Sunday 21st April 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘lithium’

Ximen Mining expands its presence in British Columbia’s Greenwood camp

April 5th, 2019

by Greg Klein | April 5, 2019

A former mining region about 500 highway kilometres east of Vancouver continues to attract interest as another company picks up additional property. Through a combination of purchase and staking, Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM acquired over 12,900 hectares surrounding its Gold Drop project, now optioned to GGX Gold TSXV:GGX.

Last year’s drilling at Gold Drop returned near-surface, high-grade intervals of gold and silver along with tellurium, classified by the U.S. government as a critical mineral. Some highlight assays include:

Ximen Mining expands its presence in British Columbia’s Greenwood camp

A quartz sample from Ximen’s recent site
visit brought 2.87 g/t gold and 127 g/t silver.

Hole COD18-67

  • 129.1 g/t gold, 1,154.9 g/t silver and 823.4 g/t tellurium over 7.28 metres, starting at 23.19 metres in downhole depth

COD18-70

  • 107.5 g/t gold, 880 g/t silver and 640.5 g/t tellurium over 6.9 metres, starting at 22.57 metres

True widths were unavailable. The operator has spring drilling scheduled to begin this month.

Ximen’s new Providence claim also borders Grizzly Discoveries’ (TSXV:GZD) Greenwood project, where Kinross Gold TSX:K subsidiary KG Exploration works towards a 75% earn-in. Other companies active in the Greenwood area include Quebec niobium-tantalum explorer Saville Resources TSXV:SRE, which this week announced sampling found high-grade gold and copper along with silver on its Bud project. Last week Nevada lithium explorer Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA announced its acquisition of the Greenwood-area Pathfinder project. Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM has been working a number of properties in the area, home to numerous former mines.

Ximen Mining expands its presence in British Columbia’s Greenwood camp

An historic pit yielded this sample
of copper-rich massive sulphide.

Among those within or bordering Ximen’s acquisition is the Providence mine, which produced 10,426 tonnes containing 183 kilograms of gold, 42,552 kilograms of silver, 183 tonnes of lead and 118 tonnes of zinc during intermittent operation between 1893 and 1973, according to historic reports. The historic Combination deposit gave up 11 tonnes for 60,340 grams of silver and 653 grams of gold. Ximen’s new claims cover 11 known mineral occurrences, the company stated.

Recent sampling returned 2.87 g/t gold and 127 g/t silver from a mine dump northeast of the former Providence operation. Another sample showed 2,350 ppm copper from one of the property’s undocumented exploration pits that show exposed massive sulphides containing chalcopyrite, bornite and magnetite.

In southern B.C.’s Okanagan region, Ximen also holds the Brett gold project. In November the company announced that metallurgical tests on material stockpiled in the 1990s during early-stage mine development support an historic account of 4 g/t to 5 g/t gold.

About three and a half hours’ driving distance from Vancouver, Ximen has its Treasure Mountain property under option to New Destiny Mining TSXV:NED. Grab samples collected last year included 11.3 g/t and 8.81 g/t gold, as well as samples showing up to 1.45% zinc, 122 g/t silver, 0.87 g/t gold, 57 g/t tellurium and 12.3 g/t indium.

Ximen closed private placements of $540,000 in December and $250,000 in February. Last month the company arranged a private placement of $405,000 subject to TSXV approval.

Read more about Ximen Mining.

Belmont Resources/MGX Minerals receive “milestone” water rights permit, await assays from Nevada lithium project

March 21st, 2019

by Greg Klein | March 21, 2019

Considered a milestone for two companies pursuing lithium, a recently granted water rights permit might be the first of its kind for Nevada. Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA and MGX Minerals CSE:XMG received the permit to extract up to 943.6 million U.S. gallons of water annually from the Monte Cristo Groundwater Basin for brine processing and potential production of lithium compounds on their Kibby Basin property. Some 91% of the water will be returned to the source through injection wells or infiltration galleries, the companies stated.

