Saturday 25th May 2019

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Posts tagged ‘newfoundland’

Miners and explorers pick their spots in Fraser Institute’s latest report card

February 28th, 2019

by Greg Klein | February 28, 2019

Ontario dropped dramatically but an improved performance by the Northwest Territories and Nunavut helped Canada retain its status as the planet’s most mining-friendly country. That’s the verdict of the Fraser Institute’s Annual Survey of Mining Companies 2018, a study of jurisdictions worldwide. Some 291 mining and exploration people responded to questions on a number of issues, supplying enough info to rank 83 countries, provinces and states.

Canadian and American jurisdictions dominated the most important section, with four spots each on the Investment Attractiveness Index’s top 10. Combined ratings for all Canadian jurisdictions held this country’s place as the miners’ favourite overall.

The IAI rates both geology and government policies. Respondents typically say they base about 40% of their investment decisions on policy factors and about 60% on geology. Here’s the IAI top 10 with the previous year’s numbers in parentheses:

  • 1 Nevada (3)

  • 2 Western Australia (5)

  • 3 Saskatchewan (2)

  • 4 Quebec (6)

  • 5 Alaska (10)

  • 6 Chile (8)

  • 7 Utah (15)

  • 8 Arizona (9)

  • 9 Yukon (13)

  • 10 Northwest Territories (21)

Here are Canada’s IAI rankings:

  • 3 Saskatchewan (2)

  • 4 Quebec (6)

  • 9 Yukon (13)

  • 10 Northwest Territories (21)

  • 11 Newfoundland and Labrador (11)

  • 12 Manitoba (18)

  • 15 Nunavut (26)

  • 18 British Columbia (20)

  • 20 Ontario (7)

  • 30 New Brunswick (30)

  • 51 Alberta (49)

  • 57 Nova Scotia (56)

Despite Ontario’s fall from grace, the province’s policy ratings changed little from last year. Relative to other jurisdictions, however, the province plummeted. Concerns include disputed land claims, as well as uncertainty about protected areas and environmental regulations.

The Policy Perception Index ignored geology to focus on how government treats miners and explorers. Saskatchewan ranked first worldwide, as seen in these Canadian standings:

The evidence is clear—mineral deposits alone are not enough to attract precious commodity investment dollars. A sound regulatory regime coupled with competitive fiscal policies is key to making a jurisdiction attractive in the eyes of mining investors.—Ashley Stedman,
senior policy analyst,
the Fraser Institute

  • 1 Saskatchewan (3)

  • 9 New Brunswick (13)

  • 10 Quebec (9)

  • 11 Nova Scotia (24)

  • 14 Alberta (16)

  • 18 Newfoundland (10)

  • 24 Yukon (22)

  • 30 Ontario (20)

  • 33 Manitoba (27)

  • 42 NWT (42)

  • 44 B.C. (36)

  • 45 Nunavut (44)

The NWT and Nunavut’s indifferent PPI performance suggests greater appreciation of the territories’ geology boosted their IAI rank.

This year’s study included a chapter on exploration permitting, previously the subject of a separate Fraser Institute study. Twenty-two jurisdictions in Canada, the U.S., Australia and Scandinavia were evaluated for time, transparency and certainty. Cumulatively, the six American states did best, with 72% of explorers saying they got permits within six months, compared with 69% for the eight Canadian provinces, 53% for the two Scandinavian countries (Finland and Sweden) and 34% for the six Australian states.

A majority of respondents working in Canada (56%) said permitting waits had grown over the last decade, compared with 52% in Australia, 45% in Scandinavia and 28% in the U.S.

A lack of permitting transparency was cited as an investment deterrent by 48% of respondents working in Australia, 44% in Canada, 33% in Scandinavia and 24% in the U.S.

Eighty-eight percent of explorers working in the U.S. and Scandinavia expressed confidence that they’d eventually get permits, followed by 77% for Australia and 73% for Canada.

Saskatchewan led Canada for timeline certainty, transparency and, with Quebec, confidence that permits would eventually come through.

As for the IAI’s 10 worst, they include Bolivia, despite some recent efforts to encourage development; China, the only east Asian country in the study; and problem-plagued Venezuela.

