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Posts tagged ‘Eagle Plains Resources Ltd (EPL)’

Lakeland Resources expands its southwestern Athabasca Basin uranium presence

May 29th, 2015

by Greg Klein | May 29, 2015

Lakeland Resources expands its southwestern Athabasca Basin uranium presence

Carter Lake claims straddle the bountiful Patterson Lake
corridor as well as the under-explored Carter corridor.

 

New acquisitions announced May 28 nearly triple the size of Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) Carter Lake property in Saskatchewan’s southwestern Athabasca Basin. Contiguous claims picked up through purchase and staking now bring the project’s footprint to 10,052 hectares. The property straddles both the Carter Lake and Patterson Lake conductive corridors, the latter host to the Triple R deposit and R600W zone at Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) Patterson Lake South, the Arrow and Bow zones at NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) Rook 1, and the Spitfire zone at Hook Lake, a joint venture of Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU, Cameco TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada.

With 32 properties totalling over 300,000 hectares, Lakeland holds one of the Basin-region’s largest portfolios.

Carter Lake’s depths to the unconformity are estimated at 500 metres or more, similar to some of the depths of uranium mineralization found by NexGen at Arrow. Carter Lake also encompasses parts of the relatively unexplored Carter corridor, an area that’s had only five known historic drill holes, despite the positive exploration potential, Lakeland stated.

Subject to approvals, 5,095 hectares of the new turf comes from Eagle Plains Resources TSXV:EPL for $40,000 and 800,000 shares. Lakeland got another 1,260 new hectares by staking 38 claims. Those 38 claims, along with four claims of the original property, are subject to a 2% NSR payable to Eagle Plains, half of which Lakeland may buy for $1 million.

“The summer of 2015 will see active exploration at multiple, high-potential projects across the Athabasca Basin for Lakeland,” commented president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “In addition to work programs at Gibbon’s, Newnham Lake and Key Lake Road, we will prepare for reconnaissance scale work at Carter Lake, given the number of recent uranium discoveries along the Patterson Lake corridor.”

Gibbon’s Creek underwent Phase I drilling last winter, with positive results released in early May.

Read more about Lakeland Resources’ Star/Gibbon’s Creek project.

Disclaimer: Lakeland Resources Inc is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Lakeland Resources.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 22nd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 15 to 21, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Denison signs LOI to acquire International Enexco, finds new Wheeler River zone

The expansionist Denison Mines TSX:DML announced another potential acquisition with a letter of intent to take over one of its joint venture partners, International Enexco TSXV:IEC. The March 19 after-market announcement had Denison chairperson Lukas Lundin saying his company “continues to focus on becoming the pre-eminent exploration company in the Athabasca Basin.”

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 15 to 21, 2014

The acquisition of JV partner Enexco would give Denison full ownership
of Bachman Lake, one of the company’s priority projects.

The plan of arrangement would exchange each Enexco share for 0.26 of a Denison share plus an undetermined portion of a spinco or subsidiary that would hold Enexco’s assets outside the Basin.

The deal would have Enexco shareholders owning about 2.1% of Denison. The latter company already holds about 8.4% of Enexco, along with another 1.8 million warrants.

The LOI includes a non-solicitation covenant on the part of Enexco, while Denison has the right to match any superior proposal.

The two companies JV together on the 11,419-hectare Bachman Lake property four kilometres west of Cameco Corp’s TSX:CCO proposed Millennium mine in the southeastern Basin. Enexco holds a 20% interest. Operator Denison describes the project as one of the company’s highest priorities “due to its location in the southeast Athabasca Basin and the presence of strong conductors, graphitic basement and sandstone alteration.”

Mann Lake, another JV 20 klicks northeast, is held 30% by Enexco, 52.5% by Cameco and 17.5% by AREVA Resources Canada. The 3,407-hectare property lies on trend between Cameco’s Read Lake and Denison’s 60%-held Wheeler River projects.

In Nevada, Enexco’s 100%-held Contact copper project is currently working towards feasibility.

Denison’s most recent acquisition closed in January, after the company grabbed Rockgate Capital to thwart its proposed merger with Mega Uranium TSX:MGA. Rockgate’s directors initially characterized Denison’s manoeuvre as an “unsolicited opportunistic hostile takeover bid.” As a result Denison gained the advanced-stage Falea uranium-silver-copper project in Mali. The company had said it intended to spin out its non-Athabasca projects.