Belmont Resources/MGX Minerals receive “milestone” water rights permit, await assays from Nevada lithium project

Assays are pending from winter drilling
on the Belmont/MGX Kibby Basin project.

The news follows a winter drill campaign that reached 256 metres into lakebed sediments in hole KB-4, testing a potential fault where geophysical and geological analysis suggests geothermal activity might have brought concentrations of dissolved minerals close to surface.

The team currently has logging and sample preparation from drill cuttings underway, as well as water sampling from a layer near the bottom of the hole. Assays will follow.

Some 2,300 metres southwest of KB-4, KB-3 produced results averaging 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres, reaching a high of 580 ppm.

Having spent $300,000 so far, MGX has earned 25% of the project and may increase its interest to 50% with another $300,000 of work. The 2,056-hectare Kibby Basin property sits 65 kilometres north of Albemarle’s (NYSE:ALB) Silver Peak mine, North American’s only lithium producer.

In northern Saskatchewan, Belmont has a 50% stake in two uranium properties, with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT holding the remainder.

Subject to exchange approval, Belmont expects to close a private placement first tranche of $67,500. In July the company closed a private placement totalling $375,000.

Infographic: Climate Smart Mining and minerals for climate action

March 14th, 2019

sponsored by the World Bank | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | March 14, 2019

Climate Smart Mining Minerals for climate action

 

Countries are taking steps to decarbonize their economies by using wind, solar and battery technologies, with an end goal of reducing carbon-emitting fossil fuels from the energy mix.

But this global energy transition also has a trade-off: to cut emissions, more minerals are needed.

Therefore, in order for the transition to renewables to be meaningful and to achieve significant reductions in the Earth’s carbon footprint, mining will have to better mitigate its own environmental and social impacts.

Advocates for renewable technology are not walking blindly into a new energy paradigm without understanding these impacts. A policy and regulatory framework can help governments meet their targets, and mitigate and manage the impacts of the next wave of mineral demand to help the communities most affected by mining.

This infographic comes from the World Bank and it highlights this energy transition, how it will create demand for minerals and also the Climate Smart Mining building blocks.

Renewable power and mineral demand

In 2017, the World Bank published The Growing Role of Minerals and Metals for a Low Carbon Future, which concluded that to build a lower carbon future there will be a substantial increase in demand for several key minerals and metals to manufacture clean energy technologies.

Wind
Wind power technology has drastically improved its energy output. By 2025, a 300-metre-tall wind turbine could produce about 13 to 15 MW, enough to power a small town. With increased size and energy output comes increased material demand.

A single 3 MW turbine requires:

  • 4.7 tons of copper

  • 335 tons of steel

  • 1,200 tons of concrete

  • 2 tons of rare earth elements

  • 3 tons of aluminum

Solar
In 2017 global renewable capacity was 178 GW, of which 54.5% was solar photo-voltaic technology (PV). By 2023, it’s expected that this capacity will increase to one terawatt with PV accounting for 57.5% of the mix. PV cells require polymers, aluminum, silicon, glass, silver and tin.

Batteries
Everything from your home, your vehicle and your everyday devices will require battery technology to keep them powered and your life on the move.

Lithium, cobalt and nickel are at the centre of battery technology that will see the greatest explosion in demand in the coming energy transition.

Top five minerals for energy technologies

Add it all up, and these new sources of demand will translate into a need for more minerals:

 

  2017 production 2050 demand from energy technology Percentage change (%)
Lithium 43 KT 415 KT 965%
Cobalt 110 KT 644 KT 585%
Graphite 1200 KT 4590 KT 383%
Indium 0.72 KT 1.73 KT 241%
Vanadium 80 KT 138 KT 173%

 

Minimizing mining’s impact with Climate Smart Mining

The World Bank’s Climate Smart Mining (CSM) supports the sustainable extraction and processing of minerals and metals to secure supply for clean energy technologies, while also minimizing the environmental and climate footprints throughout the value chain.

