Monday 24th July 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘lithium’

Chemical engineer and Voltaic Minerals project manager Tom Currin comments on his research into selective extraction from lithium brines

July 21st, 2017

…Read more

Initial metallurgy looks positive for 92 Resources’ NWT lithium project

July 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 18, 2017

Encouraging metallurgical results have come early for 92 Resources’ (TSXV:NTY) Hidden Lake project. Preliminary beneficiation tests for the road-accessible Northwest Territories property suggest favourable liberation characteristics and “amenability to simple and conventional spodumene mineral processing methods,” the company announced July 18. The lab conducted five flotation tests on a composite sample from four pegmatites on the Northwest Territories project. A standard flowsheet was used.

Initial lithium metallurgy brings 92 Resources a 6.16% concentrate at 79% recovery for NWT project

Backed by encouraging lab work, 92 Resources reactivates
its Hidden Lake camp this summer for another field program.

Results brought a “high-grade” spodumene concentrate of 6.16% LiO2 at 79% recovery, with an average spodumene lithium content of 3.8% lithium (or about 8.2% LiO2), close to the maximum theoretical limit, 92 Resources stated.

A low iron content also suggests the high quality of Hidden Lake spodumene. In a further advantage to mineral processing, the company added, tests confirmed the property’s dominant mica to be muscovite with low levels of lithium. Muscovite with high lithium levels “would dilute the lithium content of a final concentrate, as typically the lithium content would be significantly less than that of spodumene.”

“This initial work demonstrates the high-lithium/low-iron nature of the spodumene at Hidden Lake, as well as its favourable upgrading characteristics, both of which are highly attractive attributes of the project,” said president/CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

Phase II beneficiation tests will include magnetic separation, heavy liquid separation and further flotation on material collected during the upcoming summer field program.

Channel sampling last year tested four of the property’s six known lithium-bearing spodumene dykes, bringing assays up to 1.58% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 8.78 metres.

In January the company filed a 43-101 technical report for Hidden Lake. The 1,659-hectare property has year-round road access to Yellowknife, about 40 kilometres southwest.

92 Resources also keeps busy with its Golden frac sand project in eastern British Columbia, adjacent to Heemskirk Canada’s Moberly silica mine. Last month’s 10-day field program at Golden will provide data for a 43-101 technical report.

In northern Quebec, 92 Resources also holds the 5,536-hectare Pontax River lithium project.

The company closed an oversubscribed $895,199 private placement in February and received a $140,000 award under the NWT Mining Incentive Program in June to offset Hidden Lake expenditures.

NRG Metals readies geophysics, drilling, 43-101 for new Argentina lithium project

July 13th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 13, 2017

A property optioned in June has a busy agenda scheduled as NRG Metals TSXV:NGZ prepares to explore its Hombre Muerto North project on an Argentinian salar that also hosts an FMC Corp NYSE:FMC lithium mine and Galaxy Resources’ advanced-stage Sal de Vida lithium-potash project. With drill permitting underway, NRG intends to begin with geophysics, followed by up to eight holes ranging from 150 to 200 metres in depth. Results might encourage the company to extend some holes down to 400 metres, with some larger-diameter holes for pumping tests.

NRG Metals readies geophysics, drilling, 43-101 for new Argentina lithium project

A newly commissioned 43-101 technical report
will assess previous surface sample results.

NRG also plans to build a pilot test pond to assess the brine’s evaporative conditions and chemical features.

A 43-101 technical report will be compiled by a Chilean company to verify previous samples and provide details of the upcoming drill program. Twenty surface samples taken in 2016 and 2017 brought non-43-101 results ranging from 48 milligrams lithium per litre to 1,064 mg/L, averaging 587 mg/L. Ratios of magnesium to lithium remained low by industry standards, averaging 4.6 to 1, the company added.

In addition to this 3,287-hectare project, NRG has drill permitting underway for its optioned 29,182-hectare Carachi Pampa property, also on the prolific Salar del Hombre Muerto.

