Ekati would have its life expectancy extended to at least 2030 should the Jay pipe addition pass feasibility and final permitting. The mine employs around 1,500 workers and accounts for about $400 million in annual spending.

Commemorating the quarter-century since Ekati’s discovery, the NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines presents a Diamond Gala on November 17, the final evening of this year’s Geoscience Forum. Hoefer says the event will be a three-part celebration recognizing the discovery, the subsequent construction and operation of four mines, and the support of aboriginal governments. Fipke will be on hand as guest speaker, perhaps marvelling at the transformation brought about by his pursuit of Lac de Gras glitter.

This is the second of a two-part feature. See Part 1.

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures ponders its B.C. gold-copper porphyry project

October 26th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 26, 2016

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures ponders its B.C. gold-copper porphyry project

Primarily focused on Nunavut diamond exploration, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI has launched a technical and strategic review of its Trapper gold project in northwestern British Columbia.

The 40-square-kilometre property lies adjacent to Brixton Metals’ (TSXV:BBB) Thorn project and hosts the Ring zone “with over 10 kilometres of strike surrounding a porphyry centre, with gold-rich polymetallic mineralization drilled across 2.2 kilometres and associated surface copper porphyry showings,” Dunnedin stated.

Over $4 million of exploration included a 42-hole, 8,580-metre program completed in 2011. Some highlights showed:

Hole TG-11-011

  • 1.71 g/t gold, 5.6 g/t silver, 1.01% lead and 0.25% zinc over 34.11 metres, starting at 106.89 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 92.8 g/t gold, 18.8 g/t silver, 0.13% lead and 0.12% zinc over 0.41 metres)
  • (and including 3.9 g/t gold, 27 g/t silver, 9.11% lead and 0.91% zinc over 3.39 metres)

Hole TG-11-038

  • 1.68 g/t gold, 1.8 g/t silver, 0.02% lead and 0.07% zinc over 15 metres, starting at 122.5 metres
  • (including 5.08 g/t gold, 4.4 g/t silver, 0.05% lead and 0.13% zinc over 4.23 metres)
  • (which includes 21.8 g/t gold, 11.9 g/t silver, 0.15% lead and 0.36% zinc over 0.62 metres)

Hole TG-11-039

  • 1.01 g/t gold, 2.3 g/t silver, 0.02% lead and 0.13% zinc over 30 metres, starting at 67.5 metres
  • (including 2.19 g/t gold, 2.7 g/t silver, 0.06% lead and 0.3% zinc over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 2.98 g/t gold, 4 g/t silver, 0.04% lead and 0.09% zinc over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 2.64 g/t gold, 2.5 g/t silver and 0.35% zinc over 2.34 metres)

Hole TG-11-040

  • 1.19 g/t gold, 1.8 g/t silver, 0.01% lead and 0.07% zinc over 27.5 metres, starting at 132.5 metres
  • (including 11.15 g/t gold, 5.7 g/t silver, 0.03% lead and 0.17% zinc over 2.5 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

“The property overlies an unusually gold-rich porphyry copper complex including drill-ready copper porphyry and gold-rich semi-massive sulphide stockwork,” commented CEO Chris Taylor. “Dunnedin is conducting a comprehensive review of this 100%-owned project to determine how best to unlock its value for shareholders.”

The company has also been finding gold on its flagship Kahuna diamond project, with evidence from 2015 till sampling—just recently evaluated for gold—and from historic rock samples.

This year’s program collected 10 times as many till samples as 2015, gathering 1,111 samples to be analyzed for diamond indicator minerals and gold. The company also staked another 25,000 hectares, increasing Kahuna to about 60,000 hectares.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

Dunnedin Ventures finds gold synergies at its Nunavut diamond deposit

October 17th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 17, 2016

Diamonds remain the focus of Dunnedin Ventures’ (TSXV:DVI) Kahuna project but evidence of gold offers additional potential, the company announced October 17. Recent till sampling on the Nunavut property brought positive gold results, as did historic rock samples.

