Saturday 25th May 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘gold’

Visual Capitalist: A brief history of jewelry through the ages

March 21st, 2019

by Iman Ghosh | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist

A brief history of jewelry through the ages

 

Jewelry has been an integral aspect of human civilization for centuries, but it was the discovery and subsequent spread of precious metals and gemstones that really changed the game.

In this infographic from Menē TSXV:MENE, we visualize how the uses and symbolism of jewelry have evolved across time and space to become the industry we’re familiar with today.

Antique, yet ageless

There isn’t a single corner of the world that’s untouched by the influence of jewelry.

Ancient Egypt
Gold accompanied the affluent into the afterlife—the famous 1922 discovery of King Tutankhamun’s tomb was filled to the brim with gold jewelry.

Ancient Greece and Rome
Jewelry was used practically and as a protection against evil. The gold olive wreath design was highly popular during this time.

Mesopotamia
Both men and women in the Sumer civilization wore intricate pieces of jewelry, incorporating bright gems like agate, jasper or lapis lazuli.

Meso-America
The aristocracy in Aztec culture wore gold jewelry with gemstones to demonstrate rank. The jewelry also doubled up as godly sacrifices.

Ancient India
The Mughal Empire introduced the combination of gemstones with gold and silver. Today pure gold jewelry is often gifted to new brides for financial security.

Ancient China
Both rich and poor wore jade jewelry for its durable and protective properties. Pure gold jewelry is making a fashion comeback, doubling as a form of investment.

Modern jewelry: At a crossroads

Today jewelry is at once the very same and vastly different from what it used to be.

The industry is worth upwards of $348 billion per year and it’s not hard to see why. As an alternative asset, jewelry has grown 138% in value over the last decade—only outperformed by classic cars, rare coins and fine wine.

However, perceptions of jewelry vastly differ. It’s not a stretch to say that Western jewelry buyers are enamoured with diamonds, given their enduring association with special occasions—but it’s interesting to note how that ideal was fabricated.

The invention of diamonds

The De Beers Group is well known for making diamonds great again. In the early 1900s, the company had already monopolized the diamond trade and stabilized the market, but they faced the challenge of marketing diamonds to consumers at all income levels.

The average American considered diamonds an extravagance, preferring to spend money on cars and appliances instead. The concept of engagement rings existed but they weren’t widely adopted. The #1 slogan of the century—“A Diamond is Forever”— transformed all that.

Even as more companies like Tiffany and Cartier entered the playing field, De Beers had set a successful industry standard. But there’s a catch—diamonds are actually:

  • Not all that rare in nature

  • Intrinsically low in value

  • Easily replicated in a lab

  • Decreasing in sales

Despite these caveats, the popularity of diamonds illustrates how Western consumers do not approach jewelry in the same way as Eastern economies, where its function as a store of wealth persists.

The Eastern gold standard

In Eastern economies, jewelry often takes the form of pure gold. The reasons behind this difference are surprisingly pragmatic: gold is considered a secure and innate store of wealth that maintains its purchasing value over decades, allowing families to pass wealth from generation to generation.

The rich history of the precious metal has made it a sought-after commodity for centuries, and China and India drive more than half of global gold jewelry demand every year:

Year Share of demand (India + China) Total global jewelry demand (tonnes)
2014 57% 2,510 tonnes
2015 58% 2,426 tonnes
2016 55% 2,068 tonnes
2017 57% 2,201 tonnes
2018 58% 2,200 tonnes

Source: Gold Hub. Values have been rounded up to the nearest tonne.

Why are Eastern cultures so attracted to the properties of pure gold?

Part 2 of this series will show why gold is the world’s most incredible metal and why it’s coveted by billions of people.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Update: Ximen Mining/GGX Gold add tellurium to B.C. gold-silver project, drilling resumes in April

March 18th, 2019

by Greg Klein | updated March 20, 2019

New assays add impressive critical mineral results to near-surface, high-grade precious metals at southern British Columbia’s Greenwood mining camp. The news comes from the Gold Drop project, where earlier this month Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM and GGX Gold TSXV:GGX reported intervals as high as 129.1 g/t gold and 1,154.9 g/t silver over 7.28 metres, along with 107.5 g/t gold and 880 g/t silver over 6.9 metres. After 14 intervals surpassed the upper analytical limit of 500 g/t tellurium, the core was re-assayed specifically for the critical mineral.

