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Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 31st, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to October 31, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission hits 8.53% over 24 metres at Patterson Lake South

The 600th company to graduate from the Venture to the big board since 2000,
Fission Uranium opens the TSX on October 30. (Photo: TMX Group)


Fission hits 8.53% U3O8 over 24 metres at Patterson Lake South

A second batch of assays hit the streets October 27 from Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) Patterson Lake South summer program, the final drill season before a maiden resource due in December. Thirteen holes from the R780E zone showed mineralization at shallow depths, some with very impressive results. Several holes broaden the zone’s lateral width at different locations up to about 93 metres north and 38 metres south, and also extend the depth. Still the focal point of PLS, R780E remains by far the largest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open at both ends.

Some of the best results follow:

Hole PLS14-253

  • 1.33% U3O8 over 16.5 metres, starting at 117.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 3.57% over 5.5 metres)

  • 1.65% over 5 metres, starting at 155 metres
  • (including 5.37% over 1.5 metres)


  • 0.62% over 13 metres, starting at 169 metres
  • (including 2.42% over 2.5 metres)


  • 1.76% over 39.5 metres, starting at 61.5 metres
  • (including 3.16% over 8 metres)
  • (and including 6.22% over 3.5 metres)

  • 1.17% over 11.5 metres, starting at 104 metres
  • (including 3.99% over 2.5 metres)


  • 5.02% over 5 metres, starting at 256.5 metres


  • 4.21% over 38.5 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 23.53% over 6 metres)

  • 2.77% over 13.5 metres, starting at 205 metres
  • (including 6.95% over 4 metres)


  • 1.43% over 42.5 metres, starting at 58 metres
  • (including 5.91% over 9.5 metres)

  • 0.74% over 26 metres, starting at 104 metres
  • (including 2.42% over 6 metres)


  • 1.85% over 8 metres, starting at 234 metres
  • (including 6.63% over 2 metres)


  • 0.27% over 22.5 metres, starting at 191.5 metres

  • 0.37% over 19.5 metres, starting at 216.5 metres


  • 0.56% over 16 metres, starting at 164.5 metres
  • (including 1.44% over 4.5 metres)


  • 8.53% over 24 metres, starting at 78 metres
  • (including 24.87% over 7.5 metres)

  • 0.55% over 28.5 metres, starting at 105.5 metres
  • (including 2.02% over 3.5 metres)

True widths weren’t provided.

These results bring the total to 42 holes reported. Assays for another 18 delineation holes and 22 exploration holes are pending. The previous batch of summer assays, released earlier this month, included the project’s strongest intercept so far.

Lakeland Resources ready to drill Star/Gibbon’s project, confirms drill-ready targets at Lazy Edward Bay

A busy summer has moved two Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK projects to the drill-ready stage, one of which will see a rig working as soon as winter conditions allow. Announced October 28, a 1,500-metre program on the adjacent Gibbon’s Creek and Star properties follows positive results from surface sampling and a DC-resistivity survey, some of the Athabasca Basin’s highest RadonEx readings and confirmation of a radioactive boulder field grading up to 4.28% U3O8.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to October 31, 2014

A structural lineament connects this radioactive boulder field with
two other mineralized systems on the Star/Gibbon’s Creek properties.

The two properties on the Basin’s north-central rim host a regional, multi-staged, structural lineament immediately west of the Star Uplift, a basement outcrop about 350 metres by 700 metres, that extends south to the Gibbon’s Creek boulder field about three kilometres away. In addition an east-west resistivity low, interpreted as an alteration corridor, has been found near an historic intercept of 1,500 parts per million uranium.

Surface sampling at the uplift found a gold trend that also revealed platinum group elements, rare earths and anomalous low-grade uranium. Follow-up drilling will test the trend and examine basement geology as it relates to the Gibbon’s Creek targets, Lakeland stated.

With depth to the unconformity ranging from 50 to 250 metres, the company anticipates an economical program of shallow drilling. Roads and power lines cross the property, which lies a few kilometres from the town of Stony Rapids.

The company wholly owns Gibbon’s Creek and holds a 100% option on Star.

