Saturday 31st October 2020

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Posts tagged ‘IAMGOLD Corp (IMG)’

Maintaining essential service

April 14th, 2020

As Quebec mining resumes, Canadian companies make open-or-shut decisions

by Greg Klein | April 14, 2020

As Quebec mining resumes, Canadian companies make open-or-shut decisions

A COVID-19 outbreak put Impala’s Lac des Iles on lockdown.
(Photo: Impala Canada)

 

With additional health standards in place and encouraged by a surging gold price, Quebec miners have been given a back-to-work go-ahead. On lifting a three-week suspension, the province allowed ramp-up procedures to begin April 15. A ban on non-essential industrial activities, including mineral exploration, has been extended to May 4.

Mine restarts announced so far include Eldorado Gold’s (TSX:ELD) Lamaque mine, IAMGOLD’s (TSX:IMG) Westwood operation, Agnico Eagle Mines’ (TSX:AEM) LaRonde complex and Goldex mine, and the Agnico Eagle/Yamana Gold TSX:YRI Canadian Malartic JV.

Glencore stated it’s “analyzing options” to restart its Raglan nickel and Matagami zinc operations in Quebec.

As Quebec mining resumes, Canadian companies make open-or-shut decisions

Agnico Eagle and Yamana Gold were quick to announce
Canadian Malartic’s ramp-up. (Photo: Canadian Malartic JV)

New measures mandated by the government and its health and workplace standards agencies require physical distancing, additional protective equipment, health monitoring and enhanced sanitation. The new regimen also calls for additional training and in some cases longer stints in job site accommodations to reduce travel.

But market forces aggravated by the pandemic will keep Stornoway Diamond’s Renard mine on care and maintenance. Prior to the March 24 government-ordered suspensions, Renard operated only through the support of creditors.

“We will continue to monitor the market conditions for improvements which would allow for a restart of mining activities,” said Stornoway president/CEO Patrick Godin. The diamond industry has been hit by broken supply chains as well as plunging prices.

Also on April 14 McEwen Mining TSX:MUX announced restarts of its Black Fox mine in the Timmins camp, along with the San Jose operation in Argentina. Although the Ontario government exempted mining and exploration from its list of suspensions, the company paused Black Fox for two weeks while implementing new policies and procedures.

“Our miners and teams are overwhelmingly supportive of returning to work with the new safety measures,” the company stated.

In northwestern Ontario, Implats subsidiary Impala Canada suspended its Lac des Iles palladium mine on April 13 after learning that a worker tested positive for COVID-19. By April 14 the company announced seven confirmed cases connected with LDI. 

Impala told all employees to go into isolation until April 27, during which time they’d get a $100-a-day bonus on top of base pay for the entire month. The company also arranged free hotel rooms and meals during the isolation period.

As Quebec mining resumes, Canadian companies make open-or-shut decisions

McEwen Mining lifted the voluntary suspension
of its Black Fox operation. (Photo: McEwen Mining)

Industrial operations face numerous challenges in adapting to new health protocols. Last week the Globe and Mail reported concerns about conditions at Teck Resources’ (TSX:TECK.A/TSX:TECK.B) southeastern British Columbia coal operations.

A local resident “alleged that shortages of protective equipment, crowded commuter buses, packed site vehicles and ‘an absolute impossibility to self-distance because of the nature of the work,’ are fostering an environment where the virus could spread,” the paper stated.

The company had previously announced precautionary measures including “a temporary slowdown of operations and reduction of crews by up to 50%” at its B.C. mines.

According to the G&M, “Stephen Hunt, director of United Steelworkers union, which represents almost all of Teck’s B.C. workforce, said some members are satisfied the company’s mines are safe, while others are worried. He said Teck has made decent strides to reduce the risk for employees, including staggering shift start times to reduce congestion at the mine site as well as removing some of the seating on buses to ensure people are sitting at least six feet apart. Despite these precautions, he’s still on edge.”

On April 13 Cameco Corp TSX:CCO announced that the suspension of its 50%-held Cigar Lake uranium mine in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin would continue indefinitely. Orano Canada also lengthened the suspension of its 70%-held McClean Lake mill, which processes Cigar Lake ore.

The global challenges posed by this pandemic are not abating—in fact, they are deepening.—Tim Gitzel,
Cameco president/CEO

“The precautions and restrictions put in place by the federal and provincial governments, the increasing significant concern among leaders in the remote isolated communities of northern Saskatchewan, and the challenges of maintaining the recommended physical distancing at fly-in/fly-out sites with a full workforce were critical factors Cameco considered in reaching this decision,” the company stated.

President/CEO Tim Gitzel added, “The global challenges posed by this pandemic are not abating—in fact, they are deepening.”