Among the results were 823.4 g/t tellurium over 7.28 metres and 640.5 g/t over 6.9 metres. Combined with the gold-silver results, the intervals now show:

Ximen Mining/GGX Gold examine tellurium potential of B.C. gold-silver project

Hole COD18-67

  • 129.1 g/t gold, 1,154.9 g/t silver and 823.4 g/t tellurium over 7.28 metres, starting at 23.19 metres in downhole depth

COD18-70

  • 107.5 g/t gold, 880 g/t silver and 640.5 g/t tellurium over 6.9 metres, starting at 22.57 metres

True widths were unavailable.

Other individual samples graded as high as 3,860 g/t and 2,250 g/t tellurium, both in near-surface 0.38-metre intervals from COD18-67. COD18-70 also showed individual samples up to 3,340 g/t over 0.45 metres and 2,960 g/t over 0.4 metres.

“Tellurium occurs in a soft silver-grey telluride mineral,” the companies stated. “Whenever this mineral is observed in the drill core, the interval has elevated silver, gold and tellurium values. This telluride mineral is likely a silver-tellurium-gold alloy named sylvanite.”

The decision to re-assay the core was prompted by “multiple industry inquiries and spiked interest with regards to the tellurium grades,” Ximen president/CEO Chris Anderson said earlier this month.

Due to the multiple industry inquiries and spiked interest with regards to the tellurium grades, as well as the fact that the grades have exceeded upper analytical limits at the lab, the decision was made to re-assay these drill core samples.—Chris Anderson,
Ximen Mining president/CEO

The 2018 program sunk 71 holes on the COD vein in the property’s Southwest zone and also conducted trenching in the COD area along with drilling on the Everest vein. Drilling and trenching have followed COD’s vein system for 400 metres along strike, leaving it open along strike and at depth. The upcoming drill campaign will continue testing the vein’s southern extension.

GGX acts as operator on the 5,628-hectare property. If GGX completes its 100% option, Ximen may form a JV by reimbursing GGX 30% of its spending to that date. Ximen retains a 2.5% NSR. The property sits about 500 kilometres by highway east of Vancouver.

Included in last year’s U.S. government list of 35 critical minerals, tellurium finds uses globally in solar applications (40%), thermo-electric production (30%), metallurgy (15%), rubber applications (5%) and other purposes (10%), according to a recent report from the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. imports over 75% of its tellurium supply.

Ximen’s flagship is the Brett project in southern B.C.’s Okanagan region. Last November the company announced that metallurgical tests on material stockpiled during early-stage mine development in the 1990s support an historic account of 4 g/t to 5 g/t gold.

Ximen has its Treasure Mountain property under option to New Destiny Mining TSXV:NED. Grab samples from last year’s program included gold grades of 11.3 g/t and 8.81 g/t from the property’s east-northeast areas, and up to 1.45% zinc, 122 g/t silver, 0.87 g/t gold, 57 g/t tellurium and 12.3 g/t indium in the southeast region. Grab samples from a trench in the southeast area showed anomalous gold grades including 0.877 g/t, 0.46 g/t and 0.359 g/t.

The companies received permits last month for additional work on the property, which partly surrounds Nicola Mining’s (TSXV:NIM) Treasure Mountain project, about three and a half hours’ driving distance from Vancouver. Nicola’s property underwent silver-lead-zinc underground mining in 2008 and 2013.

Last month Ximen appointed Mathew Ball as VP of exploration. With over 30 years of experience, he’s served as president/COO of B.C.’s Bralorne gold mine and currently acts as interim CEO/COO/chief geologist for Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM, another company active in the Greenwood camp. “Dr. Ball brings a wealth of practical experience and knowledge of lode and epithermal gold-silver, porphyry copper-gold and related skarn deposits,” all of which potentially occur in Ximen’s three projects, the company stated.