  • 74 Bolivia (86)

  • 75 La Rioja province, Argentina (80)

  • 76 Dominican Republic (72)

  • 77 Ethiopia (81)

  • 78 China (83)

  • 79 Panama (77)

  • 80 Guatemala (91)

  • 81 Nicaragua (82)

  • 82 Neuquen province, Argentina (57)

  • 83 Venezuela (85)

Explorers made up nearly 52% of survey respondents, producers just over 25%, consulting companies over 16% and others nearly 8%.

“The evidence is clear—mineral deposits alone are not enough to attract precious commodity investment dollars,” said Ashley Stedman, who co-wrote the study with Kenneth P. Green. “A sound regulatory regime coupled with competitive fiscal policies is key to making a jurisdiction attractive in the eyes of mining investors.”

Download the Fraser Institute Annual Survey of Mining Companies 2018.

Battlefield correspondent

January 24th, 2019

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

by Greg Klein

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

An SRO audience paid rapt attention to Rex Murphy’s VRIC speech.

 

There’s something inspiring about a Newfoundlander—a Newfoundlander born in Newfoundland before it even joined Canada—coming to the West Coast largely to defend Alberta’s oil and gas sector. Actually Rex Murphy’s message applies to Canada’s resource industries overall, focusing on the people who work in them, their families and others who helped build the country. He sees the chasm between those who find fulfillment in employment and those who would shut down the industries that provide it.

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

A National Post columnist who’s somehow tolerated by the CBC, Murphy proved a huge hit with an overflow crowd at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2019. “As a journalist, I’m in a room full of achievers,” he quipped. “This is a very awkward spot.” But unlike most journalists, he neither ignores nor celebrates an enormous shift in Canadian society.

He remembers miners from Baie Verte and Buchans who frequented his mother’s restaurant in the 1950s, “the gentlest of men” despite their gruelling work. But important as mining was, Newfoundland’s main source of survival was fishing. That changed dramatically in 1992.

That’s when 31,000 people, “at the stroke of a pen on a single day, were completely removed from the Newfoundland inshore fishery. Something that had gone on for 450 years, that defined the culture, the humour, the idiom, the songs, the pattern of settlement, the whole idea of Newfoundland, was wrapped up in that fishery…. For the first time in 500 years no one could jig a codfish and have it for supper. But also it was 31,000 people abruptly unemployed.”

Proportionately that would have been 660,000 people in Ontario, he added. One man he knew, desperately hoping for a job in Hamilton, sold his house for seven plane tickets. “That’s how rough it was.”

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

But as one regional resource economy collapsed, another boomed. Alberta’s oilpatch needed workers. Murphy calls it “one of the great rescue operations of Canadian Confederation, which most people still haven’t even heard about…. It was one of the great moments, unsung, of Confederation at work, where one region of the country, very willingly, allowed a strange bunch with certainly a stranger language to wander into their province … one of the great songs that we should be singing, that the enterprise of Alberta and a primary industry rescued one of the great social and cultural blows of another part of the Confederation. Did you ever hear about it?”

We more likely heard vilification, often coming from activists, celebrities, media and increasingly Ottawa, he maintained. “You heard every criticism you could hear about poor Fort McMurray. Even after the fire they went after it…. You had the oil price decline, you had the burning of Fort McMurray, you had a flood in Fort McMurray, you had the departure of capital from Fort McMurray, you had the layoff of engineers in Fort McMurray, and what did they decide was the cure? Let’s bring in a carbon tax.

“I mean, the poor creature’s already laid out on the morgue table and they want to take another few shots at the head.”

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

Resource extraction was vital to the generations who built this country, Murphy emphasized. “It is only in a country as prosperous as our own that we get to the point where we denigrate and derogate the essential industries that brought us precisely to where we are.”

Prosperity, or at least just simply work, can provide intangible benefits too, he pointed out.

“Do you know what it’s like not to have work? There’s no psychological stress greater except loss of a loved one or breakup of a family…. It’s not just the work, it’s not just the paycheque, it is the fulfillment of the human personality.”

