Monday 5th December 2016

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘ecuador’

Gold—pricey or priceless?

May 27th, 2015

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

by Greg Klein

Gold’s allure, where it exists at all, can manifest itself in different ways. British Columbia natives, for example, remained indifferent to the metal until the arrival of prospectors. Those gold-hungry newcomers, on the other hand, were driven almost entirely by rapacity. But the pre-Conquest indigenous peoples of today’s Colombia saw nothing of value in the metal itself until, converted by metallurgy and craftsmanship, it became an object not only of beauty but of symbolic importance or transformational power.

That’s demonstrated by Allure of Gold, an exhibit within the exhibit called Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum. Holding 137 pieces of pre-Hispanic artefacts dating to 500 BC, the display makes its first North American appearance from Bogota’s Museo del Oro. Even now the pieces symbolize the Colombian peoples’ identity, pride and shared past, Museo director Maria Alicia Uribe Villegas told ResourceClips.com.

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

This gold pendant, in a style dating between 900 and 1600, would “transform” political or religious leaders into batmen, bestowing such
powers as the ability to fly, see at night and rest upside-down.
(Photo: Museo del Oro)

“These were objects that were produced mainly for display and to build power—political and religious power—by transmitting the properties of the materials,” she explained. People believed the objects asserted status, hosted spirits, or enhanced fertility and the overall quality of life.

According to belief, many objects wielded power to transform the person wearing it into another being. “They could for example acquire the identity of the jaguar, of birds, of bats,” Uribe said. “By wearing the ornament they believed they transformed their body, and by transforming their body they changed their perspective and their identity. So the power of many rulers came from that transformation. They believed that by transforming into a bird, you could fly to other worlds, to other dimensions, to the spiritual dimension, meet the spirits and the gods and ask for things, ask for hunting prey or for rain or things that your group needed.”

Some objects also presented a view of cosmology, she pointed out. “In most of these societies there isn’t this difference between nature and culture. Animals and people were nature and culture at the same time. Animals are also humans, different kinds of humans than people, so the relations between animals and humans were understood as social relations…. When you hunt you have to seduce the prey and you have to give the spiritual owner of the animal a gift in exchange.” Uribe said gold then functioned in “a transactional world,” but in a symbolic sense, not as currency.

Why was gold chosen for such representations? “It’s interesting because it’s a cultural choice,” she replied, noting that B.C. aboriginals knew about gold but didn’t use it. “It’s a wonderful material,” she added. “It’s beautiful for its colour and the shine you can give it, it doesn’t corrode, it lasts forever, and also you can give it the shape you want by hammering it or casting it.”

Although natives north of Mexico didn’t practise metallurgy, those of Colombia produced gold-copper and gold-silver alloys. When silver was used it was normally in the country’s south, which had cultural connections with today’s Peru and Ecuador. Colombians used platinum too. They couldn’t melt it because of the metal’s exceptional resistance to heat but South Americans were “the only people in the ancient world that used platinum.”

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

In a style dating between 1 BC and 700 AD, this breastplate would “transform” a chieftain or priest into a jaguar, allowing him to communicate with jaguar spirits and granting him deep respect and obedience. (Photo: Museo del Oro)

Almost all that effort was motivated by symbolism and spirituality, not practicality. But Colombians did make some metal tools for fashioning other metal objects, for example to hammer gold, Uribe noted. They also fashioned metal into needles and fishing hooks. But “those were the only practical tools they made.” Otherwise precious metals were used “for these objects of meaning.”

It’s a wonder that any of it survived the efficiently bloodthirsty business of confiscating the artwork and turning it into bullion. As Matthew Hart wrote about Francisco Pizarro’s 16th century conquest of Peru, “The artistic output of a thousand years vanished into the furnaces. It must be one of the most potent images in history—the transformation of a culture into cash.”

Most of what survived were funerary offerings hidden in tombs. “But the Spanish learned how to identify these tombs and many of them were looted,” Uribe said. Incredibly, ancient artefacts were still being melted as late as the 19th and even 20th century.

