Sunday 4th December 2016

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Posts tagged ‘GoviEx Uranium Inc (GXU)’

Where the money is

June 10th, 2016

Joe Martin sees a fundamental transformation coming to junior financing

by Greg Klein

The old system’s not only broken, it can’t be fixed. The world of finance for mineral exploration is changing and juniors must learn new rules and master new tools to survive. That’s the message from Joe Martin, a former business journalist, the founder of Cambridge House International and a prominent advocate for investment regulatory reform.

Well, better scratch that last designation. He’s no longer advocating reform. “There’s no sense trying to change the existing rules because no one at the executive level wants to,” Martin says. “So we have to look at new opportunities emerging, primarily through electronic media.”

Joe Martin sees a fundamental transformation in junior financing

The reform movement failed, he says, despite encouraging response to an open letter by the Venture Capital Markets Association last August. The status quo prevailed—and for that, Martin blames political indifference, bureaucratic intransigence, the self-serving agendas of Canada’s fragmented securities commissions and banks that wield power over the TSX Venture. “Nobody wants to take action and we don’t have the money to fund a multi-million-dollar campaign,” he says.

Now he’s addressing the juniors, not the regulators, and he’s urging them to recognize new financing opportunities in crowdfunding, peer-to-peer transactions and the U.S. JOBS Act.

Crowdfunding has already prompted considerable buzz, especially with the arrival of Australian mine-funder Mineral Intelligence in late 2015, followed by Canada’s Red Cloud Klondike Strike after Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia laid down a regulatory framework in January. Investors register with Klondike under the ordinary, eligible or accredited category.

Klondike’s first listing, Banyan Gold TSXV:BYN put up a $750,000 offer on March 2. The company closed a more conventional private placement of $200,000 the previous January. By press time, Banyan had yet to update the progress of its online offer.

Following that company by six days, Radisson Mining Resources TSXV:RDS offered up to $1 million on Klondike after completing a $324,000 private placement in December. Radisson expected to complete its offer by April 8. But it wasn’t until June 6 that the company announced closing of the second and final tranche, with a total $675,010 raised.

Joe Martin sees a fundamental transformation in junior financing

Joe Martin: “You’d better get in
this game and learn the new rules.”

Klondike’s biggest involvement so far might be IDM Mining TSXV:IDM, which raised a total of $10.85 million in April with Rob McEwan participating. But IDM didn’t divulge how much crowdfunding contributed. The company had said a portion of the placement would be brokered through a syndicate of Klondike, Haywood Securities and Medalist Capital.

Current offers listed on Klondike come from GoviEx Uranium CSE:GXU (up to $2 million), Sarama Resources ($2.25 million) and Brixton Metals TSXV:BBB ($1 million and $1.3 million).

Martin foresees a fairly gradual transformation but a definite change nevertheless with crowdfunding, peer-to-peer lending and the U.S. JOBS Act “all blending together to bring in a new world of financing. P2P, for example, is becoming very big in England.”

With last month’s Tier III enactment of JOBS (Jumpstart Our Business Startups), American crowdfunding has “opened up big time,” Martin says. “Less than 1% of Canadians are accredited investors who can take part in private placements.” The new U.S. regulations allow crowdfunding participants to invest a portion of their income or net worth, up to a percentage that depends on the individual’s financial circumstances.

“Those rules are changing. Canada isn’t changing, so we may be going to the States for financing.”

Martin also sees hope for Canadian juniors on foreign exchanges, as well as the Venture’s rival. “The CSE is doing a pretty good job. They’re a lot easier to deal with.”

Having despaired of fixing the existing system, he sees new opportunities elsewhere—provided juniors adapt. “You’d better get in this game and learn the new rules,” he emphasizes. “But don’t try to change the old ones because we’re not going to get it done.”

Joe Martin addresses the Vancouver Commodity Forum on June 14. Click here for free registration.

