Wednesday 7th December 2016

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘Franco-Nevada Corp (FNV)’

Franco-Nevada CEO David Harquail explains his family’s $10-million donation to the university, part of $114 million in recent pledges for mining-related studies

September 29th, 2016

…Read more

Visual Capitalist: How precious metals streaming works

September 12th, 2016

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | September 12, 2016

Miners seeking new capital have always had a variety of options: They could issue new shares, take out a loan, enter into joint-venture agreements or divest non-core assets.

However, in the last decade, a new option has emerged called “precious metals streaming”—in which streaming companies essentially offer capital up front to mining companies in exchange for metal later. If properly executed, the result is a win for both parties that can ultimately provide value to investors.

Precious metals streaming

This infographic from Silver Wheaton TSX:SLW explains the precious metals streaming model and the arbitrage opportunity that creates value for both the streamer and the miner seeking to acquire capital:

How precious metals streaming works

 

The aforementioned arbitrage opportunity in precious metals streaming is key.

For a traditional base metal miner, the majority of forecasted mine revenue may come from a metal like copper or nickel. However, along with those “target” metals, smaller amounts of gold and silver may be produced from the deposit as well.

Investors would still value those byproduct precious metals in a base metal miner’s portfolio, but the metals may be typically valued at an even higher multiple in a precious metal streamer’s portfolio. This allows the base metal miner to transfer these future “streams” to the streamer in exchange for up-front capital, which can be a win-win scenario for both parties.

Streaming benefits

In other words, miners use streaming to acquire non-dilutive financing and to extract value from non-core assets. This allows them to deploy capital on purposes more central to their strategy. Major miners such as Teck Resources TSX:TCK.A and TCK.B, Barrick Gold TSX:ABX, Vale NYSE:VALE and Glencore all sold streams in 2015.

Meanwhile, streaming companies have been very successful since this model was first pioneered 12 years ago. They are getting gold and silver at a discount, and this has created significant value for investors over the last decade. Today there are many valuable streaming companies out there, including the major ones such as Silver Wheaton, Royal Gold and Franco-Nevada TSX:FNV.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Laurentian University gets $114 million for mineral exploration research

September 7th, 2016

by Greg Klein | September 7, 2016

Sudbury’s school of hard rocks celebrated an unprecedented influx of funding September 6 as it received pledges totalling more than $114 million for mining-related studies. The biggest was a $49.27-million grant from Ottawa’s Canada First Research Excellence Fund for the school’s seven-year Metal Earth project. The program gets another $55 million in cash and in-kind contributions from 22 partners in academia, industry and government. That’s not including $10 million for the newly renamed Harquail School of Earth Sciences from the family of David Harquail, president/CEO of Franco-Nevada TSX:FNV.

Laurentian University gets $114 million for mineral exploration research

This great big government cheque represents the
largest single funding in Laurentian’s 56-year history.
(Photo: Laurentian University)

“Metal Earth is a new approach, it goes beyond traditional research at deposit or district scale,” said Harold Gibson, leader of the project and director of the Harquail School’s Mineral Exploration Research Centre. “It will transform how we explore for metals and our understanding of Earth’s early evolution.”

The project will involve researchers from Laurentian and partner institutions, recruiting over 35 post-doctoral fellows, research assistants, technicians and support staff, over 80 graduate students, 100 undergrads and numerous subcontractors.

“Global metal reserves are being depleted due to increased demand and decreased global discovery rates over the past 10 years,” Gibson added. “Spending on exploration has increased while discovery rates have decreased. Without a means to discover and extract metals, modern societies will be faced with a crisis that will detrimentally impact social, technological and industrial development.”

David Harquail called his family’s donation a step towards making Laurentian the world leader in mineral exploration research. “Laurentian has mining in its DNA with its location next to mines and a cluster of mining-related government departments and research agencies on campus. Success will come from the development of new concepts and tools to find the next generation of ore deposits.”

The Harquail endowment marks the fourth eight-figure gift in less than five years to a Laurentian department from mining-related tycoons. The other contributions went to the university’s Bharti School of Engineering, Goodman School of Mines and McEwen School of Architecture.

Gwen Preston looks back on PDAC and an exciting week

March 15th, 2016

by Gwen Preston | SmallCapPower.com | March 15, 2016

What a week it was! Another PDAC is in the books. And a good one. It was undoubtedly small—fewer booths, attendance of just 22,000 compared to an average of 29,000 over the last five years—but the buzz was inarguably better than last year.