Enexco valued the combined Denison/spinco offers at $0.64 for an Enexco share, a 63% premium over its March 19 close of $0.39, after having been trading between a 52-week low of $0.23 and a 52-week high of $0.48. But by March 21 close the stock had reached $0.53. With 47.79 million shares outstanding, the company had a market cap of $22.68 million.

Denison closed March 19 on $1.74 and March 21 on $1.72. With 484.68 million shares outstanding, its market cap came to $833.65 million.

One day after the LOI announcement, Denison’s Wheeler River JV returned to prominence with a high-grade hole from the newly found Gryphon zone, three kilometres northwest of the Phoenix deposit.

The one interval reported, from hole WR-556, showed:

  • 3.7% uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) over 12.6 metres, starting at 691 metres in downhole depth

  • (including 9.7% over 4.6 metres)

True thickness was about 70%. The results come from a downhole radiometric probe which, although more accurate than a scintillometer, are no substitute for assays.

As project operator, Denison targeted two historic holes where it found “a basement wedge that has been faulted up into the sandstone and then encountered a large interval of graphitic basement, within which is a zone of alteration and mineralization 140 metres down-dip of the old drill holes.”

Gryphon’s mineralization lies “approximately 200 metres beneath the sub-Athabasca unconformity and is open in both strike directions and down-dip,” the company added.

In late February Denison released radiometric results for eight holes on the Phoenix deposit and briefly updated some other projects.

Fission Uranium merges two more zones at Patterson Lake South

Back on the subject of M&A, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU might be considered an acquisition waiting to happen. On March 17, for the second time in less than two weeks, the company said it merged two zones at Patterson Lake South, evidently part of its ambition to demonstrate one big deposit before the company gets swallowed by a bigger fish.

Radiometric results closed an approximately 60-metre gap, joining zone R585E to its former neighbour to the west, R390E. The project now has five zones, three of them high-grade, along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike. The $12-million winter program’s primary goal is to delete the word “potential.”

The news followed a March 5 announcement that drilling had merged two other zones into R780E and a March 10 announcement of the project’s second-strongest radiometric results. Of eight holes released March 17, five showed intervals of 9,999 counts per second, the highest possible reading on the hand-held scintillometer that measures radioactivity from drill core. Scintillometer readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Maximum readings for three holes showed composites of 15.25 metres, 7.14 metres and 5.85 metres. Of all mineralized intercepts, the interval closest to surface began at 60 metres in downhole depth, while the deepest stopped at 373 metres.

Of the three high-grade zones, R00E shows a 165-metre strike and lateral width up to about 45 metres. About 135 metres east, the newly expanded R390E has an approximately 390-metre strike and lateral width up to about 50 metres. About 75 metres east again, R780E shows an approximately 300-metre strike and lateral width up to about 95 metres.

Two additional zones, R1155E and R600W, sit at the eastern and western ends of the 1.78-kilometre stretch.

Fission Uranium has four drills trying to connect the high-grade zones and a fifth exploring outside the mineralized area just south of the Basin.

Lakeland/Declan JV announces Gibbon’s Creek plans, Lakeland closes oversubscribed $2.83-million financing

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 15 to 21, 2014

Boulder samples at the Lakeland/Declan Gibbon’s Creek JV assayed up to 4.28% U3O8, while radon measurements returned some of the Basin’s highest results.

One day after announcing imminent exploration plans for its Gibbon’s Creek project, Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK closed an oversubscribed private placement for $2.83 million. With JV partner Declan Resources TSXV:LAN spending a first-year commitment of $1.25 million on their Gibbon’s flagship, Lakeland can now turn to its 14 other Basin projects.

Gibbon’s is about to get a ground electromagnetic survey to confirm historic work prior to an anticipated drill program of up to 15 shallow holes totalling 2,500 metres. Results released in January from the 12,771-hectare project showed some of the highest radon gas levels ever measured in the Basin, along with surface boulders grading up to 4.28% U3O8. The property is about a 10-minute drive from the northern Basin town of Stony Rapids.

Lakeland’s other properties dot the northern, eastern and southern sections of the Basin.

“Several of our projects are at that stage where we just need to do line-cutting, resistivity and RadonEx to identify drill targets,” president/CEO Jonathan Armes told ResourceClips.com. “But with all these projects, we know we can’t do them all. We’ll continue to develop other joint venture possibilities, while at the same time compiling data on the projects to identify those we want to focus on.”