Ximen closed private placements of $540,000 in December and $250,000 in February. On March 18 the company announced it arranged a private placement of $405,000 subject to TSXV approval.

Ximen Mining/GGX Gold examine tellurium potential of B.C. gold-silver project

March 7th, 2019

This story has been updated and moved here.

Got the minerals?

March 4th, 2019

A new book says self-imposed obstacles block U.S. self-sufficiency

by Greg Klein

“The Middle East has oil, China has rare earths.”

Deng Xiaoping’s 1992 implied threat became all too real eight years later in the Senkaku aftermath, when RE dependency put Japan and the West at China’s mercy. But just as the United States overcame the 1973 OPEC embargo to become the world’s leading oil producer, that country can overcome its growing reliance on dodgy sources of mineral production and processing. So say authors Ned Mamula and Ann Bridges in Groundbreaking! America’s New Quest for Mineral Independence.

Their country’s problem isn’t geology but policies, the book argues. Repeatedly pointing to Canada and Australia as role models, the authors say their own country’s mining potential can restore mining self-sufficiency, or at least minimize a crippling dependency.

A new book says self-imposed obstacles block U.S. self-sufficiency

Indeed, the mighty nation has a mighty problem with minerals: Imports supply many critical minerals and metals in their entirety, with heavy reliance on Russia and especially China, “countries we consider at best our competitors, and at worst our adversaries.”

Rare earths stand out as the “poster child for U.S. critical mineral vulnerability.” As the authors note, REs remain “essential for military and civilian use, for the production of high-performance permanent magnets, GPS guidance systems, satellite imaging and night vision equipment, cellphones, iPads, flat screens, MRIs and electric toothbrushes, sunglasses, and a myriad of other technology products. Since they offer that extra boost to so many new technologies, these rare earth metals rival energy in importance to our 21st century lifestyle.”

Industrial countries not only surrendered rare earths mining and processing to China, but gave up technological secrets too. That happened when China forced RE-dependent manufacturers to move their operations to China. After Apple transplanted some of its manufacturing to that country, China copied and reproduced the company’s products, at times outselling the iPhone with knock-offs.

A new book says self-imposed obstacles block U.S. self-sufficiency

Other intellectual property faces threats. “U.S. companies—Intematix, GE (Healthcare/MRI Division), Ford (Starter Motor Division), and Battery 1,2,3—have all added manufacturing capacity in China, and so has Japan’s Showa Denko, Santoku, and scores of other global electronics companies.”

RE dominance has also allowed China to lead the world in technology for electric vehicles, renewable energy and next-generation nuclear power. And America relies on its rival for defence: “Most of the U.S.’ advanced weapon systems procurement is 100% dependent on China for advanced metallurgical materials.”

Foreign dependency includes tantalum, “critical to the economy and national defense,” gallium, cobalt, uranium and the list goes on.

According to a just-published report from the U.S. Geological Survey, “in 2018, imports made up more than half of U.S apparent consumption for 48 non-fuel mineral commodities, and the U.S. was 100% net import-reliant for 18 of those.

“For 2018, critical minerals comprised 14 of the 18 mineral commodities with 100% net import reliance and 15 additional critical mineral commodities had a net import reliance greater than 50% of apparent consumption. The largest number of non-fuel mineral commodities were supplied to the U.S. from China, followed by Canada.”

The takeover of former TSX listing Uranium One by Russia’s state-owned Rosatom brings threats worse than most observers realized, the authors say. The acquisition granted the Russian government membership in trade organizations and therefore valuable intel formerly available only through espionage. Uranium One also gives Russia the ability to curtail future American uranium production and use its influence on Kazakhstan, the world’s top producer, to flood the U.S. with cheaper, subsidized supply. That could put both U.S. production and processing out of business in a tactic reminiscent of China’s RE machinations.

China’s communist government uses a ‘debt trap’ model of economic development and finance which proffers substantial financing to developing countries in exchange for an encumbrance on their minerals resources and access to markets. This predatory model has been particularly effective in countries characterized by weak rule of law and authoritarian regimes.—Ned Mamula
and Ann Bridges

The Chinese “are now masters at securing and controlling core natural resources globally, especially minerals.” The country uses long-term contracts, equity investments and joint ventures, as well as the “debt trap” that provides “substantial financing to developing countries in exchange for an encumbrance on their minerals resources and access to markets. This predatory model has been particularly effective in countries characterized by weak rule of law and authoritarian regimes.”

