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Posts tagged ‘Majescor Resources Inc (MJX)’

Arctic Star looks to T-Rex for Lac de Gras diamonds

August 5th, 2015

by Greg Klein | August 5, 2015

A 54,000-hectare property in the Northwest Territories’ diamond-rich Lac de Gras region has come under renewed attention by Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD. After reviewing previous work on the T-Rex project, the company announced on August 5 it plans further exploration itself.

Arctic Star looks to T-Rex for Lac de Gras diamonds

Production at Ekati’s Jay pipe would likely ensure winter road
access within 10 kilometres southwest of Arctic Star’s T-Rex project.
Image: Tibbitt to Contwoyto Winter Road JV

Details of the plans weren’t divulged. But Arctic Star stated it “has verified through research and compilation that the property hosts over a dozen kimberlites, most of them diamondiferous.”

The company’s staked ground overlaps the Hardy Lake property explored by De Beers between 1992 and 2003 and by Majescor Resources TSXV:MJX for another five years under option. The latter company “reported 26 high-interest areas defined by anomalous kimberlite indicator mineral samples and kimberlite float,” according to Arctic Star. In 2005 Majescor stated that “large, very prospective sectors [of Hardy Lake] have been inadequately sampled.”

De Beers collected 2,335 till samples, with 1,000 showing kimberlite indicator minerals on Hardy Lake. The global giant analysed 29,123 minerals and put Hardy Lake through 16,709 line-kilometres of geophysics, 144 geophysical grids and 137 drill holes, according to Arctic Star. The company stated it acquired about 65% of De Beers’ data that was filed as assessment work and “forms a strong basis for future exploration.”

Costs would benefit from the site’s proximity to the Tibbitt-to-Contwoyto winter road, which is “expected to be ploughed as far as the Jay kimberlite for decades to come,” Arctic Star stated. The route links Dominion Diamond’s (TSX:DDC) majority-held Ekati mine with Yellowknife, 400 kilometres south by road.

Currently undergoing permitting, Jay could potentially add 11 years to Ekati, extending its lifespan to 2031. Dominion hopes to begin Jay’s construction next year.

Lac de Gras also hosts two other diamond mines, Rio Tinto NYE:RIO/Dominion’s 60/40 Diavik and De Beers’ Snap Lake. Combined, the three operations place the NWT third globally for diamond production by value.

De Beers and Mountain Province Diamonds TSX:MPV expect to add a fourth Lac de Gras operation by H2 2016 with Gahcho Kué, considered the world’s richest diamond development project.

In June Arctic Star reported preliminary geophysical and surficial geology evaluations from its Redemption project, also in Lac de Gras. With work carried out by 55% earn-in partner North Arrow Minerals TSXV:NAR, the results will be used to define targets for a spring 2016 drill program, the companies stated.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 6th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 29 to April 4, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium stretches strike with new zone at Patterson Lake South, closes $28.75-million financing

Step-out drilling has added a new zone to Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South, shortly after infill drilling had merged other zones. Announced March 31, zone R1620E lies 465 metres east of R1155E, extending the project’s potential strike from 1.78 kilometres to 2.24 kilometres.

The results come from a hand-held scintillometer that measures gamma radiation from drill core in counts per second. Scintillometer readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 29 to April 4, 2014

The road to Patterson Lake South, where Fission has four
of its five rigs trying to merge zones into one big deposit.

Six new holes all showed mineralization, with the new zone’s inaugural hole, PLS14-196, revealing a 30-metre interval ranging between 300 cps and 6,100 cps starting at 99 metres in downhole depth. The maximum that the scintillometer can measure is 9,999 cps. Drilling on PLS14-196 continues.

Among other holes, PLS14-190, south of zone R1155E, “suggests that further step-outs to the south may be prospective,” the company stated.

Starting from the west, zone R600W has both a 30-metre east-west strike and a 30-metre north-south lateral width. About 510 metres east, discovery zone R00E has a strike of approximately 165 metres and a lateral width up to about 45 metres. Another 135 metres east sits R780E, with about 855 metres in strike and up to about 95 metres in lateral width.

Neighbouring 75 metres east, R1155E so far has just three mineralized holes. Fission Uranium declared the new zone, 465 metres east again, on the basis of a single hole over conductor PL-3C, “the suspected 1.3-kilometre-long strike extension of the mineralized PL-3B conductor” at an interpreted cross-fault, the company added.

So far 63 of a planned 100 holes totalling 30,000 metres have been sunk. The winter budget comes to $12 million but on April 1 the company announced its most recent private placement closed with gross proceeds of $28.75 million.

Three days later Fission Uranium granted insiders 6.5 million options at $1.65 for five years.

NexGen’s best-ever hole extends strike at Rook 1’s Arrow zone

NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE ended its Rook 1 winter drill program with a “massive” step-out showing the project’s best hole yet. Results for three holes released March 31 lengthen the strike to about 215 metres, open to the southwest.

The winter campaign comprised 17 holes totalling 7,442 metres, but it wasn’t until late February that the Arrow discovery diverted attention to this new zone of the PLS-adjacent project. A second hole in early March contributed to the company’s optimism. In all, seven of eight Arrow holes so far have found significant mineralization.

The results come from a hand-held spectrometer that measures drill core for radiation in counts per second. As is the case with Fission Uranium’s scintillometer readings, the results are no substitute for assays, which NexGen expects to see in about six weeks.

NexGen reports radiometric readings differently than Fission Uranium, providing a more detailed breakdown of small intercepts.

The step-out, hole RK-14-30, found a composite 47.2 metres (not true widths) of anomalous intercepts at least 0.05 metres wide measuring over 500 cps. A total of 8.3 metres surpassed the spectrometer’s maximum possible reading of 9,999 cps. Mineralization began at 84.15 metres in downhole depth, with the deepest intercept stopping at 701.45 metres.

RK-14-29 also revealed many small intercepts, with the first starting at 50.6 metres in downhole depth and the last ending at 569 metres.

RK-14-28 intercepts started at 87 metres in downhole depth, with the last ending at 549 metres.

Having closed an $11.5-million bought deal the previous week, NexGen now has about $15 million to spend. Spring breakup work will include detailed petrography and petrophysics before drilling resumes in the summer.

Denison drills 17.3% eU3O8 over 4.2 metres at new Wheeler River zone

Denison Mines TSX:DML reported a second hole on April 2 that supports last month’s discovery of the Gryphon zone at the Wheeler River JV. WR-560 was drilled 40 metres along the up-dip extension of the first hole, revealing one especially high-grade interval. The results come from a downhole probe that measures radiation in uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8). Although the probe is more accurate than a scintillometer or spectrometer, its readings are no substitute for assays. Nevertheless they show:

  • 0.1% eU3O8 over 1.3 metres, starting at 653.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.1% over 4.1 metres, starting at 676.2 metres

  • 17.3% over 4.2 metres, starting at 757.9 metres

  • 0.3% over 2.6 metres, starting at 770.7 metres

True widths are estimated at about 75%. Denison interprets these results “to be a new lens in the footwall, about 50 metres northwest of the high-grade intersection in WR-556,” Gryphon’s discovery hole. Mineralization lies approximately 200 metres beneath the unconformity and remains open in both strike directions and at depth, the company stated.

With spring break-up underway, drilling is expected to resume in early June, largely focusing on the new find. Gryphon is three kilometres northwest of the project’s Phoenix deposit, which produced a batch of drill results in February.

Denison holds a 60% interest in Wheeler and acts as operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% and JCU (Canada) Exploration the rest.

Declan picks up six Alberta and Saskatchewan properties

Calling it a “six-pack” of new properties, Declan Resources TSXV:LAN announced a package of Alberta and Saskatchewan acquisitions in and around the Basin on April 1. Totalling roughly 101,000 hectares, the properties include Maurice Creek in Alberta, immediately northwest of the Northwest Athabasca project, a JV involving Cameco, Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC and NexGen that hosts the historic Maurice Bay deposit.

Two other Alberta properties, Maybelle North and Richardson River, “cover potential northerly extensions to the structure which is host to a significant uranium deposit at Dragon Lake along the Maybelle River shear zone,” Declan stated.

The other properties are Archer Lake and Jackfish Creek, also in Alberta, and Thorburn Lake in Saskatchewan.

