Friday 28th July 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘northwest territories’

New assays on old core reveal more diamonds on Arctic Star Exploration’s new Finnish acquisition

July 26th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 26, 2017

Just weeks after announcing plans to take on a diamond project in Finland, Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD has found further encouragement by reanalyzing previous work. Recent assays on 48.65 kilograms of historically extracted split core showed 111 microdiamonds. The results represent approximately 52.7 metres of core from the Timantti property’s White Wolf kimberlite.

New assays on old core reveal more diamonds on Arctic Star Exploration’s new Finnish acquisition

A due diligence program reported earlier this month confirmed 58 microdiamonds from an 18.9-kilogram White Wolf sample.

With most of the world’s diamond-bearing kimberlites showing an exponential relationship between small and large stones, the company plans to gather enough caustic fusion samples to evaluate the property’s diamond size distribution. Following ground geophysics, Arctic Star hopes to drill Timantti for additional samples, delineating the kimberlites’ size and shape.

Looking at an entirely different range of commodities, the company last week sent a drill crew to the Cap project in east-central British Columbia’s Rocky Mountain Rare Metal Belt. Tantalum, niobium and rare earths are among the targets on the 2,825-hectare property. In 2010 sampling results included 0.14% Nb2O5, 3,191 ppm zirconium and 547 ppm total rare earth elements. More sampling the following year brought grades including 0.27% Nb2O5 and 773 ppm TREE, while two historic, non-43-101 samples showed 0.13% and 0.1% TREE.

Arctic Star also holds a 40% interest in the Northwest Territories’ Diagras diamond project, where JV partner Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA conducted a short geophysical program last May.

Hedging his energy bets

July 24th, 2017

Adrian Lamoureux of 92 Resources pursues green lithium and fossil-fuel frac sand

by Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel: I would like to introduce the CEO of 92 Resources TSXV:NTY Adrian Lamoureux. Hi Adrian, it is a pleasure to talk to you again. To get started I would like to ask you to tell us a little bit about your background and how you became CEO of 92 Resources.

Adrian: Hi Isabel, thank you for having me. I had been active with finance and investor relations for public companies for about a decade before I received my opportunity to run one. Raising capital and marketing helped me form very strong opinions on how a company should be run, so I was always looking to move up the corporate ranks.

Isabel: 92 Resources has two lithium projects. One is in the Northwest Territories and one is in Quebec. What makes these projects so valuable?

Adrian: Lithium is not only a commodity for today, but rather a commodity for tomorrow. We see today’s strong demand as just the beginning, with a global push towards green energy. Simply put—lithium is the way of the future.

Isabel: What are the highlights on these projects so far?

Adrian: Hidden Lake, NWT, has been successful right from the get-go. Last summer we pulled a sample high of 3.08% Li2O and a channel sample of 1.9% Li2O over 9.02 metres. Most recently we conducted a metallurgical program, where we produced a 6.16% Li2O concentrate.

Adrian Lamoureux of 92 Resources pursues green lithium and fossil-fuel frac sand

Initial metallurgical tests suggest the suitability of conventional
processing methods for pegmatites from Hidden Lake. The 1,100-
hectare property has nearby highway access leading to Yellowknife,
about 40 kilometres west.

Isabel: 92 Resources also has a frac sand project in British Columbia. I am not sure if everyone knows what frac sand is and is used for. Could you give a brief introduction to the application and demand, as well as of course about your project itself?

Adrian: The Golden frac sand property is ideally situated. Our project sits immediately adjacent to a frac sand [deposit] and rail access. Some of the biggest oil basins in North America are shale, and the best method of extraction is through fracking. Sand is forced down horizontal wells under high pressure, bracing cracks within the shale open, which is where the oil can be liberated and pumped out. The demand for frac sand has continued to grow in light of a slip in oil prices. This is attributed to re-fracking of older wells, a higher rig count and increased frac sand intensity on a per-well basis.

Isabel: What is the most exciting thing happening right now at 92 Resources?

Adrian: We’re having success on multiple fronts. I feel we are at the right place at the right time.

Isabel: What are the plans for the rest of 2017 and what are the next milestones for 92 Resources?

Adrian: Our plans are focused, continued growth through acquisition and development. We need to move vertically with current demand and always be looking to where future demand should be.

