Thursday 6th August 2020

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Posts tagged ‘niobium’

Saville Resources, Commerce Resources announce fluorspar trend on Quebec niobium property

July 23rd, 2020

by Greg Klein | July 23, 2020

Further analysis of previous drilling shows further critical mineral potential for an early-stage project. Saville Resources TSXV:SRE has identified an encouraging fluorspar trend in the Mallard area of its Niobium Claim Group following review of assays showing niobium, tantalum and phosphate, as well as fluorspar.

Saville Resources, Commerce Resources announce fluorspar trend on Quebec niobium property

Saville operates the 1,223-hectare project on a 75% earn-in from Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE that calls for $5 million of spending within five years. Two kilometres away, Commerce moves its Ashram rare earths-fluorspar deposit towards pre-feasibility.

Saville’s review covered results from historic drilling as well as last year’s five-hole, 1,049-metre program. Overall, three drill campaigns have totalled 14 holes and 3,537 metres.

The study outlines a fluorspar trend within the primary niobium trend that’s “broader and more extensive than previously understood,” the company stated. Stretching laterally at least 600 metres, the fluorspar trend remains open to the northwest, southeast and down dip, “and is interpreted to continue to surface where it is obscured by a shallow veneer of overburden,” Saville added. “Fluorspar mineralization is readily observable to the naked eye as the fluorspar present is purple in colour and relatively abundant where grades are of interest.”

The company now plans to have assay pulps undergo laboratory fluorine analysis.

Fluorspar, niobium and tantalum have been designated critical minerals by the United States. A number of American initiatives to secure domestic and allied sources include the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 which recently passed the U.S. House of Representatives and now faces Senate debate. In June Canada and the U.S. reaffirmed their commitment to the Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration announced in January, which would encourage investment and development for North American mining projects and supply chains.

Troubled and uncharted

April 10th, 2020

Navigating the new normal to an uncertain destination

by Greg Klein | April 10, 2020

The new normal transitions into an uncertain future

 

What’s Chinese for “cui bono”?

Through grimly ironic coincidence, the country that unwittingly inflicted this on the world stands to benefit. “The Chinese Communist Party is seizing what its senior officials are calling the ‘opportunity’ of the pandemic to realize the party’s long-game objective of fully eclipsing North America and Europe in the global order,” writes Terry Glavin.

“While the Chinese government’s internal statistics are routinely questioned by outside analysts, China’s Ministry of Industry and Information Technology credibly reports that roughly 75% of small and medium-sized businesses across the country have already resumed production.”

On April 7 Bloomberg reported its own estimates “that most of China was 90% to 95% back to work at the end of last week, noting pick-ups in the steel market, construction activity and crude processing. Those oil refineries, as well as coal-fired power plants, are nearing last year’s operating rates, while metals stockpiles have shrunk from record or near-record levels. It’s a three-month cycle of collapse and recovery marked by perhaps the most heartening milestone for those nations still fending off the worst of the virus: China has now reported zero new COVID-19 deaths for the first time since January.”

But not so heartening, former U.K. foreign secretary William Hague noted in the Telegraph that “in Europe, North America and lower-income countries too, it seems likely that the virus will kill far more people, wreak much worse economic damage and bring more unwelcome changes to life than in China itself.”

The new normal transitions into an uncertain future

Glavin quotes from an analysis by Horizon Advisory, a consultancy that investigates Chinese policy: “Beijing intends to use the global dislocation and downturn to attract foreign investment, to seize strategic market share and resources—especially those that force dependence—and to proliferate global information systems.”

Hague warned that “China will gain from the new age of the surveillance state that will be summoned into existence around much of the world in the coming months…. Guess who will be well-placed to supply the systems, software and data, and to do so quickly and on a large scale?”

Glavin also stressed China’s designs on global information technology architecture, “mostly through Huawei Technologies, China’s ‘national champion’ telecom giant.”

He remains stark in his conclusion: “We may be stumbling headlong into an uncharted realm of social breakdown and mass graves. We could be destined for something else, somewhere dark and foreboding, where Xi Jinping calls all the shots. Or we might be traversing an excruciating social and economic terra incognita towards some eventual semblance of normalcy.”

Keep the news stream flowing

Seemingly steadfast, though, are miners and explorers. Many of their announcements concern responses to the crisis, especially whether companies are allowed to continue working, or whether they find it practical to do so.