Gwen Preston looks back on PDAC and an exciting week

Mining deals flowed with PDAC buzzing in the background.

I comment on my PDAC impressions after going through the mining news events of the week. As usual, news flow ramped up during the world’s biggest mining conference so there was lots to talk about, and all I got to were the four biggest stories.

Others also deserve comment. Canamex Resources (TSXV:CSQ), for example, published a PEA showing how they could turn their Bruner gold project into a 46,500-ounce-per-year producer for a capital cost of just US$33.4 million. If built, the mine should be able to generate a 39% after-tax internal rate of return and operate for six years. It would be a simple oxide heap leach operating on patented land, which eases permitting considerably.

Those are pretty good numbers. The asset and company are small for my tastes but Canamex deserves credit: it not only survived the bear market but advanced its asset to the point where it supports an economic PEA. If the team can now establish a path to production, starting with accessing the cash needed to take the next step, its share price may well respond. This is, after all, a simple gold project in Nevada, one of the most desirable mining jurisdictions in the world.

That’s one example of interesting news. There was no shortage: companies arrived at PDAC armed with new drill results, property deals, exploration plans, financings and resource estimates.

Deal flow was the most exciting part. I go through three new deals below (Silver Standard buying Claude, Endeavour buying True Gold and Lundin moving on Timok), but financings were also hot. Pretium raised US$130 million, Franco pulled in an oversubscribed US$920 million and Kinross raised US$250 million. I like to see money moving. This sector seizes up otherwise.

No wonder PDAC-ers were pumped. Or cautiously optimistic, in the very least…. Continue reading this article on SmallCapPower.com.

October 10th, 2014

Infographic: The history of metals GoldSeek
David Morgan’s secret to being grateful, even at $17 silver Streetwise Reports
How important is a social licence to operate? Geology for Investors
600 million reasons to keep your eyes on India VantageWire
Lundin Mining, Franco-Nevada in Chilean copper-gold mine deal Stockhouse
Video: Flinders CEO discusses new graphite mine, Big North acquisition Industrial Minerals
The last resort when monetary policy fails Equedia

October 9th, 2014

David Morgan’s secret to being grateful, even at $17 silver Streetwise Reports
How important is a social licence to operate? Geology for Investors
Infographic: The 15 greatest gold heists of all time GoldSeek
600 million reasons to keep your eyes on India VantageWire
Lundin Mining, Franco-Nevada in Chilean copper-gold mine deal Stockhouse
Video: Flinders CEO discusses new graphite mine, Big North acquisition Industrial Minerals
The last resort when monetary policy fails Equedia

October 8th, 2014

How important is a social licence to operate? Geology for Investors
Infographic: The 15 greatest gold heists of all time GoldSeek
600 million reasons to keep your eyes on India VantageWire
Lundin Mining, Franco-Nevada in Chilean copper-gold mine deal Stockhouse
Catalyst check: Natural resources watchlist at three months Streetwise Reports
Video: Flinders CEO discusses new graphite mine, Big North acquisition Industrial Minerals
The last resort when monetary policy fails Equedia

October 7th, 2014

600 million reasons to keep your eyes on India VantageWire
Lundin Mining, Franco-Nevada in Chilean copper-gold mine deal Stockhouse
Catalyst check: Natural resources watchlist at three months Streetwise Reports
Opportunities in nickel GoldSeek
Video: Flinders CEO discusses new graphite mine, Big North acquisition Industrial Minerals
An introduction to alteration Geology for Investors
The last resort when monetary policy fails Equedia

March 3rd, 2014

Mining industry dogged by get-rich-quick mentality: Franco-Nevada CEO Stockhouse
A brief look at geological and technical risk analysis in mine planning Geology for Investors
Michael Ballanger: Junior miners rising from the ashes Streetwise Reports
Large flake graphite prices settle at new equilibrium Industrial Minerals
The most sought-after metal on Earth GoldSeek
What’s the game-changer for gold? VantageWire
A sign of things to come—gold outlook 2014 Equedia

Athabasca Basin and beyond

November 3rd, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for October 26 to November 1, 2013

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Alpha/Fission hit 5.98% U3O8 over 17.5 metres, including 19.51% over 5.5 metres

With so many scintillometer results announced already, assays for the same holes can be anti-climactic. But that’s the way Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW have orchestrated their Patterson Lake South campaign, now giving observers a near sense of déjà vu. Assays from four holes announced October 29 add little to the news of August 8, although results from the lab are much more reliable than those from the hand-held radiation-detecting gizmo. The assays come from R00E, the farthest southwest of the project’s five zones.