As Quebec allows mining to resume, Canadian companies make open-or-shut decisions

April 14th, 2020

This story has been expanded and moved here.

COVID-19 wage subsidy will help keep mines open, but operations remain threatened by infection

March 30th, 2020

by Greg Klein | March 30, 2020

Ottawa’s extension of wage subsidies to all businesses brings hope to mining industry workers, says the Mining Association of Canada. But controversy remains about keeping projects in operation when there’s a risk of coronavirus transmission.

COVID-19 wage subsidy will help keep mines open, but operations remain threatened by infection

Companies still in operation hope extra precautions will
shield their mines from infection. (Photo: Agnico Eagle Mines)

In an effort to prevent layoffs, the feds now offer a temporary 75% wage subsidy up to $58,700 backdated to March 15, MAC reported. To qualify, large and small businesses, non-profits and charities would have suffered revenue decreases of at least 30% due to the pandemic. MAC “looks forward to further specifics of the program but welcomes the intent,” the association announced.

“As is the case with many sectors, mining has been heavily impacted by COVID-19, with multiple companies reducing or suspending operations at mines, smelters and refineries across Canada, resulting in tens of thousands of layoffs of direct and indirect employees,” said MAC president/CEO Pierre Gratton. “The wage subsidy will help prevent further layoffs, thus minimizing both the scale and extent of disruption to both businesses, employees and contractors, and better position the mining sector to resume operations and support the many thousands of individuals who depend on it for employment.”

Mine suspensions have been occurring inconsistently around the world and within Canada. Following an order from Quebec, IAMGOLD TSX:IMG suspended its Westwood mine in that province but continued work on its advanced-stage Coté project in Ontario, a province that considers mining and related projects to be essential services. The company continues operation at its Burkina Faso and Suriname mines, which have been transitioning to “self-confinement” since last week.

Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM put its three Quebec operations on care and maintenance last week but continues reduced operations at its Meliadine and Meadowbank mines in Nunavut using Quebecois workers to replace native territorial employees whose communities are considered especially vulnerable to an outbreak.

Last week Baffinland Iron Mines took similar precautions with its Mary River employees, the Nunatsiaq News reported.

On March 29 the newspaper stated that Agnico Eagle had put Meliadine on “complete lockdown” with non-emergency travel to or from the site banned for 28 days. The company denied the decision came in response to a tweet from a catering contract employee ridiculing the site’s health precautions and the threat of infection, the paper added. The employee has been fired, according to the News.

The miner will also reduce transportation to Meadowbank from four flights a week to four a month.

Meanwhile an employee at Ontario’s Detour Lake mine has tested positive for COVID-19. “The worker arrived at the mine with no symptoms on March 12, began showing symptoms and self-isolated on March 14, and was taken from site on the morning of March 16,” said a March 29 statement from Kirkland Lake Gold TSX:KL. Workers who had been in close contact have been instructed to undergo medical examinations, while others have been told to monitor themselves for symptoms.

Work suspended

March 26th, 2020

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

by Greg Klein | March 26, 2020

Shut Down Canada has largely been achieved, but not by the forces that advocated it nor—until someone finds a way of blaming this on climate change—by the doomsday belief they were pushing. Residents of our strangely quiet cities and towns watch the horror unfold elsewhere while wondering how long and hard the pandemic will hit Canada. Meanwhile, workers and business owners might consider themselves lucky if the economy fares no worse than a very serious recession.

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

A reminder that one crisis can trigger another unwittingly came from FortisAlberta on March 23. The company that provides 60% of the province’s electricity “is taking the necessary actions and precautions to protect the health and well-being of its employees and to provide electricity service to its customers.”

The obvious but demoralizing question arises: What happens if too many key people get sick? That danger could apply to any number of essential services. Economic collapse, social disorder, a breakdown of supply chains add to the nightmarish possibilities.

All of which might not happen. In the meantime we can thank the front line workers who keep our society functioning to the extent that it does. Those one- or two-buck-an-hour temporary pay raises hardly acknowledge society’s debt to retail staff who interact constantly with a potentially plague-ridden public. Care workers for the elderly constitute another group of low-paid heroes, several of whom have already made the ultimate sacrifice.

In the meantime here are some reports on Canadian mining’s response to the crisis.

Inconsistent closures suggest an ambivalent industry

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

IAMGOLD sidelined its Westwood operation in Quebec but
continues work on its Coté project in Ontario. (Photo: IAMGOLD)

Mining hasn’t actually been banned in Ontario and Quebec, although shutdowns of non-essential services continue to April 8 and April 13 respectively. Extensions, of course, look likely. Quebec has ordered the industry, along with aluminum smelting, to “minimize their activities.” Ontario specifically exempted mineral exploration, development, mining and their support services from mandatory closures.

