Tuesday 22nd September 2020

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘magnesium’

Mining Association of Canada CEO Pierre Gratton sees additional opportunities for this country’s resources

July 21st, 2020

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Poll shows Canadians back sustainable production of critical minerals

May 13th, 2020

by Greg Klein | May 13, 2020

A Mining Week announcement from the Mining Association of Canada expresses public opinion on an issue of increasing prominence. A survey by Abacus Data shows almost 90% of respondents “like the idea of Canada being a preferred source for critical minerals and would like to see government take a number of steps to support this approach,” MAC reported.

Poll shows Canadians back sustainable production of critical minerals

Increasing demand, supply chain weaknesses, and rivalries in trade and geopolitics have heightened concern for raw materials necessary for the aerospace industry, defence, communications, computing, medicine and clean energy.

“China has been a major supplier of these minerals but Canada has an opportunity to play a larger role in this marketplace as customers look for products made to high environmental standards,” MAC stated, pointing to its Towards Sustainable Mining program.

Among the survey’s findings:

  • 88% of respondents want Canada to increase its role in producing critical minerals for world markets

  • 86% want to encourage international investment in Canadian critical minerals and metals companies that are sustainability leaders

  • 83% want to encourage Canadian production of critical minerals to compete with China

  • 81% want to promote interest in Canadian critical minerals by drawing attention to Canada’s high standards of sustainability

MAC commissioned the online nationwide poll. Conducted between March 3 and 11, it surveyed 2,600 people weighted according to census data. Abacus gave the results a margin of error of plus or minus 1.92%, 19 times out of 20.

Canada is a top five country in global production of 15 minerals and metals, including several critical minerals essential to new technologies such as cobalt, copper, precious metals, nickel, uranium. We have the potential to expand in lithium, magnesium and rare earths.—Pierre Gratton, president/CEO,
Mining Association of Canada

“More than a decade of Canadian leadership in responsible mining practices is giving us an additional edge, and we see more investors and customers examining how their suppliers approach environmental responsibility,” said MAC president/CEO Pierre Gratton. “The market is growing and Canada’s opportunity is clear.”

In January Canada and the U.S. announced their Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration, which the Canadian industry expects will attract investment and encourage further development of supply chains. The plan follows a number of American initiatives to reduce its dependence on rival countries, especially China.

MAC also pointed to the Canadian Minerals and Metals Plan, a federal-provincial effort intended to enhance competitiveness, innovation and native participation in mining.

“Canadians may not all have a detailed knowledge about the mining sector,” added Gratton, “but they can clearly spot the chance to leverage our advantages in terms of abundant resources and the high standards of responsibility that our industry is known for. They know that winning a bigger share of this growing market means more well-paying jobs and stronger communities.”

According to figures supplied by MAC, mining contributes $97 billion to national GDP and 19% of total domestic exports. Employing 626,000 people directly and indirectly, the industry is proportionally Canada’s largest private sector employer of natives and a major customer of native-owned businesses.

Mapped: The geology of the moon in astronomical detail

May 11th, 2020

by Nicholas LePan | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist

View the medium resolution version of this map (9 MB) | View the full resolution version (47 MB)

Mapped The geology of the moon in astronomical detail

View the medium resolution version of this map (9 MB) | View the full resolution version (47 MB)

 

If you were to land on the moon, where would you go?

This post shows the incredible Unified Geologic Map of the Moon from the U.S. Geological Survey, combining information from six regional lunar maps created during the Apollo era, as well as recent spacecraft observations.

Feet on the ground, head in the sky

Since the beginning of humankind, the moon has captured our collective imagination. It is one of the few celestial bodies visible to the naked eye from Earth. Over time different cultures wrapped the moon in their own myths. To the Egyptians it was the god Thoth, to the Greeks, the goddess Artemis, and to the Hindus, Chandra.

Thoth was portrayed as a wise counsellor who solved disputes and invented writing and the 365-day calendar. A headdress with a lunar disk sitting atop a crescent moon denoted Thoth as the arbiter of times and seasons.

Artemis was the twin sister of the sun god Apollo, and in Greek mythology she presided over childbirth, fertility and the hunt. Just like her brother who illuminated the day, she was referred to as the torch-bringer during the dark of night.

Chandra means “moon” in Sanskrit, Hindi and other Indian languages. According to one Hindu legend, Ganesha—an elephant-headed deity—was returning home on a full moon night after a feast. On the journey, a snake crossed his pathway, frightening his horse. An overstuffed Ganesha fell to the ground on his stomach, vomiting out his dinner. On observing this, Chandra laughed, causing Ganesha to lose his temper. He broke off one of his tusks and hurled it toward the moon, cursing him so that he would never be whole again. This legend explains the moon’s waxing and waning, as well as the big crater visible from Earth.