The optioner gets $25,000 and 2.5 million shares on TSXV approval, another $125,000 within a year and a 3% gross overriding royalty with a 1% buyback clause for $1 million. To keep the properties in good standing Declan must spend $225,000 by April 17.

Declan also announced changes to its board, which now consists of David Miller, Wayne Tisdale, Michelle Gahagan, Hikmet Akin, Gordon King, Jamie Newall and Craig McLean.

Declan’s flagship is Gibbon’s Creek, a joint venture with Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK.

International Enexco reports new radiometric results from Mann Lake

The latest hole from its Mann Lake JV suggests the project has at least 300 metres of mineralized trend within the footwall of the western conductor target, International Enexco TSXV:IEC stated April 3. The results come from a downhole radiometric probe and are no substitute for assays.

Sunk 150 metres north of the project’s best interval so far, hole MN-065 showed:

  • an average 3.67% eU3O8 over 1.2 metres, starting at 689.8 metres in downhole depth

  • (including an average 6.51% over 0.7 metres)

  • (which includes an average 11.02% over 0.3 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

So far eight holes have tested about 1.8 kilometres of the target, which the company says remains prospective for its entire 3.1-kilometre length. Enexco anticipates follow-up drilling next winter along the conductor and on other areas. The southeastern Basin project is operated by JV partner Cameco, which holds 52.5%, leaving Enexco with 30% and AREVA Resources Canada 17.5%.

But how long Enexco will be involved depends on the outcome of Denison’s most recent acquisition activities. The two companies signed a letter of intent last month for an all-share deal that would give Denison all of Enexco’s Basin properties while spinning out the others. The companies currently JV on another southeastern Basin property, Bachman Lake.

Uracan/UEX drill results suggest prospective target at Black Lake

Black Lake partners Uracan Resources TSXV:URC and UEX Corp TSX:UEX reported the first six holes from their northern Basin JV on April 2, with one mineralized hole suggesting a new target. BL-148 showed:

  • 0.13% U3O8 over 0.5 metres, starting at 275 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.04% over 0.5 metres, starting at 299.5 metres

  • 0.12% over 1 metre, starting at 317 metres

True widths weren’t provided. The three intervals occur up to 19 metres below a footwall unconformity between the basement and sandstones, representing a mineralization style that “has not been encountered previously in this area of the property and represents a new prospective target,” the companies stated.

Next in line is a ground DC resistivity survey to precede further drilling and field work. Uracan may earn 60% of the 30,381-hectare project from UEX, which holds an 89.99% interest. AREVA Resources Canada holds the remaining 10.01%. UEX acts as operator.

Previous Black Lake drilling has found intervals as high as 0.69% over 4.4 metres, starting at 310 metres in downhole depth, 0.79% over 2.82 metres, starting at 310 metres, and 0.67% over 3 metres, starting at 274 metres.

The property borders Gibbon’s Creek, where JV partners Lakeland and Declan have reported boulder samples grading up to 4.28% and some of the Basin’s highest-ever radon readings.

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Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South assays and other U3O8 news in brief

December 24th, 2013

by Greg Klein | December 24, 2013

Among a pre-Christmas blitz of uranium news from several companies, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU released assays from Patterson Lake South—the second batch in five days from a project that’s largely ridden the market on scintillometer results. The December 23 announcement reports one hole from R585E and seven from R390E, narrowing the gap between the two zones.

Highlights from hole PLS13-098 on R585E show:

  • 0.73% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 11.5 metres, starting at 68.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.56% over 3.5 metres)
Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South assays and other news

  • 0.21% over 5.5 metres, starting at 113.5 metres

  • 8.47% over 16.5 metres, starting at 123.5 metres
  • (including 26.36% over 4.5 metres)
  • (which includes 60.3% over 0.5 metres)
  • (and including 7.51% over 2 metres)

  • 18.62% over 4 metres, starting at 145.5 metres
  • (including 34.78% over 2 metres)

  • 0.67% over 9.5 metres, starting at 160.5 metres
  • (including 3.41% over 1.5 metres)

From the R390E zone, highlights from the better holes show:


  • 0.53% over 17.5 metres, starting at 53 metres
  • (including 1.63% over 4 metres)

  • 0.27% over 8.5 metres, starting at 132 metres

  • 0.44% over 3 metres, starting at 143 metres

  • 0.78% over 4 metres, starting at 151 metres
  • (including 4.09% over 0.5 metres)


  • 0.1% over 14.5 metres, starting at 62.5 metres

  • 0.21% over 23.5 metres, starting at 80 metres
  • (including 1.35% over 1 metre)

  • 0.52% over 7 metres, starting at 135 metres
  • (including 1.42% over 1 metre)

  • 0.36% over 4.5 metres, starting at 163.5 metres


  • 0.3% over 7.5 metres, starting at 104 metres
  • (including 2.24% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.5% over 11.5 metres, starting at 130 metres
  • (including 1.16% over 3 metres)


  • 0.63% over 11.5 metres, starting at 68 metres
  • (including 2.79% over 2 metres)

  • 0.2% over 6 metres, starting at 94 metres

  • 0.22% over 23.5 metres, starting at 125.5 metres
  • (including 1.02% over 1 metre)


  • 0.75% over 5.5 metres, starting at 53 metres
  • (including 2.54% over 1 metre)

  • 0.35% over 3.5 metres, starting at 101 metres
  • (including 2.06% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.17% over 12.5 metres, starting at 107 metres

  • 0.8% over 4.5 metres, starting at 138 metres
  • (including 2.42% over 1 metre)

True widths weren’t available. The company reported all holes as vertical.

A PLS13-098 interval within an interval shows the highest grade found at PLS so far, 60.3% over 0.5 metres.

The R390E zone now extends east, within about 105 metres of R585E. The two zones comprise the third and fourth of six zones along a 1.78-kilometre trend. Additionally, two R390E holes increase “the prospectivity of extending the zone laterally to the south along the entire length of the corridor,” the company stated.

Both zones remain open in all directions.

Other uranium news in brief…

On December 23 Uravan Minerals TSXV:UVN announced results from an airborne electromagnetic survey over its Stewardson Lake project in the Athabasca Basin. Among other findings, the data shows features “interpreted to be the northern extension of the C and E conductors identified on Cameco’s Virgin River project” adjacently south of Stewardson. With a 51% earn-in option, Cameco TSX:CCO is now reviewing Uravan’s proposed program and budget. Uravan acts as project operator.

European Uranium Resources TSXV:EUU and Portex Minerals CNSX:PAX announced a definitive agreement December 23 on their proposed merger, first announced in a letter of intent earlier this month. The new company would be named European Minerals Inc.

On December 23 Strateco Resources TSX:RSC announced closing a $3-million loan from the Sentient Group and amendments to a $14.9-million convertible note. The transaction allows Strateco to proceed with its 60% option on Denison Mines’ TSX:DML Jasper Lake project in Saskatchewan, among other goals.

Ur-Energy TSX:URE reported the first sale from its Lost Creek in-situ recovery mine in Wyoming. Some 90,000 pounds of U3O8 fetched an average $62.92 per pound. In another December 23 announcement, the company stated it closed its acquisition of Pathfinder Mines, a $5.18-million private placement and a $5-million loan redraw.

Majescor Resources TSXV:MJX announced the resignation of director Peter Chodos on December 23.

Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN stated December 23 it cancelled a brokered $2-million private placement with Industrial Alliance Securities and was instead offering a $1-million non-brokered flow-through placement.

On December 24 Uracan Resources TSXV:URC announced raising $1.24 million from flow-through shares of $683,000 and non-flow-through units of $556,350.

The same day Purepoint Uranium Group TSXV:PTU reported closing the second tranche of a private placement to raise $441,949. Combined, the two slices equal $745,484.

CanAlaska Uranium TSX:CVV delists from the big board on December 27, the company announced December 24. But “it is understood” the company will begin Venture trading under TSXV:CVV on December 30.

Also on Christmas eve, Laramide Resources TSX:LAM announced closing a $2-million private placement.

See last week’s roundup of uranium news.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

November 30th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 23 to 29, 2013

by Greg Klein

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December 6 expected for Fission to finish Alpha acquisition; Fission spinco gets court approval

Now that both companies have put it to a vote, Fission Uranium’s TSXV:FCU acquisition of Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW goes to the TSXV and Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench for final approval. The 50/50 Patterson Lake South joint venture partners announced overwhelming support at their respective meetings on November 28. The companies expect final approval on December 6.