Interpreting Quebec’s decree as a ban, IAMGOLD TSX:IMG suspended its Westwood gold mine in that province but continued work at its 64.75%-held, advanced-stage Coté gold project in Ontario as an “essential service.” Production continues at the company’s Burkina Faso and Suriname operations.

But regardless of government bans or directives, voluntary suspensions take place. Restrictions on travel and social distancing have made projects non-viable, while the threat of localized outbreaks looms large—not just at the job sites and accommodations, but in the isolated communities that supply much of the labour.

In Canada, that often means native communities. “They have a bad history with disproportionate impacts from epidemics,” a Vale Canada spokesperson told the Financial Post. The company put its Voisey’s Bay mine in Labrador on care and maintenance, and planned reductions at its associated Long Harbour nickel-copper-cobalt processing plant in Newfoundland.

So far alone of the Northwest Territories’ three operations, Dominion Diamond Mines announced an indefinite suspension for Ekati on March 19. The Union of Northern Workers stated its intention to grieve the manner in which its members were laid off.

Some Canadian mining and exploration dispatches during the pandemic

Having laid off its native staff, Agnico Eagle continues its Nunavut
operations largely with workers from Quebec. (Photo: Agnico Eagle)

Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM made the ramp-down decision a day after Quebec’s March 23 order, after discussions with government “to get additional clarity.” The suspensions applied to three Quebec mines but the company planned “reduced operations” at Meliadine and Meadowbank in Nunavut, largely under Quebecois workers.

Five days earlier Agnico Eagle began sending home Nunavummiut staff from its Nunavut mines and exploration projects to prevent virus transmission “from a southern worker to a Nunavut worker, with the risk of it moving into the communities,” explained CEO Sean Boyd. Production was expected to continue under the remaining staff.

The following day residents blocked a road from Rankin Inlet airport to Meliadine to protest the use of replacement workers from Mirabel and Val d’Or, Quebec. Although the territory has banned travel from other jurisdictions, critical workers may apply for an exemption. They’re also required to undergo two weeks of isolation in their own region prior to travel.

From boots on the ground to fingers on the keyboard

Exploration suspensions haven’t come at a bad time for some projects, which had completed or nearly completed winter programs. Where labs remain open, assays might provide some badly needed good news.

Much of the crucial work of analyzing results and planning future exploration can be done by desktop. One example of a company with a multinational work-at-home team is Turmalina Metals TSXV:TBX, which completed a seasonal field program at its San Francisco de Los Andes gold project shortly before Argentina imposed a nation-wide quarantine. “While Turmalina maintains a corporate office in Canada our technical and managerial team operate remotely from individual home offices located in Peru, Brazil, Argentina, Canada and Asia,” states a March 23 announcement. “The current compilation, analysis and modeling of recently collected data is being done on a physically decentralized basis from these individual home offices as the company prepares for drilling.”

Follow the money

No one’s saying so out loud, but travel restrictions just might divert money from conferences, trade shows and expense accounts to actual work. Then again, money can still be squandered on low-IQ promotional campaigns produced at the kitchen table.

Every metal and mineral has a silver lining

This isn’t a sector that overlooks opportunity. Two days after Vanstar Mining Resources TSXV:VSR reported that drilling “continues without stopping” at its 25%-held Nelligan project in Quebec, the company acknowledged that majority partner IAMGOLD had suspended work. But “it should be noted that current events can also bring certain opportunities for acquiring gold projects at a lower cost,” Vanstar pointed out. The junior was merely echoing comments made by others, including BHP Group NYSE:BHP earlier this month.

With the economic outlook as confused as a professional stock-picker’s thought processes, mining’s future remains profoundly uncertain. But diminished supply can certainly help chances of rebounding demand.

And suspensions might encourage advantageous awareness, as noted by Uranium Energy Corp NYSE:UEC president/CEO Amir Adnani. “The recent global events and supply disruptions further underscore the importance of domestic supply chains for vital resources,” stated the U.S. purveyor of U3O8.

How could we live without them?

Endeavours deemed essential by Ontario and Quebec include capital markets services and agencies like the TMX Group and securities commissions. The provinces also consider alcohol and cannabis retailers essential. As if the world wasn’t already facing worse consequences, Toronto medical officer Eileen de Villa said banning booze “would lead to pretty significant health consequences.”

She didn’t specifically mention geoscientists.

The experts speak

Some fatuous remarks at PDAC provided retrospectively grim humour, as well as an exhibition of prognosticator pomposity. Here’s Mickey Fulp’s take on COVID-19, as quoted by IKN:

  • “I think it’s overblown.”

  • “All these shows are flu incubators, anyway.”