Now leading exploration is NRG’s new director/COO, José de Castro. A chemical engineer with extensive lithium project experience, he headed Orocobre’s (TSX:ORL) Olaroz Salar lithium project from exploration to commercial production. He also supervised exploration of Argentina’s Salinas Grandes salar and developed a patent to produce battery-grade lithium carbonate.

One week before de Castro’s June appointment, Gordon Neal joined NRG’s board. Having served with several explorers, Neal has raised over $500 million for resource companies since 2004.

Update: Far Resources mobilizes for Manitoba lithium on finding more spodumene-bearing dykes

July 11th, 2017

(Update: On July 11 Far Resources announced a helicopter-supported field crew had mobilized to assess the newly found spodumene-bearing dykes, supplement historic data and build a 3D model prior to further drilling.)

by Greg Klein | July 4, 2017

Seeing further potential for its Zoro lithium project in Manitoba, Far Resources CSE:FAT reports additional spodumene-bearing dykes on the Snow Lake region property. A field program found the dykes in trenches, pits and outcrops between previously reported dykes 5 and 7, the company stated. “Accordingly, potential exists for new spodumene-bearing dykes adjacent to dykes 2, 3, 4 and 6 on the property and the area will become the focus of upcoming field work in 2017.”

Far Resources finds more spodumene-bearing dykes on its Manitoba lithium project

Chip sampling results released in May assayed from 1.46% to 6.35% Li2O for Dyke 5 and 1.35% to 2.91% for Dyke 7. Later that month results from a seven-hole, 1,088-metre stepout drill campaign on Dyke 1 showed intercepts up to 1.2% Li2O over 38.3 metres.

Site exploration and 3D modelling has been assisted by advice from Robert Linnen of the University of Western Ontario and Tania Martins of the Manitoba Geological Survey, two pegmatite scientists who accompanied the most recent field study.

In New Mexico, meanwhile, Far Resources last month closed its acquisition of the Winston gold project, where the company hopes to begin an initial program of six to eight holes to confirm historic results. “We have compiled two separate expert teams to advance these projects and, over the coming months, we will be making some strategic decisions on how best to advance both these projects to ensure each is managed to its best advantage,” said president/CEO Keith Anderson.

Berkwood Resources adds lithium to Quebec energy metals portfolio

July 11th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 11, 2017

Seeing lithium potential in the gold-laden Abitibi, Berkwood Resources TSXV:BKR announced a 3,064-hectare acquisition called the Delbreuil project on July 11. Located in a region known for lithium showings, the property features spodumene-hosting pegmatites and historic lithium assays.

Berkwood Resources adds lithium to Quebec energy metals portfolio

One historic, non-43-101 result from a pegmatite sample graded 1,290 ppm lithium and 126 ppm tantalum. Historic drilling also brought results for zinc, nickel, copper, silver and cobalt. Satellite imagery suggests multiple outcrops have high potential for hosting additional pegmatite intrusions, the company added.

Now being planned is Delbreuil’s first lithium-specific program, with Phase I field work to include prospecting, mapping and till sampling.

Subject to approvals, Berkwood gets the road-accessible project for 2.1 million shares and $15,000.

The property would complement Berkwood’s portfolio of energy metals projects in Quebec. Last month the company announced an agreement to acquire the Cobalt Ford property in the infrastructure-rich Côte-Nord region. Previous work on the 2,176-hectare property revealed three base metals showings as well as historic, non-43-101 samples of 904 ppm and 1,480 ppm cobalt.

Last year’s work on the company’s Lac Gueret South graphite project, meanwhile, produced grab samples from Zone 1 averaging 4.99% carbon-as-graphite within a range of 0.04% to 36.3% Cgr in the vicinity of large geophysical anomalies. The property’s located about three hours by road from the city of Baie-Comeau.

Nevada’s new-era fuel

July 7th, 2017

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

by Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel: I would like to introduce Gary Musil, CFO and director of Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA. Hi Gary, it is a pleasure to talk to you again.

Gary: Likewise, always a pleasure to talk to you.

Isabel: To get started, tell us a little bit about your background and how you got involved with Belmont Resources.