Where’s that gold now? You might be wearing some of it. The global gold supply comes from diverse and sometimes ancient sources, one of the museum displays points out. The bling in your ring could come from a Colombian chief or an Egyptian pharaoh.

But some of Colombia’s treasures were preserved by local collectors and European museums. The Museo del Oro’s collection started in 1939, after Colombia’s minister of education prevailed on the country’s national bank, then holding a monopoly on gold ownership, “to keep these objects out of the market, being taken abroad and melted,” Uribe said.

Now all such artefacts belong to the country’s entire population, she explained. A private collector must register with the office of archeological heritage and may ask for tenancy on a privately held collection. But Colombia retains ownership. “You cannot buy it, sell it or even inherit it.”

So while the commodity’s spot price keeps gold bugs guessing, these objects remain priceless.

Allure of Gold appears with Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum until October 31.

Read more about the Colombian national collection.

Read more about Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia.

Salazar reports Ecuador assays of 3.05 g/t Gold, 57.48 g/t Silver over 3.2m

May 14th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningSalazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced results from its Curipamba VMS Project in Ecuador. Assays include

2.26 g/t gold and 59.27 g/t silver over 4.6 metres
1.09 g/t gold and 66.1 g/t silver over 1.4 metres
1.49 g/t gold and 13.81 g/t silver over 5.1 metres
3.05 g/t gold, 51.24 g/t silver, 0.86% copper, 0.85% lead and 7.88% zinc over 3.6 metres
3.9 g/t gold, 102.77 g/t silver and 5.99% zinc over 2.1 metres
3.05 g/t gold, 57.48 g/t silver, 2.14% copper and 4.45% zinc over 3.2 metres

President/CEO Fredy Salazar stated, “We have now completed the Phase IV drill program at El Domo and drill rigs have been demobilized. We await final results from the drill program and then will begin planning on how to best advance the future development of El Domo to maximize shareholder value. While the Phase IV drill program has concluded, we are continuing with our surface geological program with the objective of identifying and proving up new targets. While additional results from the Phase IV drill program are pending, we are very pleased with the results to date which continue to demonstrate the presence of mineralization outside the established resource blocks. The Phase IV drill program has successfully identified new areas with potential to increase the El Domo resource.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Investor Relations
647.925.8981

by Ted Niles

Salazar reports Ecuador Assays of 6.4 g/t Gold, 215.25 g/t Silver, 3.98% Copper over 5.3m

April 10th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningSalazar Resources Ltd TSXV:SRL announced results from its Curipamba VMS Project in Ecuador. Assays include

6.4 g/t gold, 215.25 g/t silver, 3.98% copper, 1.71% lead and 12.54% zinc over 5.3 metres
(including 23.47 g/t gold, 732 g/t silver, 3.55% copper, 6.57% lead and 38.86% zinc over 1.22 metres)
0.31 g/t gold, 11.45 g/t silver, 0.15% copper, 0.1% lead and 1.57% zinc over 33.5 metres
(including 1.36 g/t gold, 43.94 g/t silver, 0.02% copper, 0.11% lead and 0.16% zinc over 5.3 metres)
1.11 g/t gold, 24.47 g/t silver, 0.2% copper, 0.46% lead and 1.87% zinc over 6.6 metres
1.55 g/t gold, 42.85 g/t silver, 1.65% copper, 0.32% lead and 4.16% zinc over 4.1 metres

President/CEO Fredy Salazar commented, “These new results continue to show potential to increase the El Domo resource in multiple directions. The intersections in CURI-169 and 171 demonstrate additional potential to the southwest, while the intersection in CURI-170 shows the mineralization remains open in the northeast. Additional drilling is required in both areas to follow up these positive results.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Investor Relations
647.925.8981

by Greg Klein

Odin reports Ecuador Results up to 2.55 g/t Gold, 0.18% Copper over 18m

April 4th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningOdin Mining and Exploration Ltd TSXV:ODN announced assays from the Casique Target of its Greater Cangrejos Property in Ecuador. Results include