Isabel: What do you like about the mineral exploration business?

Adrian: I like being able to take an idea or concept and turn it into something real, something that shareholders and hopefully the world can benefit from.

Isabel: What is your favourite commodity and why?

Adrian: Lithium is my favourite. This green energy commodity is changing the world as we know it.

Isabel: Thank you very much for your time, Adrian.

Adrian Lamoureux

Adrian Lamoureux,
92 Resources CEO

Bio

Adrian Lamoureux has worked in the venture capital markets for the past eight years, specializing in the design and implementation of market strategies and corporate development. He has particular expertise in the mineral exploration and development sector. During his time working in venture capital markets, Lamoureux has financed a number of successful private and public companies.

Fun facts

My hobbies: European football

My favourite airport: Schiphol, Amsterdam

My favourite tradeshow: PDAC in Toronto

My favourite commodity: Lithium

With this person I would like to have dinner: Cristiano Ronaldo

If I could have a superpower, it would be: Invisibility

My role model: My father

Read more about 92 Resources’ Hidden Lake lithium project and Golden frac sand project.

Diamond explorer Arctic Star to drill B.C. property for rare earths and rare metals

July 19th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 19, 2017

With a crew now en route, Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD prepares to begin a summer field program at its Cap project in east-central British Columbia. Located in the Rocky Mountain Rare Metal Belt, the 2,825-hectare property has undergone geochemical and geophysical surveys suggesting potential for carbonatite intrusions which might host niobium, tantalum and/or rare earth elements. A program of about three holes and 1,000 metres will further investigate the potential.

Diamond explorer Arctic Star to drill B.C. property for rare earths and rare metals

Piquing interest in the property is a circular magnetic anomaly measuring about three to five kilometres in diameter that the company interprets to represent a carbonatite or similar intrusion. Geochem sampling in 2010 on two dykes near the most prominent mag anomaly brought grades including 0.14% Nb2O5, 3,191 ppm zirconium and 547 ppm total rare earth elements, Arctic Star reported.

In 2011, following radiometrics and additional magnetics, the company found more highly anomalous grades with samples containing 0.27% Nb2O5 and 773 ppm TREE. Two historic, non-43-101 samples assayed 0.13% and 0.1% TREE.

Contrasting luxuries with critical minerals, Arctic Star last week announced plans to acquire a diamond project in Finland. The diamondiferous kimberlites of the Timantti property sit on the Fennoscandian Shield, home to the major Russian diamond mines Lomonosov and Grib.

In May the company announced a short program of geophysics on the Diagras diamond project in the Northwest Territories, where Arctic Star has a 40% stake with JV partner Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA holding the rest.

Initial metallurgy looks positive for 92 Resources’ NWT lithium project

July 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 18, 2017

Encouraging metallurgical results have come early for 92 Resources’ (TSXV:NTY) Hidden Lake project. Preliminary beneficiation tests for the road-accessible Northwest Territories property suggest favourable liberation characteristics and “amenability to simple and conventional spodumene mineral processing methods,” the company announced July 18. The lab conducted five flotation tests on a composite sample from four pegmatites on the Northwest Territories project. A standard flowsheet was used.

Initial lithium metallurgy brings 92 Resources a 6.16% concentrate at 79% recovery for NWT project

Backed by encouraging lab work, 92 Resources reactivates
its Hidden Lake camp this summer for another field program.

Results brought a “high-grade” spodumene concentrate of 6.16% LiO2 at 79% recovery, with an average spodumene lithium content of 3.8% lithium (or about 8.2% LiO2), close to the maximum theoretical limit, 92 Resources stated.

A low iron content also suggests the high quality of Hidden Lake spodumene. In a further advantage to mineral processing, the company added, tests confirmed the property’s dominant mica to be muscovite with low levels of lithium. Muscovite with high lithium levels “would dilute the lithium content of a final concentrate, as typically the lithium content would be significantly less than that of spodumene.”

“This initial work demonstrates the high-lithium/low-iron nature of the spodumene at Hidden Lake, as well as its favourable upgrading characteristics, both of which are highly attractive attributes of the project,” said president/CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

Phase II beneficiation tests will include magnetic separation, heavy liquid separation and further flotation on material collected during the upcoming summer field program.

