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Posts tagged ‘Khan Resources Inc (KRI)’

Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 1st, 2015

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to May 1, 2015

by Greg Klein

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NexGen ends winter with outstanding step-outs, plans 2015 maiden resource

Following a season in which 44 of 46 holes at Rook 1’s Arrow zone found mineralization, the last one released by NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE showed the project’s highest total composite mineralization. That April 29 announcement followed an April 23 batch of results that included some of the zone’s strongest offscale radioactivity. Although lots of assays are still pending, drilling resumes in early June with five rigs expected to sink a total of 25,000 metres. The longer-term goal is a maiden resource by December.

Winter’s record-breaker was angled hole AR-15-45b, which drilled through A2 and A3, two of the zone’s three mineralized shears. It returned a composite 226 metres of mineralization distributed within a 468-metre section starting at 391 metres in downhole depth. Included was a composite 9.8 metres that went “offscale” between 10,000 and 54,000 counts per second.

The results come from a hand-held scintillometer that measures drill core radioactivity. Readings above 10,000 cps are considered offscale due to the limitations of earlier devices. These measurements don’t substitute for assays, which have yet to arrive.

Another radioactive announcement six days earlier heralded a substantial expansion to A2’s high-grade core, some of Arrow’s strongest off-scale measurements and semi-massive to massive pitchblende that would make a geologist’s mouth water. Currently marking Arrow’s southwestern border, hole AR-15-44b stepped out 76 metres southwest along strike from AR-14-30, which last October assayed 7.54% U3O8 over 63.5 metres.

AR-15-44b found a composite 190.7 metres within a 519-metre section, starting at 430.5 metres in depth. The results included an offscale composite of 40.45 metres.

Other highlights include:

  • AR-15-43a, with 92 composite metres within a 501.5-metre section, starting at 346 metres

  • AR-15-42a, with 68.9 composite metres within a 592.5-metre section starting at 142.5 metres

Arrow now covers 515 metres by 215 metres, with mineralization found vertically at depths between 100 metres and 920 metres. Still open in all directions and at depth, the zone boasts significant off-scale mineralization at both its southwestern and northeastern extents.

Beyond Arrow, NexGen’s winter season also resulted in Rook 1’s Bow discovery.

Athabasca Basin bought deals: Fission closes $20 million, Denison announces $15 million

April 29 proved a good day for uranium financings as the Basin’s two most prominent explorers announced substantial bought deals. Fission Uranium TSX:FCU completed a private placement of 13.34 million flow-through shares at $1.50 to bring in $20.01 million. Denison Mines TSX:DML announced an agreement to purchase 12 million flow-through shares at $1.25 for $15 million, an offer that’s expected to close around May 26.

Fission’s placement started at $15 million on April 1. Within hours the figure rose to $17.4 million. With the underwriters exercising their additional 15% option, the deal closed on $20.01 million. Earlier this month the company finished its winter program at Patterson Lake South, which strived to expand and upgrade the Triple R deposit and the R600W zone, as well as explore the PLS property farther afield.

Denison also wrapped up winter work earlier this month after sinking 61 holes totalling 30,400 metres on seven projects, most of them joint ventures. Summer plans call for about 34,000 metres on eight projects, focusing on the flagship Wheeler River project, which has a maiden resource for the Gryphon zone planned for December to complement the very high-grade Phoenix deposit three kilometres southeast. Denison holds 60% of the JV with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (30%) and JCU (Canada) Exploration (10%).

Also announced April 29, Cameco’s Q1 results showed $566 million in revenue, a 35% increase over the same period last year. Gross profit reached $129 million, a 19% increase. But a net loss attributable to shareholders sunk to $9 million, or $0.02 per share diluted, 107% below Q1 2014 performance. The company attributed blame “primarily due to higher mark-to-market losses on foreign exchange derivatives.”

In a more modest financing the following day, Kivalliq Energy TSXV:KIV closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling nearly $2.8 million. UEX Corp TSX:UEX offered a $2.5-million placement on April 21.

Phase I drilling finds U3O8 at Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project

Assays released May 1 show a promising start to Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) Star/Gibbon’s Creek project. As a result the company plans geophysics and drilling to complement last winter’s 14-hole, 2,550-metre program on the road-accessible property a few kilometres from the town of Stony Rapids, on the Basin’s north-central rim.

