Monday 5th December 2016

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Posts tagged ‘Endeavour Mining Corp (EDV)’

Gwen Preston looks back on PDAC and an exciting week

March 15th, 2016

by Gwen Preston | SmallCapPower.com | March 15, 2016

What a week it was! Another PDAC is in the books. And a good one. It was undoubtedly small—fewer booths, attendance of just 22,000 compared to an average of 29,000 over the last five years—but the buzz was inarguably better than last year.

Gwen Preston looks back on PDAC and an exciting week

Mining deals flowed with PDAC buzzing in the background.

I comment on my PDAC impressions after going through the mining news events of the week. As usual, news flow ramped up during the world’s biggest mining conference so there was lots to talk about, and all I got to were the four biggest stories.

Others also deserve comment. Canamex Resources (TSXV:CSQ), for example, published a PEA showing how they could turn their Bruner gold project into a 46,500-ounce-per-year producer for a capital cost of just US$33.4 million. If built, the mine should be able to generate a 39% after-tax internal rate of return and operate for six years. It would be a simple oxide heap leach operating on patented land, which eases permitting considerably.

Those are pretty good numbers. The asset and company are small for my tastes but Canamex deserves credit: it not only survived the bear market but advanced its asset to the point where it supports an economic PEA. If the team can now establish a path to production, starting with accessing the cash needed to take the next step, its share price may well respond. This is, after all, a simple gold project in Nevada, one of the most desirable mining jurisdictions in the world.

That’s one example of interesting news. There was no shortage: companies arrived at PDAC armed with new drill results, property deals, exploration plans, financings and resource estimates.

Deal flow was the most exciting part. I go through three new deals below (Silver Standard buying Claude, Endeavour buying True Gold and Lundin moving on Timok), but financings were also hot. Pretium raised US$130 million, Franco pulled in an oversubscribed US$920 million and Kinross raised US$250 million. I like to see money moving. This sector seizes up otherwise.

No wonder PDAC-ers were pumped. Or cautiously optimistic, in the very least…. Continue reading this article on SmallCapPower.com.

Week in review

January 25th, 2013

A mining and exploration retrospect for January 19 to 25, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Canadian company’s employees still held hostage in Colombia

Kidnappers continue to hold five workers abducted from Braeval Mining’s TSX:BVL Snow Mine project in Colombia. According to a Thursday story in Colombia Reports, two Colombian hostages are being held separately from two Peruvians and a Canadian. The government has offered a cash reward while the army said it has 2,700 soldiers searching for the victims.

A Monday Colombia Reports article said soldiers had arrested three of the 20 to 25 kidnappers. The story gave the victims’ names as Canadian Jernoc Wobert, Peruvians Jose Manami and Javier Ochoa, and Colombians William Batista and Manuel Francisco Zabaleta.

Rebels abducted them on January 18 in northern Colombia’s Bolivar department. Among grievances cited by the kidnappers, the National Liberation Army (ELN) listed unequal distribution of mining rights, stated Colombia Reports.

Most Mali operations safe so far

A mining and exploration retrospect

“If you are still in Mali, you should leave immediately,” Canada’s Foreign Affairs department warned on Sunday. But Tuesday’s Toronto Star reported that work continues in most of southwestern Mali’s mining operations while French-led forces battle rebels hundreds of kilometres away. Over 15 Canadian exploration and mining companies operate in the country although some, especially in the northeast, have suspended work.

Endeavour Mining TSX:EDV Neil Woodyer described the turmoil as “part of the nature of the beast, as far as we’re concerned, being miners.” But his company’s properties, like most of Mali’s advanced-stage projects and operating mines, are in the southwest.

Mali is Africa’s third-largest gold-mining country, the Star reported. According to a 2008 estimate cited by the CBC, about 17% of the country’s government revenue comes from gold mining.

BCSC finds sloppy disclosures an ongoing problem

NI 43-101 regulations govern not only news releases and technical reports but also company Web sites, speeches, corporate presentations and other communications considered to be voluntary disclosures. But that fact sometimes slips the minds of company officials.

Of a sample of companies reviewed by the British Columbia Securities Commission between 2009 and 2012, only half met 43-101 standards in their voluntary disclosures. According to the BCSC 2012 Mining Report released Thursday, the problem is especially apparent when reporting PEA results, historic estimates, quality control, lab procedures and identifying the qualified person who takes responsibility for the information.