Channel sampling last year tested four of the property’s six known lithium-bearing spodumene dykes, bringing assays up to 1.58% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 8.78 metres.

In January the company filed a 43-101 technical report for Hidden Lake. The 1,659-hectare property has year-round road access to Yellowknife, about 40 kilometres southwest.

92 Resources also keeps busy with its Golden frac sand project in eastern British Columbia, adjacent to Heemskirk Canada’s Moberly silica mine. Last month’s 10-day field program at Golden will provide data for a 43-101 technical report.

In northern Quebec, 92 Resources also holds the 5,536-hectare Pontax River lithium project.

The company closed an oversubscribed $895,199 private placement in February and received a $140,000 award under the NWT Mining Incentive Program in June to offset Hidden Lake expenditures.

Arctic Star sees new diamond frontier in Finland

July 12th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 12, 2017

A plan that so far has been a year in the making would have Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD shift its diamond exploration focus from northern Canada to northern Finland. The Timantti (Finnish for “diamond”) project would begin with exploration rights over 243 hectares of kimberlites, with an additional 95,700 hectares of land to come under an exploration reservation permit for which the company has applied.

Arctic Star sees new diamond frontier in Finland

Small bulk samples dating to 2005 have revealed diamonds, while a more recent due diligence program confirmed 58 small stones in an 18.9-kilogram sample from the project’s White Wolf kimberlite.

The Wolf kimberlites lie on the Fennoscandian Shield, which also hosts the major diamond mines Lomonosov and Grib in Russia’s Arkhangelsk region.

Because kimberlites tend to occur in clusters, the Wolf kimberlites could indicate a more extensive group, according to Roy Spencer, who discovered the Wolf kimberlites. Data in the public domain shows a “cloud” of kimberlite indicator minerals across an approximately 80-kilometre-wide area roughly centred on the Wolf kimberlites, the company added. “The exploration reservation will allow Arctic Star to explore the entire region,” Spencer said.

A diamond exploration veteran with De Beers and other companies, Spencer “was largely responsible for the discovery of the world-class Grib kimberlite,” Arctic Star added. Spencer joins the company as a director.

On closing the acquisition, Arctic Star plans magnetic, gravity and EM surveys prior to drilling and a subsequent bulk sample on the road-accessible property, as well as regional airborne surveys.

Ranking fifth globally in the annual Fraser Institute survey of overall mining investment attractiveness, Finland boasts arctic infrastructure in relative profusion to northern Canada.

The deal would involve Arctic Star taking over Foriet Oy, a Finnish company that would become a wholly owned subsidiary, for 14.5 million shares at a deemed price of $0.20.

Arctic Star also welcomed Scott Eldridge’s appointment to the board. A co-founder and president/CEO of Euroscandic International Group, which provides accounting and investment banking services to resource companies, he has raised over $500 million in equity and debt for mining-related projects around the world.

Last May Arctic Star announced a brief geophysical program at the Diagras diamond project in the Northwest Territories, with work expected to finish mid-month. The company has a 40% stake in the JV, with Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA holding the rest and acting as project operator.

Equitorial Exploration to drill for NWT lithium

June 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 28, 2017

The rig returns to a Northwest Territories hardrock lithium project for the first time in a decade as Equitorial Exploration TSXV:EXX heads to the field in July. About 30 kilometres from the former Cantung tungsten mine in the territory’s southwest, the Little Nahanni Pegmatite Group project will also undergo mapping, channel sampling and resampling of drill core from 2007 when two holes struck intervals of 1.2% Li2O over 10.94 metres and 0.92% over 18.27 metres.

Equitorial Exploration to drill for NWT lithium

Red paint marks a channel sample
interval from last year’s field work at LNPG.

Summer drilling will test the vertical extent of lithium-cesium-tantalum-type pegmatite dyke swarms now identified at about 300 metres in depth and 13 kilometres in strike. The dykes are well exposed on cirque walls of the mountainous terrain, the company stated.

Channel sampling last year brought assays up to 1.13% Li2O, 71.1 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.03% SnO2 over 10.35 metres. That included a sub-interval of 1.86% Li2O, 116.7 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.05% SnO2 over 6.3 metres.

Three specimen samples released in October brought results up to 2.85% Li2O, 28.1 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.05% SnO2.