The World Bank has established four building blocks for Climate Smart Mining:

  • Climate change mitigation

  • Climate change adaptation

  • Reducing material impacts

  • Creating market opportunities

Given the foresight into the pending energy revolution, a coordinated global effort early on could give nations a greater chance to mitigate the impacts of mining, avoid haphazard mineral development and contribute to the improvement of living standards in mineral-rich countries.

The World Bank works closely with the United Nations to ensure that Climate Smart Mining policies will support the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

A sustainable future

The potential is there for a low carbon economy, but it’s going to require a concerted global effort and sound policies to help guide responsible mineral development.

The mining industry can deliver the minerals for climate action.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Update: Belmont Resources/MGX Minerals resume drilling Nevada lithium target

March 1st, 2019

Update: On March 1 Belmont Resources announced drilling had restarted after “highly unusual” weather had delayed the program. “Belmont expects that the drilling will proceed with no further delays,” the company stated.

 

by Greg Klein | December 18, 2018

Encouraged by their last round of lithium assays, these two companies aren’t waiting for the post-Christmas season to reactivate the rig. With a new program now underway at the Kibby Basin project in Nevada, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA and MGX Minerals CSE:XMG focus on an area 2,300 metres northeast of hole KB-3, where previous results averaged 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres, reaching a high of 580 ppm.

Belmont Resources/MGX Minerals resume drilling Nevada lithium target

Previous drill results have Belmont and
MGX optimistic about the current program.

The team expects KB-4 to reach an initial depth of 300 metres into lakebed sediments, focusing on the centre of a gravity low interpreted as a potential fault. Geophysical and geological analysis suggests potential geothermal activity might have brought concentrations of dissolved minerals close to the surface, the companies stated.

Belmont also announced the appointment of two new directors. Karim Rayani has 14 years’ experience providing consulting and investment banking services to junior mining, bio-medical and technology sectors. Over the last four years he has helped raise more than $45 million for public and private companies.

As CEO/director of MGX, Jared Lazerson built a company with exploration properties in four countries and industrial technology subsidiaries including rapid lithium extraction and battery mass storage. MGX holds four million Belmont shares, four million two-year warrants and the right to acquire up to 10 million additional shares.

Under an option with Belmont signed in July, MGX has earned an initial 25% interest in Kibby Basin by spending $300,000. An additional $300,000 by year-end would make the company operator of a 50/50 joint venture.

The companies interpret the 2,056-hectare property’s geology to hold similarities with Nevada’s lithium-rich Clayton Valley, 65 kilometres south.

Belmont also holds a 50% stake in two Saskatchewan uranium properties, with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT holding the remainder.

Last July Belmont closed a private placement totalling $375,000.

92 Resources plans 2019 advancement of Canadian energy metals projects

January 22nd, 2019

by Greg Klein | January 22, 2019

With a portfolio that features lithium projects in Quebec along with vanadium and frac sand properties in British Columbia, 92 Resources TSXV:NTY now has its new year agenda in preparation. Taking precedence will be the FCI claims, a recent acquisition that enhances the company’s adjacent Corvette lithium project in Quebec’s James Bay region.

92 Resources plans 2019 advancement of Canadian energy metals projects

High-grade channel sampling has brought
Corvette’s CV1 pegmatite to the drill-ready stage.

Under a 75% earn-in, 92 has a year one spending commitment of $250,000 on FCI. The company has been reviewing historic data while working with operator Osisko Mining TSX:OSK to plan a surface program for the spring and summer. Following that will be a new field campaign at Corvette to precede the first-ever drill program on the two bordering properties.

Encouraging developments from Corvette last year include channel sampling on the CV1 pegmatite that revealed lithium grading as high as 2.28% Li2O over 6 metres and 1.54% over 8 metres, along with tantalum results. The team discovered two more spodumene-bearing pegmatites that suggest a potentially large mineralizing system along strike and at depth, 92 reported. A substantial staking expansion to Corvette along with the FCI earn-in covers about 15 kilometres of potential strike.