Meanwhile exploration at Lazy Edward Bay has confirmed the project’s drill-ready targets, as well as its prominence in Lakeland’s portfolio. Field work on two areas of the 26,375-hectare property on the Basin’s southeastern edge revealed anomalous rock samples, soil samples and RadonEx readings, the company announced October 30.

The Liberty Trend consists of an approximately five-kilometre-long conductive zone intruded by diabase dykes. Near a radioactive spring reported earlier in October, two boulders graded 537 ppm and 896 ppm U3O8, also showing anomalous levels of the pathfinder elements arsenic, cobalt, chromium, nickel and lead.

Two nearby soil samples returned uranium values of 13.7 ppm and 14.8 ppm, along with 2,920 ppm arsenic, 119 ppm cobalt and 112 ppm nickel. An outcrop sample farther south showed low-grade uranium and was also enriched in copper, cobalt and zinc, the company added.

The significance of the Liberty Trend “appears to be a rare combination of favourable geochemistry, geophysics and surface rock samples anomalous in radioactivity coupled with a series of radioactive springs within a complex structural setting,” said Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “This confluence of geologic features attests to the potential of this area to host a large mineralizing system.”

The project’s Bay Trend underwent 150 soil samples over a 789-sample radon-in-soil grid. The samples showed several anomalous geochemical results coinciding with previously identified basement conductors. This year’s work further refines the conductors.

Results from both the Liberty and Bay trends confirm high-priority drill-ready targets and Lazy Edward’s place among “the most promising early-stage exploration projects that Lakeland has assembled, which include the Gibbon’s Creek, Star and Newnham Lake properties,” Armes said.

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

Fission 3.0 stakes new ground, joins Brades on Clearwater West fall campaign

Seven new acquisitions, along with expansions to four other properties, bring the Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU portfolio up to 17 projects totalling 232,088 hectares, all in the Basin area except one in Peru. The expansion came through staking, the company announced October 29.

Karpinka Lake, a 3,072-hectare property 40 klicks south of the Basin, features at least 14 historic uranium occurrences. The most significant “consists of a series of five discontinuous low-grade zones of stratabound uranium mineralization,” Fission 3.0 stated.

Midas, a 1,476-hectare property near Uranium City, has five known uranium occurrences including an historic intercept of 0.19% U3O8 over 9.6 metres.

On the Basin’s north-central rim, the 1,678-hectare Hearty Bay property sits up-ice from a boulder train that graded up to 3% uranium.

Eighty kilometres south of the Basin’s southeastern margin, the 5,745-hectare Hobo Lake property has had historic lake sediment samples showing anomalous uranium. South of the Basin but north of Hobo Lake, the 1,213-hectare Costigan Lake property benefits from a 2005 airborne radiometric survey that found anomalous radioactivity associated with conductors.

Just beyond the Basin’s southern edge, the 1,866-hectare River Lake “has potential to host outliers of sandstone cover, which is the favourable host rock for unconformity and perched styles of uranium mineralization.”

East of the Basin’s northeastern margin, the 2,412-hectare Flowerdew Lake underwent airborne geophysics in 2005, finding “moderate to strong formational electromagnetic conductors trending northeast.”

A 1,024-hectare addition to Beaver River covers an extension of the property’s EM conductors and includes two historic uranium showings. Cree Bay got another 5,252 hectares of contiguous turf along the prospective Black Lake shear zone. Grey Island grew by 1,271 hectares over a strong EM conductor. Thompson Lake added 577 hectares, also covering the extension of a conductor.

On October 15 Fission 3.0 and Brades Resource TSXV:BRA announced fall plans for their Clearwater West joint venture. The program calls for mapping, prospecting and a DC resistivity survey to follow up on radiometric anomalies identified last May. Brades holds a 50% option on the 11,835-hectare project, where Fission 3.0 acts as operator. Read a review of the companies’ announcement by Geology for Investors.

Winter drilling planned for Azincourt/Fission 3.0’s Patterson Lake North

Patterson Lake North’s agenda calls for a $1.5-million, 3,200-metre winter program, JV partner Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ announced October 21. Work will follow up on last summer’s drilling, targeting the property’s A1-A4 conductor area and two untested areas, the N conductor trend and the Broach Lake conductor system.