Yet compliance in non-voluntary disclosures is hardly reassuring. Only 65% of companies made the 43-101 grade. PEAs were especially problematic, flunking out in more than half of all cases for both voluntary and compulsory disclosures. A lack of cautionary language was the most frequent reason.

Non-compliant data verification, resource and reserve estimates, pre‐feas and feasibility studies also raised concerns. A common problem with resource estimates was totalling all categories instead of segregating the inferred numbers.

Among other monitoring activities, the commission targeted 82 companies between February 2011 and September 2012 that were selected because of “poor disclosure we observe in e-mail blasts, news releases and paid promotions on industry‐related Web sites,” the report stated.

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Week in review

December 14th, 2012

A mining and exploration retrospect for December 8 to 14, 2012

by Greg Klein

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U.S. politicians ponder windfall royalties

The United States has joined the list of countries considering additional ways to mine miners, according to a Wednesday Reuters story. Some American politicians are talking about royalties as high as 12.5%, the same benchmark applied to certain other resources, including oil and gas.

Reuters said the proposal would get about $700 million during the lifespan of Freeport-McMoRan’s copper-molybdenum operations in Colorado, Arizona and New Mexico. Last year alone, the royalty could have taken $150 million from Barrick’s TSX:ABX Goldstrike mine in Nevada, according to Reuters’ figures. Barrick told the news agency the company’s taxes have already jumped four-fold over five years.

Democrat Representative Raul Grijalva, a proponent of the 12.5% levy, sees it differently. “As we face these fiscal challenges, these are the pennies that we should pinch,” Reuters quoted him. Along with some other U.S. federal politicians, Grijalva also wants to review miners’ tax breaks.

Previous attempts to raise miners’ taxes have failed, Reuters stated, “as the industry has strong political allies.” The story added that “state and local governments often catch a windfall from mining revenue.”

Ivory Coast hikes taxes but overestimates profits, miner says

A mining and exploration retrospect

A new tax on Ivory Coast gold extraction underestimates cash costs by nearly 50%, according to at least one source. New legislation that applies to 2012 production assumes cash costs of $615 an ounce, Reuters stated on Friday. The tax on “profits” above that amount will fluctuate with the yellow metal’s price. At $1,600, that comes to 17%. The rate will be lower for companies that pay the country a corporate tax, the news agency added. Randgold Resources CEO Mark Bristow called the new levy, expected to raise $79.8 million, a “punitive tax,” Reuters said.

In a December 7 Bloomberg report, Endeavour Mining TSX:EDV spokesperson Nouho Kone said Ivory Coast gold production can actually cost between $1,000 and $1,200 an ounce. “The worst-case scenario would be to see companies shut down their mines in the short term,” he told Bloomberg. Reuters stated that Perseus Mining TSX:PRU put its $160-million Sissingue project on hold last September “pending clarification of the fiscal regime applicable to the project.”

Maybe Ghana too

Ghanaian President John Dramani Mahama’s re-election brings to mind his previous effort to impose a 10% tax on windfall profits, Monday’s Financial Post reported.

The government had already raised miners’ corporate taxes from 25% to 35% and imposed “a uniform regime for capital allowance of 20% for five years of mining,” the FP stated. But the government’s intended windfall tax had been shelved due to industry pressure, according to a Wednesday Reuters dispatch.

Reuters added that government discussions with gold miners are underway “to loosen up so-called ‘stability agreements’ held by some firms that lock in royalty and tax rates.” This year Ghana raised gold royalties from 3% to 5%, but the stability agreement exempted companies like AngloGold Ashanti and Newmont Mining TSX:NMC, the news agency stated.

Unions lose bid to block foreign workers from staffing B.C. mine

HD Mining International called it a “massive victory,” the Globe and Mail reported Friday. A federal court judge has allowed the company to import Chinese workers for its proposed Murray River coal mine in British Columbia. Two unions had applied for an injunction blocking the work permits after learning that HD Mining planned to staff its underground operation exclusively with Chinese workers—which would total over 400 at full production.