Of 129 till samples taken last year, 84 showed anomalous results of 50 ppb gold or better. Twelve samples assayed greater than 1,000 ppb, with one sample reaching 5,930 ppb.

Dunnedin Ventures finds gold synergies at its Nunavut diamond deposit

Evaluation of gold grains suggests local bedrock sources, Dunnedin emphasized.

“One area of strong gold-in-till concentration occurs at the 10-square-kilometre hinge domain of a previously untested folded metasediment belt where a number of diamond-bearing kimberlites including PST, Notch and 07KD-24 are also located, suggesting proximal bedrock sources of gold and diamonds,” the company added.

Previous analysis of the till samples revealed diamond indicator minerals suggesting potential extensions to Kahuna’s known kimberlites, as well as additional kimberlite targets prospective for diamonds.

Historic work included 97 rock samples that assayed between 0.05 and 2.52 g/t gold.

The 60,000-hectare property sits about 25 kilometres from the Hudson Bay hamlet of Rankin Inlet and about 10 kilometres from Agnico Eagle Mines’ (TSX:AEM) Meliadine gold project, which could potentially begin production in 2020. An all-season trail under construction from Rankin Inlet to another Hudson Bay hamlet, Chesterfield Inlet, would pass within a few kilometres of Kahuna. Dunnedin has pledged $25,000 to the project. Longer-term plans would include a link to the current all-season road to Meliadine.

Kahuna has a January 2015 inferred resource for near-surface diamond deposits on the Notch and Kahuna kimberlites, 12 kilometres apart:

  • Kahuna (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.06 million tonnes averaging 1.04 carats per tonne for 3.19 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.8 ct/t for 2.45 million carats

  • Notch (+0.85 mm cutoff): 921,000 tonnes averaging 0.9 ct/t for 829,000 carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.83 ct/t for 765,000 carats

  • Total (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 ct/t for 4.02 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.81 ct/t for 3.22 million carats

Both dykes remain open along strike and at depth.

Sample recovery from the project’s PST kimberlite showed 96 commercial-sized diamonds totalling 5.34 carats.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

Inuit org launches legacy fund for $24 million in mine royalties

October 5th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 5, 2016

A Nunavut Inuit organization has collected more than $24 million from a mine that’s been in operation for two years, the Nunatsiaq News reported. The Qikiqtani Inuit Association gets the money from Baffinland Iron Mines under an Inuit Impact and Benefit Agreement for the Mary River iron ore mine, which began operations in September 2014. The QIA represents over 14,000 people.

Inuit org launches legacy fund for $24 million in mine royalties

Photo: Qikiqtani Inuit Association

“All of the Mary River project IIBA royalties have been sitting in a separate QIA account accumulating interest,” the paper quoted organization president P.J. Akeeagok speaking at an AGM on October 4. “The current value of that account is $24.2 million, to March 31, 2016.”

On October 5 the organization announced a legacy fund to deliver programs as well as guard the money for future generations. “We will want to hear from Inuit in our region what they would like to see done in terms of programming or projects with the Inuit money,” Akeeagok stated.

Early last month the group launched arbitration proceedings against the northern Baffin Island miner, claiming the company owed advance royalties of $6.25 million plus interest. “QIA is aware that the Mary River project has experienced financial pressures, but QIA negotiated substantial financial participation payments in the IIBA as compensation for the impact to Inuit of BIMC mining activities on Inuit Owned Lands,” the organization stated. “As such it is imperative to QIA that the objectives and intent of all IIBA provisions be complied with to the greatest extent possible.”

The dispute goes to a three-person panel in Vancouver on October 25 and 26.

Baffinland is held 50/50 by Iron Ore Holdings and ArcelorMittal, with the latter acting as project operator. Unprocessed ore is trucked 100 kilometres north to Milne port, from where it’s shipped to European customers.

Dunnedin Ventures wraps up summer field work, expands Nunavut diamond property

October 4th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 4, 2016

Encouraged by last year’s success, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI expanded both its till sampling program and property size at the Kahuna diamond project in Nunavut. On October 4 the company announced completion of 1,111 till samples, approximately 10 times the amount taken in 2015. Dunnedin also staked another 25,000 hectares, bringing the property size to around 60,000 hectares and its border within about 10 kilometres of Meliadine, where Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM sees gold production potentially starting in 2020.