Equitorial filed a 43-101 technical report on the LNPG project in March.

In Utah last May, the company staked another 1,092 hectares, expanding its Tule Valley lithium project to about 2,792 hectares. That gives Equitorial the entire Tule Valley Basin, which the company describes as a closed basin which could be similar to Nevada’s Clayton Valley. Equitorial also sees Clayton Valley similarities in the company’s Gerlach property in Nevada.

Closeology helps Zimtu Capital close in on NWT diamonds

June 21st, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 21, 2017

A surprisingly neglected property in an especially prospective location gets some overdue attention as a crew mobilizes for the Northwest Territories’ Munn Lake diamond project. Held 50% each by Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC and a staking partner, the property has ground geophysics and till sampling about to begin.

The property does have diamonds, as historic work shows. Non-43-101 results from a 581-kilogram sample on the Yuryi boulder field revealed 226 diamonds, 62 of them macro-diamonds. Non-43-101 results from a 42-kilogram sample on the Munn Lake kimberlite sill showed 14 diamonds, including two macros and 12 micro-diamonds.

There’s closeology and then there’s closeology, as Zimtu Capital closes in on NWT diamonds

Southern Slave kimberlites show an incomparably
higher success rate than those of the northern craton.

The Munn Lake sill is the source of one of five kimberlite indicator mineral trains. The other four have seen little follow-up work, leaving their sources unknown.

The current agenda calls for further till sampling and a tight magnetic survey, explains Neil McCallum of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, which will conduct the program. Using GPS that wasn’t available to the previous operator, he expects “more focused” results.

One of the distinctions that really intrigues McCallum is Munn Lake’s especially prospective location. The Slave Craton has three diamond mines in operation, two past producers and an advanced stage project. But chances of a kimberlite actually holding diamonds are much higher in the southern Slave, home to Munn Lake.

“There are some 250 or so known kimberlites in the northern Slave’s Lac de Gras field whereas the southern Slave has only about 16 that are known,” McCallum explains. “Of those 16, six have been mined, are currently producing or are in advanced stages.” He points to De Beers’ former Snap Lake operation, the high-grade Kelvin and Faraday kimberlites being advanced by Kennady Diamonds TSXV:KDI and three kimberlites going into Gahcho Kué, the De Beers/Mountain Province Diamonds TSX:MPV JV that officially opened last September as the world’s largest new diamond mine in 13 years.

That’s notwithstanding the Lac de Gras success stories in the north, home to the Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO/Dominion Diamond TSX:DDC Diavik JV and Dominion’s majority-held Ekati mine.

Kimberlites of the south Slave are much older (by nearly 500 million years) and much rarer than those of the north. But when they’re found, they’re much more likely to bear diamonds—and diamonds of economic grades, McCallum adds.

“The Munn Lake property is closer to the kimberlites of the southern Slave cluster and the Munn Lake kimberlite sill is similar in geometry to the others in the southern Slave. So with the proposed expansion of the Munn Lake kimberlite sill and the potential for several new kimberlites on the project, the Munn Lake property has very good odds for a high-grade discovery.”

Munn Lake also benefits from a winter road running through the 14,000-hectare property, connecting Gahcho Kué with Yellowknife.

McCallum expects the mag results to arrive about one week after the survey finishes, with the till samples taking about a month. “I’m really looking forward to see what comes out,” he says.

“I’d like to see some drilling on the project too. On the kimberlite that the past operators did intercept, I’m not sure they hit the best target.”

92 Resources begins frac sand field work while advancing lithium metallurgy

June 6th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 6, 2017

With a crew already en route, 92 Resources TSXV:NTY has a 10-day exploration program about to begin on its Golden frac sand project in eastern British Columbia. A team from Dahrouge Geological Consulting will undertake further mapping and sampling for a 43-101 technical report. While the company’s focus remains the Hidden Lake lithium project in the Northwest Territories, 92 Resources sees potential in another energy-related commodity.

92 Resources begins frac sand field work while advancing lithium metallurgy

“Despite fluctuating oil and gas prices, North American demand for frac sand is exceptionally robust and there remains a nearly non-existent domestic supply of high-quality proppant within Canada,” said president/CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

Close to the Alberta border and with nearby roads, the property’s located five kilometres from Golden, B.C., on the Canadian Pacific main line. Adjacent to the property is Heemskirk Canada’s Moberly project, a former producer of silica sand for the glass industry that’s now being redeveloped as a frac sand production and processing operation. The parent company, Heemskirk Consolidated, is the object of a takeover bid by Northern Silica, held by Taurus Resources No. 2 Fund.