  • “I think it (i.e. infections) are going to be less this year, because people are doing things like washing their hands.”

  • “This is a blip on the radar screen. Especially in the U.S. where I’m from, because our economy is absolutely roaring and virus fears are not going to do major damage to the U.S. market.”

  • “I think it absolutely is an overreaction and the quicker it’s realized, the better.”

  • “This is a variety of flu.”

Of course to sheltered North Americans, the first week of March might seem a long time ago. So here’s Doug Casey’s insight, as published by Kitco on March 24:

“The virus itself isn’t nearly as serious, I don’t know how serious it’s going to be, but not terribly in my opinion. What I’m really shocked at, Daniela, is the degree of hysteria on the part of the powers that be. They’ve actually just gone insane.”

Click here for objective data on the coronavirus pandemic.

Newfoundland newly found

June 26th, 2017

Jon Armes of Kapuskasing Gold talks with Isabel Belger about zinc, copper and cobalt

 

Jon Armes of Kapuskasing Gold talks with Isabel Belger about zinc, copper and cobalt

Isabel Belger

Isabel: I would like to introduce Jon Armes, the president and CEO of Kapuskasing Gold TSXV:KAP. Jon, good to see you again. Tell us something about your background to start with.

Jon: Hi Isabel, good to see you too. I started in the mineral exploration business back in 1993 as an investor relations consultant. I spent the better part of 10 years working for various companies exploring for gold and precious metals as well as base metals and diamonds.

In the mid-2000s I ended up working in the field alongside a couple of different geologists and spent time managing drill programs, splitting drill core, prospecting and assisting in the staking of claims. I also helped structure some companies—bringing project opportunities and public companies together.

In 2010 I was given the opportunity to run a junior exploration company called Lakeland Resources. That company merged with Alpha Exploration in late 2015 and became ALX Uranium [TSXV:AL]. I remained as president until October of 2016 after concluding a transaction with Denison [TSX:DML] on behalf of ALX.

I was appointed president of Kapuskasing Gold in February of 2016. We carried out some drilling last summer on a gold project in Timmins, Ontario, but unfortunately did not intersect anything of significance in that campaign. Since that time I have been looking for the right opportunity or opportunities to bring in to the Kapuskasing property portfolio. The Newfoundland property package seemed like the right fit, and since then we have done some consolidating to the original acquisitions announced on March 1, 2017, and then more recently added the Daniel’s Harbour zinc property to the property portfolio. The copper-cobalt projects are the Lady Pond property and the King’s Court property. The lack of systematic testing for cobalt gave rise to these properties being so interesting because, the few times cobalt was tested for, there were several anomalous values. I particularly like the short- and longer-term outlook for both copper and zinc, and these copper-cobalt projects also provide a polymetallic exposure that includes cobalt, gold and silver.

Isabel: Congratulations on your recent zinc property acquisition in Newfoundland, the Daniel’s Harbour property. What intrigued you about this project?

Jon Armes of Kapuskasing Gold talks with Isabel Belger about zinc, copper and cobalt

With breathtaking geography and bountiful geology, the Rock
and neighbouring Labrador hold potential for Kapuskasing.

Jon: The opportunity to acquire a project that was a past-producer is always an interesting one. There is an old saying in the mining business that the best place to look for a mine or a deposit is in the “shadow of a headframe.” The Mississippi Valley-type nature of these zinc deposits is also intriguing because of the difficulty in finding them. Typically they are found in an outcrop as was the case for the majority of the lenses that were mined out between 1975 and 1990. I am of the belief that there is an opportunity to find more of these lenses within the boundary of the current Daniel’s Harbour zinc property. The fact that Altius [TSX:ALS] has acquired a significant land position within the immediate area of this project only helps to reaffirm my belief. We will do some compilation of the historic work and more recent exploration on the property and incorporate some out-of-the-box thinking on how to employ some geophysics that have either not been used before or perhaps some re-interpretation. Another aspect could be a ground prospecting program that may identify an outcrop or showing on the property that has yet to be found.

Isabel: What are your exploration plans for the coming months?

Jon: Kapuskasing is currently undertaking a small financing to assist in getting things going both on the Daniel’s Harbour property and the Lady Pond copper-cobalt project. As mentioned, the first things for Daniel’s Harbour would be some data compilation and to identify some geophysical techniques to help identify some drill targets.

The Lady Pond copper-cobalt property has a drill-ready target area called the Twin Pond prospect, recently acquired to complete the consolidation of the original Lady Pond property package. We have also staked several claims to cover additional historic showings of copper-cobalt-gold and silver. The Twin Pond prospect has a non-43-101 resource of approximately one million tonnes grading 1% copper, and looks to be open in all directions. [We hope to increase this resource] with a properly designed drill program—ideally in the coming months with the right funding and availability of service companies to carry out the work.