The 27,408-hectare property lies adjacent to and north of Patterson Lake South. Fission 3.0 acts as operator. Azincourt, which currently holds a 10% stake, said its $1.5-million winter expenditure will complete the $3-million year-two requirement, raising its total to 20%. The option allows Azincourt up to a 50% interest.

The company also stated it distributed the Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL stock resulting from that company’s acquisition of Azincourt’s Peruvian properties (read more here and here). Shareholders got “the equivalent of $0.09 per Azincourt share, based on the recent Macusani share price.”

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 23rd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 9 to 22, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission widens main zone, plans more step-outs, arranges $12.5-million bought deal

Although infill drilling has been the priority for Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) summer program, two step-outs have widened Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone, inspiring a 10-hole addition to the campaign. Radiometric results for nine holes released August 18 include one that extended the zone about 30 metres north and another 15 metres south. All nine holes returned wide mineralization, the company stated.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 9 to 22, 2014

R780E is the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open to the east and west.

These results, which are no substitute for assays, come from a handheld scintillometer that measures drill core for radiation in counts per second. Last month Fission replaced its old model, which maxed out at 9,999 cps, with a new-fangled gadget capable of measuring up to 65,535 cps. But the company still refers to anything above four nines to be “off-scale.”

By that standard several intervals were well off-scale, with a few reaching past 60,000 cps.

Another innovation introduced last month is barge-based angled drilling, allowing a better understanding of the geometry of mineralization beneath the lake. Encouraged by the widening of R780E, Fission plans another 10 step-outs. That adds 4,700 metres to a summer agenda now expected to total 25,000 metres in 73 holes.

There seems to be little worry about paying for all that. On August 18 Fission announced a $12.52-million bought deal that’s expected to close around September 23. Roughly three months later comes the maiden resource’s due date.

Winter assays reported August 13 further boosted confidence in R780E, while a summer exploration hole released two days earlier showed interesting radiometric results 17 kilometres away. Read more.

NexGen steps out to widen Rook 1’s Arrow zone

If any company can compete with Fission’s top spot as the Athabasca Basin’s number one newsmaker, it might be next-door neighbour NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE. Four “aggressive” step-out holes have extended the company’s Rook 1 Arrow zone from 180 metres to 215 metres in width for a zone that’s 515 metres in strike and open in all directions. The northwest-southeast fence of drilling announced August 20 has also revealed “multiple sub-vertical stacked mineralized shear zones” increasing the company’s hopes of finding additional high-grade areas.

One of the five holes failed to find significant mineralization.

Like Fission’s August 18 news, the results come from scintillometer readings that don’t substitute for assays, which are pending.

So far 25 of 27 Arrow holes totalling 15,318 metres have shown mineralization. Another three holes at Area A, however, failed to find anomalous radioactivity. They tested an electromagnetic conductor that NexGen interprets to be PL-3B, which hosts the PLS discovery.

Lakeland Resources updates three projects, appoints uranium veteran to board

As a busy summer progresses, Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK reported a new addition to its board and further work on one of the largest portfolios in and around the Basin. On August 20 the company announced the appointment of director Steven Khan, a veteran of Canadian investment and corporate governance with specific experience in raising funds and forging joint ventures for uranium companies. The next day Lakeland released a progress update for three of its projects.

The projects are Star, Lazy Edward Bay and Fond du Lac on the northern, southern and eastern margins of the Basin respectively. “That’s the shallowest depth—the depth to the unconformity becomes more shallow as you get closer to the Basin’s margin,” explains president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “At Gibbon’s Creek our target depths are between about 80 and 120 metres below surface. We hope the others will fall into that kind of range so we’ll be drilling 150- to 200-metre holes.”

At the Star property, crews from Dahrouge Geological Consulting have just wrapped up six days of sampling and mapping. They picked up some 73 rock samples and 124 soil samples around a basement outcrop that’s shown anomalous concentrations of gold, platinum group elements and rare earth elements, as well as highly anomalous uranium. The combination suggests a strong hydrothermal system.

“Those are typical pathfinders for uranium in the Basin,” says Armes. “At Patterson Lake South they had gold grades running two or three grams. So with the first pass on our exploration program in late 2013 we had gold grades of four or five grams.”