Looking at other possible sources of Quebec lithium, 92 also has field programs planned for the Pontax, Eastman and Lac du Beryl properties. Pontax grab samples have graded up to 0.94% Li2O and 520 ppm Ta2O5.

Additionally, the 2019 agenda calls for surface sampling on the Silver Sands vanadium prospect acquired in B.C. last November. The property features regionally mapped rock units that potentially host vanadium-bearing horizons.

Last year 92 filed a 43-101 technical report for its Golden frac sand project in southern B.C., adjacent to Northern Silica’s high-grade Moberly silica mine.

In the Northwest Territories, 92 holds an interest in the Hidden Lake lithium project, the subject of a maiden drill program last year by Far Resources CSE:FAT. The latter company has completed 60% of a 90% earn-in from 92.

92 closed a private placement of $618,000 in late December.

Read more about 92 Resources.

‘The great enabler’

January 16th, 2019

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

by Greg Klein

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

 

Gold and precious metals can attract people seeking wealth or beauty, while diamonds and other gems convey an intrigue of their own. But who becomes downright passionate about a base metal? To those who’ve head him talk, Gianni Kovacevic quickly comes to mind. Copper’s his metal of interest but his real fascination is the future—that, and a vision of the importance this metal holds to a new era of energy history.

Chairperson of CopperBank Resources CSE:CBK, an authority on energy systems and author of My Electrician Drives a Porsche?, he’s an especially engaging public speaker who’s possibly more effective than anyone in communicating mining’s importance to non-mining people.

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

The era of electrification offers promise to both
developed and emerging economies, says Kovacevic.

But those in the industry find his message captivating too. He calls mining, metals and especially copper “the great enabler” of electrification. And electrification’s the key to a new era in which copper usage will grow by magnitudes, he declares.

That’s happening already as developed countries wean themselves off fossil fuels and emerging countries use more and more electricity for consumer items and transportation or—from village to village and home to home—as they adopt electricity for the first time.

Among other vital metals are aluminum, lithium, vanadium and cobalt. “I like anything that enables electrification,” Kovacevic explains. “The sensitive one is cobalt. If people are talking about reducing cobalt in batteries or eliminating it altogether, who wins? Nickel. But no question about it, we will require hundreds of millions, in fact billions, of new battery cells.”

Overall, approximately 19% of energy use now comes from electricity, he says. But he expects the number to reach about 50% by 2050. His data for current and planned copper production, however, shows alarming shortfalls in capacity.

Half of the world’s primary copper production now comes from 25 mines. Just two countries, Peru and Chile, provide a combined 45%. One major copper mine, First Quantum Minerals’ (TSX:FM) Cobre Panama, has commissioning planned this year. Nothing else over 110,000 tonnes is expected until around 2022.

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

First Quantum’s Cobre Panama will be the only
major new copper mine until about 2022, Kovacevic says.

In 2010 the 15 largest copper producers boasted average grades around 1.2%. The 2016 average was 0.72% and falling. Over the next half-century he expects average grades to slip below 0.5%.

Clearly more copper production will require much higher prices to make lower grades economic, Kovacevic emphasizes. He’s not alone in that outlook. Among others extolling the metal’s virtues is Robert Friedland, who also considers copper the key to electrification and maintains that declining grades will require higher prices.

Over the last nine months, however, prices haven’t co-operated. In late May spot copper approached a five-year high in the range of $3.30 a pound, but fell steeply after June 1. Current prices sit around $2.60 to $2.65, although that’s well above levels seen through most of 2015 and 2016. But Kovacevic says warehouse inventories suggest the market has reached a supply deficit.

Two decades of prices show an ironic connection with the commodity that fueled the previous energy era, he adds. “Copper’s never left its long-term bull market but it’s been pushed around by oil, because 90% of the time it’s correlated with oil. But now the prices have to decouple. Copper has to go much, much higher.”