Running through the 3,211-hectare Golden property is an 18-kilometre strike of the Mount Wilson formation, described as hosting high-purity, white, quartzite and friable sandstones. Four samples collected in 2014 showed silica content averaging 98.6% SiO2, with low boron and iron values. “Preliminary testing on these samples indicates favourable frac sand characteristics, as well as metallurgical-grade silica potential,” 92 Resources stated.

Last week the company announced initial results from Phase I metallurgical tests for its Hidden Lake lithium property in the NWT. Early findings suggest material from the hard rock project might be suitable for a conventional flowsheet. As the program goes into Phase II, potential tantalum recovery will be examined as well. 92 Resources filed a 43-101 technical report on the property in January.

The company also holds the 5,536-hectare Pontax lithium property in northern Quebec.

92 Resources advances metallurgy for NWT hard rock lithium

June 1st, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 1, 2017

Phase I mineralogy studies have 92 Resources TSXV:NTY confident that its Hidden Lake lithium project in the Northwest Territories could be amenable to a conventional flowsheet. QEMSCAN and Electron Probe Micro Analysis on a composite sample from each of four pegmatites showed similar results, confirming spodumene as the primary host of lithium. The coarse-grained spodumene shows very good liberation characteristics and low iron content, the company stated.

92 Resources advances metallurgy for NWT hard rock lithium

The 1,659-hectare Hidden Lake project has all-weather
road access to Yellowknife, 45 kilometres southwest.

Spodumene liberation “indicates a strong potential for recovery using dense media separation and flotation techniques, which are common processing methods applied to spodumene-bearing pegmatites,” 92 Resources added.

The program also found potential for tantalum recovery, which will be further assessed in Phase II. About to begin, the program will conduct flotation tests to determine the reagent scheme and assess the ability to produce spodumene concentrate without additional processing.

Last year’s channel sampling targeted four of six known lithium-bearing spodumene dykes, with the best result showing:

  • 1.58% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 8.78 metres

  • (including 1.78% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 6.93 metres)

The company filed a 43-101 technical report on Hidden Lake in January.

92 Resources’ portfolio also includes the 5,536-hectare Pontax lithium prospect in northern Quebec and the 3,211-hectare Golden frac sand project in southeastern British Columbia.

In February the company closed an oversubscribed private placement of $895,199.

‘Everyone’s hiring again’

May 24th, 2017

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting presages a wave of M&A

by Greg Klein

As an executive search firm, the Mining Recruitment Group might serve as a bellwether for the industry. Founder and self-described mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says, “I put together management teams for companies, I connect people with opportunities and opportunities with people.” In that role, he experienced the upturn well before many industry players did.

To most of them, the long-awaited resurgence arrived late last year. Pollard saw it several months earlier.

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting could presage a wave of M&A

“The market came back in a huge way, at least in the hiring side, early last year when my phone started ringing a hell of a lot more,” he explains. “There was a huge volume. And what I’ve found is that the available talent pool for executives shrank in a period of about six months. In January 2016, for example, I was working on a search and there was almost a lineup out the door of some really big-name people. What I’m finding now, a year and a half later, is that the available talent has almost evaporated. It’s much harder to recruit for senior positions.”

Lately his work suggests another industry development. “The major upturn I’m seeing in the market now is a huge demand for corporate development people who can do technical due diligence on projects. Over the last few years large mining companies and investment banks cut staff almost to the bone in that regard because no one was interested in doing deals or looking at acquisitions.”

Just completed, his most recent placement was for Sprott. “They had me looking for someone with a technical background who can do due diligence for their investments. In doing so I spoke with everyone on the street, from investment banks to some big name corporate development people and they all said the same thing: Everyone’s hiring again. These are people who couldn’t get job offers a year ago, now every single candidate on the short list for this last search has multiple offers from companies looking to get them. I haven’t seen that in five years.

“So that leads me to believe companies have been staffing up their corporate development teams. I see that as a major sign that you’re going to see M&A pick up in a huge, huge way, probably over the next three to six months.”

