Monday 5th December 2016

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘manganese’

Battery infographic series Part 4: The critical ingredients needed to fuel the battery boom

October 27th, 2016

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | October 27, 2016

The Battery Series will present five infographics exploring what investors need to know about modern battery technology, including raw material supply, demand and future applications.

 

The critical ingredients needed to fuel the battery boom

 

We’ve already looked at the evolution of battery technology and how lithium-ion technology will dominate battery market share over the coming years. Part 4 of the Battery Series breaks down the raw materials that will be needed for this battery boom.

Batteries are more powerful and reliable than ever and costs have come down dramatically over the years. As a result, the market for electric vehicles is expected to explode to 20 million plug-in EV sales per year by 2030.

To power these vehicles, millions of new battery packs will need to be built. The lithium-ion battery market is expected to grow at a 21.7% rate annually in terms of the actual energy capacity required. It was 15.9 GWh in 2015, but will be a whopping 93.1 GWh by 2024.

Dissecting the lithium-ion

While there are many exciting battery technologies out there, we will focus on the innards of lithium-ion batteries as they are expected to make up the vast majority of the total rechargeable battery market for the near future.

Each lithium-ion cell contains three major parts:

1. Anode (natural or synthetic graphite)

2. Electrolyte (lithium salts)

3. Cathode (differing formulations)

While the anode and electrolytes are pretty straightforward as far as lithium-ion technology goes, it is the cathode where most developments are being made.

Lithium isn’t the only metal that goes into the cathode—other metals like cobalt, manganese, aluminum and nickel are also used in different formulations. Here’s four cathode chemistries, the metal proportions (excluding lithium) and an example of what they are used for:

 

Cathode Type Chemistry Metals needed Example Use
NCA LiNiCoAlO2 80% Nickel, 15% Cobalt, 5% Aluminum Tesla Model S
LCO LiCoO2 100% Cobalt Apple iPhone
LMO LiMn2O4 100% Manganese Nissan Leaf
NMC LiNiMnCoO2 Nickel 33.3%, Manganese 33.3%, Cobalt 33.3% Tesla Powerwall

 

While manganese and aluminum are important for lithium-ion cathodes, they are also cheaper metals with giant markets. This makes them fairly easy to procure for battery manufacturers. Lithium, graphite and cobalt are all much smaller and less-established markets—and each has supply concerns that remain unanswered:

    South America: The countries in the Lithium Triangle host a whopping 75% of the world’s lithium resources—Argentina, Chile and Bolivia.

    China: 65% of flake graphite is mined in China. With poor environmental and labour practices, China’s graphite industry has been under particular scrutiny and some mines have even been shut down.

    Indonesia: Price swings of nickel can impact battery makers. In 2014, Indonesia banned exports of nickel, which caused the price to soar nearly 50%.

    Democratic Republic of Congo: 65% of all cobalt production comes from the DRC, a country that is extremely politically unstable with deeply rooted corruption.

    North America: Companies such as Tesla have stated that they want to source 100% of raw materials sustainably and ethically from North America. The problem? Only nickel sees significant supply come from the continent.

Cobalt hasn’t been mined in the United States for 40 years and the country produced zero tonnes of graphite in 2015. There is one lithium operation near the Tesla Gigafactory 1 but it only produces 1,000 tonnes of lithium hydroxide per year. That’s not nearly enough to fuel a battery boom of this size.

To meet its goal of a 100% North American raw materials supply chain, Tesla needs new resources to be discovered and extracted from the U.S., Canada or Mexico.

Raw material demand

While all sorts of supply questions exist for these energy metals, the demand situation is much more straightforward. Consumers are demanding more batteries and each battery is made up of raw materials like cobalt, graphite and lithium.

Cobalt:

Today about 40% of cobalt is used to make rechargeable batteries. By 2019, it’s expected that 55% of total cobalt demand will go to the cause. In fact, many analysts see an upcoming bull market in cobalt.

