Wednesday 20th March 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘Goldcorp Inc (G)’

Philanthropist Ian Telfer said he’ll give it all away. But first…

March 15th, 2019

by Greg Klein | March 15, 2019

The news hardly went unnoticed, despite being buried on page 88 of a 249-page management information circular. Goldcorp TSX:G and its chairperson Ian Telfer decided to nearly triple his retirement allowance, from about US$4.5 million to around US$12 million.

The payout depends on shareholders approving the company’s takeover by Newmont Mining NYSE:NEM.

Philanthropist Ian Telfer said he’d give it all away. But first …

At a public event in July, Goldcorp chairperson
Ian Telfer vowed to put all his money
into worthy causes.

The rationale? When Telfer took over the board he “relinquished entitlement to benefits he would have otherwise been entitled to receive as an executive, including participation in the various executive incentive plans, other than a retirement allowance,” the disclosure stated. “The retirement allowance approved in 2006 did not contain any indexing to reflect inflation, and other than his annual salary and annual Goldcorp RSU grants made at the same value as other Goldcorp directors, Mr. Telfer did not receive any other benefits from Goldcorp since that time.”

But condemnation came quickly. Telfer had already been “lining his pockets” with about US$11.8 million of shareholders’ money while heading a board whose “stock price has collapsed by nearly 60%,” argued the Shareholders’ Gold Council. “In Mr. Telfer’s role as a ‘strategic leader’ at Goldcorp, he has presided over one of the most disastrous and egregious examples of shareholder value destruction in the mining industry.”

The non-profit research group also attacked other Goldcorp figures, most notably CEO David Garofalo, who’d get “an outrageous change of control package of up to C$11 million, despite his role in destroying over C$3.7 billion in shareholder value…. While Goldcorp is telling its shareholders to sell their shares close to a 13-year low, Goldcorp management stands to reap over US$33 million in potential change of control payments.”

“I’m appalled by it,” Bloomberg quoted Joe Foster of VanEck, Goldcorp’s second-largest shareholder. “They put the current management in place three years ago, and they’ve done a very poor job of operating the company, and it shows in their results,” the portfolio manager added. “To reward that poor performance with these huge payouts is a crime in my view.”

Goldcorp stock “has plummeted almost 75% since its 2011 high and the company fell short of almost every target when it last reported earnings,” the news agency stated. “Meanwhile, Telfer has collected $900,000 in average annual compensation since becoming chairman in 2006 and reaped at least $35 million from exercising stock options, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.”

Telfer’s “getting paid for destroying a ton of value over his tenure then selling at a low,” analyst John Qian of the T. Rowe Price Group told the news agency. “In what world is that worthy of a massive payout?”

Even Rick Rule spoke out against his “long-time friend.” He told Bloomberg that Telfer’s “combination of this special bonus, his prior special bonus, stepping down as CEO and his continuing role appears excessive.”

But then there’s Ian Telfer, philanthropist.

Having already donated millions of his money, last summer he publicly vowed to give it all away on his death. He stated his intention to emulate Peter Munk, who “gave away his complete net worth to charity. And while a lot of successful people say they’re going to do that, most of them don’t…. Peter Munk’s comment was that all the good that came to him came from society, and it should go back. And so that will be my legacy.”

Then what are Telfer’s plans for that extra US$7.5 million—add it to family assets? Go on a late-life binge? Or donate it to charities in a redistribution of wealth from shareholders?

And as for that legacy, which will prevail—company builder, destroyer of shareholder value or generous benefactor?

Frank Holmes comments on how mining mergers can affect the Canadian industry

March 5th, 2019

…Read more

Getting Frank

January 23rd, 2019

Frank Holmes discusses tips, disruptors, M&A, what drives HIVE, and more

by Greg Klein

Frank Holmes discusses tips, cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

With over 7,000 attendees, VRIC 2019’s numbers and enthusiasm suggested a buoyant market mood.