The Fission tally was 99.55% from shareholders and 99.6% from security holders. Alpha’s enthusiasm was slightly more restrained, with 83.18% shareholder and 85.72% security-holder support.

Assuming final approvals come through, the arrangement will put the celebrated PLS uranium project under a single takeover target… er, company. Alpha and Fission will each create a spinco for their non-PLS assets.

Court approval for Fission’s spinco was announced November 29. Itself a spin-out resulting from last April’s Fission Energy acquisition by Denison Mines TSX:DML, Fission Uranium calls the new entity Fission 3.0. Each Fission Uranium shareholder gets one new share of post-arrangement PLS-holding Fission Uranium as well as a share of Fission Mach III, expected to start trading December 10.

Read more about the takeover.

Read more about uranium merger-and-acquisition activity.

PLS regional drilling disappoints but Fission/Alpha end campaign triumphantly

Two of the final 11 autumn holes at PLS confirmed continuity along a 30-metre strike at the project’s recently discovered sixth zone. But nine others failed to find significant radioactivity, according to scintillometer results released by Fission and Alpha on November 27. The non-mineralized nonet, sunk further west of the project’s western-most R600W zone, might please only an anti-nuke activist. Nevertheless “varying degrees of secondary hydrothermal alteration were present in all holes, thus providing encouragement for the prospectivity of the western strike extension” of the PL-3B EM conductor corridor. R600W remains open in all directions, the partners maintain.

Their hand-held scintillometer measures gamma ray particles in drill core up to a maximum of 9,999 counts per second. These results are no substitute for assays, which are still to come. But don’t hold your breath—so are assays for 40 holes drilled last summer.

Of the two mineralized holes, PLS13-123 reached a total depth of 260 metres, encountering sandstone at 90.7 metres and the basement unconformity at 100 metres. Some highlights show:

  • <300 to 1,200 cps over 20 metres, starting at 95 metres in downhole depth

  • <300 to 5,100 cps over 7.5 metres, starting at 132.5 metres

  • 320 to 2,300 cps over 2.5 metres, starting at 142.5 metres

Hole PLS13-124 found sandstone at 97.5 metres and the basement unconformity at 99 metres before stopping at 257 metres. Highlights include:

  • 450 to 5,500 cps over 6.5 metres, starting at 97.5 metres

  • <300 to 1,300 cps over 7.5 metres, starting at 114 metres

  • <300 to 2,500 cps over 11.5 metres, starting at 197 metres

True widths weren’t available. With dips of -87 and -89 degrees respectively, the two holes’ downhole depths are close to vertical.

The 11 land-based holes bring an end to this drill program, most of which took place from barges over the lake. Fifty-three holes totalling 16,485 metres found six near-surface zones along a 1.76-kilometre trend. Ending the season on a triumphant note, Alpha president Ben Ainsworth said the 12-month campaign nearly equalled “what was completed in four years of work on Hathor’s Roughrider discovery.”

Research report examines Lakeland Resources as company acquires additional Basin property

Just one day after a research report was released on Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK, the company reported expansionary plans in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin. Announced November 27, a JV teams the company with Star Minerals Group TSXV:SUV on two claims totalling 1,092 hectares. The new turf sits adjacently north of the Gibbon’s Creek target, focal point of Lakeland’s Riou Lake property.

The acquisition takes place while results are pending from autumn field work at Gibbon’s Creek. “Based on preliminary findings we decided it was important that we acquire that ground,” Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes tells “Star Minerals is focused on a rare earth project north of the Basin so the agreement works well for both companies.”

Gibbon’s autumn campaign, including boulder sampling, line-cutting, a RadonEx survey and a ground DC resistivity survey, has just wrapped up, he adds. “We’re putting all the data together and we’ll get that out imminently.”

A distinct topographical feature of the new property is an uplifted block of basement rock that “highlights the evidence for structural offsets, a key feature of known unconformity-type uranium deposits,” Lakeland stated. Historic work by Cameco Corp TSX:CCO-predecessor Eldorado Nuclear found several anomalous soil samples around the uplifted block measuring up to 0.01% uranium. Trenching by Eldorado showed concentrations of rare earths that might also indicate unconformity-type uranium mineralization. The property has also undergone 14 historic drill holes.

Lakeland plans to follow up on the previous work while reviewing Gibbon’s Creek data to identify drill targets. “We still have two other priority projects, South Pine bordering Riou Lake on the west, and Perch Lake farther east,” Armes says. “There’s lots more field work we can do, even during winter. Both radon and resistivity can be carried out during the winter, so we’re not limited to fair weather programs.”

Gibbon’s Creek and the new claims also benefit from close proximity to the town of Stony Rapids, a few kilometres away. Apart from the new acquisition, Lakeland has a portfolio of nine properties totalling over 100,000 hectares in the northern and eastern Basin.

Under the JV agreement, Lakeland may earn a 100% interest in the two additional claims by paying Star $60,000 and issuing 600,000 shares over 12 months. Star retains a 25% buy-back option for four times the exploration expenditures up to 90 days following a resource estimate.

One day before the announcement, prospect generator Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC released a report on Lakeland. Written by Zimtu research and communications officer Derek Hamill, it places Lakeland in the context of Athabasca Basin exploration, the nuclear energy industry and the outlook for uranium prices. Presented as both research and opinion, Hamill’s work shows a shareholder’s perspective—Lakeland is a core holding of Zimtu.

So a degree of self-interest can be acknowledged. But the breadth of research goes far beyond Lakeland, its people and projects, providing a level of detailed scrutiny not often applied to early-stage companies.

Download the Lakeland Resources research report.

Read more about Derek Hamill’s research.

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

UEX announces final Shea Creek results, initial 2014 uranium exploration plans

North from PLS along Highway 955, and 13 kilometres south of the Cluff Lake past-producer, a year’s drilling has wrapped up at Shea Creek. UEX Corp TSX:UEX reported final results for two concurrent programs reported November 27.

UEX picked up the entire $2-million tab for drilling around the Kianna deposit while funding $1.27 million of $2.6 million sunk into property-scale exploration as part of the company’s 49%/51% JV with AREVA Resources Canada.

Results were given in uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) using readings from a downhole radiometric probe which were calibrated with an algorithm calculated by comparing previous probe results with assays.

The most promising results came from the Kianna deposit. Kianna East hole SHE-142-3 reached a total depth of 1,065 metres, finding the unconformity at 736.9 metres and expanding the zone to the south. Highlights show:

  • 0.99% eU3O8 over 5.3 metres, starting at 961.2 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 3.21% over 1.5 metres)

In addition, UEX credited hole SHE-135-16 with a northwest expansion to Kianna East. Ending at 1,038 metres’ depth, the hole found the unconformity at 750.5 metres. Some of the better results show:

  • 0.16% over 5.2 metres, starting at 956 metres
  • (including 0.41% over 0.9 metres)
  • (and including 0.49% over 0.7 metres)

  • 0.48% over 3 metres, starting at 979.9 metres

Kianna North hole SHE-135-17 hit the unconformity at 732.2 metres before stopping at 1,059 metres, expanding the zone’s eastern extension of basement-hosted mineralization. Highlights include:

  • 0.33% over 9.4 metres, starting at 724.6 metres
  • (including 0.5% over 1.3 metres)
  • (and including 0.53% over 4.4 metres)

  • 0.8% over 31.5 metres, starting at 848.8 metres
  • (including 3.29% over 1.3 metres)
  • (and including 3.22% over 1.3 metres)
  • (and including 4.05% over 4.1 metres)

Of 10 exploration holes that tested two conductors, eight failed to find significant results. Two holes at Anne South showed these results:

  • 0.14% over 0.9 metres, starting at 765.4 metres

  • 0.21% over 0.9 metres, starting at 748.4 metres

(True widths were unavailable for all holes.)

Four of the 10 holes confirmed the Saskatoon Lake East conductor’s location, providing a new target area parallel to the roughly three-kilometre trend hosting Shea’s four deposits. Combined, they comprise the Basin’s third-largest resource after Cameco’s McArthur River and Cigar Lake, showing:

  • indicated: 2.07 million tonnes averaging 1.48% for 67.66 million pounds U3O8

  • inferred: 1.27 million tonnes averaging 1.01% for 28.19 million pounds

Still undecided are next year’s plans for Shea Creek, where AREVA acts as project operator. UEX states work will depend on Q1 capital market conditions.