In many ways, the cobalt industry has the most fragile supply structure of all battery raw materials.—Andrew Miller,
Benchmark Mineral Intelligence

    Battery demand is rising fast

    Production is being cut from the Congo

    A supply deficit is starting to emerge

Graphite:

There are 54 kilograms of graphite in every battery anode of a Tesla Model S (85 kWh). Benchmark Mineral Intelligence forecasts that the battery anode market for graphite (natural and synthetic) will at least triple in size from 80,000 tonnes in 2015 to at least 250,000 tonnes by the end of 2020.

Lithium:

Goldman Sachs estimates that a Tesla Model S with a 70-kWh battery uses 63 kilograms of lithium carbonate equivalent (LCE)—more than the amount of lithium in 10,000 cell phones. Further, for every 1% increase in battery electric vehicle market penetration, there is an increase in lithium demand by around 70,000 tonnes LCE per year.

Lithium prices have recently spiked but they may begin sliding in 2019 if more supply comes online.

The future of battery tech

Sourcing the raw materials for lithium-ion batteries will be critical for our energy mix. But the future is also bright for many other battery technologies that could help in solving our most pressing energy issues.

Part 5 of the Battery Series will look at the newest technologies in the battery sector.

See Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 of the battery infographic series.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Pushing the boundaries

October 12th, 2016

Technology opens new mining frontiers, sometimes challenging human endurance

by Greg Klein

This is the second of a two-part feature. See Part 1.

“Deep underground, deep sky and deep sea” comprise the lofty goals of Three Deep, a five-year program announced last month by China’s Ministry of Land and Resources. Part 1 of this feature looked at the country’s ambitions to take mineral exploration deeper than ever on land, at sea and into the heavens, and also outlined other countries’ space programs related to mineral exploration. Part 2 delves into undersea mining as well as some of the world’s deepest mines.

Looking to the ocean depths, undersea mining has had tangible success. De Beers has been scooping up alluvial diamonds off southwestern Africa for decades, although at shallow depths. Through NamDeb, a 50/50 JV with Namibia, a fleet of six boats mines the world’s largest-known placer diamond deposit, about 20 kilometres offshore and 150 metres deep.

Technology opens new mining frontiers, sometimes pushing human endurance

Workers at AngloGold Ashanti’s Mponeng operation
must withstand the heat of deep underground mining.

Diamond Fields International TSXV:DFI hopes to return to its offshore Namibian claims, where the company extracted alluvial stones between 2005 and 2008. The company also holds a 50.1% interest in Atlantis II, a zinc-copper-silver deposit contained in Red Sea sediments. That project’s now on hold pending a dispute with the Saudi Arabian JV partner.

With deeper, more technologically advanced ambitions, Nautilus Minerals TSX:NUS holds a mining licence for its 85%-held Solwara 1 project in Papua New Guinea waters. A seafloor massive sulphide deposit at an average depth of 1,550 metres, its grades explain the company’s motivation. The project has a 2012 resource using a 2.6% copper-equivalent cutoff, with the Solwara 1 and 1 North areas showing:

  • indicated: 1.03 million tonnes averaging 7.2% copper, 5 g/t gold, 23 g/t silver and 0.4% zinc

  • inferred: 1.54 million tonnes averaging 8.1% copper, 6.4 g/t gold, 34 g/t silver and 0.9% zinc

Using the same cutoff, the Solwara 12 zone shows:

  • inferred: 2.3 million tonnes averaging 7.3% copper, 3.6 g/t gold, 56 g/t silver and 3.6% zinc
Technology opens new mining frontiers, sometimes pushing human endurance

This Nautilus diagram illustrates
the proposed Solwara operation.

A company video shows how Nautilus had hoped to operate “the world’s first commercial high-grade seafloor copper-gold mine” beginning in 2018 using existing technology from land-based mining and offshore oil and gas. Now, should financial restructuring succeed, Nautilus says it could begin deployment and testing by the end of Q1 2019.

Last May Nautilus released a resource update for the Clarion-Clipperton Fracture Zone in the central Pacific waters of Tonga.