Wheeler River PEA buoyant even with cautious uranium price forecast

April 4th, 2016

by Greg Klein | April 4, 2016

Two high-grade eastern Athabasca Basin uranium deposits could form a single mining operation lasting 16 years, according to the Wheeler River joint venture’s PEA. Operator Denison Mines TSX:DML released the figures April 4 from a study that incorporates the McClean Lake mill and bases its numbers on a conservative price forecast.

Wheeler River PEA buoyant even with cautious uranium price forecast

McClean Lake expansion should provide
excess capacity of six million pounds a year.

Using an 8% discount rate, the pre-tax NPV comes to $513 million with a 20.4% IRR. Each of the three partners would face a different tax scenario, Denison pointed out. The company holds a 60% stake in the JV with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (30%) and JCU (Canada) Exploration (10%).

Initial capex would come to $560 million and sustaining capex another $543 million. Payback was reckoned at about three years.

Those numbers assume a uranium price of $44 per pound U3O8, the current long-term contract price according to Denison. (In lieu of a spot price, UEX Consulting provided a very low March 28 price indicator of $29.15.)

By comparison, Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) September PEA for Patterson Lake South considered a price of $65 per pound. Cameco’s average realized price for 2015 came to $57.58, partly bolstered by the weak Canadian dollar.

But should uranium reach $62.60, Wheeler River’s PEA projects a pre-tax NPV of $1.42 billion and a 34.1% IRR.

The “conventionally mined” basement-hosted Gryphon deposit would enter production first. The unconformity-hosted Phoenix, located below water-saturated sandstone, would require Cigar Lake techniques of ground-freezing and remote-control jet-boring. The two Wheeler River deposits lie three kilometres apart on the 11,720-hectare property.

The Phoenix resource used a 0.8% cutoff to show:

  • indicated: 166,400 tonnes averaging 19.14% for 70.2 million pounds U3O8
  • inferred: 8,600 tonnes averaging 5.8% for 1.1 million pounds

Gryphon’s resource used a 0.2% cutoff:

  • inferred: 834,000 tonnes averaging 2.31% for 43 million pounds

Cutoff grades were based on an assumed price of $50 per pound. The Phoenix indicated category has the world’s highest grade of any undeveloped uranium deposit, Denison states. High-grade Gryphon assays from last winter’s drilling have yet to be incorporated into the resource.

The study sees Gryphon production beginning in 2025, turning out around 40.7 million pounds over seven years. Phoenix would follow with 64 million pounds over nine years. Milling would take place at McClean Lake, expected to have excess capacity of six million pounds a year when expansion finishes by the end of 2016. Denison holds a 22.5% share of the mill, along with AREVA Resources Canada (70%) and OURD Canada (7.5%).

“Thanks to the existing infrastructure in the eastern Athabasca Basin, our ownership interest in the McClean Lake mill, and a project designed to minimize risk and upfront capex, the Wheeler River project has the potential to emerge as one of the next producing assets in the region,” stated Denison president/CEO David Cates.

Last week the company announced an all-share deal in which GoviEx Uranium CSE:GXU would acquire all of Denison’s African assets. Expected to close next month, the transaction would leave Denison with 25% of GoviEx outstanding shares and 28% on a fully diluted basis.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 21st, 2015

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to March 20, 2015

by Greg Klein

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Step-outs renew Fission’s interest west of PLS resource

The zone’s five previous holes found disappointingly low grades but Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) most recent drilling brings new attention to R600W, 555 metres west of the Triple R deposit that surprised even some of the more optimistic Patterson Lake South-watchers. The most westerly of four PLS zones got five more holes this season, four showing mineralization in basement rock and three suggesting high grades over significant widths, the company announced March 18.

These results, no substitute for the still-pending assays, come from a scintillometer that measures drill core radiation in counts per second.

Hole PLS15-364, 570 metres west of Triple R, hit a composite total of 45.5 metres of mineralization over a 61-metre section starting at 107 metres in downhole depth. A composite 6.44 metres surpassed 10,000 cps, a level sometimes termed “offscale” due to the limitations of earlier scintillometers.