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Burkina bulletins

September 18th, 2012

A steady stream of gold news flows from west Africa

By Greg Klein

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A poor country rich in gold. That contradiction might someday correct itself if mining can improve life for the people of Burkina Faso. Over the last six years several Canadian companies have explored its potential, among them Riverstone Resources TSXV:RVS. (Update: On February 25, 2013, Riverstone Resources Inc began trading as True Gold Mining Inc TSXV:TGM.) In what’s almost a weekly event, the company announced drill results September 17 from its Karma Gold Project.

Assay highlights from the Kao Deposit include

  • 9.5 grams per tonne gold over 12 metres
  • (including 33.6 g/t over 2 metres)
  • 2.02 g/t over 30 metres
  • (including 2.54 g/t over 18 metres)
  • 2.97 g/t over 14 metres
  • 13.45 g/t over 2 metres
  • 1.73 g/t over 12 metres
  • 3.21 g/t over 6 metres
  • 3.19 g/t over 4 metres
A steady stream of gold news flows from west Africa

Adversity notwithstanding, wide-ranging gold exploration
continues in Burkina Faso.

True widths are estimated between 90% and 100%. Depths extend to 260 metres, but most were less than 54 metres. The company states that its resource update, scheduled for release later this month, is expected to show an increase in more easily recoverable oxide resources.

Karma’s current estimate, issued last January, shows an indicated resource of 54.1 million tonnes grading 1.02 g/t gold for 1.77 million gold ounces and an inferred resource of 37.4 million tonnes grading 0.8 g/t for 959,000 ounces. Over 80% of the resource falls within five Whittle open pit shells. Over 85,000 metres of additional drilling will be incorporated into this month’s update.

On September 17 the company also filed the technical report for Karma’s PEA, which was announced last month. The study projects an initial capex of $125 million, which might be cut to $96 million through contract mining. The study also shows a pre-tax net present value of $271 million and a 47% internal rate of return, or an after-tax NPV of $192 million and a 37% IRR. Payback is estimated at two years.

The study examined three processing options, favouring a heap leach operation that would process three million tonnes of oxide and transition mineralization annually to produce 70,000 to 90,000 gold ounces a year over a 10-year life. Cash costs would come to $525 an ounce. Calculations are based on a gold price of $1,350 an ounce.

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Rich And Stable

April 20th, 2012

Abzu Has Two Potentially Big Gold Properties in Ghana

By Ted Niles

Investor opinion is divided on West Africa. On the one hand, it is a place of extraordinary mineral potential; on the other, it is a region with a high level of geopolitical risk. The March 22 coup by Mali’s military is only the latest example. But Peter Klipfel, President of Abzu Gold Ltd TSXV:ABS, has reason to believe that Mali is the exception in the region and that neighbouring Ghana is both rich in minerals and politically secure.

“For the last 15 years now, Ghana has had a very stable government and parliamentary process,” Klipfel reports. “You have an emerging middle class that has expectations of its country and society. They are an entrepreneurial bunch. And for the most part, what you see is a legitimate and fair rule of law and order. If there ever was an issue, I take faith in the fact that it would go a lot better than it might if you were somewhere like Venezuela.”

Abzu Has Two Potentially Big Gold Properties in Ghana

Klipfel is not alone in this opinion, for Ghana, Africa’s second-largest gold producer, is not short of players. The country has seen a steady influx of juniors over the last decade, and majors active there include Gold Fields, AngloGold Ashanti, Kinross TSX:K and Newmont TSX:NMC. “If you look at Newmont,” Klipfel says, “they see the end coming someday for their Carlin Trend and some of their other deposits. For 10 years now, they’ve been pumping money into their Ahafo Project with the expectation that it is going to be their company maker in the future. That they’ll keep the company going strong from Ghana is, to me, a huge vote of confidence both in the country and its politics.”

Confidence that Abzu hopes to translate into success of its own. Abzu‘s properties in Ghana fall into two categories: concessions that it owns exclusively (six) and those that it holds in joint venture with Kinross Gold TSX:K (10). Of the 16, it has selected two for its flagship operations: Nangodi and Asafo, both highway-adjacent and with access to power and water.

The 142-square-kilometre Nangodi concession is located in the country’s north, on the Bole-Nangodi Belt—also host to Endeavour Mining’s TSX:EDV Youga Mine in Burkina Faso. An historical producer, Nangodi was acquired by Kinross when it bought out Red Back Mining in 2010. Abzu is currently earning a 51% interest in the property by spending $3 million over three years. “When we first picked up [Nangodi], it had the lowest hanging fruit available in terms of past work,” Klipfel says. “[It was] something we could sink our teeth into—get drill rigs going on and come up with what we thought would be good results.”