Lakeland holds a 100% earn-in option on Star, which has year-round road access from the town of Stony Rapids a few kilometres away.

Now that permits have arrived, mobilization to Lazy Edward Bay should begin ASAP, he adds. Under initial scrutiny will be the BAY trend, actually two parallel conductive trends, which will undergo a RadonEx survey. Field crews will also search out boulders or other signs of unconformity-style mineralization.

“We have Lazy Edward drill targets already but a lot of them were defined by yesterday’s technology,” Armes explains. “We’ll use RadonEx and other work to re-interpret the historic data to better define targets.” In all, the property has six known trends.

Lakeland adviser Rick Kusmirski knows the property from his time as president/CEO of JNR Resources. “He dug up some historic data which is very helpful to identify areas to focus on. There’s some historic areas we want to re-visit.”

Also in line for RadonEx is Fond du Lac, initially targeting a coincident geochemical and conductive target. Geologist and Lakeland director Neil McCallum thinks historic work “missed it by a couple of hundred metres,” Armes says.

But while the summer activity continues, he also looks further ahead “from a treasury standpoint as well as our projects. We’re convinced that 2015 is going to see a significant move in uranium prices. If we ever re-visit 2006 and 2007 levels, when there were 50, 60, 70 juniors active, we hope to be ready and get as many drill programs going as possible through the joint venture and prospect generator model, along with any programs we focus on 100% ourselves.”

[Khan’s JV work with Sumitomo and Kepco] was certainly a great experience in negotiating and concluding contracts, and working with them on the joint management committees. That built long-term relationships but also gave me insight into the Asian psyche and some of the issues they have to deal with.—Steven Khan, director
of Lakeland Resources

Just one day before the exploration update, Lakeland announced Steven Khan’s appointment as director. His background includes key positions with uranium companies Energy Fuels TSX:EFR, Strathmore Minerals and Fission Uranium’s predecessor, Fission Energy. He helped found the latter company, holding the role of executive VP. Khan served as president/chairperson of Strathmore Minerals until last year’s takeover by Energy Fuels, where he stayed on as a director until recently.

Khan played an instrumental part in the negotiating team that brought Japan’s Sumitomo Corp into a JV on Strathmore’s Roca Honda project in New Mexico. He also helped bring the Korea Electric Power Corp into two other JVs, with Strathmore on the Gas Hills project in Wyoming and with Fission, leading to the Waterbury Lake discovery.

Khan has nearly 20 years of experience in all aspects of the Canadian investment industry, including fundraising for early-stage private and public companies.

A confluence of factors convinced him to join Lakeland, he says. “I’ve had a long-term relationship with some of the company’s principals and I’ve always been interested in returning to the Athabasca Basin arena after I left Fission Energy in 2010. Strathmore was more focused on the U.S., where I spent the last number of years. That combination of moving back to the Basin, working with a group of people I respect and seeing a number of properties that have potential presented an opportunity for me.”

He says his work with Sumitomo and Kepco “was certainly a great experience in negotiating and concluding contracts, and working with them on the joint management committees. That built long-term relationships but also gave me insight into the Asian psyche and some of the issues they have to deal with.”

Khan thinks Asian companies might revive their previous interest in early-stage explorers. “Before Fukushima they were attracted to earlier-stage projects like Fission had at the time, as well as more advanced projects like those of Strathmore in the U.S. When uranium prices come back I think they’ll be forced to return to earlier-stage projects because most of the advanced projects will have been tied up.”

As for uranium’s current price, “its resurgence has been muted and is taking longer than expected. But I think that in the medium to longer term, demand will certainly outstrip supply.”

“I’m quite excited about getting involved with the Lakeland team and I think the opportunity for the sector is attractive,” Khan emphasizes. “I think there’s going to be more Athabasca Basin discoveries and that bodes well for companies like Lakeland that are properly positioned and properly financed. So for me the timing is good and the interplay of several factors is favourable.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 27th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 19 to 25, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium completes winter delineation, releases Patterson Lake South drill results

Delineation drilling, the focus of Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) winter 2014 Patterson Lake South program, has come to its seasonal end. While one rig worked outside the main mineralized area, four others sunk 82 infill holes, roughly 85% of the 30,000-metre campaign, since mid-January. As a result PLS now consists of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open at both east and west. Along with its April 24 announcement Fission Uranium released radiometric results for the last dozen holes. Two days earlier the company reported assays for nine others.