PLS15-352 revealed a continuous 56.5-metre intercept starting at 102.5 metres that included continuous “offscale” readings for 11.77 metres. PLS15-360 showed 25 continuous metres starting at 111 metres, while PLS15-364 gave up 40.5 continuous metres starting at 107 metres.

True widths weren’t available.

The angled holes have expanded the zone’s strike to 45 metres, a 50% increase that extends PLS’s potential strike from 2.24 to 2.25 kilometres. R600W’s lateral width extends up to about 30 metres. Results have “substantially increased our understanding of the geometry and tenure of the mineralization,” said Fission COO/chief geologist Ross McElroy.

While delineation continues at Triple R, R600W has more drilling to come.

Read more about the Triple R resource estimate.

See an historical timeline of the PLS discovery.

NexGen continues to find high grades at Rook 1’s Arrow zone

Its first two batches of winter assays once again have NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1 project vying for attention with Fission’s Patterson Lake South. On March 17 NexGen announced the project’s widest high-grade interval yet, hitting 70 metres of 2.2% U3O8. Two days later the company confirmed an 88-metre strike extension from AR-14-30, an outstanding hole released last October. The results come from Rook 1’s Arrow zone, defined last month as three mineralized shears named A1, A2 and A3.

The star hole from the first batch, AR-15-34b, was a 30-metre step-out from October’s AR-14-30, centrepiece of the A2 shear. Although the new hole’s other intercepts fell far short in grade and thickness, these intervals brought redemption, the first from A2, the second from A1:

  • 2.2% U3O8 over 70 metres, starting at 522 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 8.95% over 11 metres)

  • 0.12% over 32 metres, starting at 697 metres

As for some other highlights:

AR-15-33

  • 0.26% over 12.5 metres, starting at 548.5 metres

AR-15-35

  • 0.33% over 18.5 metres, starting at 394.5 metres

  • 0.49% over 12 metres, starting at 553.5 metres

AR-14-36

  • 0.32% over 51 metres, starting at 167 metres

  • 0.1% over 61.5 metres, starting at 248 metres

True widths weren’t available. AR-14-36 was a vertical hole. The others were sunk at a dip of -70 or -75 degrees.

Assays for two angled holes released two days later inspired additional confidence in A2. Highlights show:

AR-15-37

  • 2.46% over 16.5 metres, starting at 580.5 metres
  • (including 12.85% over 3 metres)

  • 0.34% over 13.5 metres, starting at 602 metres

  • 2.88% over 40 metres, starting at 621.5 metres
  • (including 4.92% over 22 metres)

AR-15-38

  • 0.75% over 6 metres, starting at 664 metres

  • 0.9% over 32 metres, starting at 583.5 metres

Again, true widths weren’t provided. The latter hole confirms an 88-metre strike expansion southwest of AR-14-30, NexGen stated.

The Arrow zone covers about 515 metres by 215 metres with mineralization starting at about 100 metres in depth and now extending to 820 metres. The zone remains open in all directions and at depth.

NexGen has further drilling planned for the A2 shear as well as the newly discovered high-grade area within A3. At last count the season’s program had completed 38 holes, according to the March 19 press release, or 39, according to a February 24 statement. Roughly a third of the 18,000-metre winter agenda has been drilled.

Phase I drilling finds anomalous radioactivity at Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to March 20, 2015

The first round of drilling went radioactive at
Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK wrapped up a successful 14-hole, 2,550-metre winter program by reporting anomalous radioactivity at its Star/Gibbon’s Creek project on the Athabasca Basin’s northern rim. While assays are pending, initial results also reveal “alteration suggestive of a proximal basement-hosted or unconformity-hosted uranium occurrence,” said company president Jonathan Armes on March 12.

Six holes along a corridor about 1.5 to two kilometres long struck the unconformity at depths of less than 125 metres, finding either anomalous radioactivity, alteration or both. The results confirm the trend as a high-priority target.

Three other holes along a one-kilometre corridor near the head of the Gibbon’s Creek boulder field found the unconformity at depths of less than 110 metres, again intersecting either anomalous radioactivity, alteration or both and confirming another high-priority target.