But another November 27 announcement reported a $2-million budget for three western Basin projects. Plans include about 4,000 metres of drilling to test EM conductors at the Laurie and Mirror River projects, and a 50.4-line-kilometre ground tensor magnetotelluric survey at the Erica project. Work is expected to start in January. By that time ownership will be divided approximately 49.1% by UEX and 50.9% by AREVA, again acting as operator.

Among other UEX projects, its 100%-held Hidden Bay on the Basin’s east side has three deposits totalling:

  • indicated: 10.37 million tonnes averaging 0.16% for 36.62 million pounds U3O8

  • inferred: 1.11 million tonnes averaging 0.11% for 2.71 million pounds

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

November 10th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 2 to 8, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Alpha/Fission find sixth zone with 525-metre step-out west of PLS discovery

Almost exactly a year ago joint venture partners Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW announced their Patterson Lake South discovery hole in what came to be known as zone R00E. Since then drilling from ice or barge extended east along the lake, finding five zones along a 1.23-kilometre trend. Now initial results from a $2.25-million, 11-hole, 3,700-metre land-based extension to the 2013 summer program have found a sixth zone, R600W, 525 metres west of the discovery.

The 50/50 JV bases its claim on scintillometer results—which measure gamma radiation up to 9,999 counts per second and are no substitute for lab assays—for two holes released November 4.

Hole PLS13-116 was sunk at a dip of -74 degrees, reaching 323 metres in total downhole depth, encountering basement bedrock at 106.4 metres. Results show:

  • 300 to 310 cps over 1 metre, starting at 143 metres in downhole depth

Collared from the same location but with better results, PLS13-118 went vertical to 314 metres and hit basement at 97.2 metres. The shallower depth “possibly suggest[s] structural faulted off-set between the holes,” the companies stated. Results show:

  • <300 to 680 cps over 9 metres, starting at 174.5 metres

  • <300 to 750 cps over 3 metres, starting at 186 metres

  • 314 to 5,550 cps over 8 metres, starting at 191.5 metres

  • 650 to 880 cps over 1 metre, starting at 222 metres

  • 380 cps over 0.5 metres, starting at 254.5 metres

True widths were unavailable. Assays, as well as downhole radiometric probe results, are pending.

The targets result from a radon in sediment anomaly found last summer, which “may be associated with inferred north-south cross-cutting structures. This anomaly lies along an east-northeast trend, parallel and just north of the PL-3B EM conductor,” according to the JV. The companies plan further drilling to focus on this zone, which moves activity closer to the high-grade radioactive boulder field that sparked the PLS rush.

Non-compliant quote of the week

Despite all the verifiably positive news, Alpha disregarded geological best practices and NI 43-101 disclosure rules by distributing this semantically confused whopper about PLS, courtesy of a magazine called ResourceWorld:

“No uranium resource/reserves figures have been inferred from the status of the project as yet, but it can be implied that PLS will become a standalone operation with a minimum 50 million pounds of U3O8.”

International Enexco, Denison report three holes from Bachman Lake

Four kilometres west of Cameco Corp’s TSX:CCO proposed Millennium mine in the southeastern Athabasca Basin, JV partners International Enexco TSXV:IEC and Denison Mines TSX:DML have wrapped up their 2013 Bachman Lake drill program. Three holes reported November 4 tested two of the property’s three conductors.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 2 to 8, 2013

One hole intersected the ML-1 conductor, finding “a large graphitic shear zone in contact with granite gneiss, a favourable host for mineralization warranting additional drilling,” Enexco stated.

An intersection of the CR-2 conductor “confirm[s] that the dominant clay species is illite with some dravite, both of which are commonly elevated near unconformity-related mineralization.” The partners are considering follow-up drilling.

A sandstone alteration zone encountered by the third hole suggests “it may have just overshot the favourable conductive basement horizon.”

Now that Enexco has earned its 20% interest, both companies will fund further work on a pro-rata basis. Denison, which holds a 7.4% interest in Enexco, acts as project operator on the 11,419-hectare property. Enexco also holds a 30% interest in the Mann Lake JV 20 kilometres northeast, along with Cameco (52.5%) and AREVA Resources Canada (17.5%). In Nevada, Enexco has a pre-feasibility study underway on its 100%-held Contact copper project.

Ashburton’s Phase I exploration finds three anomalous areas at Sienna West

Disruptions by the animal kingdom notwithstanding, a radon survey on Ashburton Ventures’ TSXV:ABR Sienna West project found three anomalous areas for follow-up work. Of 35 cups that were buried to measure radon gas, eight were dug up by wildlife. But some of the others identified areas of interest, the company stated on November 4.

In addition, 12 previously reported radioactive boulders have now been analysed, with two showing 12.4 and 184.5 parts per million uranium. The latter was found in an area with high radon counts.

Ashburton also announced the resignation of director Phil Taneda.

The Sienna project comprises the 1,090-hectare Sienna West property about 40 kilometres southwest of PLS and the 147-hectare Sienna North property contiguously north of PLS.

Western Athabasca Syndicate announces winter plans for Preston Lake

With its summer field program complete, a four-company alliance prepares for winter at the PLS-proximal Preston Lake property. Work so far consisted of rock, soil, radon and biogeochemical sampling, as well as airborne electromagnetic, magnetic and radiometric surveys, the companies announced November 5. The Western Athabasca Syndicate consists of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY.

Still to come are final results. But the campaign identified eight potential corridors with 15 drill target areas to be refined with ground gravity, EM and radon surveys between December and February. The companies anticipate drilling to begin in March. So far only about half of the alliance’s 246,643-hectare land package has been explored.

Energy Fuels suspends Arizona mine development, updates corporate news

Blaming litigation and low prices, Energy Fuels TSX:EFR has suspended construction of its Canyon mine in Arizona, the company announced November 5. Legal action by environmentalists and local natives challenges the U.S. Forest Service’s approval of the mine. With all surface infrastructure complete, the company has put underground development on hold until December 2014, or earlier if a court decides on the merits of the case.

According to Associated Press, low uranium prices had put the project “on standby status before, from 1992 until work resumed earlier this year.” The news agency added, “The mine sits in a nearly [404,680-hectare] area that was placed off limits to new mining claims in January 2012. Companies with existing claims that were proven to have sufficient quantity and quality of mineral resources could be developed.”

Canyon has an inferred resource of 82,800 tons averaging 0.98% for 1.63 million pounds U3O8. The deposit is part of Energy Fuels’ Arizona Strip project, acquired when the company bought out Denison’s American assets in June 2012. Canyon had been slated for production in 2015.

In another November 5 announcement rather lacking in specifics, Energy Fuels stated it had applied “to be listed on a recognized U.S. stock exchange.” The same day the company’s post-consolidation shares began trading on the TSX and OTCQX following a 1:50 reverse split agreed to the previous week. The company also changed its fiscal year-end from September 30 to December 31.

Energy Fuels supplies about 25% of American uranium production.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 19th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for October 12 to 18, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Alpha/Fission upgrade R780E zone; final barge drilling shows zones open in all directions

Actual lab assays, not scintillometer readings, show the best results so far from Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone, giving it high-grade status similar to the R390E zone. Announced by 50/50 joint venture partners Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW on October 17, some highlights from hole PLS13-080 include:

  • 6.93% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 43 metres, starting at 130 metres in downhole depth

  • (including 26.73% over 2 metres)
  • (and including 15.63% over 14 metres)

  • 0.28% over 5 metres, starting at 175.5 metres

  • 0.48% over 6 metres, starting at 236.5 metres

  • 1.98% over 2.5 metres, starting at 245 metres

  • 0.16% over 11 metres, starting at 290 metres
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for October 12 to 18, 2013

Alpha Minerals VP of exploration
Garrett Ainsworth surveys a PLS core shack.

True widths weren’t available. The hole reached a total depth of 347 metres, encountering basement bedrock at 54 metres. At an 89-degree dip, downhole depths are close to vertical.