Ten of the 12 latest holes came from zone R780E, the third of the five east-west zones. With a total of 77 holes so far, R780E has about 855 metres in strike and up to about 95 metres in lateral width. Seven of the latest 10 holes showed substantial intercepts reaching the maximum possible reading of 9,999 counts per second on a hand-held scintillometer that measures radiation from drill core. Scintillometer results are no substitute for assays, which are pending for these holes.

R1620E, at the eastern extent and declared a new zone earlier this month after just one hole, now has a second which showed 38.5 metres (not true width) ranging from under 300 cps to 3,500 cps. Ironically for the discovery zone, R00E gave up just half a metre of 490 cps.

Assays released two days earlier included yet another PLS “best yet”—this time “the widest high-grade interval to date,” which helped PLS14-187 nearly equal a previously recorded best hole. This nine-hole batch marks the third set of assays, totalling 22 holes, for the winter campaign. Like the previous week’s dozen holes, all nine came from R780E. Some of the best results showed:

Hole PLS14-138

  • 0.2% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 34 metres, starting at 73 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 19 to 25, 2014

  • 0.4% over 3.5 metres, starting at 137.5 metres

  • 1.04% over 17 metres, starting at 170 metres
  • (including 2.88% over 4.5 metres)


  • 0.15% over 30 metres, starting at 130 metres

  • 0.28% over 8.5 metres, starting at 199 metres


  • 0.1% over 19.5 metres, starting at 22.5 metres

  • 0.28% over 7.5 metres, starting at 254.5 metres


  • 0.13% over 27.5 metres, starting at 89.5 metres

  • 0.97% over 22.5 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 2.24% over 7.5 metres)

  • 1.34% over 2.5 metres, starting at 178.5 metres

  • 0.4% over 7.5 metres, starting at 203.5 metres

  • 0.22% over 8 metres, starting at 218 metres


  • 2.18% over 47 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 4.3% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 14.27% over 2 metres)

  • 1.04% over 4 metres, starting at 237 metres
  • (including 3.64% over 1 metre)

  • 3.19% over 2 metres, starting at 254 metres


  • 0.15% over 28.5 metres, starting at 115 metres


  • 0.31% over 6 metres, starting at 125.5 metres

Best of the batch and second-best overall was PLS14-187:

  • 5.98% over 102.5 metres, starting at 63 metres
  • (including 27.2% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 12.93% over 10.5 metres)
  • (and including 14.12% over 6 metres)
  • (and including 16.92% over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 16.14% over 4.5 metres)

  • 2.59% over 9 metres, starting at 218.5 metres

True widths weren’t provided. “Mineralization is both located within and associated with a metasedimentary lithologic corridor, bounded to the south by the PL-3B basement electromagnetic conductor,” Fission Uranium added.

The $12-million winter agenda also calls for geophysics. And no, there’s still no word on when Fission Uranium might unveil its maiden resource.

Lakeland Resources acquisition expands Lazy Edward Bay project

Out of Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) portfolio of 16 uranium properties in and around the Athabasca Basin, Lazy Edward Bay has taken on greater prominence. A three-claim, 4,475-hectare acquisition announced April 24 expands the project to 26,375 hectares. The new turf also adds two conductive trends, giving Lazy Edward a total of six around the Basin’s southern margin.

Subject to TSXV approval, the 100% interest will cost Lakeland $5,000, 250,000 shares and a 2% gross revenue royalty.

Of the two additional conductive trends, the Ponderosa consists of two parallel graphitic trends, each about 2.5 kilometres long, Lakeland stated. Ground EM surveys and seven holes tested the trend in 1989, with more EM and another hole following in 2001.

The Jack trend extends from the original Lazy Edward property, tripling the trend to about 5.1 kilometres. In 2007 it underwent a ground fixed loop transient EM survey but hasn’t been drilled.

