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Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘Dundee Precious Metals Inc (DPM)’

Visual Capitalist looks at the potential of smart mining

April 30th, 2019

by Nicholas LePan | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | April 30, 2019

Click the image to see the full-size infographic.

 

Mining has traditionally been depicted with pack mules, pickaxes and rugged prospectors. Of course today’s industry is precisely the opposite in almost every respect. It’s high-tech, efficient and safe.

This is partly because modern mining companies are deploying the latest in sensor and cloud technology. These connected mines are improving the extraction process and workers’ safety while also boosting productivity.

This infographic comes to us from Natural Resources Canada and discusses how this sensor and cloud technology can be integrated into the extractive process.

What is smart mining?

Any mining operation today will have thousands or hundreds of thousands of sensors capturing in real time a vast swath of data.Mukani Moyo,
McKinsey senior expert

A connected mine uses data from sensor technology to effectively manage underground and pit mining operations.

From a single application on a mobile device, supervisors at mine sites can now receive alerts via SMS, email or in-app notifications. This helps them react to critical problems in real time and maximize productivity.

In addition, advanced data analytics can be applied to the raw data to create insights, visualizations and recommendations. This information is delivered to mine managers and employees in real time on their mobile devices.

Case study: Smart solutions in practice

Dundee Precious Metals TSX:DPM was one of the first companies to bring wireless networks into an underground mine. The company used RFID and Wi-Fi to monitor the location of equipment and people. The networks also allowed personnel to stay connected to the surface.

Once the networks were installed, communication was reliable and instantaneous—even at 600 metres underground, at the bottom of the mine. Workers could bring laptops and smartphones into the mine to stay connected to personnel and software on the surface.

With an RFID chip on every vehicle, machine and person, managers can see the location of everyone and everything in the mine. This helps prevent accidents and breakdowns, and streamlines operations in real time.

There are also environmental and cost-saving benefits. Using location data, an automated ventilation system can respond and minimize energy consumption.

Fans turn on and off as miners enter or leave an area. In addition, fan speeds adjust when machines or vehicles are running nearby to ensure that emissions are properly vented. This could drastically reduce a mine’s energy requirements.

Changing the nature of work: Remote working

These smart mining solutions are reducing the risks miners face and creating new opportunities for a tech-savvy generation.

Remote mine locations that revolve around shift work can place stress on workers and their families. With a connected infrastructure, mine employees and managers can monitor operations at a distant office.

There will always be a need for workers on site, but connected technology can create some town-based career opportunities and help stabilize families.

A sustainable future for mining

This is just the beginning.

Over time, data from sensor technology and cloud software will reveal insights that could help develop sustainable mining operations.

By minimizing their negative impacts, mining companies will be able to responsibly deliver the materials the modern world needs.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

North Of 60

September 7th, 2011

Sabina Faces a Huge Challenge in Nunavut

By Ted Niles

The Canadian Arctic contains the largest reserve of unexploited natural resources in the world. But they have remained unexploited for good reasons: savage weather and nominal infrastructure. Even as talk of climbing temperatures and Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s commitment to the region excite interest, the cost of development remains a dauntingly high barrier to entry for such as Sabina Gold & Silver.

In response to this challenge, Sabina announced June 2 that it had sold its Nunavut Hackett River Project and some Wishbone Greenbelt Belt claims to Swiss mining giant Xstrata for $50 million and a silver production royalty equal to 22.5% of the first 190 million ounces of payable silver and 12.5% thereafter. President/CEO Tony Walsh explained that the deal “transforms Sabina into a purely precious metals company… Our goal is to become a mid-tier gold company producing between 300K to 400K ounces of gold per year from Back River, a project scope we believe we can expedite.”

Sabina Faces a Huge Challenge in Nunavut

The Back River gold project, located about 60 kilometres from Hackett River (and 70 kilometres south of the Arctic Circle), consists of seven claim blocks, the most important of which are the Goose Lake and George properties. Since acquiring the project from Dundee Precious Metals in 2009, drilling has focussed largely on Goose, and the discovery of the Llama and Umwelt deposits there have considerably increased the project’s resources. In March 2011 Sabina announced a new resource estimate for Back River of 2.66 million ounces gold indicated—more than doubling the existing indicated resource—and 1.56 million ounces gold inferred.

The objective of Sabina’s 2011 drill campaign is to add at least another 700,000 ounces of gold to the resource. VP Exploration Manojlovic tells Resource Clips, “We’re still drilling up there right now, and we will be until the end of September. We have nine drills currently turning. We have five drills working on the Umwelt itself—we’re expanding that deposit. Last year we drilled about 550 metres at the top end of that deposit, brought it to a resource, and this year we’re drilling to get the additional mineralization to the south. Once we’re done at the end of September, we’ll be working on doing the resource from that 550 metres down to however deep we take it by the end of September. We would hope to get [the updated resource] out by 4Q.”

Umwelt assays reported September 1 include 14.62 grams per tonne gold over 13.9 metres (including 27.56 g/t over 5 metres), 7.32 g/t over 24.4 metres, 5.47 g/t over 29 metres and 7.28 g/t over 18.4 metres. August 25 results included 10.19 g/t over 33 metres (including 27.16 g/t over 9 metres), 5.64 g/t over 6.7 metres, 3.35 g/t over 19.2 metres, 4.79 g/t over 20.8 metres, 15.42 g/t over 6 metres and 13.43 g/t over 24.4 metres (including 72.8 g/t over 3 metres).

We have very high confidence that we will continue to increase resources and bring the project to the mining stage —Peter Manojlovic

Manojlovic comments, “We’re quite excited about the results that we’ve released. Certainly the highlight was the hole that returned 13 g/t over 24 metres. The deposit now extends from, basically, near surface at the north down to about 650 metres at the south end, which is where that hole is. It demonstrates the incredible continuity of the deposit over 1.4 kilometres. The thickness is very consistent as well.”

He continues, “We hope to complete our drilling and get those resources and begin a preliminary economic assessment of the project this fall. We see that as having a high likelihood of being positive. We would progress as rapidly as we can once we reach that stage.”

Sabina believes that Ontario’s Timmins and Kirkland Lake mining districts presented similar challenges to what the Far North faces today, and as awareness of Nunavut increases infrastructure will follow. Prime Minister Harper made a step in this direction August 24 with the investment of $230,000 in the establishment of an Iqaluit office for the Northwest Territories and Nunavut Chamber of Mines. More important, perhaps, is the investment in Nunavut by other miners. Apart from numerous juniors exploring there, majors include Agnico-Eagle—whose Meadowbank gold mine began production June 2011—as well as ArcelorMittal, Areva, Newmont, BHP Billiton and Xstrata.

However, according to an August 31 Reuters story, Agnico-Eagle has invested $1.5 billion in Meadowbank, while “Newmont has spent $2 billion so far on its Hope Bay gold deposits in western Nunavut, and there is no guarantee a mine will ever be built.”

Nevertheless, Manojlovic concludes, “We’re extremely excited about Back River. Sabina has been working on the project for about two years, and in those two years we’ve made a number of new discoveries, the most significant of which are the Umwelt deposit and the Llama deposit. We’ve increased resources there quite substantially, so we have very high confidence that we will continue to increase resources and bring the project to the mining stage.”

Sabina Gold & Silver currently has 160.3 million shares trading at $4.88 for a $782.2 million market cap. Sabina also has three early-stage exploration projects in Ontario’s Red Lake mining district.