In the immediate area of Lady Pond, there are several past-producing mines and undeveloped prospects that could turn into economic deposits…. Rambler Metals [TSXV:RAB] has several projects and properties in this area, including the Little Deer project contiguous to our Lady Pond property. There is potential with the right combination of funding and exploration success for Kapuskasing to find more than one of these deposits within the Lady Pond property, having had a good start with the Twin Pond prospect.

Isabel: How much of Kapuskasing is held by the management?

Jon: Currently insiders and parties close to the company own approximately 20% of the issued and outstanding shares. Typically the insiders participate in the financings, as will be the case in this one. We are currently looking to raise up to $750,000 in a combination of flow-through and common shares. We hope to close a first tranche financing in the coming weeks to begin deploying exploration capital.

Isabel: What is your favourite commodity besides the ones in your company?

Kapuskasing will be in a great position to take advantage of not just one but several commodity price spikes, the first of which I think will be in both copper and zinc. —Jon Armes

Jon: I do like both copper and zinc, as evidenced by the recent acquisitions. The battery technology metals are also interesting—with cobalt and lithium leading the latest charge. People forget that electricity needs copper. Wires transport the electricity from batteries and generators to the tool or outlet. I consider copper to be the most important metal for the energy metal sector. We have cobalt as a possible byproduct of the two main polymetallic projects in the Lady Pond and King’s Court projects, along with gold, silver and zinc. Kapuskasing will be in a great position to take advantage of not just one but several commodity price spikes, the first of which I think will be in both copper and zinc.

Isabel: What do you like most about your job?

Jon: I like the multifaceted aspects of running a junior exploration program; there never seems to be a dull moment. I get to meet a lot of different people in the mining and finance industry, the prospectors that generate the project ideas, and the service people that ultimately carry out the exploration of the projects with our team of geologists and technicians. The most exciting times are when we are actually carrying out a drill program. It is drilling that ultimately leads to discovery.

Isabel: That is right. Good talking to you Jon, and good luck with the drill program.

Jon: Thank you.

 

Jon Armes of Kapuskasing Gold talks with Isabel Belger about zinc, copper and cobalt

Jon Armes
president/CEO of
Kapuskasing Gold

Bio

Jonathan Armes, also known as Jon, has been the CEO and president of Kapuskasing Gold since February 9, 2016, and a director since October 8, 2014. Jon Armes has been a consultant of ALX Uranium since October 2016. Jon Armes served as the president/CEO of ALX Uranium (formerly, Lakeland Resources) from August 12, 2010, until October 2016. He has provided corporate development and investor relations services to mining exploration companies for over 15 years including Band-Ore Resources (which became part of Lake Shore Gold, which in turn joined Tahoe Resources TSX:THO) and Trelawney Mining and Exploration, an IAMGOLD TSX:IMG takeover. He graduated from the University of Guelph in 1993 with a Bachelor of Applied Science degree.

Fun facts

My hobbies: Fishing, hockey and music
Sources of news I use: News apps on my phone
My favourite airport: Vancouver
My favourite commodities: Copper, gold, zinc, cobalt
My favourite tradeshow: PDAC
With this person I would like to have dinner: Warren Buffet (talking about philanthropy, investing and life)
If I could have a superpower, it would be: Seeing into the future


Read more about Kapuskasing Gold.

Kapuskasing Gold drills near-surface 4.68 g/t over 1.6 metres in northern Ontario

September 27th, 2016

by Greg Klein | September 27, 2016

A brief drill program of three shallow holes confirmed significant gold mineralization on the Rollo project in northern Ontario, Kapuskasing Gold TSXV:KAP announced September 27. The 150-metre summer campaign tested continuity of the property’s Racicot gold showing. The previous summer’s channel sampling found results up to 8.82 g/t gold over 0.6 metres. Grab samples assayed 1 g/t, 1.89 g/t and 11.41 g/t gold.

Kapuskasing Gold drills 4.68 g/t over 1.6 metres in northern Ontario

Some highlights from the most recent program show:

Hole RO-16-01

  • 3.24 g/t gold over 0.7 metres, starting at 8.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 2.32 g/t over 0.5 metres, starting at 10.6 metres

Hole RO-16-02

  • 3.3 g/t over 0.9 metres, starting at 8.2 metres

Hole RO-16-03

  • 4.68 g/t over 1.6 metres, starting at 14 metres
  • (including 8.05 g/t over 0.8 metres)

True widths were unavailable.