Historic work has sunk at least 53 holes on Lazy Edward’s six trends but, with each ranging between five and seven kilometres long, they remain under-explored. One hole on the Bay trend assayed 770 ppm uranium, along with anomalous pathfinder metals. Depths to the unconformity along the Basin’s southern edge range from zero to 350 metres.

“As a result of the historic and recent exploration on the property, all six trends are considered drill ready,” the company stated.

Among other projects in Lakeland’s portfolio is Gibbon’s Creek, a joint venture with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN that features surface boulders grading up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the highest radon readings ever measured in the Basin.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

Aldrin reports initial findings from Triple M’s initial four holes

With drilling suspended by snowmelt, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN reported preliminary results from the first four holes on its PLS-adjacent Triple M property. All four “intersected alteration, structures and breccia zones within a metasedimentary rock succession including elevated radioactivity counts in a graphitic fault zone,” the company stated on April 22. Assays have yet to come.

With less than 25% of the planned 4,000-metre program complete, the quartet tested the Forrest Lake fault. Aldrin plans at least four more holes over the same fault “moving towards the most intense part of the basement conductive anomaly” before starting on the Anticline target.

Drilling could resume on the 12,000-hectare property in as little as two weeks, the company added.

NexGen adds to eastern Basin holdings

The size of the property wasn’t divulged. Nor was its name. But NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE announced an eastside Basin acquisition and option on April 25. Subject to approvals, NexGen gets a 75% interest in five claims by issuing Long Harbour Exploration TSXV:LHC shares worth $135,000. NexGen’s option on the other 25% would require additional shares worth $45,000. Value would be calculated by the volume-weighted average for five days before closing. The property remains subject to a 2% NSR and 2% gross overriding royalty. The claims lie “in close proximity” to NexGen’s Thorburn Lake property.

On April 22 the company implemented a shareholder rights plan.

Late last month NexGen wrapped up winter drilling at its southwestern Basin Rook 1 flagship by announcing radiometric results for the project’s best hole so far.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 9th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 1 to 7, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium merges two zones, narrows gap between two others at Patterson Lake South

Fission Uranium merges two zones, narrows gap between two others at Patterson Lake South

Fission Uranium has four of its five rigs trying
to fill the gaps in the now six-zone PLS project.

With several zones stretched along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike at Patterson Lake South, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU obviously wants to find one big, shallow, high-grade deposit. That dream came closer to reality with radiometric results released March 5 and 7. Zones R780E and R945E are now one, forever intertwined, while the gap between two zones to the west has been narrowed.

Scintillometer results from 20 holes released March 5 show mineralization at depths as shallow as 54 metres and as deep as 459 metres. Thirteen holes showed off-scale intervals, reaching the maximum 9,999 counts per second on the hand-held device that measures drill core for gamma radiation. Scintillometer readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Apart from the hope of merging more zones—the goal of this winter’s drill program—Fission Uranium sees expansion potential. The best hole of this batch was the most easterly of the newly merged zone, which “bodes extremely well for high-grade expansion to the east.”

Two days later Fission Uranium unveiled scintillometer results for four more holes, each from a different zone, starting with R780E and moving west to the discovery zone. The interval nearest to surface started at 51 metres and the deepest ended at 276 metres. Intervals from one hole showed a total of 16.18 metres of off-scale radioactivity, while another hole gave up an off-scale composite of 2.65 metres. The gap between R390E and R585E has been narrowed to about 60 metres.

With 36 of the planned 85 winter holes complete, Fission Uranium claims a 100% hit rate. The company has one rig exploring outside the mineralized trend and four others attacking the gaps between these six zones:

The discovery zone, R00E, has a 165-metre strike and a lateral width up to about 45 metres. About 135 metres east, R390E has a 255-metre strike and a lateral width up to about 50 metres. Sixty metres east again, R585E has a 75-metre strike and a lateral width up to about 20 metres. About 105 metres east, R780E now has an approximately 270-metre strike, as a result of subsuming R945E. The lateral width reaches up to about 90 metres.

R780E’s geology “is similar to other zones,” Fission Uranium stated, “consisting of mineralization primarily associated with sequences of steeply south-dipping pelitic lithology with localized mylonites and cataclasites.”