One day earlier the JV reported more scintillometer results, largely the stock in trade of this campaign’s announcements, for the final 10 holes drilled from barges. The hand-held device measures drill core for gamma radiation up to an off-scale reading over 9,999 counts per second. Scintillometer readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

The two companies didn’t always report results the same way. Some highlights from Alpha’s chart include:

R390E zone, hole PLS13-104

  • <300 to <9,999 cps over 14.5 metres, starting at 98 metres in downhole depth

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 10.5 metres, starting at 131 metres

R780E zone

Hole PLS13-097

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 49.5 metres, starting at 117.5 metres

  • 340 to >9,999 cps over 6 metres, starting at 228.5 metres

Hole PLS13-101

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 17 metres, starting at 179 metres

Hole PLS13-105

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 18.5 metres, starting at 113 metres

Hole PLS13-107

  • <300 to 8,400 cps over 24.5 metres, starting at 138.5 metres

Hole PLS13-108

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 20 metres, starting at 152 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 21 metres, starting at 174.5 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 6.5 metres, starting at 228 metres

Hole PLS13-109

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 10.5 metres, starting at 105.5 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 34 metres, starting at 136 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 15 metres, starting at 197 metres

Again, true widths were unavailable. Dips ranged from -85 to -89 degrees.

Alpha noted that the five zones remain open in all directions and continuity is possible between some or all of the “zones.”

The quotation marks might reflect Alpha’s previous doubt that a fifth zone had been confirmed. But elsewhere in the company’s October 16 news release Alpha refers unequivocally to five zones.

Now Fission’s the more cautious partner. Two additional holes stepped out 195 metres grid east of the most easterly zone, R945E. Although mineralization wasn’t strong, Alpha said the results extend the PLS trend by 210 metres to 1.23 kilometres. Fission, on the other hand, said the holes may extend the strike at least 200 metres. Presumably these little differences will be forgotten once Fission closes its acquisition of Alpha, which might take place in November.

Meanwhile the recently extended campaign continues with 11 land-based holes, totalling 3,700 metres, west of the lake.

NexGen finds three mineralized holes at Rook 1, plans winter drilling

With Rook 1’s Phase I now complete, NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE reported probe results for three of 12 widely spaced holes on October 16. Like the scintillometer, the downhole probe measures gamma radiation in counts per second while assays are pending. Some highlights include:

Hole RK-13-03

  • 350 to 508 cps over 0.8 metres, starting at 131.9 metres in downhole depth

  • 345 to 1,143 cps over 0.5 metres, starting at 149.9 metres

Hole RK-13-05

  • 380 to 4,379 cps over 2.7 metres, starting at 215.7 metres

  • 347 to 1,771 cps over 1.7 metres, starting at 219.2 metres

Hole RK-13-06

  • 481 to 2,297 cps over 2.1 metres, starting at 151.8 metres

True widths weren’t available. The three holes targeted three parallel conductors, one of them interpreted to be the same conductor hosting the PLS discoveries 2.1 kilometres southwest.

NexGen plans “a significantly large” winter drill campaign near the mineralized holes and on targets identified by geophysics.

The company’s portfolio includes a 70% option on the northeastern Athabasca Basin Radio project two kilometres east of Rio Tinto’s NYE:RIO Roughrider deposits. Assays are pending from Radio’s nine-hole, 3,473-metre program, which wrapped up in July.

Kivalliq to buy Nunavut uranium project in $275,000 deal

On the southern boundary of Nunavut’s Baker Lake Basin, Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV will acquire a 93,991-hectare property from Pacific Ridge Exploration TSXV:PEX. Subject to approvals, the deal has Kivalliq paying $55,000 to Pacific Ridge, issuing the company 600,000 shares at a deemed price of $0.25 and investing $70,000 by purchasing 1.4 million Pacific Ridge units at $0.05. Each unit would consist of one share and one-half warrant, with each whole warrant exercisable at $0.10 for a year, Kivalliq announced October 15.

The 100% acquisition doesn’t include any diamonds found on the property.

Previous work on the Baker Basin project included $7.1 million of exploration in 2006 and 2007. Among the results were:

KZ zone

  • 0.31% U3O8 over 11.5 metres, starting at 79.5 metres in downhole depth

  • (including 0.56% over 5.5 metres)

  • 0.27% over 5.8 metres, starting at 36 metres

True widths were unknown.

Lucky 7 zone

  • 0.3% over 17.3 metres, starting at 232.2 metres

  • (including 0.51% over 9 metres)

True widths were estimated between 50% and 70% of intercepts.

Four zones haven’t been fully evaluated, according to Kivalliq. The company plans to compile project data before planning additional work. The property lies 60 kilometres south of the hamlet of Baker Lake.

About 165 kilometres farther south, Kivalliq’s 137,699-hectare Angilak project has inferred resources of 43.3 million pounds U3O8, 1.88 million ounces silver, 10.4 million pounds molybdenum and 15.6 million pounds copper. The company reported new geochemical and metallurgical results in September.

Pacific Ridge focuses on projects in the Yukon’s White Gold and Klondike districts.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

September 15th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 7 to 13, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Denison updates Waterbury Lake resource, releases Wheeler River assays up to 43.8% U3O8 over 12 metres

Denison Mines TSX:DML confirmed its best-ever hole from the eastside Athabasca Basin Wheeler River project on September 11. Releasing lab assays to back up previously reported radiometric results from downhole probes, the company reported hole WR-525 with 43.8% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 12 metres, starting at 400.5 metres in downhole depth.

With intercepts approximately equal to true thicknesses, some other results include:

  • 20% U3O8 over 8 metres, starting at 407.5 metres

  • 10.9% over 8.5 metres, starting at 404.1 metres

  • 7.3% over 8 metres, starting at 405.5 metres

  • 0.5% over 5 metres, starting at 424 metres

  • 0.4% over 3 metres, starting at 411 metres

  • 0.1% over 3 metres, starting at 412 metres

The above results come from the Phoenix A zone. Apart from lab assays, the company released radiometric readings from probes of three new holes at the same zone:

Hole WR-533

  • 1.5% radiometric equivalent uranium oxide (eU3O8) over 4.5 metres, starting at 407.1 metres in downhole depth

Hole WR-534

  • 10.3% over 3.1 metres, starting at 407.7 metres

Hole WR-535

  • 19% over 2.5 metres, starting at 404.9 metres

  • 1.4% over 1 metre, starting at 408.1 metres

With 23 holes totalling 11,074 metres, Wheeler River’s summer campaign has finished. But while Phoenix A continues to impress, other parts of the project so far haven’t. Of 10 holes sunk in the 489 zone, only one found significant mineralization (0.4% over 3 metres, starting at 411 metres). Five others at the Phoenix North and REA areas also failed to find significant results.

The project has a December 2012 resource using a 0.8% cutoff. Phoenix A shows:

  • an indicated category of 133,500 tonnes averaging 15.8% for 46.5 million pounds U3O8

  • an inferred category of 6,300 tonnes averaging 51.7% for 7.2 million pounds

The Phoenix B deposit shows:

  • an indicated category of 19,000 tonnes averaging 14.1% for 5.9 million pounds

  • an inferred category of 5,300 tonnes averaging 3.5% for 400,000 pounds

The joint venture is held 60% by Denison, 30% by Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and 10% by JCU (Canada) Exploration.

On September 12 Denison unveiled a new resource for the J zone of its Waterbury Lake project. The update, entirely in the indicated category, uses a 0.1% cutoff to show 291,000 tonnes averaging 2% for 12.81 million pounds U3O8. The resource reduces the overall tonnage but increases the grade reported in a December 2012 estimate compiled for Fission Energy prior to its acquisition by Denison.

Assays from 268 holes were used for the estimate. With an east-west strike as long as 700 metres and a width up to 70 metres, the J zone generally shows mineralization at depths of 195 to 230 metres, the company reported. No capping was applied because using “high composite values uncut would be negligible to the overall resource estimate,” Denison added. The crew now has a six-hole campaign following up on a DC-resistivity survey northwest along trend of the zone. Denison has a 60% interest in the project, with the Korea Electric Power Corp (KEPCO) holding the remainder.

Denison also updated other Basin projects. Packrat has geochemical results pending, which will determine whether drilling resumes next year. Geochem results are also pending for South Dufferin, where 10 holes failed to find significant mineralization but did confirm the presence of the Dufferin Lake fault system. Crawford Lake, Moon Lake (held 45% by Uranium One TSX:UUU) and Bachman Lake (with International Enexco TSXV:IEC earning 20%) also have small drill programs underway.

Kivalliq reports geochem, metallurgical results for its Angilak property in Nunavut

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 7 to 13, 2013

Currently undergoing a $4.8-million campaign, Kivalliq Energy’s
137,699-hectare Angilak project in southern Nunavut hosts Canada’s
highest-grade uranium deposit outside the Athabasca Basin.