Results support an interpretation that associates mineralization with a red syenite dyke that strikes approximately 100 degrees, the company stated

Located along a projected extension of the Destor-Porcupine fault zone, Rollo sits between IAMGOLD’s (TSX:IMG) Cote Lake gold deposit and Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) Borden gold project. Last week Richmond Minerals TSXV:RMD announced results from its Ridley Lake property about three kilometres southwest of Rollo, hitting up to 1.26 g/t gold over 33 metres, including 4.11 g/t over 7 metres.

Future plans for Kapuskasing include additional drilling and ground geophysics. The company intends to resume work this autumn.

A 10-hole, 1,000-metre program at Kapuskasing’s West Keefer property found no significant gold but did identify lithologies favourable for hosting mineralization, the company added.

Kapuskasing holds seven gold properties along extensions of the Destor-Porcupine structure or the Borden gold project. The company closed a $246,600 private placement in July.

In the land of giants

June 24th, 2016

Aurvista Gold sees super pit potential for its Douay gold project in Abitibi

by Greg Klein

A new Abitibi gold mine, maybe the region’s last—could that be Douay’s destiny? Jean Lafleur sees such potential in the project that attracted him to Aurvista Gold TSXV:AVA, where he took on the role of president/CEO. The geologist’s international career includes considerable experience in Quebec’s most auriferous region, including Malartic, where he was instrumental in developing the project’s campaign of bulk gold exploration. He sees similarities in Douay. But this one also stands apart for its distinctions.

Aurvista Gold sees super pit potential for its Douay gold project in Abitibi

This year’s campaign calls for more geophysics
followed by another 4,000 metres.

A bulk deposit with higher-grade “jewelry boxes” on the Casa Berardi fault, Douay’s “unique because it’s never been mined, it’s a disseminated-type deposit, there are no quartz veins so it goes against the grain of these old Archean-type deposits, it’s Crown land, but what makes it really unique is it’s the last one left in the Abitibi,” Lafleur says.

“There might be others farther north, but when you talk about strictly Abitibi, this is the last one.”

Aurvista plans to support that theory with a summer/fall campaign of geophysics and drilling backed by last month’s $1.1-million financing. The 14,500-hectare property features eight zones along a five-kilometre trend. Using a cutoff of 0.3 grams per tonne, a 2012 resource estimate totalled:

  • indicated: 2.69 million tonnes averaging 2.76 g/t for 238,435 gold ounces

  • inferred: 114.65 million tonnes averaging 0.75 g/t for 2.75 million ounces

The resource was limited to a vertical depth of about 400 metres.

With the same cutoff, a west-to-east, zone-by-zone breakdown shows the jewelry boxes amid bulk mining potential:

Douay West zone

  • indicated: 2.56 million tonnes averaging 2.77 g/t for 227,980 ounces

  • inferred: 1.41 million tonnes averaging 1.65 g/t for 74,915 ounces

North West zone

  • inferred: 1.05 million tonnes averaging 2.59 g/t for 87,605 ounces

Porphyry zone

  • inferred: 107.21 million tonnes averaging 0.68 g/t for 2.36 million ounces

20 zone

  • inferred: 340,000 tonnes averaging 0.66 g/t for 7,231 ounces

Central zone

  • inferred: 780,000 tonnes averaging 0.99 g/t for 24,935 ounces

10 zone

  • inferred: 959,000 tonnes averaging 1.32 g/t for 40,705 ounces

531 zone

  • inferred: 1.55 million tonnes averaging 1.54 g/t for 76,620 ounces

Main zone

  • indicated: 130,000 tonnes averaging 2.47 g/t for 10,450 ounces

  • inferred: 1.35 million tonnes averaging 1.97 g/t for 85,480 ounces

Pushing the cutoff up to three g/t, seven of the eight zones still show ounces, with these two standouts—Douay West revealing 153,890 ounces indicated and 28,420 ounces inferred, and the Adams section of the Porphyry zone bearing 274,200 ounces inferred.

A 2014 PEA examined Douay West alone as a combination open pit and underground operation that would cost $56.8 million to build, producing 156,000 ounces over a 3.7-year life. The study used a 5% discount rate to calculate a post-tax NPV of $16.6 million and a post-tax IRR of 40%. But the proximity of other zones, especially Porphyry, encouraged Aurvista to consider other approaches.

To that end the company has an imminent two-stage 2016 program scheduled for a three-by-10-kilometre expanse. Primarily focus will be some eight kilometres of porphyry targets. Also under scrutiny will be a six-by-one-kilometre cluster of EM anomalies immediately south that have affinities to VMS mineralization associated with gold, along with potential copper and other base metal targets, the company states.

Aurvista Gold sees super pit potential for its Douay gold project in Abitibi

Past operators left behind camp infrastructure.