An early example would be last week’s Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD buyout of Integra Gold TSXV:ICG—“one of my best clients over the years”—in a deal valued at $590 million.

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting could presage a wave of M&A

Andrew Pollard: Executive recruiting “leads me to believe companies have been staffing up their corporate development teams.”

“I think there’s leverage for other companies to start pulling the trigger faster because they’re adding the expertise to get these things done.”

Having founded the Mining Recruitment Group over a decade ago at the age of 20, “a snotty kid” with only a single year of related experience, he’s placed people in companies with market caps ranging from $5 million to well over $200 million. Now in a position to pick and choose his assignments, Pollard’s business concentrates on “the roles that will have the most impact on a company’s future.” That tends to be CEO, president, COO and board appointments.

Last year he placed five CEOs, as well as other positions. Among those assignments, Pollard worked with Frank Giustra on a CEO search for Fiore Exploration TSXV:F and filled another vacancy for Treasury Metals TSX:TML as it advances Goliath toward production.

But the hiring surge coincides with an industry-wide recruitment challenge. Pollard attributes that to a demographic predicament complicated by mining’s notorious cyclicality.

During the 1990s, he points out, fewer people chose mining careers, resulting in a shortage of staffers who’d now be in their 40s and 50s. Greater numbers joined up during the more promising mid-2000s, only to “get spat out” when markets went south. Now Pollard gets a lot of calls to replace baby boomers who want to retire. Too many of those retirements are coming around the same time, he says, because stock losses during the downturn had forced executives to postpone their exit.

Now, with a wave of retirements coinciding with a demographic gap, Pollard sees a “perfect storm to identify the next batch of young leaders.”

But he also sees promise in a new generation. That inspired him to assemble Young Leaders, one of two panel discussions he’ll present at the International Metal Writers Conference in Vancouver on May 28 and 29.

“By talking with some very successful executives age 35 and under, I want to show that we need to look at people one generation younger, and foster and develop this talent.”

By talking with some very successful executives age 35 and under, I want to show that we need to look at people one generation younger, and foster and develop this talent.

Well, it’s either talent or a precocious Midas touch that distinguishes these panel members. Maverix Metals TSXV:MMX CEO Dan O’Flaherty co-founded the royalty/streaming company just last year, already accumulating assets in 10 countries and a $200-million market cap.

As president/CEO of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Jordan Trimble proved adept at fundraising and deal-making while building a 250,000-hectare uranium-thorium exploration portfolio in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin. Integra president/CEO Steve de Jong raised the company from a $10-million market cap in 2012 to last week’s $590-million takeout.

And, demographic gap notwithstanding, Pollard’s second panel features three other success stories, just a bit older but with lots of potential left after guiding three of last year’s biggest M&A deals. They’ll take part in the Vision to Exit discussion, which closes the conference on May 29.

Eira Thomas burst into prominence at the Lac de Gras diamond fields where she discovered Diavik at age 24. Her most recent major coup took place last year on the Klondike gold fields with Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) $520-million buyout of Kaminak Gold.

Featherstone Capital president/CEO Doug Forster founded and led Newmarket Gold, producing over 225,000 ounces a year from three Australian mines and enticing Kirkland Lake Gold’s (TSX:KL) billion-dollar offer.

Now chairperson of Liberty Gold TSX:LGD and a director of NexGen Energy TSX:NXE, Mark O’Dea co-founded and chaired True Gold Mining, acquired in April 2016 by Endeavour Mining TSX:EDV. Three other companies that O’Dea co-founded, led and sold were Fronteer Gold, picked up by Newmont Mining NYSE:NEM in 2011; Aurora Energy, sold to Paladin Energy TSX:PDN in 2011; and True North Nickel, in which Royal Nickel TSX:RNX bought a majority interest in 2014.

“We’ll be looking at how they go into deals, what their philosophy is, what’s their current reading of the market and what they’re going to do next. They each have a big future ahead of them.”

Pollard’s two panel discussions take place at the International Metal Writers Conference on May 28 and 29 at the Vancouver Convention Centre East. Pre-register for free or pay $20 at the door.

In all, the conference brings generations of talent, expertise and insight to an audience of industry insiders and investors alike.

Read more about the International Metal Writers Conference.