Monday 21st August 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘diamonds’

Arctic Star’s B.C. discovery potentially associated with “a plethora of commodities”

August 8th, 2017

by Greg Klein | August 8, 2017

Even before the drill core reached the lab, Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD announced a discovery that’s both rare and potentially associated with several metals. The company found a carbonatite-syenite complex on its Cap project in east-central British Columbia.

The potential rewards associated with a new discovery such as at Cap cannot be overstated.—Jody Dahrouge

“Carbonatite is an extremely rare rock type with only around 550 complexes identified worldwide,” explained Jody Dahrouge, president of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, which oversees the exploration program. “In addition to their rarity, they are also well known for being the source of production for a plethora of commodities, including being the dominant source for niobium and rare earth elements. The potential rewards associated with a new discovery such as at Cap cannot be overstated.”

Also associated with mineralized carbonatite systems are tantalum, copper, nickel, iron, titanium, zirconium, platinum group elements, gold, fluorspar, lime, sodalite and vermiculite, Arctic Star added.

Some of the world’s better-known carbonatite deposits include Palabora in South Africa (copper, nickel, gold and PGEs), Bayon Obo in China (REEs, iron ore, niobium and fluorspar), Araxa in Brazil (niobium), Cargill in Ontario (phosphate), Niobec in Quebec (niobium), Mountain Pass in California (REEs), and Mount Weld in Western Australia (REEs).

Arctic Star’s B.C. discovery potentially associated with “a plethora of commodities”

Carbonatite in drill core from hole Cap17-004.

The discovery prompted Arctic Star to stake another 7,657 hectares, expanding its property to over 10,482 hectares. The new turf covers a ridge that extends towards the Wicheeda REE deposit, about 50 kilometres northwest.

Cap’s exploration has so far focused on an area of about 3,000 by 1,000 metres, the site of prior geophysics and anomalous niobium-REE geochemical samples. This season’s work consisted of mapping, sampling, prospecting and four drill holes. Assays are pending but carbonatite and/or alkaline rock types were found in two holes.

Carbonatite in outcrop has been mapped approximately 90 metres in strike, with an estimated thickness surpassing 50 metres. Additional outcrops of carbonatite and related rocks have been found across an area measuring about 800 by 200 metres, the company added.

Last month Arctic Star announced plans to acquire Timantti, a Finnish diamond project on the Fennoscandian Shield, which also hosts Russia’s Lomonosov and Grib diamond mines. Due diligence revealed 58 small diamonds in an 18.9-kilogram sample from Timantti’s White Wolf kimberlite. More recent assays on 48.65 kilograms of historically extracted split core showed 111 microdiamonds.

In late July the company offered a $1.25-million private placement.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Arctic Star president/CEO Patrick Power.

Of diamonds and dynasties

August 4th, 2017

A new marketing approach accompanies Alrosa’s new emphasis on polished stones

by Greg Klein

A new marketing approach accompanies Alrosa’s new emphasis on polished stones

The Dynasty Collection celebrates Alrosa’s revival of Russian jewelry craftsmanship.
(Photo: Alrosa)

 

Legendary diamonds have long been associated with imperial dynasties. Now, just as a new book promises to revive interest in the multi-empire story of the fabled Koh-i-Noor gem, Alrosa has unveiled a suite of five stones commemorating great families of old Russia. In doing so, the mining giant marks a new emphasis not just on extracting exceptional stones, but cutting and polishing them too. The company says it will use state-of-the-art techniques to revive traditions dating back to Peter I.

A near-second to De Beers as the world’s largest diamond miner by value, Alrosa’s overall strategy might be to broaden diamonds’ appeal beyond the maybe one (or two, or sometimes profligately multiple) life events that call for an engagement ring.

A new marketing approach accompanies Alrosa’s new emphasis on polished stones

(Photo: Alrosa)

The company’s new quintet started as a single 179-carat rough with a name that evokes grandeur, but also tragic decline and a horrific ending: The Romanovs. One and a half years in the making, the polished collection’s centrepiece is The Dynasty, a 51.38-carat traditional round brilliant-cut stone “unprecedented in the history of Russia” as the most expensive and purest of all large diamonds cut in the country.

The set’s other four gems recall wealthy dynasties “that played a crucial role in the development of Russian jewelry”: The Sheremetevs (16.67 carats), The Orlovs (5.05 carats), The Vorontsovs (1.73 carats) and The Yusupovs (1.39 carats).

The collection goes on sale online—take that Christie’s, Sotheby’s and U.S. sanctions—in November.

But there’s no association stronger than actual ownership, and in that regard the Koh-i-Noor might be the most esteemed of all diamonds. In a soon-to-be published book of the same name, authors William Dalrymple and Anita Anand track “the history of the world’s most infamous diamond.”