Stage 1 calls for additional mapping, re-logging previous core and flying magnetic, electromagnetic and radiometrics. That would lead to Stage 2’s 4,000-metre Q4 drill program. The company also hopes to find new trends at about 300 to 500 metres in depth, below the currently known mineralization.

With Abitibi infrastructure as well as gold, Douay has road access to a highway five kilometres away leading to Val-d’Or, 165 kilometres south, and an electrical line connecting the property with the grid.

A solid share structure supports the company. After vending Douay to Aurvista in 2011, Société d’exploration minière Vior TSXV:VIO now holds 24%. The 1,193-hectare North West zone comes under a JV with 25% partner SOQUEM, the mineral exploration division of the provincial government’s Investissement Québec. Together, the province and company insiders account for 14%. Among them is chairperson Gerry McCarvill, who helped create Repadre Capital, now IAMGOLD TSX:IMG, and Desert Sun Mining, later picked up by Yamana Gold TSX:YRI. McCarvill also helped develop Consolidated Thompson Iron Ore from its $2-million beginning to the $4.9-billion takeover by Cliffs Natural Resources NYSE:CLF.

Lafleur expects this year’s work to further support the “super pit” potential that he believes could position Douay as the next mine to be surrounded by the giants of Abitibi. A resource update could arrive this year but more likely in 2017, he says. Lafleur anticipates a three- to five-year plan for the project. “We want to follow the same story that Detour and Osisko did—just keep drilling and prove up as many ounces as we can.”

Vancouver Commodity Forum adds speakers: Gerald McCarvill, Jon Hykawy and Joe Martin

May 30th, 2016

by Greg Klein | May 30, 2016

Three more names bring additional expertise and insight to the June 14 Vancouver Commodity Forum. Prince Arthur Capital chairperson/CEO Gerald McCarvill, Stormcrow Capital president/director Jon Hykawy and Cambridge House International founder Joe Martin will address the conference at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. Already booked are Chris Berry of the Disruptive Discoveries Journal, John Kaiser of Kaiser Research Online and Stephan Bogner of Rockstone Research.

Vancouver Commodity Forum adds speakers Gerald McCarvill, Jon Hykawy and Joe Martin

The speaker lineup grows as the June 14 Vancouver event approaches.

McCarvill’s 30-year CV includes conducting mining and energy projects globally, as well as private equity and finance transactions. Among other career highlights, he helped establish Repadre Capital, now IAMGOLD TSX:IMG, and Desert Sun Mining, later acquired by Yamana Gold TSX:YRI. McCarvill also helped develop and finance Consolidated Thompson Iron Ore from a $2-million entry valuation to its $4.9-billion sale to Cliffs Natural Resources NYSE:CLF.

An expert in areas such as lithium, rare earths, fluorspar and tin, Hykawy combines a 14-year Bay Street background with an MBA in marketing, along with post-doctoral work as a physicist with Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. His technical background also includes work on rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, as well as wind and solar energy.

Starting off in business journalism, Martin created BC Business magazine, then founded Cambridge House International to present some of the world’s largest mining/exploration conferences. He remains active in semi-retirement as a prominent advocate for investment regulatory reform.

The Vancouver Commodity Forum also features a range of companies pursuing lithium, uranium, rare earths, gold, nickel, copper, diamonds, jade, scandium, zeolite, magnesium and potash. Click here for free registration.

Interview: Chris Berry discusses the lithium boom.

Gold stocks slaughtered, Barrick drops 10%

October 31st, 2013

by Frik Els | October 31, 2013 | Reprinted by permission of MINING.com

The gold price slid more than $24 or 2% an ounce on October 31 to a week low of $1,323 after the U.S. Federal Reserve signalled it may cut back its stimulus program sooner than thought and Chinese demand for the metal waned.

After a fightback from near three-year lows below $1,200 struck at the end of June, gold’s momentum now seems to have turned negative again with gold stocks sold off heavily on a relatively modest fall in the price of the metal.

By the October 31 close Barrick Gold TSX:ABX had lost 5.9%, after announcing results that were in line with expectations and the suspension of its troubled Pascua Lama project on the border between Chile and Argentina.

The world’s number one miner of the precious metal followed up after hours with more damaging news. The Toronto-based miner announced it is raising $3 billion by issuing 163.5 million common shares at $18.35 per share.

Barrick is now worth $19.4 billion, down 44% so far this year and nowhere near its $54-billion market value a mere two years ago.

Investors duly marked down the stock again with the counter shedding an additional 5.7% to $18.31 in after-hours trade in New York, wiping more than $2 billion off the value of the company on the day.

Barrick is now worth $19.4 billion, down 44% so far this year and nowhere near its $54-billion market value a mere two years ago.