 

Definitely one of the busiest people at this year’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Frank Holmes kicked off the event with a keynote speech to a capacity crowd, one of a number of times he took the stage during the two-day event. Even so, the CEO and chief investment officer of U.S. Global Investors found time to sit down with Resource Clips and discuss some wide-ranging issues.

A new feature at this year’s VRIC was the Top Picks Competition, which pitted three companies he chose against three selected by Marin Katusa. The fast pace had the rivals briefly introduce each of his three picks, followed by a company rep giving a concise six-minute presentation. The packed audience rated each company from one to 10. While waiting for results to appear on the big screen, Katusa said, “Man, I’ll be depressed if I lose to Frank.”

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

The mainstay of this year’s VRIC, Holmes
tackled issues ranging from peak gold to data mining.

But the chart showed no definite winner, at least not to those who struggle with mental math. Katusa pronounced the results a tie but Holmes confidently told Resource Clips: “I won.”

As for the format, “that model of 20 seconds per slide, capped at 20 slides, 6.4 minutes, that model is working in 900 cities,” he explained, adding that it began in 2003 with the Tokyo-based Klein-Dytham architectural firm. “The PechaKucha model will drive more interest to a company’s booth than anything else.”

But isn’t there a danger that stock tips from influential people can affect share prices more than company performance does?

“I’ve invested in all six of those companies so I’m not getting up there with anyone I haven’t vetted.”

Are they long-term holds? “They have been.”

Katusa stuck with miners but Holmes’ list included two disruptors—a soon-to-be-listed company that creates gold and platinum jewelry as tradable investments, and another company that applies machine learning to mineral exploration as well as combining quantitative and fundamental analyses of mining investment.

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Investors heard first-hand pitches from company reps.

Disruption seems to increasingly command Holmes’ attention, but not at the expense of good old-fashioned gold. He sees peak gold as one application for AI and machine learning.

“There are fundamental supply-demand issues, there has to be a new way to replace it. The world’s GDP per capita for China, India and America is so strong and when you look at China and India, their GDP per capita is highly correlated to gold demand for love.

“When I first got in the business there was a four-year cycle from exploration to discovery to production. Now it’s a minimum eight to 12 years. We have declining reserves and each year the mines are getting deeper and deeper, the grades are getting lower and lower, and there’s also a falloff in exploration success. The timeline for getting projects on stream is getting longer and longer. We do have peak supply.”

With the Newmont-Goldcorp buyout following closely on the Barrick-Rangold merger, M&A has returned to prominence. When asked whether the activity could have a trickle-down effect on junior explorers, the Toronto native brought up a nationalist perspective.

A locally headquartered major means “a junior explorer or mid-cap developer can knock on their door, pitch them a story and maybe they’re your partner. But now you’d have to go to Denver, and the process of what they look at is very different from what Canadians look at. So I think there’s a vacuum being created and it’s not helping the Canadian mining industry.”

Additionally, “I think Canada will be hurt because the geological brain trust that was with Barrick in Toronto will go to Europe or South Africa. With Newmont, the brain trust will go to Denver.”

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Attendees gleaned intel from speakers, exhibitors and each other.

He suggested gold might attract more M&A than other metals because it’s “more bullish.” Elsewhere in metals, he expects to see further shareholder activism as seen by Waterton Global Resource Management with Hudbay Minerals and Paulson & Co with Detour Gold. “I’m surprised there isn’t more in the mid-cap space,” he noted.

He considers the activism constructive—“anything that keeps people accountable.” As chairperson of cryptocurrency miner HIVE Blockchain Technologies, however, he has to account for a share price that’s plunged about 78% over the last year.

“All of us are down, but it’s only because of the Bitcoin and Ethereum prices,” he said. “With gold stocks, most of them rise or fall as gold rises or falls that day. They correlate. What HIVE has done is become a proxy [for buying cryptos]. So HIVE has become incredibly liquid and moves every day with the price action of Bitcoin and Ethereum. Bitcoin and Ethereum have a volatility such that if gold’s daily volatility is 1%, their daily volatility is 6% to 8%. So that’s what drives HIVE. If Bitcoin goes this quarter to $10,000, we’ll go to a dollar. And if Bitcoin falls, we’ll go down with it. We’re at the mercy of where the cryptocurrencies are going. But the positive part for an investor or trader is that you can call up during market hours and use that as a proxy.”