Although often incredulous, Murphy’s cri de coeur falls short of actual despair, especially when laced with homespun humour. Nevertheless a despairing thought might occur to listeners who wonder whether the intangible value of an earned paycheque matters much in a culture of entitlement, or among those who find remuneration in activism. As for work’s fulfillment of the human personality, maybe another type of personality has gained prominence, one that finds fulfillment in espousing fashionable convictions and obstructing useful projects.

What remains to be seen is whether the people he speaks for are declining, in numbers as well as influence. Maybe previous generations could have offset such a fate by producing a few more Rex Murphys.

Videos of VRIC 2019 presentations will be posted online in the coming weeks by Cambridge House International.

Streamers turn to cobalt as Vale extends Voisey’s Bay nickel operations

June 11th, 2018

by Greg Klein | June 11, 2018

It was a day of big moves for energy minerals as China bought into Ivanhoe, Vale lengthened Voisey’s and streaming companies went after the Labrador nickel mine’s cobalt.

On June 11 Robert Friedland announced CITIC Metal would pay $723 million for a 19.9% interest in Ivanhoe Mines TSX:IVN, surpassing the boss’ own 17% stake to make the Chinese state-owned company Ivanhoe’s largest single shareholder. Another $78 million might also materialize, should China’s Zijin Mining Group decide to exercise its anti-dilution rights to increase its current 9.9% piece of Ivanhoe.

Streamers turn to cobalt as Vale extends Voisey’s Bay nickel operations

At peak production, Voisey’s underground operations are expected to
ship about 45,000 tonnes of nickel concentrate annually to Vale’s
processing plant at Long Harbour, Newfoundland.

Proceeds would help develop the flagship Kamoa-Kakula copper-cobalt mine in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Platreef platinum-palladium-nickel-copper-gold mine in South Africa, as well as upgrade the DRC’s historic Kipushi zinc-copper-silver-germanium mine. Ivanhoe and Zijin each hold a 39.6% share in the Kamoa-Kakula joint venture.

Even bigger news came from St. John’s, where Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball joined Vale NYSE:VALE brass to herald the company’s decision to extend Voisey’s Bay operations by building an underground mine.

The announcement marked the 16th anniversary of Vale’s original decision to put Voisey (a Friedland company discovery) into production. Mining began in 2005, producing about $15 billion worth of nickel, copper and cobalt so far. Open pit operations were expected to end by 2022. Although a 2013 decision to go ahead with underground development was confirmed in 2015, the commitment seemed uncertain as nickel prices fell. That changed dramatically over the last 12 months.

With construction beginning this summer, nearly $2 billion in new investment should have underground operations running by April 2021, adding at least 15 years to Voisey’s life. The company estimates 16,000 person-years of employment during five years of construction, followed by 1,700 jobs at the underground mine and Long Harbour processing plant, with 2,135 person-years in indirect and induced employment annually.

Nickel’s 75% price improvement over the last year must have prodded Vale’s decision. But streaming companies were quick to go after Voisey’s cobalt. In separate deals Wheaton Precious Metals TSX:WPM and Cobalt 27 Capital TSXV:KBLT have agreed to buy a total of 75% of the mine’s cobalt beginning in 2021, paying US$390 million and US$300 million respectively. They foresee an average 2.6 million pounds of cobalt per year for the first 10 years, with a life-of-mine average of 2.4 million pounds annually.

Both companies attribute cobalt’s attraction to clean energy demand and a decided lack of DRC-style jurisdictional risk. But Vale also emphasizes nickel’s promise as a battery metal. Last month spokesperson Robert Morris told Metal Bulletin that nickel demand for EVs could rise 10-fold by 2025, reaching 350,000 to 500,000 tonnes.

Total nickel demand currently sits at slightly more than two million tonnes, Morris said. New supply would call for price increases well above the record levels set this year, he added.

Kapuskasing Gold president/CEO Jon Armes discusses the company’s expansion into Newfoundland’s Gunners Cove area

February 22nd, 2018

…Read more

King’s Bay Resources reports initial drill results from Labrador nickel-cobalt project

January 16th, 2018

by Greg Klein | January 16, 2018

Although collared 150 metres apart, the first two holes on King’s Bay Resources’ (TSXV:KBG) Lynx Lake property both showed nickel-cobalt values above background levels over wide intervals.