The U.S., meanwhile, suffers not only from naivete and short-term thinking, but from self-induced challenges. The authors devote an entire chapter to Alaska’s Pebble project, maybe the world’s largest undeveloped copper-gold-molybdenum deposit. After more than two decades and over $150 million in spending, “Pebble is still more about politics than geology, much less mining the minerals known to exist there.”

The story stands out as “the classic cautionary tale in U.S. history of how a powerful federal regulatory agency can go rogue and impose its will on an unsuspecting permit applicant.”

Suggestions to alleviate these ills include streamlining the permitting process, among other recommendations to open up domestic production and re-build supply chains. One of the authors’ more interesting ideas concerns teaming up with environmental activists to promote ethical green supply chains that would shut out conflict minerals.

The book’s marred by repetition, sloppy English and some bold-faced typographical shouting. It’s also cluttered with a few questionable information sources and excerpts from a novel that would have been better left unwritten. The portrayal of Canada as a role model, moreover, might induce bitter laughter from this side of the border. But Groundbreaking offers a vital message to general readers. In doing so, it could reinforce a growing awareness in the U.S. about the need to minimize foreign dependency.

Read more about U.S. efforts to secure critical minerals here and here.

The World Gold Council bases its 2019 optimism partly on progress in China and India

February 25th, 2019

…Read more

Margaret Lake moves fast on Nunavut gold acquisition

February 21st, 2019

by Greg Klein | February 21, 2019

Margaret Lake moves fast on Nunavut gold acquisition

Accustomed to working in Arctic conditions, Margaret Lake adds a Nunavut property to its NWT portfolio.

 

With an aggressive winter/spring campaign planned for a newly acquired project, Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA turns its attention to Nunavut gold. The company announced its Kiyuk Lake option just last week, allowing up to an 80% interest in the 59,000-hectare property north of the Manitoba border. Now, assuming receipt of land and water use permits, Margaret Lake intends to start building an exploration camp next month in preparation for up to 5,000 metres of spring drilling. The agenda also includes ground magnetics.

Margaret Lake moves fast on Nunavut gold acquisition

Past drilling brought impressive near-surface intercepts
and identified a 13-kilometre strike open in all directions.
(Photo: Cache Exploration)

Drilling will target the Rusty zone, where some historic, non-43-101 results from a previous operator in 2017 brought the following near-surface results:

  • 26.48 g/t gold over 8 metres, starting at 108 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 92.76 g/t over 2 metres)

  • 1.16 g/t over 38 metres, starting at 58 metres
  • (including 3.98 g/t over 8 metres)

  • 1.82 g/t over 122 metres, starting at 188 metres
  • (including 3.34 g/t over 15 metres)

Additionally, a 2013 intercept showed:

  • 1.6 g/t over 249 metres, starting at 8.2 metres

Further 2017 work at the property’s Gold Point/East Gold Point zone yielded the following results:

  • 1.46 g/t gold over 64 metres, starting at 35 metres
  • (including 3.12 g/t over 14 metres)

  • 6.51 g/t over 10 metres, starting at 248 metres

True widths weren’t available.

Over 13,000 metres of historic work identified four mineralized zones as well as five more areas that have yet to be drilled. The property features a 13-kilometre strike that remains open in all directions, the company stated.

Subject to exchange approval, an initial 50% Margaret Lake stake in Kiyuk Lake would require the company to issue five million shares, buy three million of the vendor’s shares for $150,000, pay $100,000 within a year and spend $3 million within three years. An additional 30% would cost $5 million.

In the Northwest Territories, the company also holds the eponymous Margaret Lake diamond project and the majority interest in a 60/40 JV with Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD on the Diagras diamond property.