Dunnedin Ventures wraps up summer field work, expands Nunavut diamond property

Some diamonds from the Notch kimberlite
between 0.6 and 0.85 millimetres.

“Last year’s program effectively identified several new potentially diamond-bearing kimberlite pipe and dyke targets,” commented CEO Chris Taylor. “The much larger 2016 program was implemented to expand upon existing diamond indicator mineral trains and to identify additional prospective diamond sources through testing the down-ice mineral signatures of geophysically interpreted kimberlite pipes and dykes across the property.”

Dunnedin uses sampling techniques and proprietary mineral chemistry filters pioneered by company adviser Charles Fipke at his Ekati discovery. Additionally, samples from the previous year are being re-examined for possible gold content.

Meanwhile work continues on diamond recoveries from mini-bulk samples taken last year at the project’s PST and Kahuna kimberlites. Early last month the company reported that a 2.32-tonne sample from the Notch kimberlite revealed 85 commercial-sized stones totalling 1.95 carats.

Last year’s resource estimate showed a near-surface inferred category for the Notch and Kahuna kimberlites, 12 kilometres apart:

  • Kahuna (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.06 million tonnes averaging 1.04 carats per tonne for 3.19 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.8 ct/t for 2.45 million carats

  • Notch (+0.85 mm cutoff): 921,000 tonnes averaging 0.9 ct/t for 829,000 carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.83 ct/t for 765,000 carats

  • Total (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 ct/t for 4.02 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.81 ct/t for 3.22 million carats

Both dykes remain open along strike and at depth. The resource didn’t include the PST kimberlite, where sample recovery showed 96 commercial-sized diamonds totalling 5.34 carats.

The property’s located about 25 kilometres from the Hudson Bay town of Rankin Inlet.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

Rediscovering the planet

September 9th, 2016

Laurentian University and its partners hope to re-write the geoscientific Book of Genesis

by Greg Klein

Laurentian University and its partners hope to re-write the geoscientific Book of Genesis

Metal Earth puts some of the world’s best-exposed, best-known
rocks under additional scrutiny to unlock evolutionary secrets.

 

Looked at this way, the future of mineral exploration lies in the past—billions of years in the past. But with state-of-the-art tools, techniques and expertise, Precambrian mysteries can be solved, leading to another generation of discoveries. Researchers with Laurentian University’s Metal Earth project intend to do just that, confidently stating they will transform our understanding of how mineral deposits originated during the planet’s evolution.

What accounts for such boldness? “We are trying new techniques, doing research on a scale that has not been done before and I’m confident that we’re going to make discoveries,” Harold Gibson tells ResourceClips.com. As director of the Mineral Exploration Research Centre at Laurentian’s Harquail School of Earth Sciences and head of the Metal Earth project, he can barely contain his enthusiasm.

Laurentian University and its partners hope to re-write the geoscientific Book of Genesis

An extensive, innovative, seven-year study makes
its headquarters at Sudbury’s Laurentian University.
(Photo: Laurentian University)

“It’s a fully integrated study of our Earth,” he continues. “We’re looking at producing MRI-like images through transects of known endowed areas and structures and compare them with structures that appear to be similar but not endowed. It’ll be backed up by a lot of geology, geochemistry, mantle xenolith geochemistry, geophysics. We’re going to apply the same scrutiny to the less endowed areas to determine the underlying processes and help guide industry to select areas. We’re going to peel back time, peel back the Earth’s crust, essentially. This has never been done before.”

Gibson’s hardly alone in his confidence. Barely a week into the project’s existence, Metal Earth has attracted cash and in-kind backing totalling over $104 million. That includes a very prestigious award of $49.27 million from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund.

With money sufficient for a seven-year run, Metal Earth will draw researchers from Laurentian and other schools, including over 35 post-doctoral fellows, research assistants, technicians and support staff, over 80 grad students, 100 undergrads and numerous subcontractors.