Referring to himself as a “realistic environmentalist,” Kovacevic says the metals and mining crucial to the new energy era also remain crucial to emerging societies. Blocking new mines from development hinders new economies from development. “I can’t say to someone in India, for example, that they’re never going to have electricity or running water in their homes. You can’t say ‘build absolutely nothing anywhere near anyone.’ People want basic human progress. Fortunately, as we go into this new pivot of energy we’re going to bypass the old ways of receiving energy in many applications.”

Kovacevic expands on his message in an illustrated keynote speech and also hosts a lithium investment panel discussion at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference on January 20 and 21. To avoid the $30 admission fee, click here for free registration.

Visual Capitalist: The bull case for energy metals going into 2019

January 10th, 2019

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | January 10, 2019

 

The rapid emergence of the world’s renewable energy sector is helping set the stage for a commodity boom.

While oil has traditionally been the most interesting commodity to investors in the past, the green energy sector is reliant on the unique electrical and physical properties of many different metals to work optimally.

To build more renewable capacity and to store that energy efficiently, we will need to increase the available supply for these specific raw materials, or face higher costs for each material.

Metal bull cases

Ahead of Cambridge House’s annual Vancouver Resource Investment Conference on January 20 and 21, 2019, we thought it would be prudent to highlight the “bull case” for relevant metals as we start the year.

It’s important to recognize that the commodity market is often cyclical and dependent on a multitude of factors, and that these cases are not meant to be predictive in any sense.

In other words, the facts and arguments illustrated sum up what we think investors may see as the most compelling stories for these metals—but what actually happens in the market, especially in the short term, may be different.

Overarching trends

While we highlight 12 minerals ranging from copper to lithium, most of the raw materials in the infographic fit into four overarching, big-picture stories that will drive the future of green energy:

Solar and wind
The world hit 1 TW of wind and solar generation capacity in 2018. The second TW will be up and running by 2023, and will cost 46% less than the first.

Electric vehicles
Ownership of electric vehicles will increase 40 times in the next 13 years, reaching 125 million vehicles in 2030.

Energy storage
The global market for energy storage is rapidly growing, and will leap from $194 billion to $296 billion between 2017 and 2024.

Nuclear
150 nuclear reactors with a total gross capacity of about 160,000 MW are on order or planned, and about 300 more are proposed—mostly in Asia.

Which of these stories has the most potential as a catalyst for driving the entire sector?

Based on these narratives, and the individual bull cases above, which metal has the most individual potential?

Visit Visual Capitalist at Booth #1228 at #VRIC19.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Click here for free VRIC registration up to January 11.

Read more about the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference.

Mixed messages

December 14th, 2018

Perspectives differ on 2018 small cap performance

by Greg Klein

Perspectives differ on 2018 small cap performance

Not everyone agrees, but some sources represent 2018 as a comeback year for mining and exploration.
(Photo: PwC Junior Mine 2018)

 

It was the best of times, the worst of times or some middling but still promising times—you’d have the dickens of a time trying to reconcile these conflicting viewpoints. Such was the state of junior miners this past year, when varying fortunes eluded generalization. Just how the sector performed depended on who did the talking.

Outright despair came from Peter Clausi last October, as the CEO of GTA Resources and Mining TSXV:GTA discussed the company’s proposal to sell its assets amid a change of business:

A look at some different perspectives on 2018 small cap performance

In this difficult Canadian mining environment, it was almost impossible for the board not to come to this decision. The lackluster commodity markets, the depressed public market for junior explorers and the severe challenge of raising further capital all contributed to this decision. We believe GTA’s shareholders will be better served in a growth industry other than junior exploration.

Not every CEO would turn a press release into such a cri de coeur, but stats show GTA’s hardly alone. Evaluating 378 mining and other companies with market caps ranging from $4 million to $588 million, the S&P/TSX Venture Composite Index shows a nearly 35% drop in valuations since the relatively heady days of last January.

Yet an entirely different perspective came from PricewaterhouseCoopers in December, with the 2018 edition of its annual Junior Mine report. Unlike the S&P/TSXV Composite, this data focuses only on miners and comes from 12 months ending June 30. Furthermore it examines the Venture’s top 100 miners by market cap, a selection that could tilt results in favour of success.