2.55 g/t gold and 0.18% copper over 18 metres
(including 5.66 g/t gold and 0.33% copper over 2 metres)
8.96 g/t gold and 0.23% copper over 6 metres
(including 14.8 g/t gold and 0.6% copper over 2 metres)
1.65 g/t gold and 0.08% copper over 24 metres
(including 4.17 g/t gold and 0.19% copper over 2 metres)
1.39 g/t gold and 0.06% copper over 8 metres
0.88 g/t gold and 0.06% copper over 10 metres
1.1 g/t gold and 0.03% copper over 7.5 metres

Since October Odin has drilled 15 holes for a total of 4,213 metres, including four holes at Trinchera-Paloma reported January 26, 2012, seven holes at Casique reported here and four more holes at Casique for which results are pending. On completing the Casique program, Odin will continue mapping, soil sampling and road construction while completing the surveys required to permit the next round of drilling.

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Contact:
Stephen Stow
President/CEO
or Daniel Noone
Director
604.888.4505

by Greg Klein

Salazar reports Ecuador Assays of 231 g/t Silver, 28.1 g/t Gold over 2m

February 24th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningSalazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced chip samples from its Santiago project in Ecuador. Highlights include

28.1 g/t gold and 231 g/t silver over 2 metres
26 g/t gold and 242 g/t silver over 1 metre
18.2 g/t gold and 252 g/t silver over 1 metre
4.8 g/t gold and 442 g/t silver over 1 metre
4.8 g/t gold and 378 g/t silver over 1.4 metres
6.4 g/t gold and 136 g/t silver over 1.2 metres
4.2 g/t gold and 183 g/t silver over 1.2 metres

President/CEO Fredy Salazar, “This project was acquired in December 2010. The results obtained from initial reconnaissance exploration are very encouraging as they indicate the potential of the property to deliver significant discoveries.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Salazar Resources Ltd
Investor Relations
647.925.8981

by Ted Niles

Salazar reports Ecuador Assays of 0.59 g/t Gold, 33.54 g/t Silver over 20.6m

January 27th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningSalazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced results from its Curipamba VMS project in Ecuador. Assays include

0.67 g/t gold and 26.13 g/t silver over 12.5 metres
(including 1.52 g/t gold and 33.05 g/t silver over 2.7 metres)
0.59 g/t gold and 33.54 g/t silver over 20.6 metres
(including 1.8 g/t gold and 146.7 g/t silver over 0.8 metres)
25.27 g/t silver over 7.9 metres
80.9 g/t silver over 0.7 metres

President/CEO Fredy Salazar said, “We are very encouraged by these latest drill holes, specifically DDH 155 located 600-metres east of the current resource estimate area, as it considerably opens the potential to extend the El Domo deposit and/or to encounter new VMS lenses. This step-out hole further validates the idea that the El Domo deposit has the potential to increase significantly beyond the current size of the resource.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Salazar Resources Ltd
Investor Relations
647.925.8981

by Ted Niles

Salazar reports Ecuador Assays of 1.21 g/t Gold, 2.36% Copper over 17.9m

December 1st, 2011

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningSalazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced assay results from its Curipamba VMS project in Ecuador. Highlights include

1.04 g/t gold, 30.06 g/t silver, 3.29% copper and 3.77% zinc over 8.2 metres
1.21 g/t gold and 2.36% copper over 17.9 metres
3.99 g/t gold, 89.76 g/t silver, 1.34% copper and 7.89% zinc over 4.3 metres
1.2 g/t gold and 18.64 g/t silver over 6.7 metres
1.64 g/t gold and 124.23 g/t silver over 3.8 metres

