Saturday 22nd October 2016

Resource Clips

Posts tagged ‘fraser institute’

Association for Mineral Exploration BC president/CEO Gavin Dirom

March 14th, 2013

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Week in review

March 1st, 2013

A mining and exploration retrospect for February 23 to March 1, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Another spring fever for graphite?

As one of Chris Berry’s “energy minerals”, graphite had an energetic week with the biggest news coming from Energizer Resources TSX:EGZ. The company’s Molo graphite deposit in Madagascar reached another milestone Tuesday with its preliminary economic assessment.

But to start with Monday, Rock Tech Lithium TSXV:RCK released drill results from the Plumbago area of its Lochaber project in southern Quebec. The same day Nevado Resources TSXV:VDO did the same thing for its Fermont property in the province’s northeast.

A mining and exploration retrospect

Coinciding with Energizer’s Tuesday release, Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST announced an option on the Portland graphite property in southeastern Ontario. Also on Tuesday, Canada Strategic Metals TSXV:CJC released metallurgical tests from its La Loutre property back in southern Quebec.

More metallurgical news came the following day from Standard Graphite’s TSXV:SGH Mousseau East deposit, again in southern Quebec. Then on Thursday Mason Graphite TSXV:LLG weighed in with drill results from Lac Gueret in northeastern Quebec.

No graphite news on Friday, however. Presumably everyone was en route to PDAC 2013, where they’ll conspire to pump up a repeat of last spring’s graphite mania.

No wait, this is the hottest new commodity

“Rhodium, the scarcest precious metal used in making catalytic converters, is outperforming platinum and palladium for the first time in seven years as global car sales rise to a record,” stated a Thursday Bloomberg report.

“The metal, used with palladium and platinum in pollution-control devices, rose 16% this year, about three times the increase of the other two ingredients and 20 times more than the benchmark commodities index (MXWD). Output will trail demand for four more years after the first deficit since 2007 [took place] last year [and eroded] inventories, Standard Bank Plc’s SBG Securities … forecasts.”

It seems to be gaining safe haven status too. “Baird & Co., a UK precious metals dealer, sold about 10,700 one-ounce rhodium bars … more than 10 times the amount planned when production began in May 2012,” the news agency added. “The London-based company expanded with bars that weigh one-tenth an ounce to five ounces to meet increased demand.”

A Baird spokesperson told Bloomberg, “At the moment we can’t make them quick enough so we are stepping up production. The market is so thin that it just needs a car company to buy a year’s worth of production or a hedge fund to pull out a little bit of loose change. It doesn’t take a lot to create quite sharp price movements.”

De Beers blockade: Cops’ lack of resolve resolves nothing

At press time Friday, De Beers’ Victor diamond mine in northern Ontario had gone seven (7) days without an illegal native blockade. The most recent roadblock ended late February 22 when the five or six protestors simply left. Then, and only then, did police move in.

So far the company has lost nearly half of an approximately 45-day opportunity to haul a year’s worth of heavy supplies over a seasonal ice road. As a result, the mine might face a temporary shutdown, the Timmins Daily Press reported on Tuesday.

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Rating the risks

February 28th, 2013

A Fraser Institute survey shows how miners and explorers see the world they work in

by Greg Klein

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“Great mineral assets, highly corrupt government….” That’s sometimes the conundrum under which exploration and mining companies operate. And that was just one comment published by the Fraser Institute as it evaluated a world of challenges and opportunities in its annual Survey of Mining Companies released on February 28.

Between October 2012 and January 2013, 742 companies rated 96 jurisdictions which included countries and, in the case of Canada, Australia, the U.S. and Argentina, provinces, states and territories. Respondents considered 15 policy factors affecting investment decisions in those jurisdictions, for a possible maximum score of 100. Some factors included regulations, corruption, taxation, aboriginal land claims, infrastructure, the local workforce, political stability and physical security.

While the full report provides breakdowns by category, here are the top 10 jurisdictions for overall scores. The 2011-to-2012 rankings are in parentheses.

A Fraser Institute survey shows how miners and explorers see the world they work in

The Fraser Institute’s annual survey rates jurisdictional risk
for a number of factors concerning mining and exploration.

1. Finland (New Brunswick)
2. Sweden (Finland)
3. Alberta (Alberta)
4. New Brunswick (Wyoming)
5. Wyoming (Quebec)
6. Ireland (Saskatchewan)
7. Nevada (Sweden)
8. Yukon (Nevada)
9. Utah (Ireland)
10. Norway (Yukon)

Last but least, here are the bottom 10:

87. Greece (Vietnam)
88. Philippines (Indonesia)
89. Guatemala (Ecuador)
90. Bolivia (Kyrgyzstan)
91. Zimbabwe (Philippines)
92. Kyrgyzstan (India)
93. Democratic Republic of the Congo (Venezuela)
94. Venezuela (Bolivia)
95. Vietnam (Guatemala)
96. Indonesia (Honduras)

Utah and Norway knocked Saskatchewan and Quebec out of the top 10. Greece was added to the survey for the first time, only to join Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of the Congo for their bottom 10 debut. Another first-timer, French Guiana placed 27th overall, a fairly impressive ranking for a newcomer and non-First-World country.

Crisis-torn South Africa dropped to 64th place overall compared to 54th last year, retaining its fourth-from-last spot for “labour regulations, employment agreements and labour militancy or work disruptions.”

Of Canadian jurisdictions, Nunavut ranked worst at number 37.

Some anonymous concerns listed under “horror stories” ranged from uncertainty about native rights in Ontario to potential corruption in Quebec. One response stated that “endless ‘community consultation’” in the Northwest Territories costs the company more than exploration. Others noted confiscation of mining rights in Indonesia and expropriation in Bolivia.

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