One indication of continuing crypto enthusiasm, he added, was a very strong turnout at the previous week’s North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami, despite a hefty admission fee.

As for VRIC, he likes the event for “energy—it’s the vibe, what people are talking about. Are they skewing to optimism, or to doubt and fear and pessimism? I get the energy and vibrations here, and whether there’s an appetite for risk. This is all venture capital. Most of these companies are speculation. As I said at the opening, I’m so happy people came here and didn’t go to the casino or buy a lottery ticket to speculate.”

Watch for videos of VRIC presentations to be posted in the coming weeks by Cambridge House International.

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Moderated by Daniela Cambone, the Ultimate Gold Panel
included Holmes, Peter Hug, Roy Sebag and Peter Schiff.

 

Frank Holmes discusses tips, disruptors, M&A, what drives HIVE, and more

Although soliciting was strictly prohibited,
a hint of hustle might have been evident.

IBM Canada partner Mark Fawcett comments on Goldcorp’s AI success at Red Lake

January 11th, 2019

…Read more

Goldcorp credits artificial intelligence with forecasting first-hole results

November 27th, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 27, 2018

Assays are pending but IBM’s Watson AI technology has already helped human geologists choose drill locations “with the first target yielding the predicted mineralization at the expected depth,” Goldcorp TSX:G announced. Drilling continues at other AI-suggested spots on the northwestern Ontario Red Lake project.

Goldcorp credits AI with forecasting first-hole results

Goldcorp hopes a joint AI/human program
will extend Red Lake’s mine life. (Photo: Goldcorp)

Having collaborated with IBM since 2017, the miner said Watson scrutinized previous info using spatial analytics, machine learning and predictive models “to develop geological extrapolations in a fraction of the time and cost of traditional methods.” The project’s data bank goes back 80 years.

“We are using accelerated computing power for complex geospatial queries that can harmonize geological data from an entire site on a single platform,” stated IBM Canada partner Mark Fawcett. “This is the first time this solution has been ever used, which makes this project all the more significant.”

Earlier this month Goldcorp’s use of AI won an Ingenious Award from the Information Technology Association of Canada in recognition of “excellence and innovation in the use of information and communications technology.” At the time Goldcorp noted that geologists “could spend up to 80% of their analytical time searching for and preparing data, and only 20% interpreting and analyzing the data. Watson’s big advantage over conventional computer systems is its ability to ingest and process massive amounts of data faster and more accurately than conventional systems.”

Having given up 29 million gold ounces since 1949, Red Lake currently hosts proven and probable reserves totalling 2.17 million ounces. Two underground operations on the complex are expected to produce 235,000 ounces this year. But the company emphasized Watson’s potential for finding new areas of mineralization on the 42,000-hectare property.

Along with other sponsors, Goldcorp presents the third annual #DisruptMining award on March 3 at PDAC. The winning proposal brings its technological innovator a US$1-million investment or contract. Last year’s winner was Acoustic Zoom, a geophysics company specializing in innovative seismic work. Two companies shared the previous year’s prize, with Cementation Canada getting the $650,000 portion for a process of transporting ore to surface using a pump-driven pipeline loop. KORE Geosystems won the remainder for its proposal to apply AI to geoscientific data.

#DisruptMining was preceded by the Online Gold Rush Challenge hosted by Integra Gold (since taken over by Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD) at PDAC in 2016. SGS Geostat won $500,000 for its innovative analysis of 75 years of data from Integra’s Sigma/Lamaque project in Quebec’s Abitibi region.

Goldcorp president/CEO David Garofalo has told PDAC, “In the future, every mining company will be a technology company.”