Here’s a rock that gained prominence in northern India’s 17th century Mughal dynasty, was pillaged by 18th century Persians and retrieved from the corpse of their assassinated ruler by Ahmad Shah, who wore the jewel himself while building the Durrani Empire of Afghanistan. His successors lost the gem, along with considerable territory, to Sikh emperor Ranjit Singh. The authors credit this early 19th century ruler with boosting the diamond’s prestige to an unprecedented level. Following his death and the Sikhs’ defeat at British hands, the victors ordered that the Koh-i-Noor “shall be surrendered by the Maharajah of Lahore to the Queen of England.”

Along with Cullinan I and Cullinan II, the world’s largest top-quality polished stones, the Koh-i-Noor takes its place in the Crown Jewels. Both India and Pakistan want it back.

The book’s publicist promises a saga of “greed, murder, torture, colonialism and appropriation.” But extracting the stones can come at a terrible cost too, and one doesn’t have to delve into history to realize that. Just days after Alrosa unveiled The Dynasty collection, the company reported nine miners missing after a flood at the Mir diamond mine in the far eastern Republic of Sakha.

A steady source of plus-sized rough, Sakha mines gave up gems of nearly 110 carats and 75 carats just last month and, last year, a 207.29-carat stone. The Romanovs was found there in 2015.

A new marketing approach accompanies Alrosa’s new emphasis on polished stones

The Tenner, a £10 flea market
find, sold for $848,000.
(Photo: Sotheby’s)

Size and weight aren’t everything, however, as the 1,109-carat Lesedi La Rona continues to demonstrate. Lucara Diamond TSX:LUC has yet to find a buyer after rejecting a $61-million bid last year for the “tennis ball-sized” Botswana diamond, the largest ever found after South Africa’s 3,106-carat Cullinan that’s since been subdivided and relocated to the Crown Jewels with the Koh-i-Noor. Last May Lucara did sell a piece of its original stone, estimated to have been about 1,500 carats, when cutter Graff Diamonds paid $17.5 million for a 373.72-carat shard that broke off during the mine recovery process.

Another super-sized non-seller is the 709-carat rough found by an artisanal miner in Sierra Leone. He entrusted it to the government, which rejected a $7.8-million bid that failed to meet the stone’s valuation.

But sometimes there’s amazing value to be found among the dross. Thirty years or so after a Brit paid 10 quid for a piece of second-hand “costume jewelry,” the owner got around to asking Sotheby’s for an appraisal. The verdict? “A genuine cushion-shaped diamond weighing 26.29 carats with an attractive colour grade of I and impressive clarity grade of VVS2.”

In dollar terms, that meant a price estimated up to about $450,000. In June the hammer came down on $848,000.

See an infographic about legendary diamonds.

Finland’s Arctic welcome

August 2nd, 2017

Arctic Star finds the Scandinavian north an hospitable place for diamond exploration

by Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel Belger

Isabel: I would like to introduce the CEO and president of Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD, Patrick Power. Hi Patrick, it is a pleasure to talk to you again.

To give the readers a chance to get to know you a bit, would you be so kind as to tell more about your background and your experiences in the mineral exploration business?

Patrick: I started in the business as a floor trader in 1984. I did that until 1990. In that period I met someone who became soon very prolific in the diamond world, Chuck Fipke. He found the Ekati mine, the first diamond mine in Canada and he got my interest up in diamonds and the exploration for diamonds. When I finished with the floor in 1990, I joined up with a company called Kelco Resources and I became a director there. That is how I got involved with the diamond world in Canada. Subsequent to that, I worked with a company called Montello Resources, and became the president and CEO. We did a lot of diamond exploration with that company from 1993 to 2000, primarily in Alberta.

We found the Legend field in Alberta with our venture partner Canaccord Canada, which is a Rio Tinto company. We didn’t have the numbers in the pipes that we wanted to. So my partner Tom Yingling and I started our own company called Arctic Star Exploration. We started with a diamond project in Manitoba with Rio Tinto. It kicked off with that project. We never did intersect in kimberlites. Shortly after that, we managed to encourage Buddy Doyle to leave Rio Tinto and he joined us on the Arctic Star board. That happened in 1996. Buddy Doyle brought over a project with him that we called Credit Lake. We spent about $25 million on Credit Lake over a period of seven to 10 years I believe. It was a long time. It just ended recently.

Isabel: Interesting! That tells already a bit of the history of Arctic Star itself. Congratulations on the news on a new member of the board and your new project in Finland. What made the connection to Finland?