Read more about Gibbon’s Creek and Lakeland’s 15-property Basin portfolio.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

February 10th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 1 to 7, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium releases final summer 2013 assays from Patterson Lake South

Having spent months doling out only occasional assays from last summer’s drilling at Patterson Lake South, on February 5 Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU suddenly dumped results for 20 holes—half of which showed no significant mineralization. They did, however, improve the company’s “understanding of the geological setting and controls of mineralization at PLS.”

The best results came from R780E, the fifth of seven zones along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike. R780E now boasts a 75-metre strike, with a lateral width up to about 60 metres. A few highlights show:

Hole PLS13-105

  • 3.93% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 3 metres, starting at 128 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 10.85% over 1 metre)

  • 1.12% over 3.5 metres, starting at 189 metres
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 1 to 7, 2014

Hole PLS13-107

  • 1.94% over 3 metres, starting at 171.5 metres

  • 0.57% over 6.5 metres, starting at 192.5 metres
  • (including 1.58% over 1 metre)

  • 0.23% over 13.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres

Hole PLS13-108

  • 0.99% over 19.5 metres, starting at 152.5 metres
  • (including 3.46% over 2 metres)
  • (and including 3.92% over 1.25 metres)

  • 0.67% over 6.5 metres, starting at 174.5 metres
  • (including 1.64% over 2.5 metres)

  • 1.33% over 11 metres, starting at 184.5 metres
  • (including 6.52% over 1.5 metres)

  • 3.48% over 4.5 metres, starting at 228 metres

Hole PLS13-109

  • 4.22% over 8 metres, starting at 108 metres
  • (including 11.1% over 3 metres)
  • (which includes 24.6% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.55% over 17.5 metres, starting at 141 metres

  • 5.89% over 6 metres, starting at 205.5 metres
  • (including 14.57% over 1.5 metres)

Off the lake and onto dry land, zone R600W shows a 30-metre strike and a lateral width up to 20 metres. Some of the better results include:

Hole PLS13-118

  • 0.34% over 6.5 metres, starting at 192 metres

Hole PLS13-121

  • 0.2% over 11.8 metres, starting at 98.7 metres

Hole PLS13-124

  • 0.29% over 6 metres, starting at 97.5 metres

The company also released assays from one hole on the R585E zone, 150 metres west of R780E. R585E now shows a 30-metre strike and a lateral width up to 10 metres. Some highlights from PLS13-106 include:

  • 0.19% over 5.5 metres, starting at 158.5 metres

  • 0.11% over 17 metres, starting at 166.5 metres

  • 0.39% over 12.5 metres, starting at 202 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Holes were vertical or close to it. One R600W hole and nine stepouts east of the zone drew blanks. These results constitute the final batch of summer assays. The current $12-million campaign, including ground geophysics as well as 90 holes totalling 30,000 metres, will primarily try to fill in the gaps separating the high-grade zones.

Rio drills Purepoint’s Red Willow

Rio Tinto NYE:RIO has begun winter drilling at Red Willow, Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU announced February 5. About 2,500 metres will test four target areas identified by geophysics, geochemistry and historic assays, the company stated. Rio is nearly halfway into its $5-million option to earn 51% of the 25,612-hectare property by December 31, 2015. The major may spend a total of $22.5 million by the end of 2021 to earn 80% of the eastern Athabasca Basin project.

In another project with some big name buddies, Purepoint began a $2.5-million, 5,000-metre program at its Hook Lake project in January. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada each hold a 39.5% interest in the PLS-vicinity property, leaving the junior with 21%.

Continental Precious Minerals updates PEA for Swedish polymetallic project

An updated resource and preliminary economic assessment takes a new approach to Continental Precious Minerals TSX:CZQ Viken uranium-polymetallic project in central Sweden. Using a 6.5% discount rate, the study calculates an after-tax net present value of US$943 million and a 12.9% internal rate of return. Pre-production capital comes to $1.23 billion with payback in 6.9 years from an operation with two open pits and a 34-year lifespan, according to the February 6 announcement.

Viken’s original 2010 PEA considered uranium-vanadium-molybdenum production using fine grinding, tank leaching and roasting. Now Continental plans bio-heap leaching for nickel, zinc and copper sulphides as well as uranium. “This has substantially lowered operating and capital costs, and has led to more robust project economics,” stated CEO/chairperson Rana Vig.