Extensive geochemical sampling has helped Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV find new anomalous areas and determine drill targets on its 137,699-hectare Angilak project in Nunavut. Some 1,538 samples brought 387 anomalous uranium soil geochem results along the three-by-12-kilometre Lac 50 trend, as well as the Nine Iron-KU trend 5.5 kilometres south. Some of the Lac 50 anomalies were found at least 600 metres beyond existing drill holes “demonstrating much more work is warranted in these areas,” the company stated on September 9. Anomalies also coincided with three electromagnetic conductor targets located 3.8 kilometres northeast, 1.8 kilometres southeast and one kilometre north of the Lac 50 resource.

Another EM target extending 8.1 kilometres from the Nine Iron zone to the KU zone showed 44 anomalous results.

Two days later Kivalliq announced positive metallurgical results for Lac 50 and J4 zone samples. In a statement accompanying the release, Chuck Edwards, director of metallurgy for the engineering firm AMEC, said: “Optimizing sulphide recovery, plus improvements to alkaline leach kinetics using oxygen as oxidant, could have a positive impact on reducing costs associated with potential treatment options.”

In addition, Kivalliq announced a trial run suggested radiometric sorting might “efficiently identify and segregate uranium-bearing minerals” from Lac 50.

Located 225 kilometres south of Baker Lake, Angilak has a 2013 exploration budget of $4.8 million. With Canada’s highest-grade deposit outside the Athabasca Basin, the project has a January inferred resource estimate using a 0.2% cutoff to show 2.83 million tonnes averaging 0.69% for 43.3 million pounds U3O8. The inferred resource also shows 1.88 million ounces silver, 10.4 million pounds molybdenum and 15.6 million pounds copper. Kivalliq operates the project in partnership with Nunavut Tunngavik Inc.

Alpha/Fission release scintillometer results, extend acquisition letter of intent

Somewhere there must be a considerable backlog of Patterson Lake South core waiting to be assayed. So far this year, 50/50 JV partners Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW have mostly released scintillometer readings. A preliminary indication of radioactivity, they measure gamma rays in counts per second, up to an off-scale reading above 9,999 cps. The September 12 batch comes from R780E, the third of four zones along a 1.02-kilometre southwest-northeast trend.

Hole PLS13-082 reached a total depth of 380 metres, finding the basement unconformity at 55.3 metres without striking sandstone. Some results show:

  • <300 to 500 cps over 7.5 metres, starting at 118.5 metres in downhole depth

  • <300 to 820 cps over 3.5 metres, starting at 141 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 35 metres, starting at 146.5 metres

  • 1,000 to 4,200 cps over 1.5 metres, starting at 237 metres

Hole PLS13-089 encountered no sandstone and hit the basement unconformity at 54.2 metres on its way to a total depth of 393 metres. Some examples show:

  • <300 to 1,800 cps over 5 metres, starting at 142.5 metres

  • <300 to 3,200 cps over 16.5 metres, starting at 150 metres

  • 740 to >9,999 cps over 1.5 metres, starting at 179.5 metres

  • <300 to 6,500 cps over 8 metres, starting at 198.5 metres

True widths were unavailable. Lab assays are pending.

With 25 holes totalling 7,746 metres complete by September 11, the campaign’s $6.95-million, 44-hole, 11,000-metre program is well advanced. Fission acts as project operator.

On September 13 the partners updated Fission’s proposed acquisition of Alpha. They’ve now extended to September 17 “the date by which the obligations set out in the LOI, including the signing of an arrangement agreement, must be completed.”

Zadar finds radioactive boulders in PLS-vicinity PNE project

With Phase I exploration complete on Zadar Ventures’ TSXV:ZAD PNE project, a scintillometer has found boulders measuring 130 to 405 cps. “The anomalous boulders sampled have basement rock lithologies similar to those reported in the early stages” of Alpha/Fission’s PLS, Zadar stated on September 11. The program also included taking boulder chip samples for assays and placing radon gas detector cups.

Phase II calls for additional scintillometer prospecting and boulder sampling, as well as a survey of more than 350 radon cups. The team also plans to locate the 15,292-hectare property’s single historic hole. PNE lies about 11 kilometres northeast of PLS and adjacent to Patterson Lake North, a 50/50 JV between Fission and Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 25th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 17 to 23, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Fission/Alpha extend zone, find “potential candidate” for PLS bedrock source

More scintillometer readings from Patterson Lake South show a 47-metre interval of continuous radioactivity and a 15-metre extension to one zone. Of five holes reported August 22, three showed no sandstone above the basement unconformity. According to joint venture partners Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW and Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU, that “makes the R390E zone a potential candidate area for one of the bedrock sources of the large uranium boulder field.” R390E is the second of four zones extending northeast along a 1.05-kilometre potential strike.

The hand-held scintillometer scans drill core to measure gamma rays in counts per second up to an off-scale reading above 9,999 cps. Scintillometer readings are not substitutes for assays, which have yet to come. Radioactivity will also be measured with a downhole probe.

Dips range from 84 to 90 degrees, making downhole depths close to vertical depths. True widths were unavailable. Hole PLS13-078 was drilled to a total depth of 224 metres, encountering sandstone at 50 metres and the basement unconformity at 53.5 metres. Highlights include:

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 31.5 metres, starting at 85 metres in downhole depth

  • <300 to 5,900 cps over 10 metres

Drilled to a total depth of 230 metres, hole PLS13-081 found two metres of sandstone before striking the basement unconformity at 51.5 metres. The one result released showed:

  • <300 to 7,300 cps over 25.5 metres, starting at 105 metres in downhole depth

Hole PLS13-083 stepped out 15 metres west to extend the zone’s strike. It found no sandstone before striking the basement unconformity at 53 metres, reaching a total depth of 278 metres. Highlights include:

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 17.5 metres, starting at 53 metres in downhole depth

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 16.5 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 7.5 metres

With a total depth of 224 metres, hole PLS13-085 hit the basement unconformity at 57 metres without encountering sandstone. Highlights include:

  • <300 to 2,800 cps over 5.5 metres, starting at 58.5 metres in vertical depth

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 22.5 metres

Hole PLS13-086 was drilled to a total depth of 263 metres, finding no sandstone but hitting the basement unconformity at 50 metres. Highlights include:

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 47 metres, starting at 75 metres in downhole depth

  • (including 530 to >9,999 cps over 22.5 metres)

PLS13-083’s 15-metre step-out brings the R390E zone’s strike to 120 metres, twice that of last winter. The zone remains open in all directions. The 50/50 JV’s $6.95-million campaign of drilling and ground geophysics continues just beyond the Athabasca Basin’s southwestern rim.

Update: On August 26 Fission announced a proposal to take over Alpha. Read more.

Fission, Azincourt complete airborne geophysics over Patterson Lake North

Backed by another JV partner, Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ, Fission is also exploring the Patterson Lake North project adjacent to PLS and about 5.7 kilometres north of the discovery. On August 20 the companies announced completion of an airborne VTEM survey over the 27,000-hectare property’s northern half.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 17 to 23, 2013

JV partners Fission and Azincourt plan a $1.53-million
summer/winter program for their Patterson Lake North project.

At 400-metre line-spacing, the survey flew 303 line-kilometres to provide data that might show basement conductors or enhanced sandstone alteration. Late summer and fall are scheduled for ground geophysics featuring time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) and magnetotellurics surveys. The partners have budgeted $530,000 for geophysics and about $1 million for winter drilling.

Azincourt may earn 50% of the project by paying $4.75 million in cash or shares and spending $12 million by April 2017. Fission retains a 2% NSR and acts as operator. Prior to the JV Fission had already spent about $4.7 million exploring PLN.

Forum begins Clearwater ground campaign, raises private placement to $2.25 million

Adjacently southwest of PLS, Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC has begun field work on its 9,910-hectare Clearwater project. Having interpreted data from airborne surveys, Forum says the EM conductor hosting the PLS discovery and parallel conductors trend onto Clearwater in a northeast-southwest direction. Radiometrics show uranium channel anomalies and historic surveys reveal two areas with highly anomalous lake sediment samples, according to the August 20 announcement.

Clearwater’s current campaign consists of prospecting with scintillometers, soil radon surveys and lake sediment sampling, along with additional ground geophysics. The company plans to begin drilling in January.