The readings come from a downhole scintillometer and are no substitute for assays, which will follow. Lakeland attributes background radioactivity to readings of 10 to 100 cps. Results show these anomalous levels of at least 800 cps over 0.3 metres:

Hole GC15-01

  • An average 1,104 cps over 0.4 metres starting at 81.2 metres in downhole depth. The maximum level hit 1,379 cps.

GC15-02

  • An average 1,204 cps over 0.3 metres starting at 99 metres, with a maximum of 1,589 cps

  • An average 1,072 cps over 0.7 metres starting at 99.6 metres, with a maximum of 1,312 cps

GC15-03

  • An average 2,828 cps over 1 metre starting at 107.1 metres, with a maximum of 7,926 cps

GC15-11

  • An average 1,415 cps over 0.6 metres starting at 102.9 metres, with a maximum of 1,740 cps

True widths weren’t available. Along with the other anomalous results, hole GC15-03 is considered highly anomalous.

To further solidify targets, the project also underwent a 270-station ground gravity survey.

“During the coming weeks we will be in receipt of geochemical results for uranium and pathfinder elements such as boron, nickel, cobalt and arsenic,” Armes stated. “As with other historic uranium discoveries within the Athabasca Basin, each successful drill program helps guide the next towards the discovery of a new uranium occurrence.”

The road-accessible project sits a few kilometres from the town of Stony Rapids, with nearby infrastructure.

Lakeland also holds drill-ready projects at Newnham Lake, east of Star/Gibbon’s, and Lazy Edward Bay on the Basin’s southern rim. Late last month the company expanded its holdings to 32 properties totalling over 300,000 hectares, one of the largest portfolios in the Basin region.

As of March 12 Lakeland’s treasury held close to $3 million.

Read more about the Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

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Nuclear energy’s back to pre-Fukushima levels, Russian source states

March 10th, 2015

by Greg Klein | March 10, 2015

Uranium-watchers might remain preoccupied with Japan but the rest of the nuclear world has returned to a “pre-Fukushima state,” according to at least one authority. In an interview with the news agency RIA Novosti quoted by the World Nuclear News on March 10, Leonid Bolshov, director of the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, said predictions of a slowdown have proven false.

“Calls for the abandonment of nuclear power crop up every now and then in different countries but these are, as a rule, the result of short-term political speculation and go against the everyday needs of national economies,” the WNN quoted him.

The Japanese reactor shutdowns resulted from a “state of fear” followed by an “emotional” response in other countries that was “unfortunately tied to politics,” Bolshov said. Yet nuclear energy is growing worldwide, he maintained.

Data from the International Atomic Energy Agency shows the world now has 440 nuclear power units in operation and another 68 under construction, the WNN stated.

Ux Consulting gave uranium a March 9 price indicator of $39.25, representing a steady climb since January, when uranium suddenly fell below $36 from its post-Fukushima high of $44 in November. Speaking at January’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, GoviEx Uranium CSE:GXU CEO Daniel Major attributed the $44 level to “a single big buyer who came in for a million pounds. It really ran the market and you had some jiggery-pokery with some of the traders.”

Term contracts, however, fetch higher prices. That’s a point often emphasized by Paladin Energy TSX:PDN managing director/CEO John Borshoff, whose public pronouncements remain bullish in the face of poor price performance. In a conference call last month he argued the world would need about 70 million pounds of new annual supply by 2020 to meet growth in China, Japan, the Middle East, India and Russia. A shortage in near- and medium-term supply “appears unavoidable post-2015,” Borshoff insisted.

A battery-powered revolution

January 21st, 2015

VRIC 2015 speakers look at emerging needs in energy and commodities

by Greg Klein

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Battery megafactories are on their way, heralding a potential “battery revolution,” says Simon Moores. Although they’re already ubiquitous, much more widespread than only a decade ago, he says batteries remain in a relatively “young stage of development.” Electric vehicles and large-scale storage for utilities could bring on a new phase demanding much more of the minerals and metals they require.