Gary: Belmont was a client of mine, and in 1992 they asked me to get more involved by joining the board of directors and later as a full-time chief financial officer in 1999.

Isabel: Belmont Resources has two different locations that you are involved with. Could you tell us a bit more about these two?

Gary: Belmont holds 50% interest in a large uranium land package (12,841 hectares) in the northern Athabasca Basin near Uranium City, Saskatchewan, Canada. Approximately $2 million was incurred on the claims from magnetic, radiometric, electromagnetic and radon gas surveys through to a successful 20-hole diamond drill program totalling 3,075 metres. The project is available for a joint venture partner or acquisition. Belmont’s current focus is on its 2,760-hectare Kibby Basin-Monte Cristo Valley, Nevada lithium project.

Isabel: So your focus is on the Kibby Basin lithium project. What makes that project so appealing?

Gary: The demand and price of lithium continues to increase as we move into a new era of electric vehicles and other technology that is requiring lithium. In addition, we are near the construction of a large facility, the Tesla Motors Gigafactory #1, near Sparks, Nevada, which will be a huge consumer of the end product. Secondly, expansion of a large electric bus factory in California to the south will also see increased consumption of lithium production for batteries. Furthermore, our Kibby Basin hosts several key features that are similar to the nearby and only operating lithium mine in North America, the area at Silver Peak-Clayton Valley, Nevada.

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

Lithium assays from last spring’s campaign have
Belmont Resources returning for additional geophysics and drilling.

Isabel: What is the most exciting thing about the Kibby Basin property up to now—what work have you accomplished there?

Gary: We commenced last year with all the baseline work, such as a NI 43-101 geological technical report, followed by a ground geophysical survey and then a detailed gravity survey to map the central basin. This generated a 3D model of the basin which provided the coverage to enhance the potential of the Kibby Basin to host a lithium-bearing brine structure.

The basin model revealed the basin to be in the order of 4,000 metres deep and approximately 7.4 kilometres long. In June Belmont drilled two diamond drill core holes, KB-1c to 548 feet [167 metres] on the eastern basin-bounding fault and KB-2c to a depth of 1,498 feet [457 metres] in the playa-dry lake bed, in the area.

The company was pleased with the core sample assays, to discover the presence of lithium ranging from 70 ppm to 200 ppm lithium with 13 of 25 core samples assaying over 100 ppm lithium, indicating that the sediments could be a potential source of lithium for the underlying aquifers.

Isabel: What are your experiences working in the U.S.A.? It is known that a lot of lithium comes from China and we’ve heard Donald Trump wants to “make America great again.” Has there been any changes in regard to working on a project that could produce lithium in the U.S.A.?

Gary: Belmont’s original mineral project, going back over 30 years ago, was a joint venture in a silver-producing mine in Nevada. We usually contract out work, i.e. geologists, geophysics work, surveys, drilling contractors, etc., to local reputable contractors. This saves costs and develops a good working relationship with the state and county officials. Any changes from the federal and state governments in regards to working on a project that could produce lithium in the U.S.A. should be positive for Belmont Resources. We anticipate governments could add incentives to mining exploration and producing companies to encourage them to expand the mineral resources and sell the end products to factories being built in Nevada, rather than importing lithium and other minerals from foreign countries.

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

Thirteen of 25 Kibby Basin core
samples surpassed 100 ppm lithium.

Isabel: What are the plans for the rest of 2017?

Gary: Belmont’s next stage of evaluation will consist of carrying out a further geophysical survey, i.e. electromagnetic resistivity survey and possibly seismic surveys, of the property, which should generate higher aquifer probability targets for further drilling this year.

Isabel: How much money do you have in the bank right now?

Gary: Belmont recently completed a four-million-unit private placement at $0.05 per share complete with a two-year transferable warrant (eight-cent warrant in year one and 10-cent warrant in year two) which generated $200,000. We will continue to raise further financing in order to continue exploration of the Kibby Basin throughout the year.

Isabel: How much of Belmont Resources is held by the management?