King’s Bay Resources reports initial drill results from Labrador nickel-cobalt project

Lynx Lake has the Trans-Labrador Highway
bisecting the property, as well as adjacent power lines.

Hole LL-17-01 brought 0.058% nickel and 0.013% cobalt over 115.2 metres. LL-17-02 returned 0.057% nickel and 0.014% cobalt over 110.8 metres (not true widths). The thickness of the intervals and distance between the holes suggest “potential for a more localized zone of economic mineralization in the area,” the company stated. Assays for gold, platinum and palladium are expected later this month.

The initial drill campaign tested a small part of an approximately 24,200-hectare property. Under focus was the project’s West Pit, where airborne VTEM found a shallow anomaly of high resistivity measuring about 400 metres in diameter and 50 to 300 metres in depth. Historic, non-43-101 grab sample assays from the area graded up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium.

Other historic, non-43-101 grab samples from the property’s east side showed up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver.

King’s Bay now plans geostatistical and structural analysis to identify more drill targets. A field crew returns later this year.

Meanwhile a 6% copper grade highlighted last month’s results from the company’s Trump Island project in northern Newfoundland. Four of 15 outcrop samples surpassed 1% copper and also showed cobalt assays up to 0.12%.

In September King’s Bay offered a $250,000 private placement that followed financings totalling $402,000 that closed the previous month.

Kapuskasing drills near-surface Newfoundland copper in historic mining region

January 11th, 2018

by Greg Klein | January 11, 2018

The past-producing area’s first significant drill program since the 1960s supported historic reports of copper at northern Newfoundland’s Lady Pond property, Kapuskasing Gold TSXV:KAP reports. An initial eight holes totalling 780 metres focused on two parallel zones about a kilometre apart, the Twin Pond and Sterling prospects. Among the highlights were Sterling hole KSP17-03:

  • 1.54% copper over 3.56 metres, starting at 71 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 5.69% over 0.8 metres)
Kapuskasing drills near-surface Newfoundland copper in historic mining region

Also at Sterling, KSP17-04 showed:

  • 1.7% over 1.2 metres, starting at 26 metres
  • (including 12.9% over 0.13 metres)

Twin Pond’s KTP17-01 showed:

  • 0.31% over 9.04 metres, starting at 56.96 metres
  • (including 1.06% over 0.48 metres)

KTP17-02, again at Twin Pond, revealed:

  • 0.69% over 16.39 metres, starting at 35.61 metres
  • (including 1.06% over 1.33 metres)
  • (and including 0.98% over 8 metres)
  • (which included 1.48% over 3 metres)

  • 1.66% over 2 metres, starting at 63 metres
  • (including 2.28% over 1 metre)

True widths weren’t available.

The autumn campaign found significant mineralization despite inaccurate historic info. “It was not until hole KTP17-03 was collared that it became clear the historic holes were plotted approximately 50 metres away from their proper locations,” Kapuskasing noted. “Given this new information, the best grades noted historically were not duplicated during this drill program.”

Based on 1960s work, Sterling hosts an historic, non-43-101 estimate of about one million tonnes averaging 1% copper, reportedly open in all directions. Historic, non-43-101 drill results for Twin Pond have reached up to 4.2% copper over 3.35 metres, starting at 82.3 metres. Grab samples released last October graded up to 9.03% copper for Twin Pond, 7.19% copper for Sterling and 1.54% copper with cobalt and silver for the Lady Pond prospect.

Phase I left several priority targets untested on all three prospects. Now being planned is Phase II to attack the priorities and better identify the 2,450-hectare property’s high-grade zones at depth and along strike, the company added.

With logging road and ATV access, the project sits adjacent to the town of Springdale, near Newfoundland’s north coast. Rambler Mining and Metals TSXV:RAB holds a base metals mill 94 road kilometres away. Rambler also holds two historic, non-43-101 copper resources contiguously west of Lady Pond.

Two days earlier Kapuskasing announced its entry into the Gunners Cove area, where White Metal Resources TSXV:WHM and other companies are exploring a potentially unique gold-bearing geological environment. Kapuskasing’s newly staked ground lies roughly 200 kilometres southwest of the company’s Daniel’s Harbour zinc project.