Such lunar myths have waned as technology has evolved, removing the mystery of the moon but also opening up scientific debate.

Celestial evolution: Two theories

The pockmarks on the moon can be easily seen from the earth’s surface with the naked eye, and have led to numerous theories as to the history of the moon. Recent scientific study brings forward two primary ideas.

One opinion of those who have studied the moon is that it was once a liquid mass, and that its craters represent widespread and prolonged volcanic activity, when the gases and lava of the heated interior exploded to the surface.

However, there is another explanation for these lunar craters. According to G.K. Gilbert of the USGS, the moon was formed by the joining of a ring of meteorites which once encircled the earth, and after the formation of the lunar sphere, the impact of meteors, not volcanic activity, produced “craters.”

Either way, mapping the current contours of the lunar landscape will guide future human missions to the moon by revealing regions that may be rich in useful resources or areas that need more detailed mapping to land a spacecraft safely.

Lay of the land: Reading the contours of the moon

This map is a 1:5,000,000-scale geologic map built from six separate digital maps. The goal was to create a resource for scientific research and analysis to support future geologic mapping efforts.

Mapping purposes divide the moon into the near side and far side. The far side of the moon is the side that always faces away from the earth, while the near side faces towards the earth.

The most visible topographic feature is the giant far side South Pole-Aitken Basin, which possesses the lowest elevations of the moon. The highest elevations are found just to the northeast of this basin. Other large-impact basins, such as the Maria Imbrium, Serenitatis, Crisium, Smythii and Orientale, also have low elevations and elevated rims.

Mapped The geology of the moon in astronomical detail

 

The colours on the map help define regional features while also highlighting consistent patterns across the lunar surface. Each one of these regions hosts the potential for resources.

Lunar resources

Only further study will resolve the evolution of the moon, but it is clear that there are resources earthlings can exploit. Hydrogen, oxygen, silicon, iron, magnesium, calcium, aluminum, manganese and titanium are some of the metals and minerals on the moon.

Interestingly, oxygen is the most abundant element on the moon. It’s a primary component found in rocks, and this oxygen can be converted to a breathable gas with current technology. A more practical question would be how to best power this process.

Lunar soil would be relatively easy to mine. As material for construction, it can provide protection from radiation and meteoroids. Ice can provide water for radiation shielding, life support, oxygen and rocket propellant feedstock. Compounds from permanently shadowed craters could provide methane, ammonia, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide.

This is just the beginning—as more missions are sent to the moon, there is more to discover.

Space-faring humans

NASA plans to land astronauts—one female, one male—to the moon by 2024 as part of the Artemis 3 mission, and after that, about once each year. It’s the beginning of an unfulfilled promise to make humans a space-faring civilization.

The moon is just the beginning. The skills learned to map near-Earth objects will be the foundation for further exploration and discovery of the universe.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

See USGS unveils comprehensive moon map amid lunar controversy.

Canada and U.S. formalize action plan for critical minerals deposits and supply chains

January 10th, 2020

by Greg Klein | January 10, 2020

A new commitment binds two neighbouring allies to produce resources essential to the economy, defence, technology and clean energy. Announced January 9, the Canada-U.S. Joint Action Plan on Critical Minerals Collaboration reflects both Canada’s mining potential and American concern about reliance on rival and potentially hostile countries.

Canada and U.S. formalize action plan for critical minerals deposits and supply chains

“Canada is an important supplier of 13 of the 35 minerals that the U.S. has identified as critical to economic and national security,” stated the Natural Resources Canada announcement. “We have the potential to become a reliable source of other critical minerals including rare earth elements, key components in many electronic devices that we use in our daily lives. Canada is currently the largest supplier of potash, indium, aluminum and tellurium to the U.S. and the second-largest supplier of niobium, tungsten and magnesium. Canada also supplies roughly one-quarter of the uranium needs of the U.S. and has been a reliable partner to the U.S. in this commodity for over 75 years.”

Among goals of the action plan are joint initiatives in R&D, supply chain modelling and increased support for industry, NRCan added. Experts from both countries will meet in the coming weeks.

Reflecting Washington’s concern, in 2017 the U.S. Geological Survey released the country’s first thorough study of critical minerals since 1973. Later that year President Donald Trump ordered a federal strategy that initially focused on 23 essential minerals. In 2018 the U.S. officially declared 35 minerals to be critical and at risk of supply disruption.