Arctic Star finds the Scandinavian north an hospitable place for diamond exploration

Patrick: Thank you, we are very excited and happy about both. It was about 2006 when Buddy Doyle looked at this project we just took into the company. We made an offer for a percentage of it. But they wanted €12.5 million for 25% of it, which we didn’t have the ability to do back then. Then 2008 came and everything became really difficult for all resource companies, specifically for diamond companies. It became very, very difficult.

Roy Spencer, who you could call the father of the Cinnamon project, found the Grip pipe, 450 kilometres east in Russia as the president of Arctic Angel in 1996. That turned out to be a mine, which started producing about two years ago. But as usual in Russia, he got kicked out before it became productive. He traced chemistry trails to the Finnish border and all those trails originated in Finland somewhere.

Isabel: What makes you so excited about this project?

Patrick: No exploration was done there in historical terms. You cannot tell the quality of the diamonds from the chemistry, but usually you can tell the amount of diamonds. All that chemistry was flooding in over 80 kilometres with no answers as to the sources. In 2007, Roy drilled first in this new field. The important part of this is that fields usually have a minimum of 30 and a high of 300 pipes. The upside potential is that it is the first pipe in a new field and that is extremely important because it has good chemistry. It is a great jurisdiction, Finland. A couple of years ago, the Fraser Institute made Finland the number one mining jurisdiction in the world. Mining and exploration friendly!

Infrastructure-wise, the Black and White Wolf, which were the two first pipes discovered—they might actually be one, because they are only 48 metres apart, we will know more about this after further geophysics being done—are only two miles away from a bus stop. Compared to Canada this is amazing infrastructure and that translates right into that you would need far less grade to become a mine. You can have a lot less compared to the north of Canada in order to be still productive. That is a big point! Also it is a very stable country since it is rated a great jurisdiction to be in. We have got Roy on the board now, the man who found this particular discovery when he was with a different company. Another interesting fact: Roy was Buddy Doyle’s first boss at Rio Tinto. They were in the outback of Australia together for two years looking for diamonds. That was more than 30 years ago. And now they are reunited. So the team is back together again. This is one of the prime reasons we got this project because of this relationship between Buddy and Roy; Roy wanted Buddy to lead the project.

Isabel: What is the plan of the re-united team now?

The project offers everything if you are looking for diamonds. Great jurisdiction, great infrastructure, it is a new field, and it has got history in the same craton with productive mines in Russia.—Patrick Power

Patrick: We are going to get out there. We will go back to the Black and the White Wolf, the two pipes that he found in 2006/2007. We will do some geophysics on top of it that wasn’t done 10 years ago. We want to see if they join, get bigger, have multiple phases, do some more drilling, etc. With those two pipes, or maybe it is one, we can potentially make a mine. So there is work to do on the first two pipes of a new field. We expect to find a lot more pipes and that is exciting because the chemistry going into them is dynamic. The project offers everything if you are looking for diamonds. Great jurisdiction, great infrastructure, it is a new field, and it has got history in the same craton with productive mines in Russia.

Isabel: Let me interrupt you for a moment. Could you explain what a craton is?

Patrick: Sure. A craton is a thick, old chunk of continental plate where diamonds form. Kimberlite pipes are created when magma bubbles up through a craton, expanding and cooling on its way up.

I am really glad that we have got all that exceptional expertise within Arctic Star…. Roy was part of the team that found Orapa, the second-largest producing mine in the world that is in Botswana. So we have got lots of positive diamond experience with the two guys, plus they work together and like each other. Their records speak for themselves. They are probably the two most awesome diamond guys with that combined experience and mine-finding ability. They are pretty amazing. We’ve got the best people in the world.

Isabel: Yes, it sounds like it! So the next step is to do more work on your new project. Will you drill, and how deep will you have to drill?

Patrick: The two pipes are very close to the surface, so it is not that deep at all. We have two phases of two programs here. The first program will be carried out on Black and White Wolf, the two existing kimberlites. We will do geophysics on the ground, to determine whether they get larger, whether they come together and whether they have multiple phases. We will also put more drill holes into it to get more samples to get a better diamond count. Buddy thinks we need about 1,000 kilograms before he can make a judgement if we go ahead with it or if we drop it, so we only have a very small amount of material so far. We will take a lot more tonnage out of these drill holes.

Arctic Star finds the Scandinavian north an hospitable place for diamond exploration

Arctic Star VP of exploration Buddy Doyle collecting
float samples at the Timantti project in Finland.

And then out of a bigger concept, we have 250 hectares of mineral claim permitted; 140,000 square kilometres around it. So on that bigger puzzle we could encompass the entire field. We are going to fly EM and mag first and then we want to fly a gravity survey, which is quite expensive. It costs probably about three to four million dollars to get the gravity survey done, but it will be a tool that will be very useful. It has not been used that much in the diamond world; it is only a few years old. Gravity is a very difficult thing to produce on the ground. There are a lot of factors involved with that. This new tool that was developed by the U.S. military was re-developed into a commercial application by BHP and has been on the market for just a few years. Very expensive!