The new normal transitions into an uncertain future

Photo: Talon Metals

But with many seasonal exploration programs completed before the industry entered pandemic mode, assays are starting to pour in. Some random and radically abbreviated examples from April 8 alone include 2.31 g/t gold over 101 metres from QMX Gold’s (TSXV:QMX) Bonnefond deposit in Val d’Or; 7.14 metres of mixed massive sulphides from Talon Metals’ (TSX:TLO) Tamarack nickel-copper-cobalt project in Minnesota; 25,466 ppm zirconium, 89.1 ppm dysprosium, 1281 ppm neodymium and 348 ppm praseodymium over 8.83 metres in a channel sample from Search Minerals’ (TSXV:SMY) Silver Fox zone in Labrador; 0.69% Nb2O5 over 185 metres at NioBay Metals’ (TSXV:NBY) James Bay niobium project in Ontario; 11.6 g/t gold and 2,960 g/t silver in surface chip samples taken by Cornerstone Capital Resources’ (TSXV:CGP) ASX-listed JV partner Sunstone Metals at their Bramaderos gold-copper project in Ecuador.

Other project updates included promises of assays to come from recent programs or new developments from analytical work. Determined, maybe even irrepressible, junior exploration soldiers on.

A humanitarian call for mineral exploration supplies and skills

As of April 9 the Association for Mineral Exploration received 29 responses to its call for assistance in providing testing, triage, housing and isolation areas for vulnerable people. “As mineral explorers, we have access to the supplies needed and are in a unique position to help,” AME pointed out. If you can, please consider the following donations:

  • Insulated structures (both hard and soft wall)

  • Camp gear such as furniture, lighting and kitchen appliances

  • Medical equipment

  • Camp support personnel such as caterers, housekeepers, janitors, etc.

  • Available medical staff including such qualifications as OFA3s, paramedics, RNs, etc.

  • Other supplies or skills

To make a contribution, fill out this form and AME will be in touch. 

For further information contact Savannah Nadeau.

AME’s program comprises part of a spontaneous international effort in which miners and explorers across Canada and around the world contribute supplies, facilities, skills and expertise to the cause.

We will get through this—won’t we?

From one perspective, nuclear energy poses dangers unimagined by its more conventional critics. Although statistically one of our safest sources of electricity, its complexity requires a sophisticated and orderly society to guarantee safety.

Would that be possible if the West succumbed to a future dominated by rampant terrorism, rioting and crime—and in Canada, incessant blockades as well as unrestrained flakery? These are nightmarish scenarios, of course, but the pandemic makes them seem almost quaint.

An outbreak during a nuclear refuelling program at Pennsylvania’s Limerick facility just hints at the vulnerability of key infrastructure if illness strikes enough people, or even just a few specialists with rare expertise. Populations would suffer not only compounding problems from the loss of essential services but also dangers ranging from an ailing reactor to a crumbling hydro dam.

Preparations to lock down essential staff show foresight, but might also presage a highly regimented society. Such an outcome might result anyway, as has often been the historic case following a period of chaos.

Weakening links in the supply chains

Anyone who’s seen the derelict state of greater Vancouver’s once bountiful agricultural districts might question the wisdom of importing so much food from so far away. Times like these afflict complicated trade, communications and transportation networks and, as the case of milk distribution shows, shorter supply lines too.

Unable to get their product to market, some Canadian dairy farmers have been dumping large amounts of raw milk. In British Columbia, the practice started on April 3, “a measure of last resort, and only considered in emergency situations,” according to the B.C. Dairy Association.

Among problems listed by Postmedia are “transportation shortages caused by an overwhelmed trucking industry, processing and packaging challenges, a sharp decline in bulk customers due to the mass closures of restaurants and bakeries, and inconsistent distribution to stores.”

Another hint of the possibilities to come was the suspension of Maple Leaf Foods’ (TSX:MFI) Brampton poultry plant after three workers became infected.

“This is a very fluid situation and our teams are working very closely within our network, as well as with our supply chain and logistics partners so that we can continue to deliver safe food at this critical time,” the company stated.

Meanwhile selling groceries can prove deadly, as shown by COVID-19 fatalities among U.S. retail workers. The virus recently struck down at least four American supermarket employees, the Washington Post reported on April 6. “Industry experts say the rise of worker infections and deaths will likely have a ripple effect on grocers’ ability to retain and add new workers at a time when they’re looking to rapidly hire thousands of temporary employees,” the paper stated.