Gary: Belmont’s management currently owns 5.5% of the issued and outstanding shares and is increasing its position as demonstrated in participation in the recently completed private placements, as well as exercising of warrant and stock option shares. Including friends, relatives and close associates, these holdings increase to over 25%.

Isabel: What do you like about the mineral exploration business?

Gary: The anticipation of drilling results and then the discovery of minerals in a new area is always exciting. Also, travelling to new areas of the world and meeting new people there.

Isabel: What is your favourite commodity and why?

Gary: Belmont has explored for silver, antimony, gold, uranium, as well as oil and gas. Lithium will be my favourite for years to come, as I see the uses of this commodity expanding, as technology continues to develop and expand along with it.

Gary Musil sees Clayton Valley similarities in Belmont Resources’ Kibby Basin lithium project

Gary Musil, CFO/director
of Belmont Resources

Fun facts

Your hobbies: Golf, cycling, hiking

Sources of news you use: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) and CNN through TV and the Vancouver Sun/Financial Post newspapers

Your favourite airport: Vancouver International Airport and Phoenix, Arizona, as that usually means a golf vacation during the winter months

Your favourite tradeshow: Outdoor Recreation and Golf Show in Vancouver

Favourite commodity besides the ones in your company: Gold, especially placer gold

People you’d most like to have dinner with: Ha—Fred Couples, senior professional golfer; So Yeon Ryu, ladies’ professional golfer; Shania Twain, country music star; and of course having dinner with my wife in many new places in the world where we have been and not been to yet

If you could have a superpower, it would be: Healing

Visual Capitalist: How commodities performed in H1 and why they’re very cheap

July 5th, 2017

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | July 5, 2017

If you’re looking for action, the commodities sector has traditionally been a good place to find it.

With wild price swings, massive up-cycles, exciting resource discoveries and extreme weather events all playing into things, there’s rarely a dull day in the sector. That being said, it’s hard to remember a more lacklustre period for commodities than the last couple of years.

For commodity bulls, the good news is that the sector is no longer tanking. The bad news, however, is that all the recent action has been in relatively niche sectors, as metals like cobalt, zinc and lithium all have their day in the sun.

At the same time, the big commodities (gold, oil, copper) have all slid sideways, having yet to revisit their former periods of glory.

Commodity winners so far

Before we highlight why commodities could still be cheap, let’s look at recent performance to get some context. Here are the commodities that have positive returns in H1 2017 so far:

How commodities performed in H1 and why they’re very cheap

 

Palladium is the best performer in 2017 so far, and it has now almost passed platinum in price. That would be the first time since 2001 that this has happened, and for the stretch of 2007 to 2012 it was even true that palladium traded at a $1,000 deficit to platinum.

Agricultural goods like rough rice, lean hogs, oats and wheat have also gotten more expensive so far this year. Meanwhile, metals like gold, copper and silver have seen modest gains—but only after dismal performances in the last part of 2016.

The losers so far

Here is the scoreboard for the commodities in negative territory, with the most noticeable losses in sugar and energy.

How commodities performed in H1 and why they’re very cheap

 

Are commodities cheap?

From the post-crisis bottom in 2009 until today, the S&P 500 is up a staggering 215.4%.

During that same timeframe, most major commodities crashed and then went sideways. The Goldman Sachs Commodity Index (GSCI) is down roughly 31.2%, which is a strong juxtaposition to how equities have done.

This extreme divergence can be best seen in this long-term chart, which compares the two indices since 1971.

How commodities performed in H1 and why they’re very cheap

 

In other words: Despite the lack of action in commodities that we noted earlier, the sector has never been cheaper relative to equities, even going back 45 years.

That means that there could be some much-needed action soon.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Far Resources finds more spodumene-bearing dykes on its Manitoba lithium project

July 4th, 2017

This story has been updated and moved here.

Equitorial Exploration to drill for NWT lithium

June 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 28, 2017

The rig returns to a Northwest Territories hardrock lithium project for the first time in a decade as Equitorial Exploration TSXV:EXX heads to the field in July. About 30 kilometres from the former Cantung tungsten mine in the territory’s southwest, the Little Nahanni Pegmatite Group project will also undergo mapping, channel sampling and resampling of drill core from 2007 when two holes struck intervals of 1.2% Li2O over 10.94 metres and 0.92% over 18.27 metres.