Another deep-sea hopeful, Ocean Minerals last month received approval from the Cook Islands to explore a 12,000-square-kilometre seabed expanse for rare earths in sediments.

A pioneer in undersea exploration, Japan’s getting ready for the next step, according to Bloomberg. A consortium including Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal will begin pilot mining in Chinese-contested waters off Okinawa next April, the news agency stated. “Japan has confirmed the deposit has about 7.4 million tons of ore,” Bloomberg added, without specifying what kind of ore.

Scientists are analyzing data from the central Indian Ocean where nodules show signs of copper, nickel and manganese, the Times of India reported in January. The country has a remotely operated vehicle capable of an unusually deep 6,000 metres and is working on undersea mining technology.

In August the World Nuclear News stated Russia is considering a nuclear-powered submarine to explore northern seas for mineral deposits. A government report said the sub’s R&D could put the project on par with the country’s space industry, the WNN added.

If one project alone could justify China’s undersea ambitions, it might be a 470.47-ton gold deposit announced last November. Lying at 2,000 metres’ depth off northern China, the bounty was delineated by 1,000 workers and 120 kilometres of drilling from 67 sea platforms over three years, the People’s Daily reported. Laizhou Rehi Mining hopes to extract the stuff, according to China Daily.

China’s deep underground ambitions might bring innovation to exploration but have been long preceded by actual mining in South Africa—although not without problems, as the country’s deplorable safety record shows. Greater depths bring greater threats from rockfalls and mini-earthquakes.

At 3.9 kilometres’ depth AngloGold Ashanti’s (NYSE:AU) Mponeng holds status as the world’s deepest mine. Five other mines within 50 kilometres of Johannesburg work from at least three kilometres’ depth, where “rock temperatures can reach 60 degrees Celsius, enough to fry an egg,” according to a Bloomberg article posted by Mineweb.com.

In his 2013 book Gold: The Race for the World’s Most Seductive Metal, Matthew Hart recounts a visit to Mponeng, where he’s told a “seismic event” shakes the mine 600 times a month.

Sometimes the quakes cause rockbursts, when rock explodes into a mining cavity and mows men down with a deadly spray of jagged rock. Sometimes a tremor causes a “fall of ground”—the term for a collapse. Some of the rockbursts had been so powerful that other countries, detecting the seismic signature, had suspected South Africa of testing a nuclear bomb.

AngloGold subjects job-seekers to a heat-endurance test, Hart explains.

In a special chamber, applicants perform step exercises while technicians monitor them. The test chamber is kept at a “wet” temperature of eighty-two degrees. The high humidity makes it feel like ninety-six. “We are trying to force the body’s thermoregulatory system to kick in,” said Zahan Eloff, an occupational health physician. “If your body cools itself efficiently, you are safe to go underground for a fourteen-day trial, and if that goes well, cleared to work.”

Clearly there’s more than technological challenges to mining the deeps.

By the way, credit for the world’s deepest drilling goes to Russia, which spent 24 years sinking the Kola Superdeep Bore Hole to 12,261 metres, halfway to the mantle. Work was halted by temperatures of 180 degrees Celsius.

This is the second of a two-part feature. See Part 1.

Battery infographic series Part 1: The evolution of battery technology

June 22nd, 2016

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | June 22, 2016

The battery series will present five infographics to inform investors how batteries work, the players in the market, the materials needed to build batteries and how future battery developments may affect the world. This is Part 1, which looks at the basics of batteries and the history of battery technology.

 

Battery infographic series part 1 The evolution of battery technology

 

Today, how we store energy is just as important as how we create it.

Battery technology already makes electric cars possible, as well as helping us store emergency power, fly satellites and use portable electronic devices. But tomorrow, could you be boarding a battery-powered airplane, or be living in a city powered at night by solar energy?

Battery basics

Batteries convert stored chemical energy directly into electrical energy. Batteries have three main components:

(-) Anode: The negative electrode that gets oxidized, releasing electrons.

(+) Cathode: The positive electrode that is reduced, by acquiring electrons.

Electrolyte: The medium that provides the ion transport mechanism between the cathode and anode of a cell. It can be liquid or solid.