More details will be available on sedar.com within 45 days.

Eagle Plains options out eastside Basin project

Eagle Plains Resources TSXV:EPL announced a definitive option agreement on February 4 for its Tarku property in the eastern Basin. The non-arms-length deal would give Clear Creek Resources a 60% interest for $500,000 cash, $5 million in exploration and 1.2 million shares over five years. Clear Creek may increase its interest to 75% by paying Eagle Plains another $1 million and completing feasibility. Previous work, including historic airborne surveys that found northeast-trending conductors, make the property prospective for both gold and uranium, Eagle Plains stated.

Next month Clear Creek expects to complete a three-way amalgamation with Ituna Capital TSXV:TUN.P and its subsidiary. Eagle Plains holds interests in over 35 properties.

Alpha airborne over Noka’s Carpenter Lake; Noka boosts private placement

Project operator Alpha Exploration TSXV:AEX has begun flying a VTEM and magnetic survey over Carpenter Lake on the Basin’s south-central edge. The 1,892-line-kilometre survey will test the 19-kilometre strike of the Cable Bay Shear Zone, a “major regional shear zone with known uranium enrichment,” Alpha stated on February 3. The work initiates the company’s 60% earn-in on Noka Resources’ TSXV:NX 20,637-hectare property.

About 10 to 14 days have been allotted to this portion of the winter campaign, which will also include radon sampling. Spring and summer should see airborne radiometrics, ground prospecting and geochemical sampling.

With interests in several properties, the Alpha Minerals spinco announced other exploration plans in December and January.

Noka, a member of the four-company Western Athabasca Syndicate, stated on February 6 it would increase a “heavily oversubscribed” private placement from $500,000 to $1.1 million, subject to exchange approval.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

October 12th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for October 5 to 11, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Alpha/Fission expand summer drilling, lengthen strike by 15 metres

Having mostly conducted barge drilling east of their Patterson Lake South discovery, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW now plan to head west with a $2.25-million, 11-hole, 3,700-metre, land-based expansion to their current campaign. The 50/50 joint venture partners will take advantage of their buoyant financing as lake conditions change with the season.

Previous drilling on the area between 360 and 860 metres west of the R00E zone showed clay alteration, anomalous radioactivity and elevated uranium results, according to the companies’ October 7 announcements. The area has also undergone electromagnetic and DC resistivity mapping, as well as a more recent RadonEx survey. The latter found anomalous radon levels north of the PL-3B EM conductor, an intriguing find since R00E zone mineralization has been situated consistently north of the same conductor.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for October 5 to 11, 2013

A successful summer of exploration and financing motivated Alpha
and Fission to expand their current Patterson Lake South campaign.

In total, the expansion brings the PLS summer budget to $9.2 million, with 49 holes totalling 14,700 metres.

Two days after that announcement, the JV reported results from the opposite side of PLS, the eastern-most hole of the eastern-most zone. And while finding new superlatives for the project can’t always be easy, the partners aren’t without inspiration. This time they say scintillometer readings show “the largest accumulation of mineralized intervals in any drill hole at PLS to date.”

The results come from a hand-held device that measures drill core gamma ray particles in counts per second up to a maximum off-scale reading of over 9,999 cps. Scintillometer results are no substitute for assays, which will follow.

Drilled to a total depth of 368 metres, PLS13-099 found the basement unconformity at 59.8 metres without encountering sandstone. The results show:

  • <300 to 640 cps over 4.5 metres, starting at 101 metres in downhole depth

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 105 metres, starting at 108.5 metres

  • <300 to >9,999 cps over 30.5 metres, starting at 222.5 metres

  • 500 to >9,999 cps over 1 metre, starting at 256.5 metres

  • <300 to 1,000 cps over 3 metres, starting at 278 metres

True widths weren’t available. With a dip of -88 degrees, downhole depths are close to vertical.

This is the fourth of four holes sunk so far in zone R945E, which parallels the PL-3B conductor and coincides with the project’s strongest radon-in-water anomaly. The hole extends the strike length by 15 metres to 1.035 kilometres.

Fission acts as project operator. The company expects to close its acquisition of Alpha as early as November 2013.