Among highlights from the project’s South trend was hole GC15-03, immediately below the sub-Athabasca unconformity, which showed:

  • 333.8 ppm U3O8 over 1.1 metres, starting at 106.8 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 0.13% over 0.23 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

The hole also revealed uranium enrichment, strong hydrothermal alteration and the pathfinder elements boron, cobalt and nickel between 106.8 and 133 metres in depth.

Additional anomalous uranium came from two holes north and south of GC15-03:

Phase I drilling finds U3O8 at Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project

Drill results show uranium enrichment, strong hydrothermal
alteration and pathfinder geochemistry for hole GC15-03.


  • 86.7 ppm over 1 metre, starting at 114.2 metres


  • 123.3 ppm over 2.1 metres, starting at 103.4 metres

GC15-02, collared near an historic hole that assayed 0.18% over 0.13 metres, showed:

  • 120.3 ppm over 1 metre, starting at 101 metres

At the South zone’s eastern end, GC15-10 returned “a strong illite clay alteration assemblage from the unconformity (80.9 metres) to 148 metres’ depth,” Lakeland stated. “This interval corresponds to a zone of strong ductile shearing and local brittle-ductile cataclastic brecciation.”

GC15-06 on the Centre zone tested an area with some of the Basin’s strongest land-based RadonEx measurements. “Highly anomalous geochemical pathfinders were noted throughout the hole, including a zone of uranium enrichment from approximately 41 metres to 109.5 metres in depth.”

The company now plans airborne electromagnetics on the project’s eastern margins, ground gravity at the South trend and additional RadonEx surveys. Further drilling around GC15-06 and the South trend will follow.

“Given the early stage of exploration at Gibbon’s Creek, results obtained from this first round of drilling are very encouraging,” said president Jonathan Armes. “The geochemical, clay and alteration results are suggestive of a nearby basement-hosted or unconformity-hosted uranium occurrence…. Lakeland will have multiple exploration programs ongoing in and around the Athabasca Basin this summer and fall, which should provide for an exciting year.”

With one of the Basin-region’s largest portfolios, Lakeland currently holds 32 properties totalling over 300,000 hectares. Among other drill-ready projects are Newnham Lake, east of Star/Gibbon’s, and Lazy Edward Bay on the Basin’s southern rim.

Last week the company appointed well-known geologist Jody Dahrouge to Lakeland’s board of directors. During his 25-year career he played a key role in Fission Energy’s acquisition of Waterbury Lake, Patterson Lake and Patterson Lake South. Waterbury Lake now hosts the J-zone discovery, while PLS holds the Triple R deposit.

Read more about Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 21st, 2015

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to March 20, 2015

by Greg Klein

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Step-outs renew Fission’s interest west of PLS resource

The zone’s five previous holes found disappointingly low grades but Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) most recent drilling brings new attention to R600W, 555 metres west of the Triple R deposit that surprised even some of the more optimistic Patterson Lake South-watchers. The most westerly of four PLS zones got five more holes this season, four showing mineralization in basement rock and three suggesting high grades over significant widths, the company announced March 18.

These results, no substitute for the still-pending assays, come from a scintillometer that measures drill core radiation in counts per second.

Hole PLS15-364, 570 metres west of Triple R, hit a composite total of 45.5 metres of mineralization over a 61-metre section starting at 107 metres in downhole depth. A composite 6.44 metres surpassed 10,000 cps, a level sometimes termed “offscale” due to the limitations of earlier scintillometers.

PLS15-352 revealed a continuous 56.5-metre intercept starting at 102.5 metres that included continuous “offscale” readings for 11.77 metres. PLS15-360 showed 25 continuous metres starting at 111 metres, while PLS15-364 gave up 40.5 continuous metres starting at 107 metres.

True widths weren’t available.

The angled holes have expanded the zone’s strike to 45 metres, a 50% increase that extends PLS’s potential strike from 2.24 to 2.25 kilometres. R600W’s lateral width extends up to about 30 metres. Results have “substantially increased our understanding of the geometry and tenure of the mineralization,” said Fission COO/chief geologist Ross McElroy.

While delineation continues at Triple R, R600W has more drilling to come.

Read more about the Triple R resource estimate.

See an historical timeline of the PLS discovery.

NexGen continues to find high grades at Rook 1’s Arrow zone

Its first two batches of winter assays once again have NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1 project vying for attention with Fission’s Patterson Lake South. On March 17 NexGen announced the project’s widest high-grade interval yet, hitting 70 metres of 2.2% U3O8. Two days later the company confirmed an 88-metre strike extension from AR-14-30, an outstanding hole released last October. The results come from Rook 1’s Arrow zone, defined last month as three mineralized shears named A1, A2 and A3.