Periodic table: New version warns of elements that are endangered

January 25th, 2019

by David Cole-Hamilton, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, University of St Andrews | posted with permission of The Conversation | January 25, 2019

Periodic table New version warns of elements that are endangered

Period pains. (Image: European Chemical Society)

 

It is amazing to think that everything around us is made up from just 90 building blocks—the naturally occurring chemical elements. Dmitri Mendeleev put the 63 known during his time into order and published his first version of what we now recognize as the periodic table in 1869. In that year, the American Civil War was just over, Germany was about to be unified, Tolstoy published War and Peace and the Suez Canal was opened.

There are now 118 known elements but only 90 that occur in nature. The rest are mostly super-heavy substances that have been created in laboratories in recent decades through nuclear reactions and rapidly decay into one or more of the natural elements.

Where each of these natural elements sits in the periodic table allows us to know immediately a great deal about how it will behave. To commemorate the 150th anniversary of this amazing resource, UNESCO has proclaimed 2019 as the International Year of the Periodic Table.

Periodic table New version warns of elements that are endangered

Dmitri Mendeleev.
(Artwork: Marusya Chaika)

As part of the celebrations, the European Chemical Society has published a completely new version of the periodic table. (See main image.) It is designed to give an eye-catching message about sustainable development. Based on an original idea in the 1970s from the American chemist William Sheehan, the table has been completely redrawn so that the area occupied by each element represents its abundance on a log scale.

Red for danger

Each area of the new table has been colour-coded to indicate its vulnerability. In most cases, elements are not lost but, as we use them, they become dissipated and much less easy to recover. Red indicates that dissipation will make the elements much less readily available in 100 years or less—that’s helium (He), silver (Ag), tellurium (Te), gallium (Ga), germanium (Ge), strontium (Sr), yttrium (Y), zinc (Zn), indium (In), arsenic (As), hafnium (Hf) and tantalum (Ta).

To give just a couple of examples, helium is used to cool the magnets in MRI scanners and to dilute oxygen for deep-sea diving. Vital rods in nuclear reactors use hafnium. Strontium salts are added to fireworks and flares to produce vivid red colours. Yttrium is a component of camera lenses to make them shock- and heat-resistant. It is also used in lasers and alloys. Gallium, meanwhile, is used to make very high-quality mirrors, light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

Meanwhile, the orange and yellow areas on the new periodic table anticipate problems caused by increased use of these elements. Green means that plenty is available—including the likes of oxygen (O), hydrogen (H), aluminium (Al) and calcium (Ca).

Four elements—tin (Sn), tantalum (Ta), tungsten (W) and gold (Au)—are coloured in black because they often come from conflict minerals; that is, from mines where wars are fought over their ownership. They can all be more ethically sourced, so it’s intended as a reminder that manufacturers must carefully trace their origin to be sure that people did not die in order to provide the minerals in question.

Smartphone shortages

Out of the 90 elements, 31 carry a smartphone symbol reflecting the fact that they are all contained in these devices. This includes all four of the elements from conflict minerals and another six with projected useful lifetimes of less than 100 years.

Let us consider indium (In), for instance, which is coloured red on the table. Every touch screen contains a transparent conducting layer of indium tin oxide. There is quite a lot of indium, but it is already highly dispersed. It is a byproduct of zinc manufacture, but there is only enough from that source for about 20 years. Then the price will start to rise quickly unless we do something to preserve current stocks.

The three main possibilities are: replace, recycle or use less. Huge efforts are being made to find alternative materials based on Earth-abundant elements. Reclaiming indium from used screens is possible and being attempted. But when we look at the periodic table and the very precious nature of so many of the elements, can we possibly justify changing our phone every two or so years?

At present over one million phones are traded every month in the UK alone, as well as 10 million in Europe and 12 million in the U.S.

At present over one million phones are traded every month in the UK alone, as well as 10 million in Europe and 12 million in the U.S. When we trade in our smartphones, many of them go to the developing world initially for reuse. Most end up in landfill sites or undergo attempts to extract a few of the elements under appalling conditions. The other elements remain in acidic brews. Along with the very many that lie around in drawers, this is how the elements in mobile phones become dissipated.

The number of phones we trade in could be greatly reduced and lower the demand on limited resources such as indium. In this context, the recent Apple profit warning, partly due to customers replacing their iPhones slightly less frequently, was at least a sign of improvement.