Forsys updates Namibian resources

Forsys Metals’ TSX:FSY Norasa project in Namibia moved closer to production with a resource update announced October 7. The news release provided separate cutoff grades of 0.01% for the Valencia deposit and 0.016% for the Namibplaas deposit, but combined the tonnage and contained pounds for both deposits. The resource shows:

  • a measured category of 17 million tonnes averaging 0.02% for 7 million pounds uranium oxide (U3O8)

  • an indicated category of 221 million tonnes averaging 0.019% for 96 million pounds

  • an inferred category of 50 million tonnes averaging 0.019% for 22 million pounds

Both deposits remain open along strike and at depth, the company stated.

The project has a reserve estimate scheduled for Q1 2014 release and feasibility for Q3. Assuming positive results, funding and other hurdles are cleared, the company hopes to begin construction late next year and start commercial open pit production in Q2 2016.

Fission/Azincourt find eight-kilometre conductive trend, announce plans for PLN

Along with JV partner Fission, Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ announced airborne VTEM results from their PLS-adjacent Patterson Lake North project on October 8. Conductive basement rocks trending north-south for eight kilometres on the property’s northern section represent “the possible extension of the Saskatoon Lake Conductor system which hosts the Shea Creek uranium deposits,” the companies stated. Additional data is now being gathered through a ground magnetotelluric survey.

Still to come is a ground EM survey for the central part of the property to target a conductive metasedimentary belt that coincides with a structural offset at the unconformity. On the project’s southern area, another ground EM survey will follow up on a prospective trend parallel to the PLS discovery. The team has also collected 16 outcrop and 56 soil samples, and re-logged historic core.

Winter drilling will include eight to 10 holes totalling 2,500 to 3,000 metres. Fission acts as project operator with Azincourt earning a 50% interest. Highway 955 bisects the 27,408-hectare property.

Purepoint plans Hook Lake winter drill campaign

Following up on last winter’s drilling, Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU plans to sink more Hook Lake holes, focusing on the same conductive trend that hosts the PLS discovery about five kilometres away. EM surveying has identified three prospective structural corridors, each with multiple conductors, Purepoint added. The program will consist of about 5,000 metres with a $2.5-million budget, according to an October 8 announcement. But it wasn’t clear whether those numbers include previous work.

Purepoint holds a 21% interest in Hook Lake. JV partners Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada each hold 39.5%. Purepoint has interests in 10 other active Athabasca Basin projects, the company states.

Aldrin to acquire 49,275-hectare Basin property, offers $1-million private placement

Under an agreement announced October 8, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN will buy the 49,275-hectare Virgin property, three contiguous blocks around the Basin’s south-central rim. One of them sits adjacent to Cameco’s Centennial property. The deal has Aldrin paying $75,000 and issuing a total of five million shares to four vendors who retain a 3% NSR or, should the property produce diamonds, a 3% gross overriding royalty on the gems. A similar diamond provision was part of Aldrin’s 70% PLS-adjacent Triple M acquisition from the same vendors last April.

Aldrin also announced a private placement offering up to 10 million units at $0.10 for gross proceeds of $1 million. Each unit consists of one share and one warrant exercisable at $0.20 for a year. Proceeds will go to Triple M exploration and general working capital.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

September 7th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 31 to September 6, 2013

by Greg Klein

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PLS to come under Fission control as Alpha agrees to sweetened takeover offer

The Patterson Lake South partners have come to terms. Joint September 3 news releases from Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW and Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU announced a letter of intent to combine the 50/50 joint venture under Fission’s control. The acquisition would cost 5.725 Fission shares for each Alpha share while each company would spin out its non-PLS assets into a new entity. Alpha gets no place on Fission’s management team but would nominate two directors to Fission’s five-person board.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 31 to September 6, 2013

With three barges supporting drill rigs,
the Alpha/Fission flotilla patrols Patterson Lake South.

The deal sweetens Fission’s previous offer of 5.3 shares announced August 26 and represents a 14.5% premium to the shares’ August 23 close and 11% to their August 30 close.

Shareholders of each company will get shares in their respective spincos, which will hold all non-cash and non-PLS assets. Each spinco will get $3 million in start-up cash.

Alpha’s other projects include three Athabasca Basin uranium projects and two gold properties in Ontario and British Columbia. Fission holds interests in six other Basin properties and one in Peru.

Pending all shareholder and regulatory approvals, the companies hope to consummate by November.

Fission/Alpha report best PLS hole so far

With the ink barely dry on their LOI, Alpha and Fission released more drill results on September 4—real assays this time, instead of teasing the market with scintillometer readings. And this time, according to Fission president/COO Ross McElroy, a single hole provided “not only the best results to date on the PLS property, but on a level with the best holes within the Athabasca Basin district.”