The star hole from the first batch, AR-15-34b, was a 30-metre step-out from October’s AR-14-30, centrepiece of the A2 shear. Although the new hole’s other intercepts fell far short in grade and thickness, these intervals brought redemption, the first from A2, the second from A1:

  • 2.2% U3O8 over 70 metres, starting at 522 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 8.95% over 11 metres)

  • 0.12% over 32 metres, starting at 697 metres

As for some other highlights:


  • 0.26% over 12.5 metres, starting at 548.5 metres


  • 0.33% over 18.5 metres, starting at 394.5 metres

  • 0.49% over 12 metres, starting at 553.5 metres


  • 0.32% over 51 metres, starting at 167 metres

  • 0.1% over 61.5 metres, starting at 248 metres

True widths weren’t available. AR-14-36 was a vertical hole. The others were sunk at a dip of -70 or -75 degrees.

Assays for two angled holes released two days later inspired additional confidence in A2. Highlights show:


  • 2.46% over 16.5 metres, starting at 580.5 metres
  • (including 12.85% over 3 metres)

  • 0.34% over 13.5 metres, starting at 602 metres

  • 2.88% over 40 metres, starting at 621.5 metres
  • (including 4.92% over 22 metres)


  • 0.75% over 6 metres, starting at 664 metres

  • 0.9% over 32 metres, starting at 583.5 metres

Again, true widths weren’t provided. The latter hole confirms an 88-metre strike expansion southwest of AR-14-30, NexGen stated.

The Arrow zone covers about 515 metres by 215 metres with mineralization starting at about 100 metres in depth and now extending to 820 metres. The zone remains open in all directions and at depth.

NexGen has further drilling planned for the A2 shear as well as the newly discovered high-grade area within A3. At last count the season’s program had completed 38 holes, according to the March 19 press release, or 39, according to a February 24 statement. Roughly a third of the 18,000-metre winter agenda has been drilled.

Phase I drilling finds anomalous radioactivity at Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to March 20, 2015

The first round of drilling went radioactive at
Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK wrapped up a successful 14-hole, 2,550-metre winter program by reporting anomalous radioactivity at its Star/Gibbon’s Creek project on the Athabasca Basin’s northern rim. While assays are pending, initial results also reveal “alteration suggestive of a proximal basement-hosted or unconformity-hosted uranium occurrence,” said company president Jonathan Armes on March 12.

Six holes along a corridor about 1.5 to two kilometres long struck the unconformity at depths of less than 125 metres, finding either anomalous radioactivity, alteration or both. The results confirm the trend as a high-priority target.

Three other holes along a one-kilometre corridor near the head of the Gibbon’s Creek boulder field found the unconformity at depths of less than 110 metres, again intersecting either anomalous radioactivity, alteration or both and confirming another high-priority target.

The readings come from a downhole scintillometer and are no substitute for assays, which will follow. Lakeland attributes background radioactivity to readings of 10 to 100 cps. Results show these anomalous levels of at least 800 cps over 0.3 metres:

Hole GC15-01

  • An average 1,104 cps over 0.4 metres starting at 81.2 metres in downhole depth. The maximum level hit 1,379 cps.


  • An average 1,204 cps over 0.3 metres starting at 99 metres, with a maximum of 1,589 cps

  • An average 1,072 cps over 0.7 metres starting at 99.6 metres, with a maximum of 1,312 cps


  • An average 2,828 cps over 1 metre starting at 107.1 metres, with a maximum of 7,926 cps


  • An average 1,415 cps over 0.6 metres starting at 102.9 metres, with a maximum of 1,740 cps

True widths weren’t available. Along with the other anomalous results, hole GC15-03 is considered highly anomalous.

To further solidify targets, the project also underwent a 270-station ground gravity survey.

“During the coming weeks we will be in receipt of geochemical results for uranium and pathfinder elements such as boron, nickel, cobalt and arsenic,” Armes stated. “As with other historic uranium discoveries within the Athabasca Basin, each successful drill program helps guide the next towards the discovery of a new uranium occurrence.”

The road-accessible project sits a few kilometres from the town of Stony Rapids, with nearby infrastructure.

Lakeland also holds drill-ready projects at Newnham Lake, east of Star/Gibbon’s, and Lazy Edward Bay on the Basin’s southern rim. Late last month the company expanded its holdings to 32 properties totalling over 300,000 hectares, one of the largest portfolios in the Basin region.

As of March 12 Lakeland’s treasury held close to $3 million.