A $1.5-million private placement announced the morning of August 21 was, by late afternoon, raised to $2.25 million. On offer are up to 6.08 million units at $0.37, with each unit comprised of one share and one warrant exercisable at $0.50 for two years. Proceeds will go to Clearwater’s ground geophysics and 3,000-metre campaign.

Ground work begins at Aldrin’s PLS-adjacent Triple M

Adjacently west of PLS and contiguous with Clearwater, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN has begun field work on its Triple M property, according to an August 20 news release. Following up on radiometric anomalies identified by an airborne survey, the company will prospect for uranium boulders and map surficial geology. In September another crew will take surface radon samples above bedrock conductive anomalies found in an airborne VTEM survey.

The schedule calls for drilling to begin by January.

Skyharbour arranges additional $75,000 private placement

On August 19 Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH announced an additional $75,000 non-brokered private placement of 937,500 flow-through units at $0.08. Each unit consists of one flow-through share and one non-transferable warrant exercisable for a non-flow-through share at $0.10 for two years. No finder’s fee will be paid.

The company also granted incentive stock options up to a total of 531,250 shares at $0.10 for five years. The previous week Skyharbour closed a $425,000 private placement that left the company fully funded for its portion of a $6-million, two-year program.

Skyharbour is part of the Western Athabasca Syndicate, a four-company strategic alliance with Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY that’s exploring the PLS-area’s largest land package.

Read more about the Western Athabasca Syndicate Project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 18th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 10 to 16, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Alpha/Fission add fourth zone, extend PLS strike to 1.02 kilometres

Barely into their current $6.95-million campaign, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW once again grabbed the market’s attention by reporting a fourth zone at Patterson Lake South on August 15. With off-scale scintillometer readings for one hole 165 metres grid east of zone R780E, the new zone gets the informative but unsentimental name R945E. The quartet of zones now extends along a 1.02-kilometre trend.

The hand-held scintillometer measures drill core gamma radioactivity in counts per second, up to an off-scale reading of 9,999 cps. The results are not assays, which are pending. A downhole probe will also be used to measure radioactivity. Some highlights for hole PLS13-084 include:

  • <300 to 800 cps over 4 metres, starting at 104.5 metres in vertical depth
  • <300 to 1,500 cps over 7 metres, starting at 132.5 metres
  • <300 to 3,700 cps over 35.5 metres, starting at 159.5 metres
  • <300 to 5,100 cps over 7 metres, starting at 198 metres
  • <300 to 4,500 cps over 12.5 metres, starting at 209.5 metres
  • <300 to 9,999 cps over 18 metres, starting at 234 metres.

True widths were unavailable. The hole reached a total depth of 302 metres, striking the basement unconformity at 59 metres. Drilling continues on this hole.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere

On the left are barges supporting two of three drills, part of Patterson
Lake South’s $6.95-million, 44-hole, 11,000-metre campaign.

The target was chosen after radon water sampling found an anomaly parallel to a conductor and along strike of the project’s other zones. The 50/50 joint venture partners emphasized that the mineralization’s full potential “will not be fully realized until a complete fence of holes is completed across this anomaly.”

Three days earlier the JV reported its first summer hole from R780E, showing the zone’s “widest continuous and strongest results.” Drilled 10 metres grid south of a previous hole, it extends the zone’s width to about 45 metres at that point. Highlights from PLS13-080 include:

  • <300 to 9,999 cps over 48.5 metres, starting at 122.5 metres in downhole depth
  • <300 to 2,000 cps over 3.5 metres, starting at 173.5 metres
  • <300 to 9,999 cps over 11.5 metres, starting at 236 metres
  • <300 to 5,400 cps over 3 metres, starting at 298 metres.

True thicknesses weren’t available. The hole reached a total of 347 metres, hitting the basement unconformity at 54 metres. With an 89-degree dip, downhole depths approximate vertical depths. Still to come are lab assays and results from a downhole radiometric probe.

Like PLS13-084, the target was chosen to test an anomaly found by radon sampling, this one “within a resistivity low corridor proximal to an inferred north-south cross-cutting structure.”

On August 16 Fission announced the appointment of Ted Clark to its executive advisory board. Clark is chief of the Clearwater River Dene Nation and owner of Big Bear Contracting Ltd.

NexGen drills PLS-adjacent Rook 1, increases private placement again

Adjacently northeast of PLS, a two-drill, 3,000-metre campaign has begun on NexGen Energy’s TSXV:NXE Rook 1 project. Targets were identified and refined following airborne and ground geophysics that found overlapping anomalies, according to the August 16 announcement. NexGen expects to find basement rock at 65 to 100 metres in depth. Weather permitting, drilling will continue to late September.

What began as a $1.78-million private placement offered on July 29 has, after three increases, now reached nearly $5 million. The company doubled the offer to $3.53 million on August 1, increased it to $4.12 million on August 14 and, the following day, raised that to $5 million. This “third and final increase” now boosts the offer to 14.28 million units at $0.35 for gross proceeds up to almost $5 million.

Each unit consists of one share and one-half warrant, with each whole warrant exercisable for a share at $0.55 for 18 months. Raising the $5 million would leave NexGen with about $9 million cash on hand.

On the Basin’s east side, the company is earning a 70% interest in the Radio project, two kilometres east of Rio Tinto’s Roughrider deposits. Assays are pending from Radio’s 3,473-metre summer program.

Skyharbour closes $425,000 private placement, now fully funded for two years

Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH closed a private placement of 5.31 million flow-through units at $0.08 for $425,000 on August 14. Each flow-through unit consists of one flow-through share and one non-transferable non-flow-through warrant exercisable at $0.10 for two years. No finder’s fees were paid.

As part of the four-company Western Athabasca Syndicate exploring the PLS-area’s largest land package, Skyharbour is now fully financed for its portion of a $6-million, two-year program, president/CEO Jordan Trimble tells

“The first phase of work, the airborne surveys, is complete,” he points out. “Fieldwork started ahead of schedule to test a target we’re excited about. We’ll be doing some radon surveying, geochemical sampling and prospecting, among other field techniques. We hope to have all the results in by the end of October.”

Referring to the Alpha/Fission discovery of a fourth PLS zone, Trimble says, “Clearly they’re dealing with a very powerful geological event that created this deposition of uranium. That has implications for the surrounding properties. Another point is the success they’re having with these indicators—the radon anomalies, the boulder train discovery. They’re having huge success with their methodology and the specific targets they’re drilling. That’s important for companies at an earlier stage, and I think Alpha and Fission have shown the market the significance of pre-drilling exploration and reconnaissance work. There’s a lot of value you can put into a project even before you get the drill rigs there.”

The syndicate, which includes Skyharbour, Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY, has “about 150 years of uranium exploration experience focused on the Athabasca Basin,” Trimble adds. Skyharbour’s Rick Kusmirski, for example, “has over 40 years in the field and his area of expertise is the Athabasca Basin. He was exploration manager for Cameco [TSX:CCO], he took over the helm at JNR Resources, made a discovery and got bought out by Denison [TSX:DML]. Bob Marvin, our other geologist, also has decades of experience with extensive work in the uranium space. Then there’s the other three companies, each with at least one geologist and the focus has been on uranium expertise.”

Read more about the Western Athabasca Syndicate Project.

Lakeland offers $1.25-million private placement, plans Riou Lake exploration

Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK offered private placements up to $1.25 million on August 16. The pure play uranium exploration company announced up to 10 million units at $0.10 for gross proceeds of $1 million, with each unit consisting of one share and one warrant exercisable at $0.15 for one year. Another two million flow-through units at $0.125 consist of one flow-through share and one warrant exercisable at $0.15 for a year. Proceeds will go to Athabasca Basin exploration and general working capital.

With nine uranium properties, Lakeland’s initial focus will be the Gibbon’s Creek area of its Riou Lake project on the northern Basin’s edge, says corporate communications manager Roger Leschuk. “It’s already had work done on it so we have a lot of historic data to go through. Because it’s on higher ground we can drill year-round. We’ve got existing data, so we can work from that and possibly be drilling as early as October.”