Active participants

November 7th, 2018

A new study finds greater native involvement in resource projects

by Greg Klein

A new study finds greater native involvement in resource projects

Representatives of Nemaska Lithium and Nemaska Cree negotiate the Chinuchi Agreement in 2014.
(Photo: Nemaska Lithium)

 

Trans Mountain—it’s likely been Canada’s biggest and most discouraging resource story this year. The subject of well-publicized protests, the proposed $9.3-billion pipeline extension met federal court rejection on the grounds of inadequate native consultation. But any impression of uniform aboriginal opposition to that project in particular or resource projects in general would be false, a new report emphasizes. In fact native involvement increasingly advances from reaping benefits to taking active part, with corresponding advantages to individuals and communities.

That’s the case for the oil and gas sector, forestry, hydro-electricity and fisheries, with mining one of the prominent examples provided by the Montreal Economic Institute in The First Entrepreneurs – Natural Resource Development and First Nations. “While some First Nations oppose mining and forestry or the building of energy infrastructure, others favour such development and wish to take advantage of the resulting wealth and jobs,” state authors Germain Belzile and Alexandre Moreau. “This cleavage is no different from what is found in non-indigenous cities and villages in Canada, where there is no vision for the future that everyone agrees upon.”

A new study finds greater native involvement in resource projects

Visitors tour a cultural site at the Éléonore mine.
(Photo: Goldcorp)

Mining provides a case in point, and the reason’s not hard to understand. “In 2016, First Nations members working in the mining sector declared a median income twice as high as that of workers in their communities overall, and nearly twice as high as that of non-indigenous people as a whole.”

“Between 2000 and 2017, 455 agreements were signed in this sector, guaranteeing benefits in addition to those stemming from extraction royalties due to rights held by First Nations on their territories.” Those agreements often include native priority in hiring and subcontracting, which helps explain why “6% of indigenous people work in the mining sector, compared to only 4% in other industries.”

Of course the proportion rises dramatically in communities close to mines. MEI notes that Wemindji Cree make up about 25% of Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) Éléonore staff in Quebec’s James Bay region. The native total comes to 225 workers out of a community of 1,600 people. Their collaboration agreement also makes provisions for education, training and business opportunities.

At another Quebec James Bay project, Nemaska Lithium TSX:NMX expects to begin producing concentrate in H2 of next year. Collaboration with the Nemaska Cree began in 2009 and brought about the 2014 Chinuchi Agreement covering training, employment and revenue sharing, among other benefits. The community holds 3.6% of Nemaska stock.

Even stalled projects can benefit communities. Uranium’s price slump forced Cameco TSX:CCO to put its majority-held Millennium project in northern Saskatchewan on hold in 2014. But the 1,600-member English River First Nation still gained $50 million from the project in 2014 and $58 million in 2015.

Or, to take an example not mentioned in the report, natives can also profit from an operating mine that fails to make a profit. In Nunavut, a benefit agreement with Baffinland Iron Mines’ Mary River operation gave the Qikiqtani Inuit Association $11.65 million this year, as well as the better part of $3.7 million that the QIA reaped in leases and fees. In production since 2014, Mary River remains in the red.

Of course some natives still oppose some projects. Last month Star Diamond TSX:DIAM received provincial environmental approval for its Star-Orion South project in southern Saskatchewan’s Fort à la Corne district. That decision followed federal approval in 2014.

Star says the mine would cost $1.41 billion to build and would pay $802 million in royalties as well as $865 million in provincial income tax over a 20-year lifespan. The mine would employ an average 669 people annually for a five-year construction period and 730 people during operation. But continued opposition from the James Smith Cree Nation calls into question whether environmental approval will suffice to allow development.

Similar circumstances played out in reverse for Mary River. Last summer the Nunavut Impact Review Board recommended Ottawa reject Baffinland’s proposed production increase. But support from the QIA and territorial Premier Joe Savikataaq convinced the feds to approve the company’s request. So the veto, if it exists, can work both ways.