Read more about the Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

November 23rd, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 16 to 22, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Azincourt to acquire Peruvian company from Cameco and Vena for $2 million

So far best known for its 50% interest in the Patterson Lake North joint venture with Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU, Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ plans to acquire an advanced-stage uranium project in Peru. Under definitive share purchase agreements announced November 22, the $8.1-million market cap Athabasca Basin junior proposes to buy Minergia S.A.C. from 50/50 co-owners Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and Vena Resources TSX:VEM. As well as the 4,900-hectare Macusani project, Minergia comes with its younger sister, 9,600-hectare Muñani, both in southeastern Peru.

Subject to approvals, the deal would have Azincourt give Cameco and Vena $750,000 worth of shares and $250,000 each. Vena chairman/CEO Juan Vegarra would join Azincourt as an independent director. Azincourt would spend between $1.5 million and $2 million on the projects annually.

The deal would also allow Vena to buy Cameco’s portion of Azincourt shares for the purchase price plus 50% of any increase in the market price.

In a statement accompanying Vena’s announcement, Vegarra noted that Azincourt president/CEO Ted O’Connor is “the former director of Cameco’s corporate development group who was responsible for overseeing Cameco’s significant investment in Minergia.”

With over $12 million of work between 2007 and 2011, Macusani comes with an historic resource that was released in September 2011. Using a 0.009% cutoff, five of the property’s nine areas show:

  • measured: 10.39 million short tons averaging 0.025% for 5.69 million pounds uranium oxide (U3O8)

  • indicated: 34.16 million tons averaging 0.018% for 12.52 million pounds

  • inferred: 37.79 million tons averaging 0.02% for 17.42 million pounds

The project could offer low-cost open pit, acid heap leach potential, according to Azincourt.

As for Muñani, it shows uranium mineralization in sandstone and outcrops, has undergone airborne geophysics and ground prospecting, and has drill targets ready, Azincourt stated.

Although two years of depressed prices have pushed the projects into dormancy, Azincourt plans to complete community agreements and permitting prior to another drill program.

Vena also announced that Silvia Dedios has been named general manager following David Bent’s resignation. Walter Cuba becomes project manager to work with Azincourt on Minergia’s uranium assets.

Last June Vena dropped out of negotiations with a private Peruvian company to create a JV for three other Vena projects. In August the company settled $150,350 of debt for 1.64 million shares.

Azincourt and Fission update winter plans for Patterson Lake North

Back in the Basin, Azincourt and Fission updated their previously announced winter plans for Patterson Lake North on November 18. The program now includes a radon survey at Hodge Lake as well as further electromagnetic work and eight to 10 holes totalling 2,500 to 3,000 metres.

Initial results from a five-kilometre ground magnetotelluric survey over the northern part of an eight-kilometre VTEM conductive trend suggest it comprises a series of parallel west-dipping basement EM conductors, the JV stated. Further EM work will increase resolution and orient a resistivity survey scheduled for next summer. “Many structurally controlled high-grade uranium occurrences in the Athabasca Basin are related to hydrothermal alteration systems associated with basement EM conductors,” the companies emphasized. Drill targets will be refined by identifying an EM basement conductor with a resistivity low signature, especially when associated with a cross-cutting interpreted structural feature, the partners explained.

Diamond drilling is slated to begin in January, after the holes have been pre-collared with RC rigs.

Azincourt is earning a 50% interest in the 27,408-hectare project adjacent to Fission’s better-known project, the Patterson Lake South JV with Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW. Fission acts as operator on both projects.

Denison considers compulsory acquisition as Rockgate takeover now 86% complete

Delighted with “such overwhelming enthusiasm,” Denison Mines TSX:DML president/CEO Ron Hochstein announced on November 18 his company has so far nabbed 100.54 million shares for 86% control of Rockgate Capital TSX:RGT. In another extension to the offer—the final one, this time—Denison now says Rockgate laggards have until November 29 to throw in their lot with the victor.

If the company can get just 4% more of Rockgate’s total shares, Denison intends to acquire the rest through a compulsory acquisition. Otherwise the aggressive uranium miner/explorer will try an “amalgamation or other corporate reorganization” to part the hold-outs from their holdings. On October 30 Denison stated it was lowering the minimum tender condition from 90% to two-thirds of outstanding shares.

At that time directors of the two companies softened their positions considerably. Rockgate president/CEO Karl Kottmeier initially denounced the Denison offer as an “unsolicited opportunistic hostile takeover bid” which scuttled Rockgate’s proposed merger with Mega Uranium TSX:MGA. Rockgate’s board did, however, reluctantly recommend shareholder acceptance.