Equitorial Exploration to drill for NWT lithium

Red paint marks a channel sample
interval from last year’s field work at LNPG.

Summer drilling will test the vertical extent of lithium-cesium-tantalum-type pegmatite dyke swarms now identified at about 300 metres in depth and 13 kilometres in strike. The dykes are well exposed on cirque walls of the mountainous terrain, the company stated.

Channel sampling last year brought assays up to 1.13% Li2O, 71.1 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.03% SnO2 over 10.35 metres. That included a sub-interval of 1.86% Li2O, 116.7 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.05% SnO2 over 6.3 metres.

Three specimen samples released in October brought results up to 2.85% Li2O, 28.1 g/t Ta2O5 and 0.05% SnO2.

Equitorial filed a 43-101 technical report on the LNPG project in March.

In Utah last May, the company staked another 1,092 hectares, expanding its Tule Valley lithium project to about 2,792 hectares. That gives Equitorial the entire Tule Valley Basin, which the company describes as a closed basin which could be similar to Nevada’s Clayton Valley. Equitorial also sees Clayton Valley similarities in the company’s Gerlach property in Nevada.

Visual Capitalist: How copper riches helped shape Chile’s economic story

June 21st, 2017

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | June 21, 2017

Although Chile has always been noted for its abundant mineral wealth, the country was actually not a notable copper producer even at the beginning of the 20th century.

In 1907, for example, the United States was able to produce nearly 14 times as much copper as Chile. The reality was that shortages in capital, organization and water kept the country’s massive, low-grade deposits from being developed at any significant scale.

The copper standard

Things would change dramatically for Chile. The country has been the world’s top copper producer now for over 30 years, and today close to 50% of the country’s exports come from copper-related products.

This infographic comes from Altiplano Minerals TSXV:APN and it tells the story of how Chile tapped into its copper wealth to become the richest and freest economy in Latin America.

 

How copper riches helped shape Chile’s economic story

 

New milling technology, economic reforms and increasing investment attractiveness were catalysts that turned Chile into a copper powerhouse. In turn, copper exports helped propel the Chilean economy to new heights.

“The miracle of Chile”

This incredible leap can be summed up aptly with two facts:

1) Copper production went from under one million tonnes per year (late 1970s) to over five million tonnes per year (2000s).

2) Despite this massive rise, copper as a percentage of exports fell. It went from a peak of 80% of exports to more like 50% today.

Over this time, as the economy diversified, Chilean GDP per capita (PPP) gained massive ground on the Latin American average and passed it in the early 1990s.

Chile’s GDP per capita today is the highest in Latin America of major economies:

 

  GDP per capita (2015, PPP)
Chile $24,170
Argentina $22,459
Mexico $18,370
Venezuela $17,430
Brazil $15,941
Colombia $14,164
Peru $12,639
Ecuador $11,839
Guatemala $7,704

 

That said, critics of Chile’s economy will point to its inequality. The country’s Gini Coefficient, according to the World Bank, is higher (less equal) than only a handful of Latin American and Caribbean economies: Panama, Belize, Haiti, Suriname, Honduras and Colombia.

Mining in Chile today

Today, Chile’s mines produce copper, gold, molybdenum, iron and silver. The country also produces more lithium than any country from its salars.

The country is the world’s undisputed copper heavyweight champion—it’s been the top producer for 30-plus years and holds an impressive seven of the world’s top 14 copper mines. The biggest mine, Escondida, produces over a million tonnes of the red metal each year, equal to 5% of the world’s annual copper supply.

The copper crown is likely to be held by Chile in the future, as well. According to the Chilean Copper Commission (Cochilco), between 2000 and 2015 about 35 copper deposits and three gold deposits were discovered in central-north Chile. They increased the country’s resources by 208.6 million tons of copper and 34.3 million ounces of gold.

The new copper discovered is roughly equal to 30% of global discoveries over the same time period.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.