Sunk on the western part of R390E, the second of four zones extending from southwest to northeast, hole PLS13-075 showed a highlight of:

  • 9.08% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 54.5 metres, starting at 61 metres in vertical depth

  • (including 21.76% over 21.5 metres)

Additional results from the same hole showed:

  • 0.09% over 0.5 metres, starting at 57.5 metres

  • 0.07% over 7.5 metres, starting at 118 metres

  • 0.24% over 11.5 metres, starting at 130 metres

  • 0.65% over 2 metres, starting at 146.5 metres

  • 0.71% over 1.5 metres, starting at 151 metres

  • 0.06% over 0.5 metres, starting at 157 metres

  • 0.27% over 2.5 metres, starting at 160 metres

  • 0.27% over 1 metre, starting at 176.5 metres

True widths were unavailable. The vertical hole reached a total depth of 248 metres and was collared 30 metres grid west of PLS13-061, which last June showed 1.39% U3O8 over 23.5 metres starting at 110 metres, and included 4.34% over 6 metres.

The $6.95-million campaign will include additional drilling on the R390E zone, which has the largest of the lake water radon anomalies found last winter.

First tranche brings Lakeland Resources $738,000

Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK closed the first tranche of its private placement, issuing 5.7 million units at $0.10 and 1.35 million flow-through units at $0.125 for gross proceeds of $738,770, the company announced on September 3. The money goes to Athabasca Basin uranium exploration and general working capital.

Lakeland holds nine Basin properties and currently focuses on the Riou Lake project’s Gibbon’s Creek area, which has at least 23 historic holes. The project shows shallow depths to basement rock and also has radioactive boulders grading up to 11.3% uranium. Situated on high ground, the property can be drilled year-round.

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

Energy Fuels completes Strathmore takeover

Its acquisition of Strathmore Minerals TSX:STM now complete, Energy Fuels TSX:EFR has taken “an important step toward achieving our goal of becoming the dominant uranium producer within the U.S.,” according to joint statements issued September 3. Energy Fuels currently holds No. 2 position, with guidance of about 1.15 million pounds uranium oxide (U3O8) for fiscal 2013. The company added that the United States “is the world’s largest nuclear power market and heavily dependent on imported uranium for over 90% of its supply requirements.” Read more about the acquisition here and here.

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The uranium rush is on

March 22nd, 2013

Saskatchewan’s southwestern Athabasca Basin hosts a staking stampede

by Greg Klein

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This could be just what the beleaguered exploration sector needs—a good old-fashioned staking rush. And that’s exactly what’s going on in northern Saskatchewan’s uranium-rich Athabasca Basin. Although the market hasn’t fully caught on, companies are flocking into the area, drawn by the sensational Fission Energy TSXV:FIS and Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW discovery at Patterson Lake South.

Saskatchewan’s southwestern Athabasca Basin hosts a staking stampede

A major uranium discovery has diverted explorers’ attention
to an under-explored region of northern Saskatchewan.

The Basin’s no stranger to frenetic activity. It last happened in the early and mid-part of the century’s first decade. But that was on the east side, whose mines now comprise one of the world’s most important sources of uranium. This time the stampede is to the west side, some of it a little outside the Basin. Among the driving forces are Saskatchewan’s new online staking system, an increasingly optimistic supply-demand scenario and an escalating stream of news from the Fission/Alpha 50/50 JV.

That started in July 2011, when boulder field samples brought assays as high as 39.6% U3O8. By November 2012, drilling confirmed the discovery not only with high grades but—in glaring contrast to the Basin’s east side—shallow mineralization. This year’s step-outs have the sector wondering just how big this might be. Not surprisingly, other explorers aren’t content to watch from the sidelines.

“We were quick to jump in there,” says Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH manager of corporate development and communications Jordan Trimble. His company snapped up five properties totalling nearly 80,000 hectares, one of the area’s largest packages according to a March 20 announcement. Two of the properties lie 27 kilometres and 35 kilometres north of the PLS discovery, another two 15 kilometres south and the fifth 90 kilometres east.

“We have a connection with a guy from Calgary who was one of the first prospectors in there,” Trimble points out. “Given that you can now stake online, it’s incredibly cheap. We got that land package for about 30 cents an acre. Packages of land have been offered to me in the last few days in the same area, comparable properties for upwards of $10 an acre. So already I think we’ve created value just with the acquisition at the cost we did.”