Read more here and here.

Read more about uranium merger-and-acquisition activity.

Read about Denison’s Q3 report.

Denison moves its people into Rockgate management/board positions

Rockgate’s changing of the guard, meanwhile, presages its takeover. The company announced five departures from its seven-person board on November 22. Gone are Doug Ford, Edward Ford, Allen Ambrose, Gord Neal and Phil Williams. Replacing them are Denison directors Ron Hochstein, Robert Dengler and Catherine Stefan, with William Rand becoming chairperson.

Rockgate’s Karl Kottmeier, Doug Ford and Kirk Gamely step down from management, although Kottmeier and Bryan Hyde will remain on Rockgate’s board to smooth the transition of its flagship Falea project in southwestern Mali, which was scheduled for pre-feasibility in early 2014. Denison’s Hochstein now becomes Rockgate president/CEO, David Cates CFO and Sheila Colman corporate secretary.

Denison has said that on acquiring Rockgate it will spin out its African assets to concentrate on the Athabasca Basin.

Mega Uranium closes Australian sale, gains 28% of Toro Energy

Undeterred by its Rockgate failure, Mega has now picked up 28% of an ASX-listed company with “one of the larger pre-development uranium projects worldwide.” That results from the completed sale of Mega’s Lake Maitland property in Western Australia to Toro Energy. In a deal valued at about AU$37 million last August, Mega gets about 28% of Toro shares and fills Toro board positions with Mega executive VP of corporate affairs Richard Patricio and executive VP for Australia Richard Homsany, the Toronto-listed company announced November 19.

Blue Sky drills Ivana project in Argentina, offers $500,000 private placement

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 16 to 22, 2013

Located in Argentina’s Rio Negro province, Blue Sky’s
Ivana project currently undergoes a 2,000-metre drill program.

Now underway at Blue Sky Uranium’s TSXV:BSK Ivana project in Argentina, a nine-hole, 2,000-metre drill campaign targets shallow, roll-front uranium mineralization to 400 metres in depth. Announced November 18, Phase I work also includes ground geophysics. The 71,300-hectare property has previously undergone airborne radiometrics, sampling, prospecting, mapping and trenching.

AREVA funds the work under an option to spend $2 million by December 31 on Blue Sky’s Argentinian properties. On completion, AREVA may fund an additional $3 million on one project, or $4 million combined on two projects, to earn a 51% interest by the end of 2017. In addition to the project in Rio Negro province, Blue Sky currently focuses on its Sierra Colonia property in central Chubut province.

The company also announced a private placement of 10 million units at $0.05 for $500,000. Each unit consists of one share and one transferable warrant exercisable at $0.10 for two years.

Ground gravity survey underway on Aldrin Resource’s Triple M

Announced by Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN on November 20, a ground gravity survey on the PLS-vicinity Triple M property intends to find extensively altered basement rocks associated with two bedrock conductive anomalies shown in last summer’s VTEM survey. Identified by anomalous gravity lows, extensively altered rocks are associated with strong uranium mineralization elsewhere in the region, the company stated. Triple M’s schedule calls for completion of the gravity survey by year-end.

The previous week Aldrin released initial radon results from 527 sample sites. The company also plans to buy the 49,275-hectare Virgin property around the Basin’s south-central edge.

Zadar Ventures acquires two more properties from Canterra Minerals

With two new acquisitions just south of the Basin’s southeastern rim, Zadar Ventures TSXV:ZAD has signed another definitive purchase agreement. The deal, announced November 20, has Zadar issuing 160,000 shares to Canterra Minerals TSXV:CTM and 170,000 to African Oil Corp in return for the 5,831-hectare Highrock and the 5,583-hectare Riverlake projects. Canterra retains a 2% NSR on both properties, of which Zadar may buy half for $1 million.

Both properties have seen historic EM surveys, soil sampling and drilling. Radioactive pitchblende pebbles found immediately west of Highrock might have originated on the property, Zadar stated. Highrock sits eight kilometres from Cameco’s former Key Lake mine.

Riverlake features a 1,200-metre by 600-metre soil anomaly with uranium values up to 0.0374% over three EM conductors with a combined strike of five kilometres, Zadar added. A hole drilled in 2008 found 63 metres of radioactivity five to 10 times the background level.

In September the company announced its acquisition of the 37,445-hectare Pasfield Lake property, also from Canterra. Earlier that month Zadar reported finding radioactive boulders on its PLS-vicinity PNE project.

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