James Smith opposition stems largely from Saskatchewan’s lack of revenue-sharing programs, a basic component of benefit agreements in other jurisdictions. “As a government it’s our position that we will not and do not consider resource revenue sharing as a part of any proposal going forward,” enviro minister Dustin Duncan told the Prince Albert newspaper paNOW. He said the province uses mining revenue “to fund programs for the benefit of all Saskatchewan residents and not just one particular group or region.”

The MEI report quotes an estimated $321 million in 2015-to-2016 revenues from natural resources overall for First Nations, a category that doesn’t include Inuit or Metis, and a dollar figure that doesn’t include employment or business income and other benefits.

While Trans Mountain stands out as an especially discouraging process, MEI points out that proponent Kinder Morgan signed benefit agreements with 43 First Nations totalling $400 million. After Ottawa bought the company, “several First Nations showed interest in a potential takeover. For some of them, the possibility of equity stakes was indeed the missing element in the Kinder Morgan offer.”

That might take negotiations well past the stage of benefits and further into active participation. As JP Gladu of the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business told MEI, “The next big business trend that we are going to see, and that is happening already, is not only that aboriginal businesses are going to be stronger components of the corporate supply chain, but we are also going to see them as stronger proponents of equity positions and actual partners within resource projects.”

 

A new study finds greater native involvement in resource projects

The category of First Nations excludes Inuit and Metis.
(Chart: Montreal Economic Institute. Sources: Statistics Canada,
2016 Census, 98-400-X2016359, March 28, 2018)

Visual Capitalist: Nine reasons mining investors are looking at Yukon companies

September 18th, 2018

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | September 18, 2018

In the mining industry, location is paramount.

Invest your capital in a jurisdiction that doesn’t respect that investment, or in a place with little geological potential, and it’s possible that it will end up going to waste.

That’s why, when there’s a place on the map that has world-class geology and also a plan for working with miners and new explorers, the money begins to flow to take advantage of that potential.

Why investors are looking at the Yukon

This infographic comes to us from the Yukon Mining Alliance and it shows nine reasons why people are investing in Yukon mining and exploration companies today.

 

Nine reasons mining investors are looking at Yukon companies

 

For resource investors, it is rare to see variables like government investment, jurisdiction, geological potential and investment from major mining companies all aligning.

However, in the Yukon, it seems this may be the case. Here are nine reasons the Yukon is starting to attract more investment capital:

1. Rich history
Mining was central to the Yukon even over a century ago, when over 100,000 fortune-seekers stampeded into the Yukon with the goal of striking it rich in the famous Klondike Gold Rush.

2. Geological profile
In the last decade, there have been major discoveries of gold, silver, copper, zinc and lead in the Yukon—but perhaps most interestingly, only 12% of the Yukon has been staked, making the region highly under-explored. Spending on exploration and development rose from $93 million to $158 million from 2015 to 2017.

3. Major investment
Major mining companies now have a stake in the polymetallic rush. Recent companies to foray into the Yukon include Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM, Barrick Gold TSX:ABX, Coeur Mining NYSE:CDE, Goldcorp TSX:G, Kinross Gold TSX:K and Newmont Mining NYSE:NEM.

4. Leaders in exploration and mining
Juniors in the region are working on new geological ideas as well as new technology to unlock the vast potential of the region.

5. Progressive partnerships
First Nations and the government of Yukon have recently championed a new government-to-government relationship that enables them to be on the exact same page when it comes to mineral projects.

6. Government investment
The Yukon government is investing in new infrastructure via the Resource Gateway project. It also offers the Yukon Mineral Exploration Program, which provides a portion of risk capital to explore and develop mineral projects to an advanced stage.

7. Made in Yukon process
The Yukon government also tries to foster regulatory certainty to create clarity for companies and investors through its customized tri-party process.

8. Infrastructure
The jurisdiction has 5,000 kilometres of government-maintained roads, receives 95% of power from clean hydro, has international and local airports, and has access to three deep-water, ice-free ports.