But as the new version of the periodic table underlines, we must do all we can to conserve and recycle the 90 precious building blocks that make up our wonderfully diverse world. If we don’t start taking these problems more seriously, many of the objects and technologies that we now take for granted may become relics of a more abundant age a few generations from now—or available only to richer people.

David Cole-Hamilton is affiliated with the UK Liberal Democratic Party. He is vice-president of the European Chemical Society (EuChemS). He is past-president of the Royal Society of Chemistry Dalton Division covering Inorganic Chemistry. He is a member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE) Education Committee, RSE Learned Societies Group on STEM Education, RSE European Strategy Group and chairs the sub-group on Research, Innovation and Tertiary Education. He is a trustee of the Wilkinson Charitable Foundation.

Posted with permission of The Conversation.

More from The Conversation:

From Visual Capitalist:

The Conversation

Getting Frank

January 23rd, 2019

Frank Holmes discusses tips, disruptors, M&A, what drives HIVE, and more

by Greg Klein

Frank Holmes discusses tips, cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

With over 7,000 attendees, VRIC 2019’s numbers and enthusiasm suggested a buoyant market mood.

 

Definitely one of the busiest people at this year’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Frank Holmes kicked off the event with a keynote speech to a capacity crowd, one of a number of times he took the stage during the two-day event. Even so, the CEO and chief investment officer of U.S. Global Investors found time to sit down with Resource Clips and discuss some wide-ranging issues.

A new feature at this year’s VRIC was the Top Picks Competition, which pitted three companies he chose against three selected by Marin Katusa. The fast pace had the rivals briefly introduce each of his three picks, followed by a company rep giving a concise six-minute presentation. The packed audience rated each company from one to 10. While waiting for results to appear on the big screen, Katusa said, “Man, I’ll be depressed if I lose to Frank.”

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

The mainstay of this year’s VRIC, Holmes
tackled issues ranging from peak gold to data mining.

But the chart showed no definite winner, at least not to those who struggle with mental math. Katusa pronounced the results a tie but Holmes confidently told Resource Clips: “I won.”

As for the format, “that model of 20 seconds per slide, capped at 20 slides, 6.4 minutes, that model is working in 900 cities,” he explained, adding that it began in 2003 with the Tokyo-based Klein-Dytham architectural firm. “The PechaKucha model will drive more interest to a company’s booth than anything else.”

But isn’t there a danger that stock tips from influential people can affect share prices more than company performance does?

“I’ve invested in all six of those companies so I’m not getting up there with anyone I haven’t vetted.”

Are they long-term holds? “They have been.”

Katusa stuck with miners but Holmes’ list included two disruptors—a soon-to-be-listed company that creates gold and platinum jewelry as tradable investments, and another company that applies machine learning to mineral exploration as well as combining quantitative and fundamental analyses of mining investment.

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Investors heard first-hand pitches from company reps.

Disruption seems to increasingly command Holmes’ attention, but not at the expense of good old-fashioned gold. He sees peak gold as one application for AI and machine learning.

“There are fundamental supply-demand issues, there has to be a new way to replace it. The world’s GDP per capita for China, India and America is so strong and when you look at China and India, their GDP per capita is highly correlated to gold demand for love.

“When I first got in the business there was a four-year cycle from exploration to discovery to production. Now it’s a minimum eight to 12 years. We have declining reserves and each year the mines are getting deeper and deeper, the grades are getting lower and lower, and there’s also a falloff in exploration success. The timeline for getting projects on stream is getting longer and longer. We do have peak supply.”

With the Newmont-Goldcorp buyout following closely on the Barrick-Rangold merger, M&A has returned to prominence. When asked whether the activity could have a trickle-down effect on junior explorers, the Toronto native brought up a nationalist perspective.

A locally headquartered major means “a junior explorer or mid-cap developer can knock on their door, pitch them a story and maybe they’re your partner. But now you’d have to go to Denver, and the process of what they look at is very different from what Canadians look at. So I think there’s a vacuum being created and it’s not helping the Canadian mining industry.”