Industry partners so far include the looming Sudbury presence of Vale NYSE:VALE, TMAC Resources TSX:TMR, nearing production at Hope Bay in Nunavut, and Ring of Fire explorer Noront Resources TSXV:NOT. Mira Geoscience brings its world-class earth modelling expertise while the Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation provides additional computational facilities. Several universities and geological surveys have also joined in partnership.

Gibson expects ground-breaking results, in more ways than one.

Metal Earth will surpass Lithoprobe as Canada’s most extensive earth science project, he says. Some experts consider the 1980s-to-’90s endeavour to be the world’s best project of its kind. “Metal Earth is building on that with much more detail, much better equipment. We have more tools now,” he points out.

“Some ore deposits were integrated into Lithoprobe, but not a lot.” Even so the project “revolutionized ideas of tectonics, the evolution of our Shield, as well as ore deposits. This is much more focused on ore deposits and large-scale systems, so I know we’re going to have new results that will be extremely interesting. If we’re only 20% successful we’ll still change a lot of ideas.”

We’re going to peel back time, peel back the Earth’s crust, essentially. This has never been done before.—Harold Gibson,
Metal Earth project lead

Probably starting in October, field work will begin with the Abitibi Greenstone Belt. That puts a number of familiar areas under additional scrutiny. Then boots hit the ground on a less prolific belt, northwestern Ontario’s Wabigoon. Hope Bay, the Sudbury area and Manitoba will also come under investigation.

“We focused on Canada because we have the best-exposed and best-known Shield in the world—and tons of expertise. We can do this research best here but we see the results applicable globally and to younger terrains.”

Some data provided by companies will be kept confidential, but the results “will all be open source,” Gibson says. “All the data that we collect, which will be enormous, will be open to the public.”

That’ll primarily be “spatial data, on maps, plotted in 3D, in formats need by industry, government and other researchers.” Some of it will even be 4D, with the fourth dimension being time.

“We want to understand how time fits into this equation. We want to look back at the geometry, the morphology, the tectonics of the Precambrian,” he explains. “We’re going to do that through geochronology and isotope geochemistry. We’ll be looking at zircons collected by researchers and at government surveys throughout the Superior and Slave provinces, analyze them and use them as surrogates for looking at the nature of the crust at that time…. We can start reconstructing our paleo shields and look into how and when deposits fit into that.”

The results will offer a multitude of uses for exploration companies, Gibson says. He anticipates they’ll begin by poring over “an incredible amount of new data. Then we’ll be interpreting that data, creating images, integrating it all and making that available. We’ll be generating new algorithms, new ways of treating the data to see patterns that haven’t been seen before.” Info will be accessible online through Laurentian and through government partners.

While his enthusiasm’s obvious, Gibson’s well aware of the enormous challenge ahead of his team.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for us, a tremendous opportunity for geoscience in Canada, but with that comes a tremendous responsibility to do it right,” he emphasizes. “And that’s what we’re going to do.”

Dunnedin Ventures exceeds previous diamond recovery from Notch kimberlite

September 6th, 2016

by Greg Klein | September 6, 2016

Final recovery results for one of the Kahuna project’s several known diamondiferous kimberlites averaged 0.99 carats per tonne, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI reported September 6. Forty-nine commercial-sized stones above 0.85 millimetres totalled 1.29 carats out of a 1.3-tonne portion of a 2.4-tonne sample. Recovery announced last March from the rest of the sample showed 36 commercial-sized stones totalling 0.66 carats.

Dunnedin Ventures exceeds previous diamond recovery from Notch kimberlite

Near-surface sampling returned yet more
diamonds from Dunnedin’s Notch kimberlite.

The property stands near the northwestern shore of Hudson Bay, near the Nunavut hamlets of Rankin Inlet and Chesterfield Inlet.

Of the most recent batch, Dunnedin described the largest stone as a 0.23-carat, clear and colourless octahedral. Most Notch diamonds have been clear and colourless variants of octahedra, the company noted.

Second- and third-place stones from this batch weighed 0.17 and 0.09 carats. The top three from the previous batch came in at 0.1, 0.08 and 0.05 carats.