At the most basic level, batteries are very simple. In fact, a primitive battery can even be made with a copper penny, galvanized nail (zinc) and a lemon or potato.

The evolution of battery technology

While creating a simple battery is quite easy, making a good battery is very difficult. Balancing power, weight, cost and other factors involves managing many trade-offs, and scientists have worked for hundreds of years to get to today’s level of efficiency.

Here’s a brief history of how batteries have changed over the years:

Voltaic pile (1799)

Italian physicist Alessandro Volta, in 1799, created the first electrical battery that could provide continuous electrical current to a circuit. The voltaic pile used zinc and copper for electrodes with brine-soaked paper for an electrolyte.

His invention disproved the common theory that electricity could only be created by living beings.

Daniell cell (1836)

About 40 years later, a British chemist named John Frederic Daniell would create a new cell that would solve the “hydrogen bubble” problem of the voltaic pile. This previous problem, in which bubbles collected on the bottom of the zinc electrodes, limited the pile’s lifespan and uses.

The Daniell cell, invented in 1836, used a copper pot filled with copper sulphate solution, which was further immersed in an earthenware container filled with sulphuric acid and a zinc electrode. The Daniell cell’s electrical potential became the basis unit for voltage, equal to one volt.

Lead-acid (1859)

The lead-acid battery was the first rechargeable battery, invented in 1859 by French physicist Gaston Planté.

Lead-acid batteries excel in two areas: they are very low-cost and they can also supply high surge currents. This makes them suitable for automobile starter motors even with today’s technology and it’s part of the reason $44.7 billion of lead-acid batteries were sold globally in 2014.

Nickel cadmium (1899)

Nickel cadmium batteries were invented in 1899 by Waldemar Jungner in Sweden. The first ones were “wet cells” similar to lead-acid batteries, using a liquid electrolyte.

Nickel cadmium batteries helped pave the way for modern technology but they are being used less and less because of cadmium’s toxicity. The batteries lost 80% of their market share in the 1990s to batteries that are more familiar to us today.

Alkaline batteries (1950s)

Popularized by brands like Duracell and Energizer, alkaline batteries are used in regular household devices from remote controls to flashlights. They are inexpensive and typically non-rechargeable, though they can be made rechargeable by using a specially designed cell.

The modern alkaline battery was invented by Canadian engineer Lewis Urry in the 1950s. Using zinc and manganese oxide in the electrodes, the battery type gets its name from the alkaline electrolyte used—potassium hydroxide.

Over 10 billion alkaline batteries have been made in the world.

Nickel-metal hydride (1989)

Similar to the rechargeable nickel cadmium battery, the nickel-metal hydride formulation uses a hydrogen-absorbing alloy instead of toxic cadmium. This makes it more environmentally safe—and it also helps increase the energy density.

Nickel-metal hydride batteries are used in power tools, digital cameras and some other electronic devices. They also were used in early hybrid vehicles such as the Toyota Prius.

The development of nickel-metal hydride spanned two decades and was sponsored by Daimler-Benz and Volkswagen AG. The first commercially available cells were in 1989.

Lithium-ion (1991)

Sony released the first commercial lithium-ion battery in 1991.

Lithium-ion batteries have high energy density and a number of specific cathode formulations for different applications. For example, lithium cobalt dioxide (LiCoO2) cathodes are used in laptops and smartphones, while lithium nickel cobalt aluminum oxide (LiNiCoAlO2) cathodes, also known as NCAs, are used in the batteries of vehicles such as the Tesla Model S.

Graphite is a common material for use in the anode and the electrolyte is most often a type of lithium salt suspended in an organic solvent.

The rechargeable battery spectrum

There are several factors that could affect battery choice, including cost. However, here are two of the most important factors that determine the fit and use of rechargeable batteries specifically:

Think of specific energy as the amount of water in a tank. It’s the amount of energy a battery holds in total. Meanwhile, specific power is the speed at which that water can pour out of the tank. It’s the amount of current a battery can supply for a given use.