And that they’ve done. In 2011, the company undertook a 27-hole drill campaign, expanding on the 31 holes drilled in the 1990s by Australian miner Africwest Gold. Assays announced December 1, 2011, include

  • 1.91 grams per tonne gold over 44 metres (including 4.75 g/t over 15 metres)
  • 1.15 g/t over 73 metres (including 7.9 g/t over 4 metres)
  • 3.06 g/t over 10.7 metres
  • 1.99 g/t over 44.5 metres
  • 2.25 g/t over 24 metres
  • 1.61 g/t over 16 metres
  • 1.53 g/t over 66 metres (including 4.65 g/t over 15 metres)
  • 17.93 g/t over 3 metres
  • 41.6 g/t over 1 metre
  • 1 g/t over 12 metres

Klipfel comments, “We’ve expanded on the area that [Africwest] drilled and taken it from about a 600-metre zone to 1.2 kilometres—about 60-metres wide and drilled at a depth of 200 metres. Mineralization there is the sort that will go to great depths, like many of the other vein deposits in Ghana.”

The company believes that the deposit has “multimillion-ounce” potential. Klipfel explains, “You put a box around what we’ve defined so far—1,000 metres by 50 metres by 200 metres—at the grades we’re seeing, and that would give you two million ounces right there. That, of course, is our hope.” Ground geophysics and trenching work are ongoing at the site, and a minimum of 5,000 metres of drilling is planned to begin in June. An NI 43-101 resource estimate for Nangodi is expected to be released in 4Q.

Klipfel says that the company’s relationship with Kinross is good. “We’ve kept them apprised of things, and they’re happy with the work we’ve done. We’ve already exceeded the first-year expenditure [ie, $500,000], and we’re only eight months into the deal.”

Abzu‘s other flagship property—the 152-square-kilometre, 100%-owned Ahafo concession—is located in Ghana’s south on the eastern edge of the Kibi Belt. While not one of the company’s Kinross joint ventures, it too has a pedigree in that it was acquired and explored by Newmont in the early 2000s. On the basis of Newmont‘s work, plus their own geophysical work, Abzu determined three targets. A 13-hole drill program on the first of those targets returned October 20, 2011, assays including

We undertook 10,000-plus metres of drilling on four different campaigns in seven months last year. We went from blank pieces of paper to two flagship-level projects with multimillion-ounce potential —Peter Klipfel

  • 0.67 g/t over 20 metres
  • 4.08 g/t over 1 metre
  • 0.85 g/t over 12 metres
  • 0.6 g/t over 30 metres
  • 1.28 g/t over 3.5 metres
  • 4.72 g/t over 20 metres (including 62.2 g/t over 1.1 metres)

“We were jumping up and down for joy as far as a shotgun blast coming up with nine out of 13 holes with good intercepts,” Klipfel declares. “We’ve tagged on to something, and now we need to figure out what it is.” He believes that Ahafo, like Nangodi, has significant resource potential. However, before a resource estimate can be considered a trenching program and a further 4,000 metres of drilling in 2012 (planned for 2Q and 3Q respectively) are needed to better understand this project.

With about $1 million in the bank, Klipfel says that his company is due for a financing which will either be done publicly or by private placement “in the next month or so.” He continues, “We want to put about 50% of our effort and money into Nangodi, 35% into Asafo and 15% into the other [properties]. Hopefully, we can get another discovery going by the end of the year.”

Klipfel concludes, “I haven’t been able to be as aggressive about the exploration as I’d like early this year because we’re in budget-minded mode. We undertook 10,000-plus metres of drilling on four different campaigns in seven months last year. We went from blank pieces of paper to two flagship-level projects with multimillion-ounce potential. Including the joint venture with [Kinross], we’ve expanded our concessions from three to 16. I only hope our future allows us to grow like that and come up with goods like we have at Asafo and Nangodi.”

At press time, Abzu Gold had 59.2 million shares trading at $0.21 for a market cap of $12.4 million. Its other concessions in Ghana are located on the Sefwi, Asankrangwa and Ashanti Belts.

Disclaimer: Abzu Gold Ltd is a client of OnPage Media and the principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Abzu Gold.