President/CEO Fredy Salazar said, “We are extremely pleased that seven of the 10 holes intersected significant mineralization under the andesite and that the deposit remains open to the east. The better results to date have been encountered in the northern portion of this newly tested area, however encouraging results were also obtained to the south from widely-spaced reconnaissance holes. These results confirm our belief that the area to the east of El Domo warrants further investigation. We continue to aggressively explore and drill at El Domo and Curipamba, and look forward to reporting additional results as well as a new NI 43-101-compliant El Domo resource estimate in the near future.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Greig Hutton
Investor Relations
519.473.9998

by Ted Niles

Salazar reports Ecuador Assays of 3.3 g/t Gold, 100.05 g/t Silver over 8.2m

October 18th, 2011

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningSalazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced assay results from the El Domo deposit of its Curipamba VMS project in Ecuador. Highlights include

0.57 g/t gold and 22.65 g/t silver over 5.7 metres
2.1 g/t gold and 100.02 g/t silver over 4.3 metres
(including 4.87 g/t gold and 231.45 g/t silver over 1.8 metres)
3.3 g/t gold and 100.05 g/t silver over 8.2 metres
(including 9.28 g/t gold and 244.07 g/t silver over 2.8 metres)
0.52 g/t gold and 25.92 g/t silver over 11.42 metres
(including 1.37 g/t gold and 73.2 g/t silver over 1.8 metres)

President/CEO Fredy Salazar commented, “We are very pleased to see the results in holes CURI-118 and CURI-122 as they provide evidence of mineralization continuing in the extreme southwest of the El Domo Deposit. These drill holes indicate that the mineralization is open to the southwest and the company will continue to drill test to better define the mineralization in this area.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Greig Hutton
Salazar Resources Limited
519.473.9998

by Ted Niles

Salazar reports Ecuador Assays of 6.73 g/t Gold, 45.80 g/t Silver over 22.7m

March 30th, 2011

Salazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced results from the El Domo Deposit of its Curipamba Property in Ecuador. Assays include 0.76 g/t gold and 1.13% copper over 11.4 metres (including 1.19 g/t gold and 3.18% copper over 2.8 metres), 1.24 g/t gold, 19.6 g/t silver and 0.74% copper over 11.2 metres (including 2.77 g/t gold, 45.74 g/t silver and 1.42% copper over 2.9 metres), and 6.73 g/t gold, 45.8 g/t silver and 4.69% copper over 22.7 metres (including 10.77 g/t gold, 84.1 g/t silver and 9.86% copper over 9.9 metres).

President/CEO Fredy Salazar commented, “The El Domo drill program continues to produce excellent results. Drill hole 99 has yielded excellent results and is one of the highest gold grade intercepts achieved to date. We are pleased with the continuing results from this ongoing drill program.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
Greig Hutton
Manager, Investor Relations
519.437.9998

by Ted Niles

Salazar reports Ecuador assays up to 3.27 g/t Gold over 16.1m

March 3rd, 2011

Salazar Resources Limited TSXV:SRL announced assays from the El Domo Deposit in the Las Naves Central Area of its Curipamba Project in Ecuador. Results include 6.8 g/t gold and 238.53 g/t silver over 2.9 metres, 4.87 g/t gold and 73.65 g/t silver over 1.5 metres, 5.3 g/t gold and 134.1 g/t silver over 1.5 metres, and 3.27 g/t gold and 74.88 g/t silver over 16.1 metres (including 3.85 g/t gold and 116.99 g/t silver over 3.3 metres).

President/CEO Fredy Salazar remarked, “The 16-metre intersection in DDH 94 is particularly important due to its position relative to a 3.13 metre high-grade intersection in DDH 22 located approximately 180 metres to the northeast. We are optimistic that additional drilling in this area will establish continuity of potentially economic mineralization between these two drill holes and the current resource boundary, further adding to what is already an exciting resource.”

View Company Profile

Contact:
First Canadian Capital
866.580.8891

by Ted Niles