And while today the lithium-ion battery is the workhorse for gadgets and electric vehicles, what batteries will be vital to our future? How big is that market? Find out in the rest of the battery series. Parts 2 through 5 will be released throughout the summer.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

See Part 2 of the battery infographic series.

Indonesia ban rocks nickel market

January 13th, 2014

by Frik Els | January 12, 2014 | Reprinted by permission of MINING.com

Indonesia rocked the mining world on January 12, putting into effect an outright ban on nickel, bauxite and tin ore exports.

The Asian nation is the world’s premier thermal coal and tin exporter and is also a gold and copper powerhouse, but the ban on nickel and bauxite ore would have the most dramatic effect on markets.

Last week Indonesian energy and resource ministry officials scrambled to ease provisions of the raw mineral export prohibition that President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono signed into law on January 12, the most controversial decision of his 10-year presidency.

Indonesia dominates the nickel export business, accounting for over a fifth of global supply at an estimated 400,000 tonnes of contained metal. Chinese nickel pig iron producers imported more than 30 million tonnes of nickel ore from Indonesia last year and China’s aluminium smelters rely on Indonesia for 20% of their feedstock.

According to the latest rules under the ban, base metals including copper, manganese, lead, zinc and tin will be allowed to be exported in concentrate until 2017.

This benefits producers like Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold NYE:FCX, which operates the world’s third-largest copper mine at Grasberg in the West Papua province and warned about a 60% drop in output should copper form part of the ban. Phoenix-based Freeport-McMoRan and Newmont Mining NYE:NEM together account for 97% of Indonesia’s copper exports.

[The ban] is the biggest supply risk facing base metals in a long time. The market has been very complacent, thinking the Indonesians would backtrack.

However against expectations of a last-minute climbdown by authorities, the nickel and bauxite ore ban, as well as the prohibition of unprocessed exports of tin, chromium, gold and silver, went into effect January 12.

FT.com quoted Gayle Berry, base metals analyst at UK bank Barclays earlier as saying the ban “is the biggest supply risk facing base metals in a long time. The market has been very complacent, thinking the Indonesians would backtrack.”

Privately owned Ibris Nickel last week announced it will cease operations in Indonesia, laying off 1,400 workers at its two-million-tonne-per-year mine. The nickel industry employs some 200,000 Indonesians across hundreds of small-scale operations.

Reuters reports the Indonesian Mineral Entrepreneurs Association said it planned to challenge the ban in the Supreme Court and Constitutional Court while almost 30,000 mine workers have been laid off, sparking protest in the capital Jakarta:

“We call on all mining workers to prepare to go on the streets and swarm the presidential palace if the government goes ahead with the implementation of the ban,” said Juan Forti Silalahi of the National Mine Workers Union in a statement on January 11.

So far the price of nickel has not reacted in a big way to the looming ban, but now all bets are off.

 

 

Three-months nickel on the LME retreated more than 20% in 2013 from opening levels of $17,450 and, after hitting a high of $18,700 in February, dropped to a four-year low in October amid an oversupplied market.

After a brief uptick in December to over $14,200, the steelmaking raw material last week fell back to the mid-$13,000s and on January 10 the contract closed at $13,725.

Even without the Indonesian ban, the prospects for nickel aren’t rosy.

Global output is forecast to rise for the first time to over two million tonnes in 2015. That’s up from 1.4 million tonnes in 2007.

Stockpiling of ore and metal in anticipation of Indonesian disruptions and the inexorable rise of nickel warehouse levels over the past two years—hitting a record 260,000 tonnes last week—have also kept prices subdued.

 

 

Indonesia, with a population of 240 million, goes to the polls for parliamentary elections in April and in July will choose a new president, so much can change over the course of the year before the true extent of the ban can be felt.