In southwestern British Columbia, some newly hired staff appear to come from a vulnerable age group. Some of the security guards policing the socially distant queues outside retail outlets wouldn’t look out of place in a long-term care home.

Myriad other supply chain challenges include COVID-19-specific medical equipment.

The new normal transitions into an uncertain future

Can your immune system withstand The Stand?

Virus novel precaution: Take this immunity self-test

Tragically these are also times of rampant misinformation, whether it’s conspiracy theories of how the virus originated or phoney promises of miraculous cures. One especially preposterous claim has been perpetrated by the National Post: that Stephen King’s The Stand “is either the perfect distraction from COVID-19 or too eerily accurate to consider.”

Yes it’s a story, of sorts, about a virus killing off most of our species. But before any attempt to read it, potential victims should answer these questions:

  • I like fictional characters who resemble TV stereotypes

  • I don’t care how long an author takes to tell a story, as long as it’s long

  • My favourite pastimes include watching water boil, paint dry and grass grow

  • I like boring books because they make our suddenly shortened lives seem to pass so slowly

If you answered every question with a resounding yes, you have sufficient boredom immunity to survive this virus novel.

Calendar of the plague year

These days commemorate the plague that passed over and the Resurrection. We can hope…

Update: Commerce Resources’ metallurgy upgrades Quebec fluorspar to acid-spar

March 9th, 2020

On March 9 Commerce Resources announced a collaboration with CanmetMINING to enhance beneficiation performance for the company’s Ashram rare earths deposit. Funded by Natural Resources Canada, the study takes place within CanmetMINING’s rare earths and chromite R&D program. Commerce and CanmetMINING will present a paper on Ashram at the 2020 Conference of Metallurgists (COM2020) in Toronto next August.

 

by Greg Klein | Updated February 28, 2020

With further progress on a strong potential byproduct, an advanced rare earths project could provide a second critical mineral from a Canadian source. Metallurgical tests on material from Commerce Resources’ (TSXV:CCE) Ashram deposit in northern Quebec have achieved 97.8% calcium fluoride, surpassing the 97% level typical of the more expensive acid-spar grade.

Conducted at the Colorado lab of Hazen Research, the tests show Ashram’s amenability to standard physical separation techniques to upgrade fluorspar from a head grade of about 7.5% CaF2 to over 97%, Commerce pointed out.

Ashram is primarily a rare earth deposit that is well-positioned to supply the permanent magnet industry over the long term. However, these fluorspar test results also demonstrate the potential for Ashram to be a significant contributor to the acid-spar market.—Chris Grove,
president of Commerce Resources

The lab’s next trials will focus on removing impurities well as further improving fluorspar recovery, Commerce added.

The achievement follows December reports of flotation tests conducted by l’Université Laval and last month’s announcement that Hazen had studied an alternative or complimentary approach at the front end of the project’s current flowsheet.

This approach “includes a coarser-grind followed by a fluorspar pre-float as an initial beneficiation step to isolate a sizable portion of the fluorspar prior to material entering the primary REE recovery flowsheet,” Commerce stated.

Fluorspar’s higher-priced acid-grade is converted to hydrofluoric acid for the chemical industry and aluminum production. Considerable demand potential also comes from increasing use of refrigerants and from the growing lithium-ion battery market, according to Roskill. Met-spar, grading below 97%, is used in steel and cement production.

Apart from upgrading fluorspar, the Colorado lab has worked on improving REE recovery and producing concentrate samples requested by potential customers.

High-grade, near-surface drill results released by Commerce in November further highlight Ashram’s dual potential for rare earths and fluorspar. A few examples:

  • 1.71% rare earth oxides and 7.2% calcium fluoride over 221.95 metres, starting at 2.69 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 2.18% REO and 11.5% CaF2 over 36.6 metres)

  • 1.68% REO and 8.4% CaF2 over 101.86 metres, starting at 1.59 metres
  • (including 2% REO and 9.6% CaF2 over 13.28 metres)

True widths were unavailable.

Amid heightened concern about critical minerals, rare earths have gained considerable attention for their importance to the economy, clean energy and defence, among other applications. Less prominent, however, has been fluorspar, which also comes under the U.S. list of 35 critical minerals. China controls well over 50% of production but has become a net importer due to increasing domestic demand and mine shutdowns caused by environmental concerns, according to Roskill.