Last December’s inauguration of Saskatchewan’s e-registry was “certainly part of it,” he says. “But online staking or no online staking, there’s no shadow of doubt in my mind that this area would have seen a staking rush, given the [PLS] discovery. It’s a one-of-a-kind discovery.”

Michael Schuss concurs. The president/CEO of Canadian International Minerals TSXV:CIN says Patterson Lake South “is probably going to be one of the biggest discoveries in Canadian history. I wouldn’t call us ambulance-chasers by nature, but we saw the opportunity and thought we better move on it.”

Just one day before Skyharbour’s announcement, CIN revealed it nabbed a 20-claim, 25,225-hectare package in the same district. Like Skyharbour, the company’s looking at further nearby acquisitions.

Of all the news pouring out of the Fission/Alpha project, Schuss singles out the February 19 announcement of 57.5 metres of mineralization from a step-out 385 metres on strike. The JV partners were “either extremely lucky or it’s so big you couldn’t miss it. I think that’s what kicked off the staking rush.

“The excitement of Patterson Lake South is a discovery outside the traditional Athabasca Basin,” Schuss maintains. “It shouldn’t have been there. The staking has gone way beyond south of the basin. That’s something we haven’t seen before. It’s an exciting time in the industry.”

He credits people like Fission director Jody Dahrouge and Alpha director Warren Stanyer, who were among the PLS visionaries. “At first it was wildcatting at best,” Schuss says. “To go from concept to discovery in four years is an exceptional timetable. That’s part of the excitement. It also shows that in Canada you can still find major deposits in places that people drive right over.” Highway 955 cuts through PLS on its way to the former Cluff Lake uranium mine.

Schuss adds, “The staking rush is a nice feeling for a change because we probably haven’t had one in Canada since Voisey’s Bay, about 20 years ago.”

And the excitement brings a new focus to some companies.

“Skyharbour had been dormant for two years, looking for deals,” explains Trimble. “We waited patiently through a real tough market, researched uranium, saw it from the perspective of both current equity valuations in the space and the lack of what you could call saturation. You don’t have as many uranium companies clamouring for investor dollars.”

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The Proof’s In The Porphyry

February 13th, 2012

Northern Freegold Drills Yukon Gold, Silver, Copper, Moly

By Greg Klein

Northern Freegold’s TSXV:NFR January 18 inferred resource estimate was, as President/CEO/Director John Burges says, another milestone in its rapidly advancing Freegold Mountain Project in central Yukon. The Revenue Deposit’s initial 43-101 came in addition to the adjacent Nucleus Deposit’s existing resource of 1.39 million gold-equivalent ounces indicated and 898,000 gold-equivalent ounces inferred.

The boost of 3.66 million gold-equivalent ounces prompted analysts Michael Fowler and Leonie Soltay of Loewen Ondaatje McCutcheon to rate Northern Freegold a speculative buy with a target of $1.44—a steep hike from its January 18 high of $0.30.

Northern Freegold Drills Yukon Gold, Silver, Copper, Moly

That helps explain why Burges, a Northern Freegold newcomer as of November 1, “would want to move from a pretty comfortable Wall Street role covering the resource and commodities sector to a junior exploration company in the middle of a financial maelstrom.”

After being approached by Director Greg Johnson, the first thing Burges noticed was the company’s valuation. “It was trading at about a third to a quarter of its peers,” he says. “So the company’s cheap. But companies are sometimes cheap for fundamental reasons. I then went through the basics. The Yukon’s a great place to be mining, and the region has good infrastructure. But did the company have the ability to scale up its resource? This latest announcement shows we can do just that, and do so rapidly.”

With a gold-equivalent cutoff of 0.5 grams per tonne, Revenue’s January 18 inferred resource estimates 101 million tonnes grading

  • 0.34 g/t gold for 1.12 million gold ounces
  • 3.14 g/t silver for 10.19 million silver ounces
  • 0.13% copper for 286.87 million copper pounds
  • 0.04% molybdenum for 89.61 million molybdenum pounds
  • 1.08 g/t gold-equivalent for 3.66 million gold-equivalent ounces

The adjacent Nucleus Deposit has a February 2011 indicated resource estimating 48.5 million tonnes with a gold-equivalent cutoff of 0.4 g/t grading