Reprinted by permission of MINING.com

Advanced reports Nunavut Feasibility: 1.37M CAPEX, $642M NPV, 16% IRR

August 10th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior silver mining and junior silver miningAdvanced Explorations Inc TSXV:AXI announced the results of a feasibility study of the C Zone of its Roche Bay Iron Project on the Melville Peninsula, Nunavut. The project has a pretax net present value (NPV) of US$642 million at an 8% discount rate, a pretax internal rate of return (IRR) of 16%, a mine life of 15 years, a strip ratio of 0.92:1, a startup mine net cashflow of US$2.9 billion, a US$1.37 billion CAPEX, an operating life-of-mine cost of US$49.13 per tonne of (66%) iron concentrate and startup production of 5.5 million tonnes per year.

Roche Bay is located 60 kilometres southwest of Hall Beach and 240 kilometres west of Iqaluit. The C Zone orebody is located six kilometres from tidewater where the project has a natural deep-water harbour. At a 20% iron cutoff, the project hosts an indicated resource of 501.3 million tonnes grading 26.35% iron, 51.5% silicon dioxide, 3.22% aluminum oxide and 0.073% manganese oxide and an inferred resource of 73 million tonnes grading 25.58% iron, 51.3% silicon dioxide, 3.06% aluminum oxide and 0.07% manganese oxide, at a 15% iron cutoff.

President/CEO John Gingerich commented, “The completion of our feasibility study marks a significant milestone for the company and lays a clear foundation for the path forward to production. The positive economics at this initial modest startup production rate demonstrate that we have an excellent project with substantial opportunities for expansion and to further lower the operating cost using power solutions such as liquefied natural gas (LNG). The location of the project at tidewater and its consequent low infrastructure requirements promote future expansion and lower operational and construction risks, which compare favourably with many projects in Brazil, Australia and Canada. We are well positioned to become a globally competitive, low-cost producer and are on our way to become one of the lowest cost iron ore producers in North America.”

View Company Profile

Advanced Explorations Inc
416.203.0057 ext 226

by Kevin Michael Grace

Wildcat Silver reports AZ Results of 104.4 g/t Silver, 0.53% Manganese over 30.5m

May 10th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningWildcat Silver Corp TSX:WS announced results from its Hermosa Property in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. Highlights include

104.4 g/t silver, 0.53% manganese, 0.04% zinc, 0.01% copper and 0.4% lead over 30.5 metres
148.9 g/t silver, 11.32% manganese, 2.82% zinc, 0.23% copper and 3.02% lead over 16.8 metres
49.2 g/t silver, 0.22% manganese, 0.02% zinc, 0.01% copper and 0.09% lead over 39.6 metres
100.3 g/t silver, 5.8% manganese, 0.54% zinc, 0.07% copper and 0.98% lead over 16.8 metres
47.4 g/t silver, 0.65% manganese, 0.01% zinc, 0.01% copper and 0.09% lead over 32 metres
55.3 g/t silver, 0.07% manganese, 0.02% zinc, 0.01% copper and 0.08% lead over 27.4 metres

The Hermosa Property is 100% owned by Arizona Minerals Inc, which is 80% owned by Wildcat Silver. The project has a March 2012 indicated resource estimate of 101.42 million tonnes grading 53.18 g/t silver, 3.55% manganese, 0.91% zinc and 0.04% copper and 0.55% lead. The inferred estimate comes to 83.61 million tonnes grading 36.42 g/t silver, 2.38% manganese, 0.83% zinc, 0.03% copper and 0.56% lead. A resource update is scheduled for 3Q.

View Company Profile

Contact:
Letitia Cornacchia
VP of Investor Relations and Corporate Communications
416.860.6310

by Greg Klein

American Manganese advances AZ Artillery Peak Project Metallurgy

February 17th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningAmerican Manganese Inc TSXV:AMY announced an independent report by cleantech analysis firm Kachan & Co validating the hydrometallurgical process to be used at its Artillery Peak project in Arizona. The process uses commercially available equipment and maintains a low-cost, low-energy output while retaining a recovery rate of 92-93%% electrolytic-manganese metal at a purity of over 99.7%. Kachan’s Managing Partner Dallas Kachan said, “On paper and in pilot, American Manganese’s hydrometallurgical process is promising. The near closed-loop nature of the process appears to result in high-grade electrolytic manganese metal with little environmental impact and at a low cost. Proving the process at scale in the field will be the company’s biggest challenge, but early indications are encouraging.”