In August the company closed private placements totalling $115,000, following a $201,200 placement that closed in June.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Kapuskasing Gold president/CEO Jon Armes.

Read Gianni Kovacevic’s comments on future copper demand.

Kapuskasing goes after gold in Newfoundland’s Gunners Cove area

January 9th, 2018

by Greg Klein | January 9, 2018

A possibly unique discovery by another company has brought Kapuskasing Gold TSXV:KAP back to Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula. The company staked three blocks totalling 1,625 hectares near the town of St. Anthony, proximal to White Metal Resources’ (TSXV:WHM) Gunners Cove project. Last November White Metal announced highly anomalous gold and other metal values in samples taken from black shale on a wide area of the property, which had previously seen very little exploration.

Kapuskasing goes after gold in Newfoundland’s Gunners Cove area

Kapuskasing’s new turf covers “the same favourable geology,” the company stated. “This could potentially be a very important new discovery in a unique geological environment similar to that of other large gold deposits hosted in black shale environments around the world.”

“It’s grassroots, but these early days are interesting,” Kapuskasing president/CEO Jon Armes tells ResourceClips.com. “We need a presence there because this looks like it could turn into a whole new camp, a whole new geological environment that’s underexplored. And the best way to position yourself is by staking claims, with the advantage of having 100% interest with no underlying royalties. I think we’ll get more insight after the snow’s gone, when people get their boots on the ground and take a closer look.”

Kapuskasing intends to compile an exploration program over the next few months.

The acquisition expands the company’s Great Northern presence. In September Kapuskasing finalized a 100% option agreement on Daniel’s Harbour, roughly 200 kilometres southwest. The former zinc mine produced around seven million tonnes averaging 7.8% zinc between 1975 and 1990 from a Mississippi Valley Type deposit.

Off the peninsula but close to Newfoundland’s northern coast, assays are expected soon from Kapuskasing’s flagship Lady Pond project, where drilling began in November. Recent grab samples and historic, non-43-101 drill results have returned high copper grades.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Kapuskasing Gold president/CEO Jon Armes.

King’s Bay Resources samples 6% copper in Newfoundland, awaits Labrador cobalt assays

December 15th, 2017

by Greg Klein | December 15, 2017

A three-day Phase I field program in northern Newfoundland brought encouraging copper grades for King’s Bay Resources’ (TSXV:KBG) Trump Island project. Out of 15 samples taken from outcrop, four surpassed an upper detection limit of 1% copper, with results showing:

King’s Bay Resources samples 6% copper in Newfoundland, awaits Labrador cobalt assays

  • >10,000 ppm copper, 303 ppm cobalt and >6 ppm silver

  • >10,000 ppm copper, 1,213.6 ppm cobalt and 21.1 ppm silver

  • >10,000 ppm copper, 634.5 ppm cobalt and 27.4 ppm silver

  • >10,000 ppm copper, 272.3 ppm cobalt and 28.7 ppm silver

With those numbers from aqua regia digestion Ultratrace ICP-MS analysis, King’s Bay sent the first sample to a second lab for additional tests using ICP and ore grade analysis, with the following result:

  • 6.07% copper, 0.03% cobalt and 14.4 ppm silver

Grab samples don’t represent the entire property, King’s Bay cautioned. But the company sees further exploration warranted for next spring. The boat-accessible property’s historic work dates to historic times, when in 1863 a miner from Cornwall reportedly extracted a supply of copper and cobalt for shipment to Wales. Non-43-101 results from 1999 grab sampling near the Cousin Jack’s mineshaft showed 3.8% copper, 0.3% cobalt, 2.9 g/t gold and 10.9 g/t silver. The 200-hectare property has yet to be drilled.

Last month King’s Bay wrapped up an initial two-hole, 502-metre program at its Lynx Lake cobalt project in Labrador. Assays are expected in early January but the company reported intervals of net textured gabbro totalling 164.3 metres, along with a 14.9-metre intercept of mineralized biotite gabbro. The holes targeted the West Pit area, where the company anticipates a VTEM anomaly to range from 50 to 300 metres’ depth and about 400 metres in diameter. A highway and powerlines run through the 24,000-hectare property.