Two other zones at the eastern and western extremities, R1155E and R600W, bring the potential strike to 1.78 kilometres.

Two weeks earlier Fission Uranium released lab assays from R585E that showed the project’s best hole ever—or maybe that should be “so far.”

Update: On March 10 Fission released its “second-best” radiometric results from PLS. Read more.

NexGen announces $10-million bought deal for Athabasca Basin exploration

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 1 to 7, 2014

With Fission Uranium’s PLS rigs in the background, NexGen drills Rook 1.

A $10-million bought deal for NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE reinforces the company’s new prominence in Athabasca Basin uranium exploration. Announced March 4, the private placement follows news of radiometric results from a new area of the company’s Rook 1 project, which is adjacent to PLS.

Subject to approvals, the deal involves 22.3 million units at $0.45 and gives the underwriters an option to buy an additional 15%. Each unit consists of a share and one-half warrant, with each entire warrant exercisable at $0.65 for two years. Proceeds will go to Basin exploration, working capital and general corporate purposes.

NexGen’s stock took off with the February 19 release of radiometric readings from the first hole in Rook 1’s Arrow area, which the company called “a totally new zone of uranium mineralization.” The news propelled the company from a 52-week low of $0.225 to a 52-week high of $0.65 in two days. The stock closed March 7 at $0.49.

Meanwhile NexGen has moved its other rig to Arrow to focus two drills on the new area.

NexGen holds several properties in the Basin. But it has yet to release results from last summer’s nine-hole campaign on the Radio project, where the company has a 70% earn-in.

NexGen expects to close the bought deal by March 26.

Zadar announces 2014 plans for PNE and Pasfield projects

With permit applications submitted, Zadar Ventures TSXV:ZAD announced plans for two projects on March 3. The 15,292-hectare PNE, about 11 kilometres northeast of PLS, has about 3,500 metres scheduled for winter and summer drilling, along with ground-based geophysics. Previously identified radon anomalies and conductive trends will help determine targets.

Plans for the 37,445-hectare Pasfield Lake property, within the Cable Bay shear zone in the east-central Basin, include airborne and ground geophysics and a proposed 3,800 metres of drilling “followed by a staged program of uranium exploration culminating in [a] 32,000-metre drilling program,” the company stated.

Pasfield Lake is one of a number of properties that Zadar acquired from Canterra Minerals TSXV:CTM late last year.

Noka Resources/Alpha Exploration begin radon surveys on Carpenter Lake

Radon surveys on lake water and sediment have begun at Carpenter Lake on the Basin’s south-central edge. Announced March 4 by Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Alpha Exploration TSXV:AEX, the four-to-five-week agenda will include sampling from about a thousand locations over a 16-kilometre stretch of the Cable Bay shear zone, which the companies have described as a “major regional shear zone with known uranium enrichment.”

Spring and summer plans for the 20,637-hectare property include high-resolution airborne radiometrics to search for near-surface uranium boulders, followed by ground prospecting and geochemical sampling. The work is part of the Alpha Minerals spinco’s 60% earn-in from Noka, a member of the Western Athabasca Syndicate that plans to drill its PLS-vicinity Preston Lake property this month.

Late last month Noka closed a $1.13-million private placement. Alpha Exploration announced plans for other projects in December and January.

Hodgins Auctioneers pursues Basin uranium claims

A company specializing in auctioning equipment and real estate has signed a conditional agreement to acquire uranium interests in the Basin. Under a deal announced March 6 with Majesta Resources Inc, Hodgins Auctioneers TSXV:HA would get a 25% interest in a 39,125-hectare contiguous package that comes within 10 kilometres of the Key Lake mill.

Apart from TSXV approval, the transaction hinges on raising a $350,000 private placement.

An initial 25% would cost Hodgins $100,000 in cash or debt, two million shares and $300,000 in exploration spending. An additional 35% would require an extra four million shares and $400,000 in spending. A further 30% would call for another $400,000 cash or debt and two million shares.

Hodgins attributed a “low cost relative to similar transactions in the area due to the relationship between two of the insiders of the corporation and the party which owns the mineral claims.” Majesta would act as project operator.

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