VRIC 2015 speakers look at emerging needs in energy and commodities

Speaking at this year’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Moores dated the first commercial battery-powered watch to 1969. By the late 1990s, battery-powered tools, cellphones and mp3 players became common. By the mid-2000s laptops attained widespread use, followed by the “2007 smartphone revolution powered by Apple.” Tablets and other devices gained popularity. “It’s only now that we’ve evolved into a truly mobile world. You can just tell by the amount of mobile devices you have in your pocket now compared to 10 years ago,” the Benchmark Mineral Intelligence analyst pointed out.

But we’re now entering a new phase of fully electric vehicles—not hybrids—and electricity storage for utilities, he said.

Unlike the earlier mercury or lead-acid batteries, the new wave of batteries uses “niche minerals and metals, they’re not really commodities but specially processed and created products” using graphite, lithium and cobalt, among other minerals. Large-scale storage calls for lithium-ion or vanadium flow batteries.

The impending revolution wouldn’t be the first. The Apple iPhone triggered the “hand-held revolution” in 2007, not just outselling competitors but creating enormous additional demand. Its predecessor, the Nokia N70, sold a million handsets in a year, making it the best-selling smartphone of the time, Moores said. Less than two years later the iPhone emerged, selling a million handsets in 72 days. Last September the iPhone 6 sold 10 million in 72 hours.

Obviously that calls for more batteries, but there’s an additional factor that’s often missed, Moores emphasized. Notwithstanding miniaturization of electronics, batteries are getting bigger. In 2012 the iPhone 5 used roughly nine grams of graphite, he said. Two years later its successor took up to 19 grams. Similar increases apply to lithium and cobalt.

VRIC 2015 speakers look at emerging needs in energy and commodities

Simon Moores foresees a battery revolution brought about by
electronics, EVs and utility storage.

As for electric vehicles, the Nissan Leaf remains the top seller. But Tesla Motors’ approach “could be the tipping point,” Moores thinks. A key innovation was to build a car around the battery, “basically about the size of the chassis of the car” and more than twice the size of Leaf’s battery.

Other manufacturers had taken existing designs, stuck a battery in it and “then they complained the car didn’t go far enough.”

Now Tesla plans a $5-billion project to build the world’s biggest battery plant in Nevada. “They want to take what the world produced in 2013 and double that capacity in Nevada. The idea is lower-cost batteries, lower-cost cars, mass-scale commercialization of the EV.”

Korean manufacturer LG Chem has started building a $500-million battery plant in China. “We think that’s about a seven-gigawatt-hour plant.”

A manufacturer of iPhones for Apple, Foxconn has another battery factory planned for China that Moores thinks will produce about 15 GWh. Like Tesla, Foxconn’s new to the battery-building business.

Tesla’s factory, which the company hopes to see operating in 2017, would have a 35-GWh capacity. “The biggest plant today is about two gigawatt-hours.”

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

July 12th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 28 to July 11, 2014

by Greg Klein

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NexGen extends Arrow’s reach at Rook 1

The first six summer holes at the Rook 1 project’s Arrow zone have more than doubled the potential strike, NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE stated July 7. Radiometric measurements extended the 215 metres determined by eight winter holes to a potential 470-metre strike open in all directions.

Although assays have been released for the winter program, the company bases its summer results on radiation readings from a gamma spectrometer and a gamma probe. The results are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Some of the highlights include hole RK-14-37, which totalled a composite 8.1 metres of “off-scale” radioactivity straining the spectrometer’s limit of 9,999 counts per second. The drill hit 17 anomalous intercepts totalling a composite 78.05 metres of mineralization within a 227.8-metre section beginning at 378 metres in downhole depth.

RK-14-34 found 29 intercepts totalling a composite 100.6 metres of mineralization within a 627.9-metre section that started at 221.4 metres in depth.

RK-14-31 found 35 intercepts totalling 125.8 metres of mineralization within a 430.7-metre section beginning at 221.4 metres in depth.

True widths weren’t provided. All six Arrow holes, which totalled 4,324 metres, showed visible mineralization. One hole is still in progress.