9. Geopolitical stability
Canada offers geopolitical stability to start with—but with unprecedented cooperation between the territorial government and First Nations, the Yukon is arguably a step above the rest of the country.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Emulating another mining legend, Goldcorp chairperson Ian Telfer commits his fortune to philanthropy

August 10th, 2018

…Read more

Canada’s six biggest miners boost exploration spending by 31%: PwC

July 5th, 2018

by Greg Klein | July 5, 2018

Canada’s six biggest miners boost exploration spending by 31%: PwC

(Photos: PricewaterhouseCoopers)

 

The half-dozen Canadian companies among the world’s top 40 miners increased exploration expenditures last year at twice the rate of the others. That info comes from the upbeat results found in PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Mine 2018, a study of the planet’s 40 biggest companies by market cap. The six Canadians spent C$620 million looking for new resources last year, compared with C$473 million in 2016. The report forecasts continued improvement throughout the current year.

Globally, exploration rose 15% in 2017 to US$8.4 billion, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence figures cited by PwC.

Not so impressive, though, was the equity raised on three key mining markets, which fell $1.7 billion last year for the industry as a whole. Especially hard-hit was Toronto, which plunged 36%. Australia slipped 9%, while London actually jumped 47%. However this year’s Q1 investing “reveals that activity in Toronto and Australia is starting to pick up and signals a renewed interest in exploration and early development projects.”

Overall, higher commodity prices propelled the top 40 companies’ revenues 23% to about US$600 billion, with cost-saving efficiencies contributing to a “sharp increase in profits.” The report sees several years of continued growth as global annual GDP increases about 4% for the next five years.

Meanwhile market caps for the top 40 soared 30% last year to US$926 billion.

The top 40 companies’ capex outlay, however, floundered at its lowest level in 10 years. But the authors “expect next year’s level to increase as companies press ahead with long-term strategies, be it growth through greenfield or brownfield investments, or new acquisitions.”

Should that investment fail to materialize, the report asks, “will there be a temptation to spend without sufficient capital discipline when demand outstrips supply?”

At a number of points PwC admonishes miners not to “give in to the impulses” engendered by the previous boom: “Perhaps the most significant risk currently facing the world’s top miners is the temptation to acquire mineral-producing assets in order to meet rising demand. In the previous cycle, many miners eschewed capital discipline in the pursuit of higher production levels, which set them up to suffer when the downturn came.”

Canadians among the 2017 top 40 consisted of the Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan (since merged with Agrium to create Nutrien TSX:NTR) in 13th place, Barrick Gold TSX:ABX (14th), Teck Resources TSX:TECK.A and TSX:TECK.B (16th), Goldcorp TSX:G (25th), Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM (26th) and First Quantum Minerals TSX:FM (30th).

The top five companies, holding a top-heavy 47% of the top-40 combined market cap, were BHP Billiton NYSE:BHP, Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO, Glencore, China Shenhua Energy and Vale NYSE:VALE.

In addition to exploration spending, the half-dozen Canadian companies also got special mention for workplace safety, as “world leaders in digital transformation” and for boardroom diversity in which “women make up 25% of directors among Canadian miners, compared to 19% among their global peers.”

Download PwC’s Mine 2018 report.

Ian Telfer talks

July 4th, 2018

Transcending low grades in school, he hit high grades in mining and philanthropy

by Greg Klein

Goldcorp’s boss transcended lousy academic grades to acquire high-grade mines

A few of Goldcorp’s 15,000 employees stride through Quebec’s Éléonore mine.

 

Update: In March 2019 Ian Telfer came under criticism for raising his retirement allowance from about US$4.5 million to around US$12 million.

 

Here’s a guy who got rejected not by “virtually every university in Canada, it was every university in Canada”—and for an MBA program at that. Now chairperson of Goldcorp TSX:G, Ian Telfer credits one school’s 11th-hour offer with giving him a second shot at his career, putting an undistinguished background behind him to become a serial success story. His reflections provided inspiration to a sold-out Vancouver audience of 850 people hoping to pick up some of the magic that made him a mining legend.