Hole PLS13-074

  • 0.13% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 2.5 metres, starting at 65 metres in downhole depth

PLS13-076

  • 0.09% over 2 metres, starting at 178.5 metres

  • 0.08% over 1.5 metres, starting at 183 metres

  • 0.16% over 4.5 metres, starting at 186.5 metres

PLS13-077

  • 0.39% over 11.5 metres, starting at 59 metres

  • 0.13% over 15.5 metres, starting at 73 metres

PLS13-079

  • 5.98% over 17.5 metres, starting at 83 metres

  • (including 19.51% over 5 metres) (Update: On November 4 the JV partners corrected the intercept width from 5.5 metres to 5 metres.)

True widths were unavailable. Three of the holes were vertical, while 079 dipped at -75 degrees. That hole expands the zone’s high-grade southern area, the companies stated, while all four holes confirm R00E’s east-west strike at 165 metres. The zone remains open in all directions.

With the summer barge-based campaign complete, attention now turns to a land-based program west of R00E. Fission acts as project operator on the 50/50 joint venture until its acquisition of Alpha closes. Fission shareholders will vote on the deal’s spinout aspect on November 28.

(Update: On November 4 the JV announced a sixth PLS zone west of the discovery. Read more.)

Rio Tinto plans winter drilling at Purepoint’s Red Willow

Purepoint Uranium Group TSXV:PTU announced plans on October 29 by Rio Tinto Exploration Canada for 2,500 metres of drilling at Red Willow, a 25,612-hectare property on the Athabasca Basin’s eastern edge. Rio identified targets based on historic drill logs and more recent geophysical and geochemical work. The company built a 28-person camp last summer.

Depth to unconformity in the area varies from zero to 80 metres, Purepoint stated. The company says five major deposits—JEB, Midwest, Cigar Lake, McArthur River and Millennium—“are located along a NE to SW mine trend that extends through the Red Willow project.”

Rio has so far spent about $2.25 million out of a $5-million commitment to earn an initial 51% interest by December 31, 2015. The giant’s Canadian subsidiary may earn 80% by spending $22.5 million by the end of 2021.

In early October Purepoint announced a winter drill campaign for the Hook Lake JV held 21% by Purepoint and 39.5% each by Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada.

Strong Q3 financials surprise Cameco shareholders

Despite historic low uranium prices, Cameco came out with Q3 earnings far beyond the same period last year. In his October 29 statement, president/CEO Tim Gitzel attributed the success to a contracting strategy “providing us with higher average realized prices that are well above the current uranium spot price.”

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for October 26 to November 1, 2013

Rabbit Lake was one of three Cameco operations that received
10-year licence renewals the same week that the company
surprised investors with an especially strong quarterly report.

Adjusted net earnings for three months ending September 30 came to $208 million, a 324% increase over Q3 2012 or, at 53 cents a share, a 342% increase. Year-to-date figures came to $295 million (up 48%) and 75 cents a share (up 47%).

Gitzel added that Cameco’s “starting to see some of the cost benefits of the restructuring we undertook earlier” and plans to “take advantage of the opportunity we see in the long term.”

However the company’s statement noted “there have been some deferrals of future projects due to uranium prices insufficient to support new production. The deferrals will not directly impact the near-term market, but could have an effect on the longer term outlook for the uranium industry. Complicating the supply outlook further is the possibility of some projects, primarily driven by sovereign interests, moving forward despite market conditions.”

The company forecast strong long-term fundamentals, mostly to China which has “reaffirmed its substantial growth targets out to 2020 and indicated plans to pursue further growth out to 2030. Their growth is palpable as construction on two more reactors began during the third quarter, bringing the total under construction to 30.”

As for Cameco’s long-delayed Cigar Lake mine, the company’s sticking to its current plan of Q1 2014 production and Q2 milling.