About 200 metres away, the Dagger area took in four holes totalling 1,349 metres without showing anomalous radioactivity. In addition to further Arrow drilling, “preparations have been made for regional drilling to continue at Area K (Dennis Lake),” the company stated.

Rook 1 straddles the southwestern rim of the Athabasca Basin, on the northeastern border of Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South.

Fission Uranium drills 12.35% U3O8 over 13.5 metres, 4.68% over 25 metres at PLS

More high-grade assays from Fission Uranium continue to build Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone, focus of the highly anticipated maiden resource scheduled for December. Of nine holes released July 2 from last winter’s infill drilling, all showed mineralization. A half dozen brought especially impressive results. Some highlights include:

Hole PLS14-170

  • 0.35% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 58 metres, starting at 135.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.2% over 5.5 metres)
Fission drills 13.5 metres of 12.35%, 25 metres of 4.68% at Patterson Lake South

With 39 winter holes still to report,
Fission Uranium has embarked on
a 63-hole summer campaign.

  • 0.31% over 12 metres, starting at 202 metres

  • 2.9% over 20 metres, starting at 217.5 metres
  • (including 8.35% over 4 metres)

  • 0.58% over 11 metres, starting at 260 metres

Hole PLS14-174

  • 0.8% over 25 metres, starting at 105 metres
  • (including 3.45% over 1.5 metres)
  • (and including 2.8% over 1 metre)
  • (and including 4.39% over 1.5 metres)

  • 0.87% over 13.5 metres, starting at 135 metres
  • (including 9.24% over 1 metre)

Hole PLS14-175

  • 0.7% over 21 metres, starting at 120.5 metres
  • (including 3.35% over 2.5 metres)

  • 0.38% over 26 metres, starting at 144 metres
  • (including 1.44% over 2.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-178

  • 0.12% over 25.5 metres, starting at 135.5 metres

  • 0.19% over 15 metres, starting at 164.5 metres

Hole PLS14-179

  • 2.99% over 1 metre, starting at 184.5 metres

  • 2.25% over 8.5 metres, starting at 244 metres

Hole PLS14-180

  • 0.44% over 21 metres, starting at 136.5 metres
  • (including 3.45% over 2 metres)

  • 4.68% over 25 metres, starting at 165 metres
  • (including 18.56% over 5.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-186

  • 12.35% over 13.5 metres, starting at 157 metres
  • (including 23.41% over 7 metres)

  • 1.52% over 2.5 metres, starting at 175 metres

  • 0.9% over 7 metres, starting at 188 metres
  • (including 3.61% over 1.5 metres)

True widths weren’t provided. With five PLS zones stretching east-west along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike, Fission Uranium stated these results show “the continued strong nature of uranium mineralization as the R780E zone moves eastwards.”

Still to come are assays for 39 holes from the 92-hole winter campaign. One week before unloading this latest batch of results, the company announced a 20,330-metre, 63-hole summer program that would eat $12 million of this year’s $28-million budget. As was the case last winter, most of the drilling will focus on delineation for a December resource.

Gold, PGEs and REEs suggest a “robust hydrothermal system” at Lakeland Resources’ Star uranium project

Recently compiled data shows potential for a regional hydrothermal system on Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) Star uranium property, adjacently north of the company’s Gibbon’s Creek joint venture. That’s the verdict for samples taken last year, which assayed for gold, platinum group elements and rare earth elements, as well as uranium.

The Star property covers “a quasi-circular basement uplift,” a feature considered “an ideal location for the development of uranium occurrences associated with the unconformity or sub-unconformity of the Athabasca Basin,” the company stated July 8.

One outcrop sample assayed 5.7 grams per tonne gold, 0.36 g/t platinum and 0.39 g/t palladium. Another showed 1.8 g/t gold, 0.08 g/t platinum and 0.12 g/t palladium.

A sandstone boulder revealed 257 ppm uranium and 0.3% total rare earth oxides, including 1,216 ppm dysprosium and 321 ppm yttrium. Another outcrop sample showed 6.9% TREO, predominantly light REE-enriched.