Commerce Resources’ metallurgy upgrades Quebec fluorspar to acid-spar

Working on northern Quebec’s Eldor property,
Commerce and Saville offer the Western world
potential for critical minerals including
rare earths, fluorspar, niobium and tantalum.

In January, Canada and the U.S. signed a Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals to develop deposits and supply chains.

Looking at yet more critical minerals on the Eldor property that hosts Ashram, earlier this month Commerce joined Saville Resources TSXV:SRE to announce a preliminary mineralogical analysis on material from the Niobium Claim Group. Saville operates that project, two kilometres from Ashram, under a 75% earn-in from Commerce.

Using core from last year’s drill program, a University of Windsor research project found three encouraging signs for the project, the companies reported.

The property’s dominant niobium minerals are pyrochlore and columbite, the main source minerals for niobium globally, a fact that suggests favourable processing.

The property’s niobium may have been mobilized, which could potentially enhance a project’s grade.

The mineralogy supports a model of a continuous niobium mineralized trend through the complex.

Commerce and Saville noted parallels between the project’s Mallard prospect and Magris Resources’ Niobec mine in Quebec. Both projects feature carbonatites, and Niobec’s mineralization is hosted by pyrochlore and columbite similar in grain size to that found in Mallard’s preliminary analysis. Additionally, both Mallard and Niobec show mineralization in moderate to steeply dipping elongate lenses.

Having assayed high-grade niobium and tantalum from 2019 drilling, Saville plans further exploration this year.

In November Commerce closed a private placement totalling $2.51 million.

Read more about Commerce Resources.

Read more about Saville Resources..

Watch Roskill analyst Adam Coggins discussing fluorspar demand and prices.

Update: Saville Resources reports B.C. Greenwood sample results, vends project

March 3rd, 2020

by Greg Klein | March 2, 2020, updated March 3, 2020

Update: On March 3 Saville Resources announced the sale of its Bud property to Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM for 388,888 Ximen shares, subject to TSXV approval.

A company focused on critical minerals in Quebec has also kept busy in an historic southern British Columbia mining camp. On March 2 Saville Resources TSXV:SRE released grab sample assays from a 2019 field program at the Bud property in the Boundary district that includes the Republic, Belcher, Rossland and Greenwood camps of B.C. and Washington. Some highlights included:

  • 3.84 g/t gold, 105 ppm cobalt, 2,200 ppm copper and 824 ppm zinc

  • 1.52 g/t gold, 247 ppm cobalt, 4,070 ppm copper and 50 ppm zinc

  • 0.864 g/t gold, 476 ppm cobalt, 6,540 ppm copper and 127 ppm zinc
Saville Resources reports B.C. Greenwood sample results

Grab samples from the previous year reached up to 4.57 g/t gold, 27.7 g/t silver and 6.7% copper; as well as 4.44 g/t gold, 17 g/t silver and 6.84% copper.

Saville stated the 381-hectare property potentially hosts copper-gold skarn mineralization similar to the Motherlode and Sunset properties 500 metres away that had historic production of 4.2 million tonnes averaging 0.8% copper and 1.3 g/t gold. The company also sees potential for gold-bearing epithermal veins.

Reporting on its flagship Niobium Claim Group in northern Quebec last month, Saville announced completion of a preliminary mineralogical analysis conducted as part of a University of Windsor research project. Among the results, the study found three encouraging signs for the project:

The dominant niobium minerals are pyrochlore and columbite, a potential processing advantage with the most common minerals for niobium globally.

The niobium may have been mobilized, which might enhance a project’s grade.

The mineralogy supports a model of a continuous niobium-mineralized trend through the complex.

Saville drew parallels between the project’s Mallard prospect and Magris Resources’ Niobec mine in Quebec. Both feature carbonatites, while Niobec’s mineralization is hosted by pyrochlore and columbite similar in grain size to that found in Mallard’s preliminary analysis. Additionally, both Mallard and Niobec show mineralization in moderate to steeply dipping elongate lenses.

Following near-surface, high-grade niobium and tantalum intercepts from last year’s drilling, Saville plans further exploration this year. The company also plans to evaluate the property’s fluorspar potential after reviewing impressive historic grades for calcium fluoride.

Niobium, tantalum and fluorspar appear on the United States list of 35 critical minerals. Amid increasing concern, in January the U.S. and Canada signed a Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals to develop deposits and supply chains.

Saville operates the Niobium Claim Group under a 75% earn-in from Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE, which holds the advanced-stage Ashram rare earths deposit two kilometres away.