Additionally, “I think Canada will be hurt because the geological brain trust that was with Barrick in Toronto will go to Europe or South Africa. With Newmont, the brain trust will go to Denver.”

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Attendees gleaned intel from speakers, exhibitors and each other.

He suggested gold might attract more M&A than other metals because it’s “more bullish.” Elsewhere in metals, he expects to see further shareholder activism as seen by Waterton Global Resource Management with Hudbay Minerals and Paulson & Co with Detour Gold. “I’m surprised there isn’t more in the mid-cap space,” he noted.

He considers the activism constructive—“anything that keeps people accountable.” As chairperson of cryptocurrency miner HIVE Blockchain Technologies, however, he has to account for a share price that’s plunged about 78% over the last year.

“All of us are down, but it’s only because of the Bitcoin and Ethereum prices,” he said. “With gold stocks, most of them rise or fall as gold rises or falls that day. They correlate. What HIVE has done is become a proxy [for buying cryptos]. So HIVE has become incredibly liquid and moves every day with the price action of Bitcoin and Ethereum. Bitcoin and Ethereum have a volatility such that if gold’s daily volatility is 1%, their daily volatility is 6% to 8%. So that’s what drives HIVE. If Bitcoin goes this quarter to $10,000, we’ll go to a dollar. And if Bitcoin falls, we’ll go down with it. We’re at the mercy of where the cryptocurrencies are going. But the positive part for an investor or trader is that you can call up during market hours and use that as a proxy.”

One indication of continuing crypto enthusiasm, he added, was a very strong turnout at the previous week’s North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami, despite a hefty admission fee.

As for VRIC, he likes the event for “energy—it’s the vibe, what people are talking about. Are they skewing to optimism, or to doubt and fear and pessimism? I get the energy and vibrations here, and whether there’s an appetite for risk. This is all venture capital. Most of these companies are speculation. As I said at the opening, I’m so happy people came here and didn’t go to the casino or buy a lottery ticket to speculate.”

Watch for videos of VRIC presentations to be posted in the coming weeks by Cambridge House International.

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Moderated by Daniela Cambone, the Ultimate Gold Panel
included Holmes, Peter Hug, Roy Sebag and Peter Schiff.

 

Frank Holmes discusses tips, disruptors, M&A, what drives HIVE, and more

Although soliciting was strictly prohibited,
a hint of hustle might have been evident.

Ximen Mining and GGX Gold report more high-grade, near-surface gold-silver with tellurium from B.C.

January 21st, 2019

by Greg Klein | January 21, 2019

Ximen Mining and GGX Gold report more high-grade, near-surface gold and silver with tellurium from southern B.C.

Visible gold brings new potential to an historic British Columbia camp.

 

Heralding the results as once again “some of the highest-grade intersections ever drilled over the last 100 years in the Greenwood gold mining camp,” Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM CEO Chris Anderson welcomed the latest Gold Drop news from optionee GGX Gold TSXV:GGX. The property was one of the former gold and silver mining sites in the historic camp about 500 kilometres by highway east of Vancouver.

Following the previous week’s batch featuring 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres, these assays come from the final four holes of an 11-hole November campaign on the southern extension of Gold Drop’s COD vein. All holes were sunk within 25 metres of two 2018 holes and “suggest a continuous high-grade gold mineralized structure has been confirmed,” Ximen stated.

The standout of this batch was COD18-70, which showed:

  • 107.5 g/t gold and 880 g/t silver over 6.9 metres, starting at 22.57 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 541 g/t gold, 4,532 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.85 metres)
Ximen Mining and GGX Gold report more high-grade, near-surface gold and silver with tellurium from southern B.C.

Some other highlights featured:

COD18-68

  • 8.77 g/t gold, 85.4 g/t silver and 56.3 g/t tellurium over 2.76 metres, starting at 19.49 metres
  • (including 14.47 g/t gold, 131.8 g/t silver and 87.9 g/t tellurium over 1.39 metres)

COD18-69

  • 5.76 g/t gold, 67.9 g/t silver and 61.2 g/t tellurium over 7.46 metres, starting at 26.72 metres
  • (including 9.77 g/t gold, 95 g/t silver and 110 g/t tellurium over 0.8 metres)
  • (and including 70.9 g/t gold, 569 g/t silver and 278 g/t tellurium over 0.4 metres)

True widths were unavailable.

