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Posts tagged ‘Full Metal Minerals Ltd (FMM)’

Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 4th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 27 to October 3, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission continues PLS main zone’s perfect score, gets conditional approval for TSX listing

In a week that saw Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU win conditional approval to move up to the TSX big board, the company maintained this season’s 100% hit rate at Patterson Lake South’s R780E zone. All seven holes released September 29 returned wide mineralization. The main zone now boasts 61 successes out of 61 summer holes.

The results come from a hand-held device used to measure drill core for radiation. They’re no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Among the most recent batch’s highlights, hole PLS14-290 revealed intervals totalling a composite 97.5 metres of mineralization, the shallowest beginning at 113.5 metres in downhole depth. PLS14-298 showed a composite 84 metres, with the shallowest intercept starting at 146.5 metres. PLS14-296 came up with a 94.5-metre composite, with one interval starting at 96 metres. True widths weren’t available.

An innovation to the summer program has been angled drilling from barges over the lake. Now Fission’s emphasizing three “scissor” holes, each sunk north to south at an opposite azimuth to a south-to-north hole. The purpose is to “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” PLS14-290, for example, “intersected well-developed mineralization … in an area that had previously only seen moderate results.”

By far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike, R780E shows a continuous strike of 930 metres and, at one point, a lateral width of 164 metres. The project’s mineralization sits within a metasedimentary lithologic corridor bounded to the south by the PL-3B basement electromagnetic conductor.

Still to come are assays to replace the summer’s radiometric results, as well as assays for the final dozen of last winter’s 92 holes. December’s still the target for a maiden resource.

Fission greeted October 3 by announcing conditional approval for a TSX listing. The company anticipates big board trading on or about October 8, retaining its FCU ticker.

In an interview posted by Stockhouse October 3, Fission chairperson/CEO Dev Randhawa contrasted Saskatchewan’s stability with that of other uranium-rich jurisdictions like Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Namibia and Niger. Verifying his intention to sell the project, Randhawa told journalist Gaalen Engen, “We have about six or seven Asian and North American companies in the midst of due diligence who are interested in doing private placement and/or taking over the company.”

The previous week Fission closed a $14.4-million private placement and released regional PLS drill results.

Field work and drilling approach for Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek flagship

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for September 27 to October 3, 2014

Scintillometer in hand, a geologist prospects
for radiometric anomalies over the Star uplift.

Announced September 29, the termination of an option with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN gives Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK full control of its 12,771-hectare Gibbon’s Creek project, which features boulder samples up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the Athabasca Basin’s highest-ever radon readings. Three days later Lakeland released rock and soil sample results from its adjacent Star property, showing gold, platinum and palladium, as well as some rare earths and low-grade uranium. Especially when considered for their proximity to a structural lineament that runs through both properties, the results show similarities to major Basin discoveries of high-grade uranium, the company states. With the two properties on the Basin’s north-central margin united as one project, Lakeland has additional field work planned for autumn. That leads up to a drill program slated to begin this winter, if not sooner.

Jody Dahrouge, president of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, told of geophysical data showing “a major regional structural lineament that’s about 30 or 40 kilometres in length, and it’s been reactivated many times over 100 million years or more. This is a key ingredient to every uranium deposit in the Athabasca Basin…. Having it reactivated time and time again allows multiple generations of fluid to flow along that structure and deposition of perhaps multiple ore bodies.”

He identified three mineralizing systems within five to 10 kilometres of the structure. The Star uplift, a basement outcrop about 700 metres by 350 metres, was the location of many of the samples showing gold and platinum group elements, along with some rare earths and low-grade uranium.

A massive alteration zone about a kilometre south had historic drill results up to 1,500 parts per million uranium. A few kilometres farther sits the boulder field that graded up to 4.28% U3O8. “Clearly something’s going on and clearly it’s related to the structure,” Dahrouge said.

With drill permits in place, road access from a nearby community, shallow depths, high ground that can be worked year-round and a healthy treasury, Lakeland now plans the next stage of an extensive exploration program for its flagship.