Read more about Saville Resources.

Saville Resources reports B.C. Greenwood sample results

March 2nd, 2020

This story has been updated and moved here.

Update: Commerce Resources’ metallurgy upgrades Quebec fluorspar to acid-spar

February 28th, 2020

This story has been updated and moved here.

Canada and U.S. formalize action plan for critical minerals deposits and supply chains

January 10th, 2020

by Greg Klein | January 10, 2020

A new commitment binds two neighbouring allies to produce resources essential to the economy, defence, technology and clean energy. Announced January 9, the Canada-U.S. Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration reflects both Canada’s mining potential and American concern about reliance on rival and potentially hostile countries.

Canada and U.S. formalize action plan for critical minerals deposits and supply chains

“Canada is an important supplier of 13 of the 35 minerals that the U.S. has identified as critical to economic and national security,” stated the Natural Resources Canada announcement. “We have the potential to become a reliable source of other critical minerals including rare earth elements, key components in many electronic devices that we use in our daily lives. Canada is currently the largest supplier of potash, indium, aluminum and tellurium to the U.S. and the second-largest supplier of niobium, tungsten and magnesium. Canada also supplies roughly one-quarter of the uranium needs of the U.S. and has been a reliable partner to the U.S. in this commodity for over 75 years.”

Among goals of the action plan are joint initiatives in R&D, supply chain modelling and increased support for industry, NRCan added. Experts from both countries will meet in the coming weeks.

Reflecting Washington’s concern, in 2017 the U.S. Geological Survey released the country’s first thorough study of critical minerals since 1973. Later that year President Donald Trump ordered a federal strategy that initially focused on 23 essential minerals. In 2018 the U.S. officially declared 35 minerals to be critical and at risk of supply disruption.

Since then, discussions have taken place between Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, along with other representatives from both countries.

By finalizing the collaboration agreement, “we are advancing secure access to the critical minerals that are key to our economic growth and security—including uranium and rare earth elements—while bolstering our competitiveness in global markets and creating jobs for Canadians,” said Canadian Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan.

Read more about the U.S. critical minerals strategy.

Read about the U.S. list of 35 critical minerals.

Commerce Resources sees further encouragement from Quebec rare earths lab tests

December 17th, 2019

by Greg Klein | December 17, 2019, updated January 7, 2020

Update: An academic paper on the flowsheet for Commerce Resources’ Ashram rare earths and fluorspar deposit will be presented at the Canadian Mineral Processors conference in Ottawa on January 23. Lead author Jean-François Boulanger, an assistant professor at l’Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue in Rouyn-Noranda and manager of the Ashram metallurgical tests completed at l’Université Laval from 2018 to 2019, will discuss his study entitled Challenges of Scale-Up in Grinding and Flotation of Rare Earth Minerals. The report will also be published in the organization’s periodical CMP Proceedings.

“The Ashram deposit, with its simple rare earth and gangue mineralogy, and resultant well-understood processing techniques, potentially presents a base case scenario for some issues and, therefore, the test data generated by Laval has been used to formulate cautionary guidance for scale-up and large-scale concentrate production, potentially applicable to all rare earth projects regardless of mineralogy,” stated an announcement from Commerce.

Second and third authors of the study are Claude Bazin, professor and project supervisor at Laval, and Darren Smith, project manager at Ashram.

 

Another advance in rare earths processing helps distinguish this Canadian project as the United States and other allies express heightened concern about critical elements. Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE announced a potentially significant advance in flotation tests conducted by l’Université Laval on material from the company’s Ashram rare earths and fluorspar project in northern Quebec. Should further tests support this initial finding, the result could indicate a marked improvement in overall flotation performance.

Commerce Resources sees further encouragement from Quebec rare earths lab tests

Using a combined rougher concentrate from previous lab work, Laval undertook a cleaner-stage test producing a flotation concentrate of 21% rare earth oxides at a stage recovery of 92% and a stage mass pull of 41%, Commerce reported. “The current base case flowsheet incorporates a two-stage rougher only, resulting in a favourable flotation concentrate, typically of 7% to 10% REO at over 80% recovery and less than 30% mass pull.

“Subsequent cleaner stages have generally resulted in a significant drop in recovery. However, the cleaner test result from Laval indicates a potentially significant development in this regard, having resulted in a marked improvement in recovery and grade in the cleaner-stage flotation.”