The assays further indicate potential for a regional hydrothermal system as “demonstrated by intense alteration associated with historic uranium mineralization within the Gibbons Creek property located immediately to the south,” Lakeland stated. “Within the Athabasca Basin, there are a number of projects where highly anomalous precious metals and/or rare earth elements occur in spatial relation to uranium deposits and/or mineralization. Examples of such mineralization include the Nicholson Bay and Fish Hook Bay uranium-gold-platinum group elements occurrences, and the MAW zone-Wheeler River occurrences.”

The Star project’s now slated for a near-term mapping and sampling program. Lakeland may earn a 100% interest in the property by paying $60,000 and issuing 600,000 shares over 12 months. The vendor retains the option of a 25% buyback for four times Lakeland’s exploration expenses.

Declan Resources TSXV:LAN has an option to earn 70% of the adjacent Gibbon’s Creek JV, which has shown boulder samples grading up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the Basin’s highest-ever radon readings.

With an acquisition announced late last month, Lakeland now holds interests in 17 properties totalling 164,316 hectares in and around the Basin.

GoviEx debuts on CSE, orders enviro/social assessment for Niger project

The company began public trading just last month but GoviEx Uranium CSE:GXU has been advancing its Madaouela project in Niger since 2008. On July 2 the company announced contracts to complete an environmental and social impact assessment expected to “culminate the detailed feasibility study and environmental work already undertaken.”

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 28 to July 11, 2014

Backed by Toshiba and a Cameco subsidiary, GoviEx’s
Madaouela project in Niger moves towards feasibility.

As of March 2013 Madaouela’s seven deposits showed resources totalling 22.92 million pounds uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) measured, 75.3 million pounds indicated and 24.1 million pounds inferred. Included are probable reserves of 25,300 tonnes.

Five of the deposits “have been developed to pre-feasibility level of confidence,” the company states.

The July 2 announcement quoted GoviEx chief executive Daniel Major, “Through the use of proprietary technologies never before used in Niger, our project team has presented a commercially viable project and one that seeks to limit its impact on the environment with a particular focus on limitation of dust, reduction in water usage and commercialization of the molybdenum byproduct resource.”

Executive chairman Govind Friedland’s bio lists a number of accomplishments even after he took part in the 1996 Voisey’s Bay discovery. Friedland went on to graduate from the Colorado School of Mines, provided business development services to Ivanhoe Mines and Ivanhoe Energy, and co-founded Ivanhoe Industries. Yes, he’s the son of that Friedland.

Two Niger mines operated by AREVA produce 7.5% of global supply, ranking the country as the world’s fourth-largest producer. While the government supports mining, the industry has been plagued by terrorist kidnappings and a bombing.

Fission 3.0, Azincourt report scintillometer results from PLN

One of four summer holes at Patterson Lake North shows anomalous radioactivity, JV partners Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU and Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ reported July 7. Two intercepts of 0.5 metres and 7.5 metres (not true widths) showed variable readings up to 1,450 counts per second on a hand-held scintillometer. Assays are pending.

The hole, PLN14-019, “is still in progress at 258 metres, although no further intervals of mineralization are expected,” the companies stated. The three other holes “intersected anomalous hydrothermal clay altered intervals, associated with structurally disturbed sections. This further highlights the partners’ confidence of the prospectivity and potential of the A1 conductor to host high-grade uranium mineralization.”

This summer’s five-hole program will total about 1,600 metres. Fission 3.0 acts as operator on the 27,408-hectare property, where Azincourt has a 50% earn-in.

Last April the companies reported that winter drilling failed to find radioactivity but did “confirm the high prospectivity of the target areas.”

In late May Azincourt and Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL stated they would extend to June 15 a letter of intent to consolidate their Peruvian assets. That date passed without further announcement. (Update: The companies announced a definitive agreement on July 14.)

Those properties surround a project held by Fission 3.0, which holds interests in nine others in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Along with JV partner Brades Resource TSXV:BRA, Fission 3.0 announced VTEM results from their Clearwater West project in May.

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