GGX acts as operator under an option to earn 100% of the project. Should GGX fulfill the 100%, Ximen may form a JV by reimbursing GGX 30% of its spending to that date. Ximen retains a 2.5% NSR.

Also in southern B.C., Ximen plans springtime underground drilling and remedial work for its flagship Brett project in the Okanagan region. Metallurgical tests on 1990s material stockpiled during early-stage mine development support an historic report of 4 g/t to 5 g/t gold, the company announced in November.

About a three and a half hour drive northeast of Vancouver, Ximen holds the Treasure Mountain property near Nicola Mining’s (TSXV:NIM) Treasure Mountain silver project, the location of underground mining in 2008 and 2013.

In late December Ximen closed a private placement of $540,000 and offered another private placement of $250,000.

Ximen Mining/GGX Gold report near-surface 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres in B.C.

January 14th, 2019

by Greg Klein | January 14, 2019

Ximen Mining GGX Gold report near-surface 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres in B.C.

Gold Drop gives up high grades near surface at B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp.

 

With assays from seven of 11 November holes now in, Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM and GGX Gold TSXV:GGX report high gold and silver grades along with tellurium at the Gold Drop project in southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp. All from near-surface intervals on the southern extension of the property’s COD vein, the batch featured a standout result of 129.1 g/t gold and 1,154.9 g/t silver over 7.28 metres. GGX operates the project under option from Ximen.

A closer look at hole COD18-67 shows the breakdown of sub-intervals:

  • 129.1 g/t gold and 1,154.9 g/t silver over 7.28 metres, starting at 23.19 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 106 g/t gold, 1,250 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.37 metres)
  • (and including 232.1 g/t gold, 2,001.1 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 3.13 metres)
  • (and including 143 g/t gold, 1,372.9 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.77 metres)
Ximen Mining GGX Gold report near-surface 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres in B.C.

Some of the program’s other highlights showed:

COD18-61

  • 5.29 g/t gold, 32.4 g/t silver and 31.4 g/t tellurium over 1.38 metres, starting at 22.62 metres

COD18-63

  • 28 g/t gold, 424.7 g/t silver and 150.4 g/t tellurium over 1.17 metres, starting at 26.14 metres
  • (including 49.7 g/t gold, 787 g/t silver and 245 g/t tellurium over 0.59 metres)

COD18-66

  • 6.97 g/t gold, 46.8 g/t silver and 34.4 g/t tellurium over 0.94 metres, starting at 22.96 metres

True widths were unavailable.

The autumn campaign followed two initial holes sunk last August within 25 metres’ distance. Again at near surface, those results featured 50.15 g/t gold and 375 g/t silver over 2.05 metres for COD18-45, along with 54.9 g/t gold and 379 g/t silver over 1.47 metres for COD18-46.

Drilling and trenching have traced COD’s mineralized vein system for about 400 metres in strike, remaining open to the northeast, at depth and possibly to the southwest, the operator stated.

Gold Drop was one of the sites of historic gold and silver mining in the Greenwood camp, roughly 500 kilometres by highway east of Vancouver.

The Gold Drop option allows GGX to earn 100% of the project, with Ximen retaining a 2.5% NSR. If GGX completes the 100% earn-in, Ximen may form a JV by reimbursing GGX 30% of its work expenses to that date.

Ximen’s flagship Brett project in southern B.C.’s Okanagan region has underground drilling and remedial work planned for spring. In November the company announced that results from a batch test supported an historic report of 4 g/t to 5 g/t gold from material stockpiled when a mine portal was built during the 1990s. Ximen plans further metallurgical tests on the stockpiled material.

In southwestern B.C., Ximen holds the Treasure Mountain property proximal to Nicola Mining’s (TSXV:NIM) Treasure Mountain silver project, where underground mining took place briefly in 2008 and 2013.

After closing a private placement of $540,000 in late December, Ximen offered another private placement of $250,000.