Improved flotation would affect the stage where most rare earth elements are lost and also determine the amount of hydrochloric acid required, as well as other aspects of the flowsheet.

“In other words, the flotation performance has one of the largest impacts on the OPEX and CAPEX of the overall project flowsheet as it affects everything downstream of it,” the company stated. “Therefore continued improvement in the performance of the flowsheet’s flotation stage is a key interest.”

While Commerce explores funding opportunities to continue work at Laval, the company looks forward to announcing further metallurgical progress from ongoing studies by Hazen Research. The Colorado lab’s current work focuses on upgrading Ashram’s fluorspar to higher-priced acid grade, improving REE recovery and producing concentrate samples requested by potential customers.

Late last month Commerce released assays that included one of Ashram’s best intercepts, 2.38% REO over 64.54 metres, with sub-intervals including 3.02% over 28.35 metres. The near-surface results included impressive fluorspar grades, such as 7.2% calcium fluoride over 221.95 metres, including 11.5% CaF2 over 36.16 metres. Although this critical mineral wasn’t included in the project’s 2012 resource estimate, fluorspar will take its place in a resource update anticipated for the coming year.

In another critical minerals project two kilometres from Ashram, Saville Resources TSXV:SRE operates the Niobium Claim Group under a 75% earn-in from Commerce. Last June Saville released encouraging niobium-tantalum-phosphate drill results and is now analyzing the project’s historic, non-43-101 high-grade fluorspar assays.

Last month Commerce closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $2.51 million. That followed a $413,749 private placement in August.

Read more about Commerce Resources.

Commerce Resources congratulates Quebec PhD student for research on company’s rare earths project

December 5th, 2019

by Greg Klein | December 5, 2019

A study related to the Ashram rare earths-fluorspar deposit brought Université du Québec PhD candidate Sophie Costis first prize in an academic competition. Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE congratulated her on winning the $2,000 scholarship for her study on flotation tailings using the flowsheet for the company’s deposit. Costis delivered her presentation entitled Impact du gel-dégel et de la salinité sur le comportement de résidus miniers de terres rares en milieu nordique to l’Association Québécoise des Sciences de la Terre. Her first-place finish in le défi de la recherche en géosciences (Geoscience Research Challenge) was announced at last month’s Quebec Mines + Energy conference in Quebec City.

Commerce Resources congratulates Quebec PhD student for research on company’s rare earths project

A first-prize award recognizes the work of PhD candidate
Sophie Costis on Ashram’s flotation management.
(Photo: Université du Québec)

“The company is thrilled to see Sophie recognized for her hard work on the project over the last few years,” said Commerce president Chris Grove. “We are committed to advancing the Ashram project in an environmentally responsible manner and Sophie’s work will help build this foundation through high-quality data-gathering and analysis in a very important field.”

Backed by a $300,000 grant, Costis works in partnership with le Centre Eau Terre Environnement of l’Institut national de la recherche scientifique of l’Université du Québec. Expected to conclude late next year, her project provides further insight on tailings management in the flotation process plant.

Her findings so far show no serious concerns with Ashram’s flotation tailings management, show the process has no acid-generating potential and also show strong indications that there is no metal-leaching potential, Commerce stated.

In early October, Cynthia Kierscht, the U.S. deputy assistant secretary of state for Western Hemisphere affairs, hosted Shawn Tupper, associate deputy minister of Natural Resources Canada, at the first critical minerals working group meeting in Washington. The group will continue talks in coming months to finalize the joint plan.—Canadian Press

The work complements Ashram’s pre-feasibility studies for Ashram, which coincide with heightened concerns about critical minerals like fluorspar and especially rare earths. This week Canadian Press reported Ottawa is examining the role Canada could play in supplying the United States and other allied countries with minerals considered necessary to the economy, technology and defence.

NRCanada has contracted Roskill Consulting to forecast future demand for critical minerals that Canada could supply, CP added.

Last week Commerce released assays from near-surface intervals at Ashram showing high grades over wide widths. The company also has metallurgical studies underway at a Colorado lab to upgrade the project’s fluorspar potential, increase rare earths extraction and produce samples requested by potential customers.

Fluorspar wasn’t considered in the project’s 2012 resource but will be included in an update anticipated for the coming year, as will two seasons of extensive drilling. A major advantage of Ashram is the carbonatite-hosted deposit’s relatively simple monazite, bastnasite and xenotime mineralogy that’s familiar to conventional rare earths processing.