Two of Lakeland’s properties are in the eastern Basin, with the other seven in the north-central and northeastern Basin. “The Basin’s trends run from southwest to northeast. The early discoveries were on the eastern side of the Basin, on the Wollaston trend. That goes into Manitoba and finishes in Nunavut. The next trend is at Patterson Lake South, where the Alpha/Fission story is happening. Our properties on the northeast side of the Basin are part of that trend. So it’s not inconceivable that we could find something similar. The previous Riou Lake operator did find a boulder grading 11% uranium, the drilling found some very similar things, so we’re very excited about that.”

Gibbon’s Creek offers other attractions, Leschuk adds. “It’s not only on high ground but it’s very shallow to the basement rock. We’re talking maybe 50 metres down, so our drilling is going to be very shallow and very cheap to drill. Only a few kilometres away there’s a community called Stony Rapids, so we don’t have to set up a camp. We can hire people from the community who can drive to and from work, so our costs will be even lower. Our money will go a long, long way. We’re looking at 1,500 to 2,000 metres initially but we’ll get a big bang for our buck. We’re looking forward to that.”

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 11th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 3 to 9, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Fission/Alpha report 4 PLS holes, R00E zone still open

So far this summer, three previous step-outs have extended the middle of Patterson Lake South’s trio of zones. On August 8 Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW and Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU released scintillometer results from four new holes in the southern-most zone, which remains open along strike and width. Along with the results came some interesting speculation about the mineralization.

The hand-held gamma-ray scintillometer readings, which are no substitute for assays, measure radiation from drill core in counts per second. Anything over 9,999 cps is off scale.

A 15-metre step-out testing the western extent of the zone, hole PLS13-074 was drilled to 203 metres in approximate vertical depth, encountering sandstone at 60.9 metres and a basement unconformity at 66 metres:

  • 550 to 1,050 cps over 1 metre, starting at 65 metres in approximate vertical depth
  • 370 cps over 1 metre, starting at 105 metres.
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 3 to 9, 2013

The other three holes tested the zone’s centre. Hole PLS13-076 was drilled to 267 metres in approximate vertical depth, encountering sandstone at 54 metres and the basement unconformity at 61.4 metres:

  • <300 to 2,700 cps over 14 metres, starting at 177.5 metres in approximate vertical depth.

Hole PLS13-077 was drilled to 259.5 metres in downhole depth, encountering sandstone at 56 metres and the basement unconformity at 61.4 metres:

  • 340 to 7,500 cps over 11.5 metres, starting at 59 metres in downhole depth
  • <300 to 4,000 cps over 15 metres, starting at 73.5 metres.

Hole PLS13-079 was drilled to 218 metres in downhole depth, encountering no sandstone but hitting the unconformity at 59 metres:

  • 340 to >9,999 cps over 18.5 metres, starting at 82.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 5,700 to >9,999 cps over 6.5 metres)
  • 300 to 490 cps over 2 metres, starting at 119 metres.

The 50/50 joint venture partners stated the mineralization “may have been derived from a high-energy erosion of mineralization exposed at the top of a body of basement mineralization on the floor of the Devonian sea. It does not have the characteristics of hydrothermal mineralization such as is seen in the basement mineralization elsewhere.”

Alpha’s news release added, “The Devonian cover appears to be patchy and the uranium boulders in the boulder field down ice did not show any evidence of association with Devonian sandstone lithologies. This is significant as it opens the possibility that the source of the uranium boulders may be located in a nearby window in the Devonian veneer where basement mineralization was scoured by the overriding till sheet as it was pushed towards the west-southwest by the ice. The uranium mineralization encountered to date in the three zones of high-grade mineralization was not the source of the large uranium boulder field down ice.”

The boulder train discovery, announced in summer 2011, brought assays up to 39.6% uranium oxide (U3O8). Since then drilling has attempted to find the motherlode that spawned the glacial migration.

With $6.95 million to spend, the partners continue their 44-hole, 11,000-metre drilling and ground geophysics campaign. Fission acts as project operator until April 2014, when it swaps with Alpha.

UEX releases Shea Creek drill results, updates Douglas River and Hidden Bay

UEX Corp TSX:UEX announced the first five holes from Shea Creek’s summer program on August 6 and also provided updates about its Douglas River and Hidden Bay projects.

Results came from downhole probes measuring gamma radiation, with two holes in the Kianna East zone finding basement mineralization. Hole SHE-142 was drilled to a total downhole depth of 1,056 metres, reaching the unconformity at 726.5 metres:

  • 0.2% uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) over 3.4 metres, starting at 885.3 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 0.35% over 1.2 metres)
  • 0.34% over 2.9 metres, starting at 907.9 metres
  • 0.85% over 22.3 metres, starting at 915.2 metres
  • (including 1.14% over 8.8 metres)
  • (which includes 5.93% over 1.4 metres).

Hole SHE-142-1 reached 1,083 metres in downhole depth, striking the unconformity at 727.4 metres:

  • 0.23% over 1.6 metres, starting at 939.4 metres.

True widths were unavailable. Hole SHE-142 expands the zone approximately 15 metres east of the previously reported SHE-118-24 that found 1.55% eU3O8 over 19.9 metres starting at 943.7 metres, the company stated. Mineralization remains open east and southeast of SHE-142. Hole SHE-142-1 stepped out approximately 35 metres north of SHE-118-24.

Three holes sunk in the Anne South zone to test a prospective conductor found no significant results. UEX holds a 49% interest in the Shea Creek JV, in which AREVA Resources Canada acts as project operator. The companies have now incorporated their 49%/51% Douglas River JV into the Shea Creek project, saying mineralization extends from Shea Creek’s northern boundary into the contiguous Douglas River property. Shea Creek sits about nine kilometres south of the former Cluff Lake mine, a 22-year operation that produced over 64 million pounds of U3O8.

The Athabasca Basin’s third-largest resource after Cameco Corp’s TSX:CCO McArthur River and Cigar Lake, Shea Creek’s April update showed:

  • an indicated category of 2.07 million tonnes averaging 1.48% for 67.66 million pounds U3O8
  • an inferred category of 1.27 million tonnes averaging 1.01% for 28.19 million pounds.

UEX also announced it has shelved its 100%-held Hidden Bay project until spot and long-term uranium prices pick up. In February 2011 the company issued a preliminary economic assessment for the eastside Basin property’s Horseshoe and Raven deposits.

Western Athabasca Syndicate begins PLS-area fieldwork ahead of schedule

Backed by a four-company strategic alliance, fieldwork has begun on the PLS-area’s largest land package. On August 8 Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY and Noka Resources TSXV:NX announced completion of VTEM plus and radiometric surveys over their Western Athabasca Syndicate Project. After an initial review the companies decided on immediate follow-up work.

The package totals 287,130 hectares, with 275,361 hectares in the vicinity of the Fission/Alpha near-surface, high-grade discovery. On reviewing early survey data, the alliance expanded the survey for a total of 4,840 line-kilometres of VTEM plus and 4,400 line-kilometres of radiometrics to search for conductive anomalies, boulder trains and in-situ mineralization. The surveys focused on the syndicate’s Preston Lake property just south, southeast and west of PLS.

“Originally we were planning on having a field crew up there later in August,” Skyharbour president/CEO Jordan Trimble tells “Now we’ve decided to send them up this weekend because we’re very, very encouraged with what we’ve seen initially.”

One area of Preston Lake especially caught their attention. “There were quite a few targets but this one really lit up,” Trimble says. “So we made the decision to expedite the program and begin the fieldwork immediately. We’ll be employing the same techniques that worked for Alpha and Fission.”

While geophysicist Phil Robertshaw works out a more detailed interpretation of the airborne surveys, ground work will consist of water and soil radon sampling, biogeochemistry, lake sediment and soil sampling, prospecting and scintillometer surveying.

“By the end of September or early October we’ll have spent $1.5 million, with each company contributing towards its 25% earn-in. The four companies with their respective geological teams are working harmoniously on this,” he adds.

“We’re now focused on the northern part of Preston Lake, but we have a large land package. As a four-company syndicate we have more ability to finance and explore. There’s certainly a lot of blue sky potential elsewhere on our properties.”

The current phase should last until early October, he explains. “Then we’ll decide what to do in the fall. There’s still a lot of work that can be done that time of year. Obviously we don’t want to drill just anywhere but if we can get definitive drill targets by then, winter would be the ideal time to drill. The earlier we can get these targets, the better. And that’s the goal.”

Combined, the four companies have agreed to fund $6 million of exploration over two years. Athabasca Nuclear acts as project operator.

Read more about the Western Athabasca Syndicate.

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