Read more about Lakeland’s Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

June 7th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 31 to June 6, 2014

by Greg Klein

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NexGen assays improve on radiometric results from Rook 1’s Arrow

Where previous radiometric results found uranium mineralization in seven of eight holes, the Arrow zone at NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1 project now shows mineralization in all eight, according to assays released June 2. The company interprets the results to reveal “multiple parallel, steeply dipping, high-grade uranium mineralization zones within broader mineralized zones” and “continuity of uranium mineralization between holes.” The best results include:

Hole RK-14-30

  • 2.94% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 6.2 metres, starting at 475 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 5.81% over 2.6 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 31 to June 6, 2014

  • 2.51% over 10 metres, starting at 508 metres
  • (including 5.84% over 0.5 metres)
  • (and including 10.26% over 1.7 metres)

  • 1.51% over 4.9 metres, starting at 549.4 metres
  • (including 12.5% over 0.4 metres)

  • 1.61% over 8.4 metres, starting at 570.6 metres
  • (including 8.57% over 0.25 metres)
  • (and including 11.6% over 0.35 metres)
  • (and including 5.1% over 0.3 metres)

Hole RK-14-27

  • 1.04% over 29 metres, starting at 235 metres
  • (including 23.5% over 0.4 metres)
  • (and including 9.42% over 1.1 metres)

Hole RK-14-21

  • 0.37% over 5.75 metres, starting at 517.25 metres
  • (including 5.77% over 0.25 metres)

True widths weren’t provided.

Some of the intercepts showed “very minor” intervals of elevated copper and lead but “potentially deleterious elements such as arsenic, selenium, cadmium and mercury generally constitute only background levels,” NexGen stated. “Arrow is essentially a mono-mineralic uranium deposit without noticeable deleterious metals or waste.”

Winter drilling at Rook 1 consisted of 17 holes totalling 7,442 metres but February’s Arrow discovery suddenly shifted focus to the new area. Arrow’s potential strike currently reaches about 215 metres, open in all directions and at depth, NexGen has stated. More drilling’s planned for summer on the property adjacently east of Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South.

Denison releases two high-grade Wheeler River assays, outlines summer plans

Also improving on previous radiometric results—and not for the first time at that project—Denison Mines TSX:DML released assays for two holes at Wheeler River’s new Gryphon zone on June 3:

Hole WR-556

  • 15.3% U3O8 over 4 metres, starting at 697.5 metres in downhole depth

Hole WR-560

  • 21.2% over 4.5 metres, starting at 759 metres

True widths were estimated at about 75%. The zone remains open in both strike directions and at depth, Denison stated.

In April the company released a batch of high-grade assays from Zone A of Wheeler’s Phoenix deposit, three kilometres southeast of Gryphon. A Phoenix resource is expected this month. But summer drilling will concentrate on Gryphon, which is slated for an 18-hole, 14,000-metre program. “Most of the drilling will consist of 50-metre step-outs along strike and down dip of the new discovery,” Denison stated. “Some of the holes will also complete drill fences 800 metres along strike to the northeast and southwest of Gryphon.” Work begins in mid-June.

With a 60% interest in the project, Denison acts as operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% while JCU (Canada) Exploration holds the remainder.

Drills will also turn at three other Denison interests this summer. Crawford Lake and Bachman Lake, two more Denison-operated projects, get follow-up work on alteration zones found last year and on anomalies revealed by last winter’s geophysics. Denison holds 100% of Crawford and 80% of Bachman, where International Enexco TSXV:IEC holds the rest.

On June 4 Enexco security holders approved their company’s takeover by Denison.

Exploration drilling at the McClean Lake project will test geophysical anomalies near the McClean South deposit. McClean Lake is held 22.5% by Denison, 70% by project operator AREVA Resources Canada and 7.5% by OURD Canada. In all, the four properties get about 21,000 metres of drilling.

Additionally, Denison has geophysics planned for five properties.

Last month the company announced a $15-million budget for Canadian exploration focusing on the eastern Athabasca Basin.