Since then, discussions have taken place between Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, along with other representatives from both countries.

By finalizing the collaboration agreement, “we are advancing secure access to the critical minerals that are key to our economic growth and security—including uranium and rare earth elements—while bolstering our competitiveness in global markets and creating jobs for Canadians,” said Canadian Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan.

Read more about the U.S. critical minerals strategy.

Read about the U.S. list of 35 critical minerals.

Belmont Resources teams up with MGX Minerals to resume Nevada lithium drilling

July 13th, 2018

by Greg Klein | July 13, 2018

With an option agreement now in place, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA gains a new partner and new money for the Kibby Basin lithium property, 65 kilometres north of Nevada’s Clayton Valley. The deal allows MGX Minerals CSE:XMG to earn an initial 25% interest in the 2,760-hectare property by spending up to $300,000. Work would include a deep test hole on a geophysical anomaly found earlier this year. Should that program meet success, MGX may increase its stake to 50% with up to $300,000 in further expenditures and drilling a second deep test hole. The company would then become operator of a 50/50 joint venture.

Belmont Resources teams up with MGX Minerals to resume Nevada lithium drilling

Ready to get boots on the ground soon, the Kibby Basin
crew will test a geophysical anomaly found earlier this year.

An initial drill program last year consisted of two holes totalling 624 metres. Core samples graded between 70 ppm and 200 ppm Li2O, with 13 of 25 samples exceeding 100 ppm. This year’s program of deep-sensing magnetotelluric geophysics identified a conductive zone that starts at about 500 metres in depth.

Should the JV come into fruition, other potential duties for MGX could include additional exploration, operating a test well, and installing and operating a pilot plant. MGX’s wide range of assets includes a proprietary process to recover lithium, magnesium and other minerals from a variety of brines. The JV would gain access to the process and would also market any lithium or other commodities potentially produced.

“This agreement puts Belmont on secure footing with regard to funding the next stage of evaluation of the Kibby property and, at the same time, enables us to get a significant leg-up on lithium production by partnering with one of the leaders in extraction technology,” commented Belmont CEO James Place.

MGX will also invest $200,000 in a Belmont private placement. In April the latter company closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $198,000.

Belmont’s portfolio also includes the Mid-Corner/Johnson Croft property in New Brunswick, where historic, non-43-101 sampling suggests zinc, copper and cobalt potential. Additionally the company shares a 50/50 interest with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT in two Saskatchewan uranium properties.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Belmont CFO/director Gary Musil.

Equitorial Exploration releases NWT lithium channel sampling results

September 6th, 2016

by Greg Klein | September 6, 2016

Having acquired the Li lithium project in July, Equitorial Exploration TSXV:EXX announced results from the 2016 field program on September 6. Located just east of the Yukon border and 30 kilometres from the Northwest Territories’ former Cantung tungsten mine, the property hosts the Little Nahanni pegmatite group.

“Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatite dyke swarms on the Li property have been traced over a combined length of 13 kilometres in mountainous terrain that is deeply incised by several east- or west-facing cirques,” the company stated. The following highlights came from 81 channel samples up to 52.6 metres wide from dyke swarms called Prison Wall, Berlin Wall and Great Wall of China:

Equitorial Exploration releases NWT lithium channel sampling results

Prison Wall

  • 1.57% Li2O, 250.3 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.95% SnO2 over 1.7 metres

  • 2.33% Li2O, 59 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.05% SnO2 over 1.2 metres

Berlin Wall

  • 2.04% Li2O, 57.8 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.5% SnO2 over 4 metres

  • 3.1% Li2O, 53.6 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.03% SnO2 over 0.95 metres

Great Wall of China

  • 1.67% Li2O, 41.4 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.03% SnO2 over 3.75 metres

  • 1.83% Li2O, 67.3 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.05% SnO2 over 1.25 metres

  • 1.63% Li2O, 52.9 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.01% SnO2 over 5.15 metres

The dykes are “well exposed on cirque walls, but most of these areas are too steep to sample,” Equitorial added. “Fortunately, relatively continuous bedrock exposures are accessible at the base of cliffs on the north and south side of cirques.”

Dating back to 2002, the property’s best interval assayed 1.59% Li2O over 10 metres, but the 2016 program failed to relocate the dyke. Two drill holes from 2007 found 1.2% Li2O over 10.94 metres and 0.92% over 18.27 metres. Rock samples have graded as high as 3.77%, 3.55%, 2.05%, 1.79%, 1.77% and 1.74% Li2O.

The Li property acquisition costs Equitorial 7.5 million shares, 2.5 million warrants, $100,000 towards the 2016 program and a 2% NSR.