Located 12 kilometres apart, the Kahuna project’s Notch and Kahuna kimberlites have a January 2015 resource with an inferred category showing:

  • Kahuna (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.06 million tonnes averaging 1.04 carats per tonne for 3.19 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.8 ct/t for 2.45 million carats

  • Notch (+0.85 mm cutoff): 921,000 tonnes averaging 0.9 ct/t for 829,000 carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.83 ct/t for 765,000 carats

  • Total (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 ct/t for 4.02 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.81 ct/t for 3.22 million carats
Dunnedin Ventures exceeds previous diamond recovery from Notch kimberlite

The two largest stones from
Dunnedin’s most recent recovery.

Both dykes remain open along strike and at depth. Not included in the resource, the project’s PST kimberlite has previously shown 96 commercial-sized stones.

Last week Dunnedin announced a new till sampling campaign nearly 10 times the size of the 2015 program. The company hopes to complete and process the sampling in time to guide winter work. Dunnedin also has last year’s till samples under evaluation for gold. In other recent reports, the company announced progress on its permitting status, the appointments of strategic advisers John Robins and Jim Paterson, and a private placement offered at $1.3 million.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

Dunnedin Ventures increases till sampling in search of Nunavut diamonds

August 31st, 2016

by Greg Klein | August 31, 2016

With a goal nearly 10 times the size of last year’s program, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI has a greatly expanded campaign of till sampling underway at its Kahuna project in Nunavut. The company hopes to process this year’s samples in time to guide a winter program on the 13,000-hectare property near Hudson Bay’s northwestern shore.

Dunnedin Ventures increases till sampling in search of Nunavut diamonds

These diamonds from Dunnedin’s Kahuna
project range between 1.18 and 1.7 millimetres.

Using techniques pioneered by Dunnedin adviser Chuck Fipke, last year’s program “identified several new targets consistent with our known diamond-bearing kimberlites, including both dyke and pipe targets, and extensions to known diamond-bearing kimberlites,” said CEO Chris Taylor. “We anticipate that this summer’s 1,000-sample program will define additional targets and will allow us to accurately prioritize sites for upcoming drilling and bulk sampling.”

This field program should cost around $350,000, a relatively low budget due to the proximity of the hamlets of Rankin Inlet and Chesterfield Inlet.

The company also keeps busy with diamond recoveries from samples taken last year at the project’s Notch, PST and Kahuna kimberlites. Previous recoveries showed 96 commercial-sized diamonds from PST and another 36 from a Notch sample that was about 40% processed.

In addition Dunnedin has last year’s till samples under evaluation for gold potential.

Having held a series of community meetings recommended by the Nunavut Impact Review Board, Dunnedin plans to submit a revised project proposal to the NIRB. The company currently holds permits to work on federally controlled lands into 2017 and on Inuit-controlled lands into 2018.

Earlier this month Dunnedin appointed two strategic advisers, John Robins and Jim Paterson. Robins’ history with Kahuna dates to early last decade when he founded the company that held the original tenure. He brings to Dunnedin access to a proprietary database of historic results. Robins has been involved in a number of mergers and acquisitions including Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) takeover of Kaminak Gold, where he served as executive chairperson. He remains a director with other companies including Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV.

A former director of Kaminak, Paterson serves as CEO/director of Kivalliq, which holds the Angilak uranium deposit in the same region as Kahuna. During his 19 years of experience he’s acted as an executive or director of companies that raised over $175 million.

In early August Dunnedin offered a private placement of $1.3 million.

A January 2015 estimate showed inferred resources for the Kahuna and Notch kimberlites, 12 kilometres apart:

  • Kahuna (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.06 million tonnes averaging 1.04 carats per tonne for 3.19 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.8 ct/t for 2.45 million carats

  • Notch (+0.85 mm cutoff): 921,000 tonnes averaging 0.9 ct/t for 829,000 carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.83 ct/t for 765,000 carats

  • Total (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 ct/t for 4.02 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.81 ct/t for 3.22 million carats

Both dykes remain open along strike and at depth.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.