UEX reports drill results from Laurie and Mirror River JV

UEX Corp TSX:UEX announced drill results from its Laurie and Mirror River projects on June 5. Joint venture partner AREVA Resources Canada acts as operator on both, located about 35 and 55 kilometres respectively east of PLS.

Five holes totalling 1,803 metres at Laurie failed to find significant radioactivity or geochemical values. But they did confirm existence of three conductors at the unconformity and found a large fault zone which will be tested for possible up-dip continuation at the unconformity.

Nor was significant radioactivity encountered in three Mirror River holes totalling 1,579 metres, although one of two conductors was confirmed.

However the projects “remain vastly underexplored and have extensive untested EM conductors that warrant additional drilling,” UEX stated.

Another western Basin project, Erica now undergoes a ground tensor magneto-telluric survey to further examine a conductive trend found by previous geophysics.

All three projects are part of a seven-property, 116,137-hectare western Basin JV package held 49.1%/50.9% by UEX and AREVA Resources Canada. Major UEX projects consist of Shea Creek and Hidden Bay, the former also held 49.1%/50.9% with AREVA, the latter held 100% by UEX. In April the company reported six holes from Black Lake, a JV with Uracan Resources TSXV:URC.

On June 6 UEX announced shareholders re-elected their board and approved management resolutions.

Pistol Bay announces winter drill results from C-5

On June 4 Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST released assays for two of six holes from last winter’s 3,344-metre campaign at the C-5 property, where Rio Tinto Canada Uranium Corp acts as operator. Results for hole 14CBK003 showed:

  • 0.054% U3O8 over 1.5 metres, starting at 366 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 0.071% over 0.5 metres)

Located 50 metres northeast and along strike, 14CBK005 showed:

  • 0.041% over 0.32 metres, starting at 379.82 metres

  • 0.022% over 1 metre, starting at 385 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Due to high core loss, assays for 14CBK003 “are not considered truly reflective of the mineralization,” Pistol Bay stated.

The C-4, C-5 and C-6 properties comprise a JV with Rio covering 1,624 hectares adjoining the Denison/Cameco/JCU Wheeler River project. Rio has earned 55% by paying Pistol Bay $147,000 and spending $1 million on exploration so far. The mining giant’s subsidiary may increase its stake to 75% by spending another $1 million by year-end.

Pistol Bay also holds interests in copper-gold properties contiguous with Colorado Resources’ (TSXV:CXO) North ROK discovery and Imperial Metals’ (TSX:III) Red Chris mine in British Columbia, and in a graphite property in Ontario.

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Full Metal, Antofagasta report Alaska Results of 0.39% Copper, 0.1 g/t Gold over 310.3m

October 5th, 2011

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningFull Metal Minerals Ltd TSXV:FMM and Antofagasta Minerals SA announced assays from their Pyramid Porphyry Project in Alaska. Results include

0.39% copper, 0.1 g/t gold and 0.01% molybdenum over 310.3 metres
(including 0.54% copper, 0.13 g/t gold and 0.01% molybdenum over 36 metres)
0.71% copper, 0.18 g/t gold and 0.02% molybdenum over 155.9 metres
(including 0.99% copper, 0.15 g/t gold and 0.01% molybdenum over 20 metres)
0.35% copper, 0.09 g/t gold and 0.02% molybdenum over 208 metres
(including 0.47% copper, 0.12 g/t gold and 0.02% molybdenum over 12 metres)
0.56% copper, 0.13 g/t gold and 0.01% molybdenum over 104 metres
(including 0.74% copper, 0.15 g/t gold and 0.01% molybdenum over 48 metres)

The 2011 Pyramid exploration program was funded by Antofagasta Minerals SA, a subsidiary of Antofagasta PLC. Antofagasta is earning a 51% interest in the property. Full Metal has an exploration agreement with an option to lease a 100% interest in mineral rights from Aleut Corp, an Alaska Native Regional Corporation, and has been granted surface rights from Shumagin and Tanadgusix, both Alaska Native Village corporations.

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Full Metal Minerals Ltd
Kevin Stewart
IR Manager

by Greg Klein