In May Equitorial acquired the right to enter a JV with Mag One Products CSE:MDD to fund the construction of Mag One’s extraction facility for lithium and related products. Equitorial also holds the right to JV with Mag One on construction of production facilities for magnesium metal and products.

Exploring opportunity

June 17th, 2016

A capacity crowd attends the first annual Vancouver Commodity Forum

by Greg Klein
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A capacity crowd attends the first annual Vancouver Commodity Forum

 

“There’s excitement in the air,” said Cambridge House International founder Joe Martin. That’s the mood he senses as junior explorers emerge from the downturn. And certainly optimism was evident on June 14 as more than 450 people converged on the Vancouver Commodity Forum for an afternoon of expert talks amid a showcase of two dozen companies. Keynote speakers included Martin, Chris Berry of the Disruptive Discoveries Journal, Jon Hykawy of Stormcrow Capital, John Kaiser of Kaiser Research Online and Stephan Bogner of Rockstone Research.

A capacity crowd attends the first annual Vancouver Commodity Forum

Lithium, not surprisingly, stood out as a commodity of interest. While cautioning against over-enthusiasm for the exploration rush, Berry and Hykawy each affirmed the need for juniors to find new sources of the metal. Cobalt and scandium featured prominently too, as did other commodities including what Kaiser called “the weird metals”—lesser known stuff that’s vital to our lives but threatened with security of supply.

Kaiser also noted he was addressing a crowd larger than his last PDAC audience, another indication that “we’ve turned the corner.”

Attendees also met and mingled with company reps. Potential investors learned about a wide gamut of projects aspiring to meet a growing demand for necessities, conveniences and luxuries.

Presented by Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC, the forum’s success will make it an annual event, said company president Dave Hodge. Berry emceed the conference, holding the unenviable task of “making sure Dave stays well-behaved.”

Read interviews with keynote speakers:

Meet the companies

Most companies were core holdings of Zimtu, a prospect generator that connects explorers with properties and also shares management, technical and financing expertise. Zimtu offers investors participation in a range of commodities and companies, including some at the pre-IPO stage.

After sampling high-grade lithium on its Hidden Lake project in the Northwest Territories earlier this month, 92 Resources TSXV:NTY plans to return in mid-July for a program of mapping, exposing spodumene-bearing pegmatite dykes, and channel sampling. The company closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $318,836 in April. Hidden Lake’s located near Highway 4, about 40 kilometres from Yellowknife and within the Yellowknife Pegmatite Belt.

With one of the Athabasca Basin’s largest and most prospective exploration portfolios, ALX Uranium TSXV:AL has a number of projects competing for flagship status. Among them is Hook-Carter, which covers extensions of three known conductive trends, one of them hosting the sensational discoveries of Fission Uranium TSX:FCU and NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE. ALX’s strategic partnership with Holystone Energy allows that company to invest up to $750,000 in ALX and retain the right to maintain its ownership level for three years. ALX closed a private placement first tranche of $255,000 last month, amid this year’s busy news flow from a number of the company’s active projects.

A capacity crowd attends the first annual Vancouver Commodity Forum

Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD boasts one of northern Canada’s largest 100%-held diamond exploration portfolios. Among the properties are the drill-ready Stein project in Nunavut and others in the Lac de Gras region that’s the world’s third-largest diamond producer by value. North Arrow Minerals TSXV:NAR holds an option to earn up to 55% of Arctic Star’s Redemption property.

Aurvista Gold TSXV:AVA considers its Douay property one of Quebec’s largest and last undeveloped gold projects. The Abitibi property has resources totalling 238,400 ounces of gold indicated and 2.75 million ounces inferred. Now, with $1.1 million raised last month, the company hopes to increase those numbers through a summer program including 4,000 metres of drilling. Douay’s 2014 PEA used a 5% discount rate to forecast a post-tax NPV of $16.6 million and a post-tax IRR of 40%.

Looking for lithium in Nevada, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA now has a geophysics crew en route to its Kibby Basin property, which the company believes could potentially host lithium-bearing brines in a similar geological setting to the Clayton Valley, about 65 kilometres south. Results from the gravity survey will help identify targets for direct push drilling and sampling.

A mineral perhaps overlooked in the effort to supply green technologies, zeolite has several environmental applications. Canadian Zeolite TSXV:CNZ holds two projects in southern British Columbia, Sun Group and Bromley Creek, the latter an active quarrying operation.