And a degree of success PwC found, with the aggregate valuation growing to $12.9 billion, a 6% increase over the previous year, the third consecutive annual increase and the best performance “since the heydays of 2011.”

Not just the top 100, but Venture miners and explorers overall increased their total market caps by 5% to $21.1 billion, PwC reported.

Even so they were outperformed by cannabis, fintech and cryptocurrencies. “As a result, mining companies’ share of the TSXV’s total value declined to 43.8%, down from 47.4% a year earlier. Nevertheless, mining remains by far the dominant sector on the exchange, with life sciences (13%), finance (11%) and technology (9%) representing the next-largest industries by valuation.”

Investors favoured top 100 companies moving from development into production, while royalty streaming and the energy metals lithium, cobalt and nickel took on greater prominence at gold’s expense.

Financing for Venture miners overall rose 6.5% to $2.7 billion, almost $2.2 billion of that from equities that mostly went to explorers and development-stage companies, PwC stated. Companies in the production stage increasingly turned to debt financing, which rose 65.9% over the previous 12-month period.

Fifty-one of the top 100 raised more than $10 million apiece, while 10 companies each raked in over $50 million.

Apart from market caps and financings, spending provides another guide to the sector’s health. Some upbeat numbers came in October from Natural Resources Canada, following a survey of companies’ 2018 commitments for Canadian projects. If all went to plan, exploration expenditures for the year came to $2.36 billion, an 8% increase over 2017 and the highest amount since 2012. Juniors, struggling or not, accounted for over 45% of the total commitments.

With coffers at their fullest in seven years, equity and debt financings on the rise and commodity prices relatively stable, the industry has entered a long-awaited period of opportunity.—The PwC Junior Mine 2018 report

The exploration category included engineering, economic, feasibility and environmental studies, as well as general expenses. All that’s part of the much larger category of total Canadian mineral resource development investments, which totalled $11.86 billion this year, compared with $10.61 billion in 2017, NRCan found.

In fact Canada leads an encouraging global trend among juniors, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. Using different methodology, the group found budgets for nonferrous exploration leaping by 19% worldwide this year to hit $10.1 billion. Juniors showed the highest budget jump at 35%, their first increase since 2012.

Canadian companies lead the world in nonferrous exploration, boasting a 31% budget increase this year, leaving Australia and the U.S. in second and third place, S&P added.

Of course all that can sound like smiley-faced consolation to companies struggling with jurisdictional difficulties, commodity performance, investor negativity or other challenges. But in an industry not always shy about basking in reflected glory, the continuing success of some companies must offer reassurance to the sector as a whole.

Geologist Darren Smith discusses 92 Resources’ Corvette-FCI lithium project in Quebec

November 29th, 2018

…Read more

Belmont Resources readies the rig for more Nevada lithium drilling

November 22nd, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 22, 2018

Belmont Resources readies the rig for more Nevada lithium drilling

With positive assays from previous drilling,
Belmont Resources returns for another
campaign at Kibby Basin.

Following lithium results released earlier this month, Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) drill contractors return to the Kibby Basin project imminently for another attack. The target this time will be 2,300 metres northeast of hole KB-3, where the most recent assays showed an average 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres. Previous results for the same hole averaged 415 ppm over 30.5 metres.

The crew expects rotary drilling to spend a week sinking the next hole, KB-4, to an initial depth of about 366 metres. Downhole geophysics will identify layers to be sampled and deeper drilling may follow.

Work takes place on a magnetotelluric conductor found last February, which followed a gravity survey conducted in 2016.

The company interprets the 2,056-hectare project’s geology to hold similarities with Nevada’s lithium-producing Clayton Valley, 65 kilometres south.

Belmont also shares 50/50 ownership in two Saskatchewan uranium properties with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Belmont closed a private placement totalling $375,000 in July.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with CFO/director Gary Musil.