Fluorspar potential also comes under consideration at another critical minerals project two kilometres away, where Saville Resources TSXV:SRE operates the Niobium Claim Group under a 75% earn-in from Commerce. Following a drill program earlier this year, Saville released promising niobium-tantalum-phosphate results in June.

Last month Commerce closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $2.51 million. A private placement in August brought in $413,749.

 

Update: An academic paper on Ashram’s flowsheet will be presented at the Canadian Mineral Processors conference in Ottawa on January 23. Lead author Jean-François Boulanger, an assistant professor at l’Université du Québec en Abitibi-Témiscamingue in Rouyn-Noranda and manager of the Ashram metallurgical tests completed at l’Université Laval from 2018 to 2019, will discuss his study entitled Challenges of Scale-Up in Grinding and Flotation of Rare Earth Minerals. The report will also be published in the organization’s periodical CMP Proceedings.

“The Ashram deposit, with its simple rare earth and gangue mineralogy, and resultant well-understood processing techniques, potentially presents a base case scenario for some issues and, therefore, the test data generated by Laval has been used to formulate cautionary guidance for scale-up and large-scale concentrate production, potentially applicable to all rare earth projects regardless of mineralogy,” stated an announcement from Commerce.

Second and third authors of the study are Claude Bazin, professor and project supervisor at Laval, and Darren Smith, project manager at Ashram.

Read more about Commerce Resources.

Commerce Resources reports high grades over wide intervals at Quebec rare earths-fluorspar project

November 28th, 2019

by Greg Klein | November 28, 2019

With core moved from the storage vault to the lab, new assays further confidence in a resource update anticipated for next year as the Ashram deposit advances towards pre-feasibility. The results come from a 14-hole, 2,014-metre program sunk in 2016 but only recently assayed for budgetary reasons. Now cashed-up Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE unveils an impressive batch of near-surface rare earths and fluorspar intercepts from the northern Quebec property.

Commerce Resources reports high grades over wide intervals at Quebec rare earths-fluorspar project

Among the highlights are one of the project’s best-yet intercepts: 2.38% rare earth oxides over 64.54 metres, with sub-intervals including 3.02% over 28.35 metres. Another standout shows 1.71% over 221.95 metres, including 2.18% over 36.16 metres. Yet another hole boasts 2.16% over 53.55 metres. (True widths were unavailable.)

These are near-surface results, starting at downhole depths of 66.5 metres, 2.69 metres and 1.54 metres respectively.

Another critical mineral and one not factored into Ashram’s previous PEA, fluorspar also comes through in impressive grades, such as 7.2% calcium fluoride over 221.95 metres, including 11.5% CaF2 over 36.16 metres. Metallurgical studies currently underway work on upgrading the fluorspar to higher-priced acid grade in a flowsheet that would provide both rare earths and fluorspar concentrates, improve RE extraction and reduce tailings. The Colorado lab will also produce samples to meet requests from potential customers.

This round of definition drilling targeted the deposit’s northern, western and southern margins with holes spaced 50 metres apart, and in some cases 25 metres apart. Additional drilling at 25-metre centres may take place.

Using a 1.25% cutoff, Ashram’s 2012 resource estimate showed:

  • measured: 1.59 million tonnes averaging 1.77% total rare earth oxides

  • indicated: 27.67 million tonnes averaging 1.9% TREO

  • inferred: 219.8 million tonnes averaging 1.88% TREO

The carbonatite-hosted deposit features relatively simple monazite, bastnasite and xenotime mineralogy, familiar to conventional rare earths processing

Anticipated for the coming year is Ashram’s first resource update since 2012, factoring in 9,625 metres of drilling since then. Previous drilling followed mineralization from near-surface to depths beyond 600 metres where mineralization remains open, as evidenced by 4.13% REO over 0.6 metres beginning at 599.9 metres’ depth.

Work continues as the United States and other allied countries show increasing concern about China’s domination of several critical minerals with a special focus on rare earths but also including fluorspar, tantalum and niobium. Commerce also holds the advanced-stage Blue River tantalum-niobium deposit in southern British Columbia.

About two kilometres from Ashram, Saville Resources TSXV:SRE operates the Niobium Claim Group under a 75% earn-in from Commerce. After releasing niobium-tantalum-phosphate results last June, Saville now has the project’s fluorspar potential under evaluation.

Earlier this month Commerce closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $2.51 million. Another placement in August garnered $413,749.

Read more about Commerce Resources.