With a high-grade, near-surface rare earths deposit hosted in minerals that have proven processing, Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE takes its Ashram project in Quebec towards pre-feasibility. The relatively straightforward mineralogy contributes to steady progress in metallurgical studies. Commerce also holds southeastern B.C.’s Blue River tantalum-niobium deposit, which reached PEA in 2011 and a resource update in 2013.

Permitted for construction following a 2014 PEA, Copper North Mining’s (TSXV:COL) Carmacks copper-gold-silver project now undergoes revised PEA studies. The agenda calls for improved economics by creating a new leach and development plan for the south-central Yukon property. In central B.C. the company holds the Thor exploration property, 20 kilometres south of the historic Kemess mine.

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Vancouver Commodity Forum adds speakers: Gerald McCarvill, Jon Hykawy and Joe Martin

May 30th, 2016

by Greg Klein | May 30, 2016

Three more names bring additional expertise and insight to the June 14 Vancouver Commodity Forum. Prince Arthur Capital chairperson/CEO Gerald McCarvill, Stormcrow Capital president/director Jon Hykawy and Cambridge House International founder Joe Martin will address the conference at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Already booked are Chris Berry of the Disruptive Discoveries Journal, John Kaiser of Kaiser Research Online and Stephan Bogner of Rockstone Research.

Vancouver Commodity Forum adds speakers Gerald McCarvill, Jon Hykawy and Joe Martin

The speaker lineup grows as the June 14 Vancouver event approaches.

McCarvill’s 30-year CV includes conducting mining and energy projects globally, as well as private equity and finance transactions. Among other career highlights, he helped establish Repadre Capital, now IAMGOLD TSX:IMG, and Desert Sun Mining, later acquired by Yamana Gold TSX:YRI. McCarvill also helped develop and finance Consolidated Thompson Iron Ore from a $2-million entry valuation to its $4.9-billion sale to Cliffs Natural Resources NYSE:CLF.

An expert in areas such as lithium, rare earths, fluorspar and tin, Hykawy combines a 14-year Bay Street background with an MBA in marketing, along with post-doctoral work as a physicist with Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. His technical background also includes work on rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, as well as wind and solar energy.

Starting off in business journalism, Martin created BC Business magazine, then founded Cambridge House International to present some of the world’s largest mining/exploration conferences. He remains active in semi-retirement as a prominent advocate for investment regulatory reform.

The Vancouver Commodity Forum also features a range of companies pursuing lithium, uranium, rare earths, gold, nickel, copper, diamonds, jade, scandium, zeolite, magnesium and potash. Click here for free registration.

Interview: Chris Berry discusses the lithium boom.

June 14 Vancouver Commodity Forum showcases explorers and expert speakers

May 11th, 2016
June 14 Vancouver Commodity Forum showcases explorers and expert speakers

Mineral explorers and expert analysts will meet and mingle
with attendees at the June 14 Vancouver Commodity Forum.

If you have your ear to the ground and eyes on the street you might notice a more positive mood in the market lately, suggesting a retreating bear or even an approaching bull. Whether that comes to pass remains to be seen. But one opportunity to better assess the situation happens on June 14 at the Vancouver Commodity Forum.

Presented by Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC, the one-day event features expert speakers as well as a range of companies pursuing lithium, uranium, rare earths, gold, nickel, copper, diamonds, jade, scandium, zeolite, magnesium and potash, among other commodities.

Insight and analysis will come from keynote speakers including Chris Berry of the Disruptive Discoveries Journal, John Kaiser of Kaiser Research Online, Stephan Bogner of Rockstone Research and others to be announced.

The Vancouver Commodity Forum takes place June 14 at the downtown Hyatt Regency Hotel. Watch for further details about presenters, registration and additional speakers.

Chris Berry takes a closer look at magnesium

August 10th, 2015

by Greg Klein | August 10, 2015

Magnesium, one of the overlooked industrial minerals that play a crucial role in our society, comes under scrutiny by Chris Berry in a new 10-page report. The metal’s uses range from alloys, fertilizer, refractories and flame retardants to water purification. A typical car, for example, contains roughly 10 to 12 pounds of magnesium. According to a report jointly issued by GM, Ford and Chrysler, estimates suggest that “by 2020, 250 pounds of magnesium will replace 500 pounds of steel, and 90 pounds of magnesium will replace 130 pounds of aluminum per vehicle, resulting in an overall 15% weight reduction.”

China produces about 70% to 80% of global supply, thanks to lax environmental standards, plentiful labour and cheap coal. But “while overall supply may not be an issue, security of supply is likely a better lens with which to view the magnesium market,” Berry writes.

Presenting a clear, balanced overview, Berry’s report sheds light on a little-known but essential commodity.

Download the 10-page report.