  • 0.7 g/t gold for 1.1 million gold ounces
  • 0.9 g/t silver for 1.4 million silver ounces
  • 0.06% copper for 67.75 million copper pounds
  • 0.89 g/t gold-equivalent for 1.39 million gold-equivalent ounces

The Nucleus inferred resource estimates 41.45 million tonnes with a gold-equivalent cutoff of 0.4 g/t grading

  • 0.47 g/t gold for 627,000 gold ounces
  • 0.98 g/t silver for 1.31 million silver ounces
  • 0.07% copper for 62.03 million copper pounds
  • 0.67 g/t gold-equivalent for 898,000 gold-equivalent ounces

“Last season we drilled 27 holes, 12,375 metres, all of it in Revenue. We spent $4 million on exploration and converted that to over 3.6 million gold-equivalent ounces, an incredibly low finding cost,” Burges points out. “Part of that comes from having a porphyry asset. When you have a pretty good sense of the overall structure, you can scale up the size with relatively low-risk, low-cost drilling.

“We have an eight-kilometre geophysical anomaly running from Nucleus to the Stoddart Zone,” he adds. “Revenue is in between and that’s probably where the porphyry is centred. When you compare that geophysical anomaly to the soil geochemistry, where we have extremely strong copper and gold showing across a four-kilometre strike zone that crosses about the middle of that geophysical anomaly, it’s easy to become convinced that it’s a single porphyry system. It’s one of the largest geophysical anomalies you’ll see and probably comparable to some of the largest porphyry projects in the world. That’s the potential—obviously we haven’t proved that yet. We have to work at that every drill season.

“Revenue is open laterally in all directions and at depth. This coming season we think we’ll have very similar results as we drill the western side of the deposit.”

We spent $4 million on exploration and converted that to over 3.6 million gold-equivalent ounces, an incredibly low finding cost —John Burges

This year the company also plans to drill Nucleus below its current depth of about 300 metres and to explore some of the project’s prospective targets. The drill season usually runs from April to October.

As for infrastructure, “We have a government-maintained road leading to the main highway, a key advantage over companies that have to helicopter everything in. A high-voltage transmission line is about 30 kilometres away. We are on Crown land, but we maintain strong relationships with the local communities.”

Those relationships are enhanced by Founder/Director Bill Harris, a second-generation Yukon prospector who knows the territory’s people as well as its geology. “He not only found the deposit but was able to amalgamate a very fragmented land package,” Burges notes.

Director Greg Johnson is President/CEO of South American Silver TSX:SAC and a co-founder of NovaGold TSX:NG who helped push three projects through to feasibility as the company’s market cap rose from $50 million to over $2 billion.

Tim Termuende is President/CEO/Co-founder of Eagle Plains Resources TSXV:EPL, which Burges describes as “a serial incubator of assets which they spin out, the most recent example being Copper Canyon Resources, which NovaGold acquired last year.”

VP of Exploration Al Armitage is a 25-year geologist with extensive experience in North American porphyry assets, says Burges. “With his colleagues Al Sexton and Joe Campbell, they’ve really driven the exploration side of the company.”

The company had $3.6 million cash as of December, Burges says. “The cheapest capital would come from exercise warrants. We now have 29.8 million warrants at a 45-cent exercise price.”

He concludes, “We have the kind of asset that intermediate producers like—low-cost, open-pittable bulk-tonnage projects. And having a project like this in a low-risk jurisdiction with good infrastructure makes it even more valuable. I believe Freegold is going to be huge, and we’re rapidly working towards that.”

At press time Northern Freegold had 111.5 million shares trading at $0.29 for a market cap of $32.4 million.

Eagle Plains reports BC Gold Assays including 26.8 g/t over 6.1m

January 6th, 2011

Eagle Plains Resources Ltd EPL:CA announced assays from its Yellowjacket Project in BC. Highlights include 26.8 g/t gold over 6.1 metres (including 138.26 g/t over 1 metre), 5.83 g/t over 11.2 metres (including 46.63 g/t over 1 metre) and 7.73 g/t over 8.7 metres (including 30.48 g/t over 2 metres).

VP Exploration Chuck Downie commented, “We are encouraged by the presence of two relatively continuous, near surface mineralized gold zones within the area of the next pit. The tight-spaced drilling will give us a very detailed geologic model which will greatly enhance the effectiveness of grade control during our mining operation.”

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Mike Labach
Investor Relations Manager
866.486.8673

by Ted Niles