King’s Bay offered a $250,000 private placement in September.

Drilling begins as Kapuskasing tests historic high-grade copper in Newfoundland

November 3rd, 2017

by Greg Klein | November 3, 2017

A non-43-101, historic estimate of about a million tonnes averaging 1% copper has Kapuskasing Gold TSXV:KAP working to prove up a resource at its Lady Pond project in northern Newfoundland. Now underway, the first phase of modern drilling will sink eight to 12 holes totalling about 1,000 metres on the 2,450-hectare property.

Drilling begins as Kapuskasing tests historic high-grade copper in Newfoundland

Recent field work produced high-grade surface
samples from Kapuskasing’s Lady Pond copper project.

Three areas of interest are the Lady Pond prospect, the Twin Pond prospect and the Sterling prospect. The latter hosts a former mine and the historic, non-43-101 estimate that’s reportedly open in all directions. Some previous intercepts from Sterling, again historic and non-43-101, showed:

  • 5.5% copper over 4.42 metres, starting at 38.1 metres in downhole depth

  • 2.32% copper over 6.1 metres, starting at 106.68 metres

  • 1.45% copper over 4.57 metres, starting at 50.29 metres

Recent field work reported last month brought two Lady Pond surface grab samples grading 2.75% and 7.19% copper.

About 1.5 kilometres northeast, Twin Pond underwent 32 holes of drilling without an estimate being calculated. Some historic, non-43-101 highlights include:

  • 4.2% copper over 3.35 metres, starting at 82.3 metres

  • 2.16% copper over 3.05 metres, starting at 33.53 metres

  • 3.2% copper over 3.05 metres, starting at 70.14 metres

A recent grab sample from Twin Pond showed 9.03% copper.

One historic, non-43-101 assay for the Lady Pond prospect, about three kilometres northeast of Twin Pond, recorded 2.61% copper over 8.1 metres. A grab sample from the recent field work showed 0.089% cobalt, 1.54% copper and 9.4 g/t silver.

The property borders the town of Springdale and hosts logging roads and ATV routes. Another 94 kilometres by road sits Rambler Mining and Metals’ (TSXV:RAB) base metals mill. Rambler holds two historic, non-43-101 copper resources contiguous to Lady Pond.

In September Kapuskasing closed an option agreement on Daniel’s Harbour, a 1,050-hectare project on Newfoundland’s Great Northern Peninsula. Between 1975 and 1990, a former mine on the property produced around seven million tonnes averaging 7.8% zinc. The company considers Daniel’s Harbour prospective for additional Mississippi Valley-type deposits.

Just south of the peninsula, Kapuskasing holds the King’s Court copper-cobalt property.

The company closed private placements totalling $215,000 in August and $201,200 in June.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Kapuskasing Gold president/CEO Jon Armes.

King’s Bay Resources to begin first-ever drill program on Labrador copper-cobalt project

October 26th, 2017

by Greg Klein | October 26, 2017

Following up on field work and airborne geophysics, King’s Bay Resources TSXV:KBG has returned to its Lynx Lake property to prepare the site for an initial drill campaign. Under focus will be a VTEM-identified anomaly about 400 metres in diameter, extending about 50 to 300 metres in depth on the property’s West Pit.

King’s Bay Resources begins first-ever drill program on Labrador copper-cobalt project

A prospector displays a sample of
massive sulphides from Lynx Lake.

Historic, non-43-101 grab samples from the area brought up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium. At least two holes totalling 500 metres are planned.

About 24,000 hectares in size, the southeastern Labrador property has a year-round highway passing through the property and an adjacent powerline. East of the highway, historic, non-43-101 grab samples assayed up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver.

Earlier this month King’s Bay wrapped up Phase I exploration at its 200-hectare Trump Island copper-cobalt project on Newfoundland’s northern coast. Assays are pending for 15 outcrop samples showing sulphidic wall rock and massive sulphide veins.

In September the company offered a private placement up to $250,000. The previous month King’s Bay closed the second tranche of a financing that totalled $402,750.

See an infographic about cobalt.