American Manganese President/CEO Larry Reaugh commented, “Kachan was commissioned to do an independent assessment of our hydrometallurgical process. Its findings illustrate how American Manganese has developed one of the most efficient models of mining low-grade manganese ore and producing low-cost, high-grade electrolytic manganese metal. To have a net positive report published by a leading cleantech analysis firm supporting our unique hydrometallurgical process is a huge success for American Manganese. We are encouraged to continue to work towards becoming the lowest cost producer of electrolytic manganese metal in the world.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
American Manganese Inc
604.531.9639

or Kachan & Co
Ryan Tessier
Press Contact
604.613.6143

by Ted Niles

Wildcat reports Arizona Silver Resource of 171.28M oz Indicated, 98.6M oz Inferred

February 6th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningWildcat Silver Corp TSX:WS announced an updated resource estimate for its Hermosa Project in Santa Cruz, Arizona. The indicated category shows 101,416 tonnes grading 53.18 g/t silver, 3.55% manganese, 0.91% zinc, 0.04% copper and 0.55% lead for 171.28 million ounces silver. The inferred category shows 83,612 tonnes grading 36.42 g/t silver, 2.38% manganese, 0.83% zinc, 0.03% copper and 0.56% lead for 98.6 million ounces silver.

The property is 100% owned by Arizona Minerals Inc, which is 80% owned by Wildcat Silver.

View Company Profile

Contact:
Letitia Cornacchia
VP of Investor Relations and Corporate Communications
416.860.6310

by Greg Klein

Wildcat reports Arizona Assays of 8.46% Manganese, 395.2 g/t Silver over 9.1m

December 22nd, 2011

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningWildcat Silver Corporation TSX:WS announced results from its Hermosa property in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. Assays include

69.5 g/t silver and 10.23% manganese over 7.9 metres
160.4 g/t silver and 12.45% manganese over 35.1 metres
65.8 g/t silver and 14.46% manganese over 4.6 metres
13.41% manganese over 8.5 metres
46.6 g/t silver over 42.7 metres
77.2 g/t silver and 10.55% manganese over 24.4 metres
98.4 g/t silver and 11.94% manganese over 24.8 metres
68.7 g/t silver and 21.25% manganese over 18.6 metres
395.2 g/t silver and 8.46% manganese over 9.1 metres
310 g/t silver and 10.81% manganese over 10.7 metres

The Hermosa project has an NI 43-101 indicated mineral resource estimate of 36 million ounces silver and 410,000 tonnes manganese. It has inferred resources of 85 million ounces silver and 3.4 million tonnes manganese. Wildcat expects to issue an updated resource estimate and preliminary economic assessment for the project in early 2012.

View Company Profile

Contact:
Letitia Cornacchia
VP Corporate Communications
416.860.6310

by Ted Niles

Wildcat reports Arizona Assays up to 483.2 g/t Silver over 22.9m

September 27th, 2011

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningWildcat Silver Corporation TSX:WS announced drill results from its Hermosa property in Santa Cruz County, Arizona. Highlights include

89.3 g/t silver over 16.8 metres
31.5 g/t silver and 9.27% manganese over 12.3 metres
46.5 g/t silver over 33.5 metres
246.6 g/t silver over 47.3 metres
433.6 g/t silver over 19.8 metres
75.2 g/t silver over 12.2 metres
79 g/t silver and 17.76% manganese over 25.9 metres
483.2 g/t silver and 15.5% manganese over 22.9 metres

The Hermosa property currently has an NI 43-101 resource estimate of 36 million ounces silver and 410,000 tonnes manganese indicated, and 85 million ounces silver and 3.4 million tonnes manganese inferred. Wildcat continues to drill the property with five rigs.

View Company Profile

Contact:
Letitia Cornacchia
VP Corporate Communications
416.860.6310

by Ted Niles