But while junior exploration flourishes, especially in the Athabasca Basin, the major plans a 15% to 20% cut in exploration spending this year.

Three Cameco operations get 10-year licence renewals

Licences for Cameco’s Key Lake, McArthur River and Rabbit Lake operations have been renewed for 10 years, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission announced October 29. The CNSC granted the extensions after three days of public meetings that heard from the company, 27 interveners and CNSC staff. The commission agreed to Cameco’s request for 10-year renewals, twice the previous term.

MillenMin finds radioactive outcrops on east Basin properties, reports AGM results

MillenMin Ventures TSXV:MVM completed initial field work at two eastside Basin properties, the 2,759-hectare Highrock Lake NE and 1,648-hectare Smalley Lake W. Work included prospecting, outcrop mapping and examination of previously found mineralization, the company announced October 28.

Grab samples from radioactive outcrops on both properties have been sent for assays. MillenMin first announced its foray into uranium last May and has staked 11 claims totalling about 18,983 hectares in and around the Basin.

On October 31 the company reported AGM results with directors re-elected, auditors re-appointed and other business approved.

Declan options northeastern Alberta property

Southwest of the Basin’s Alberta extremity, Declan Resources TSXV:LAN has optioned the 50,000-hectare Firebag River property. Previous geophysical survey data “shows a complex pattern of magnetic lows and highs, truncated or offset in the northern part of the property by the Marguerite River Fault,” Declan stated on October 29. Exploration in 1977 “confirmed the presence of a southwest-oriented fault zone and a geochemical anomaly with 11 ppm cobalt in lake sediments atop this structure,” the company added.

The deal would have Declan paying $85,000, issuing five million shares over two years and spending $3 million over three years. The optioner retains a 2% NSR on metals and a 4% gross overriding royalty on non-metallic commodities.

In September Declan announced an option to acquire the Patterson Lake Northeast property. The company plans to engage Dahrouge Geological Consulting to explore its uranium properties.

Rockgate takeover offer: Denison softens conditions, extends deadline

Denison Mines TSX:DML advanced its attempted takeover of Rockgate Capital TSX:RGT by lowering the minimum tender condition from 90% to two-thirds of outstanding shares. In an October 30 statement Denison also extended the offer’s deadline again, this time to November 18, and dropped conditions related to staff retention and consulting agreements.

The same day Rockgate said insiders agreed not to exercise their options unless another company comes up with a better offer. Denison had requested a cease trade order on 11 million Rockgate options granted on September 30, which Denison termed “improper defensive tactics.” The British Columbia Securities Commission didn’t agree. But rather than risk Denison withdrawing its offer, Rockgate insiders “put the interests of the shareholders of Rockgate before their own personal interests and agreed to amend the terms of the options,” company president/CEO Karl Kottmeier said.

The tone of the companies’ statements has warmed considerably since Kottmeier labelled Denison’s offer an “unsolicited opportunistic hostile takeover bid.” Denison president/CEO Ron Hochstein thanked Kottmeier and the Rockgate board “for their contributions to allowing the offer to proceed towards a successful conclusion.”

Meanwhile Rockgate continues prefeasibility work on its flagship Falea uranium-silver-copper project in Mali.

Read how Denison’s offer defeated Rockgate’s proposed merger with Mega Uranium.

Read more about uranium merger-and-acquisition activity.

Lakeland Resources’ JV partner New Dimension to drill for gold

Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK announced on October 31 an imminent drill campaign of at least 1,800 metres by JV partner New Dimension Resources TSXV:NDR on the Midas gold property in north-central Ontario. Lakeland optioned the project to New Dimension in September in order to focus on Saskatchewan uranium exploration. But Lakeland will retain a 30% interest in Midas carried to an initial 43-101 resource estimate.

I’m excited that the project’s going to continue to be worked while we focus on uranium.—Jonathan Armes, president/CEO
of Lakeland Resources

“New Dimension is a great group to work with and the deal was easy to do,” Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes tells ResourceClips.com. “I’m excited that the project’s going to continue to be worked while we focus on uranium. The onus is on them to explore that project and we share in any benefits that result.”

The previous week Lakeland closed a private placement for a total of $1,057,718 and announced the appointment of Basin veteran John Gingerich to the company’s advisory board. Field work continues on Lakeland’s Riou Lake uranium project.

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

Next Page 1 | 2