Newmont Mining NYE:NEM, with a market value of $13.5 billion, escaped the worst of it, down 2.8% in regular trading and trading slightly to the upside after hours, after announcing profits up 11% despite a fall in revenue.

Attributable gold production rose 4% to 1.28 million ounces, while attributable copper output decreased 3% to 34 million pounds during the third quarter at the Denver-based company.

The world’s third-largest gold producer behind Newmont, AngloGold Ashanti NYE:AU was one of the worst performers of October 31. The Johannesburg-based company’s ADRs listed in New York slid 6.7% on October 31 and the value of the company has now halved this year.

Fellow South African miner Gold Fields NYE:GFI, the worst performer among the gold majors this year, gave up 4.4% in New York. The world’s fourth-largest gold producer has had its value slashed 63% in 2013, with investors punishing it for its contrarian purchase of high-cost mines amid the slump.

Goldcorp TSX:G, expected to produce around 2.5 million ounces of gold this year, declined 3.9%. The Vancouver-based company retained the top spot as the most valuable gold stock, with a Toronto big board market capitalization of $21.6 billion.

Toronto’s Kinross Gold TSX:K managed to hold above a $6-billion value despite losing 5.3% on the day. Investors in the company are nursing a $5-billion loss in market cap this year after Kinross, like all the majors, took multi-billion charges against the value of its operations.

Canada’s second-tier gold miners also suffered a loss of confidence from gold investors, giving up much of the gains of recent weeks.

Yamana Gold TSX:YRI skid 3.4%, Agnico Eagle Mines’ TSX:AEM losses were fairly modest at 2.5% while Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD declined 5.1% and IAMGOLD TSX:IMG dropped 5.3%.

Reprinted by permission of MINING.com

Investors pile back into gold stocks, Goldcorp up $2 billion in a week

October 22nd, 2013

by Frik Els | October 22, 2013 | Reprinted by permission of Mining.com

Investors pile back into gold stocks, Goldcorp up $2 billion in a week

Good day for the gold team. Photo: Perpetual Tourist

The gold price jumped more than $20 or 1.8% an ounce on October 22 to a three-week high above $1,340 after disappointing U.S. economic data.

The much weaker-than-expected employment numbers in the U.S. convinced gold buyers that any reduction in economic stimulus by the Federal Reserve will come later rather than sooner.

With positive sentiment returning to the gold market, investors took the chance to jump back into mining stocks which have been decimated by the 20% retreat in the price of the metal this year.

On October 22 Barrick Gold TSX:ABX shot up 4.8%, scaling the $20-billion market value for the first time in a month.

The Vancouver-based company has jumped more than $2 billion in market value over the past week and is now worth $21.3 billion.

The world’s number one miner of the precious metal has added more than $5 billion in market value since hitting 21-year lows early July.

Barrick is now worth $20.5 billion on the TSX, still down 41% so far this year amid an aggressive divestment and cost-cutting drive that is beginning to bear fruit.

Newmont Mining NYE:NEM, with a market value of $14.1 billion, added 3.5%. The company recently cut predictions for its copper output, but gold production targets remain unchanged at 4.8 million to 5.1 million ounces for the year.

The Denver-based company has not escaped the carnage in the gold sector and is down 38% this year.

The world’s third-largest gold producer behind Newmont, AngloGold Ashanti NYE:AU was one of the best performers on October 22. The Johannesburg-based company’s ADRs listed in New York gained 9% to a four-month high, but are still trading down 48% this year.

Fellow South African miner Gold Fields NYE:GFI, which is the worst performer among the gold majors this year, jumped 5% in New York. The world’s fourth-largest gold producer has had its value slashed 62% in 2013 with investors punishing it for its contrarian purchase of high-cost mines amid the slump.

Goldcorp TSX:G, expected to produce around 2.5 million ounces of gold this year, jumped 4.9%, helping retain its top spot as the most valuable gold stock.

The Vancouver-based company has jumped more than $2 billion in market value over the past week and is now worth $21.3 billion.

Toronto’s Kinross Gold TSX:K scaled the $6-billion mark, gaining 3.3% but investors in the company are still nursing a $5-billion loss in market cap this year after Kinross, like all the majors, took multi-billion-dollar charges against the value of its operations.

Australia’s Newcrest Mining declined 0.5% on the Sydney bourse, missing out on the gold price rally in New York. The Melbourne-based company earlier this month ousted its CEO and chairman after its August results showed an AU$5.6-billion loss.

Canada’s second-tier gold miners also enjoyed a rerating with Yamana Gold TSX:YRI adding 4.6%, Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM jumping more than 4.7%, Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD advancing 3.8% and IAMGOLD TSX:IMG upping its value 4.5%.

Reprinted by permission of Mining.com