The June 28 event saw him interviewed on stage by Peter Legge, a standup comic-turned-publisher and author of several motivational books. Consequently, conversation focused less on mining deals than on qualities that might complement success in any industry. Hosting the event was BCBusiness, a magazine created by Cambridge House International founder Joe Martin and sold to Legge by local zillionaire Jim Pattison.

Goldcorp’s boss transcended lousy academic grades to acquire high-grade mines

The man with the golden shoes and Midas touch
plans to devote his very considerable net worth
to good causes.

Telfer’s mid-career second chance came from the University of Ottawa, in a surprise phone call the day before classes started. Taking his studies seriously this time, he went on to become a chartered accountant and financial analyst for Hudbay Minerals TSX:HBM predecessor Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting. Looking back, he describes his former self as a mediocre salesman and “probably less than a mediocre accountant.”

But junior mining requires “promoting ideas that you hope are going to turn into companies. You have to do some selling and you have to understand numbers and it turned out I was a better accountant than the other salesman and a better salesman than the other accountant.”

By 1983 he was in Brazil running TVX Gold, an eventual Kinross Gold TSX:K acquisition, with Eike Batista. The latter went on to become the country’s richest man. But this week he got 30 years for bribing a politician.

Somewhat milder were Telfer’s career disappointments, which included an unsuccessful foray into the late 1990s tech bubble. A few years later, however, he and Frank Giustra took advantage of gold’s dismal price to pick up Wheaton River Minerals. A string of acquisitions expanded the company, enticing Rob McEwen’s Goldcorp into a merger. Telfer took over as Goldcorp’s CEO and, now at age 72, remains chairperson. Under his leadership, continued M&A brought the company to 2.57 million ounces of gold production last year, planned growth to three million ounces by 2021, and a current staff of 15,000. That compares with a half-dozen employees when he took over Wheaton River.

Still, his Hudson Bay experience proved pivotal. The company brought in an American experienced in the early ’80s new concept of strategic planning and, Telfer says with emphatic pauses after each word: “I. Learned. So. Much. From. Him.

“American businessmen—they are tougher. They are more demanding, they are way less user-friendly than Canadian executives for sure…. I learned from him how high standards could be. He was one of those people, you could put together a whole presentation and he’d throw it in the garbage. No Canadian boss I’d ever worked for would ever do anything like that…. I thought he was tough, he’d tell me stories about bosses he had that were horrific. Why? They raise your standards so high…. I felt I learned everything I learned about business from him.”

Peter Munk’s comment was that all the good that came to him came from society, and it should go back. And so that will be my legacy.

His future involves “probably not starting any new businesses but I don’t rule it out.” As for his legacy, he says he’s “incredibly proud of Goldcorp” as a source of careers and philanthropy. He also expresses admiration for Peter Munk, who “gave away his complete net worth to charity. And while a lot of successful people say they’re going to do that, most of them don’t…. Peter Munk’s comment was that all the good that came to him came from society, and it should go back. And so that will be my legacy.”

Having donated many millions so far, his $5,000 scholarship at the University of Ottawa might seem insignificant were it not for the criteria. Commemorating his own academic performance, the money’s granted each year to the student who enters first-year MBA classes with the lowest marks.

Speaking with ResourceClips.com, Telfer reiterated his belief that the world has reached peak gold. That, along with growing inflation and a weakening U.S. dollar should raise prices, he maintained. “There hasn’t been much inflation for a while but I think that’s starting. The U.S. dollar being strong also has an impact on the price of gold. So I think the supply of gold is going down, inflation is coming up and the U.S. dollar is going to weaken, and all three of those are good for gold.”

The industry’s biggest challenge is “finding reserves,” he added. “The most difficult part of our business is the exploration part. The whole industry, all the metals but especially gold, are having a very difficult time replacing reserves. So companies are starting to shrink. That’s our biggest challenge.”

Does that bode well for juniors? “If they find things.”