So that is what we plan to do on the big package, not just the claims we acquired, but the much bigger exploration permits that we are in the process of acquiring from the government. We think that this would give us the entire field picture. We will be able to prospect for the pipes in that field. That will be a big thing! We think there are a lot of pipes in this area. If the chemistry is good, it is suggested to have a lot of diamonds. But I repeat to state that it doesn’t tell you the quality of diamonds, but the quantity of diamonds.

Isabel: What is the time frame for that? This is not going to happen this year, is it?

Patrick: The only thing that is restricting us up there is the darkness. The latitude is pretty high, but it is not as cold as in northern Canada. So there is no temperature issue and again the infrastructure is great. It is just within the dark months that we can’t really do much.

Isabel: What is going on at your Cap property in northeast B.C.?

Patrick: In 2008 we diversified a bit from diamonds. We picked up a project from Zimtu [TSXV:ZC]. It is Jody Dahrouge [of Dahrouge Geological Consulting] who has been doing all the work on it for us. We spent only about $1 million developing a really nice niobium and rare earth target. It is probably in carbonatite; we are drill-testing as we speak. It has really good niobium numbers on surface and it is prospective. We decided with a million dollars into it, we need to drill it right now and we are crossing our fingers. It could be something really interesting. If we are successful, we are probably going to spin it out into a new company. We don’t want to mix niobium and diamonds. It will benefit the shareholders with a new share in a new company and we will staff it with people that know a lot about niobium.

Isabel: That sounds like a good plan! How much money do you have in the bank?

Patrick: We are planning to finance soon.

Isabel: How much of Arctic Star is held by the management?

Patrick: That sums up to be 25% by now.

Isabel: What do you like about the mineral exploration business?

Patrick: It is a difficult business, but it can be explosive on the upside. That is the thrill I like about it, which makes the difficult part worthwhile.

Isabel: What is your favourite commodity and why?

Patrick: Definitely diamonds! The reason for that is because it is so hard to find an economic deposit. It is very challenging.

Isabel: Good luck with the ongoing drilling in B.C. and with the new project in Finland. Thank you so much for your time and your insights. It is always a pleasure to talk to you.

Patrick: Thanks for having me, Isabel.

Patrick Power

Patrick Power, president/CEO
of Arctic Star Exploration

Bio

Patrick Power is a seasoned venture capitalist and financier with over 20 years of experience as a stock market professional and as director of public companies. He has been president and CEO of Arctic Star since its inception in 2002. Additionally, Mr. Power serves as a director of other mineral exploration companies. Arctic Star benefits from Mr. Power’s wealth of experience as a shrewd dealmaker, an adept financier and a tireless, results-driven leader of dynamic public companies. The company enjoys Mr. Power’s large network of contacts within the industry, his enthusiasm and his efforts as a member of the audit and remuneration panels.

Fun facts

My hobbies: Travelling and horse racing

Sources of news I use: Internet

My favourite airport: London Heathrow

My favourite tradeshow: PDAC in Toronto

My favourite commodity: Diamonds

With this person, I would like to have dinner: My wife

If I could have a superpower, it would be: Power for peace

Read more about Arctic Star Exploration here and here.

Neil McCallum of Dahrouge Geological Consulting looks at the closeology of Zimtu Capital’s 50%-held Munn Lake diamond project

July 31st, 2017

…Read more

New assays on old core reveal more diamonds on Arctic Star Exploration’s new Finnish acquisition

July 26th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 26, 2017

Just weeks after announcing plans to take on a diamond project in Finland, Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD has found further encouragement by reanalyzing previous work. Recent assays on 48.65 kilograms of historically extracted split core showed 111 microdiamonds. The results represent approximately 52.7 metres of core from the Timantti property’s White Wolf kimberlite.

New assays on old core reveal more diamonds on Arctic Star Exploration’s new Finnish acquisition

A due diligence program reported earlier this month confirmed 58 microdiamonds from an 18.9-kilogram White Wolf sample.

With most of the world’s diamond-bearing kimberlites showing an exponential relationship between small and large stones, the company plans to gather enough caustic fusion samples to evaluate the property’s diamond size distribution. Following ground geophysics, Arctic Star hopes to drill Timantti for additional samples, delineating the kimberlites’ size and shape.

Looking at an entirely different range of commodities, the company last week sent a drill crew to the Cap project in east-central British Columbia’s Rocky Mountain Rare Metal Belt. Tantalum, niobium and rare earths are among the targets on the 2,825-hectare property. In 2010 sampling results included 0.14% Nb2O5, 3,191 ppm zirconium and 547 ppm total rare earth elements. More sampling the following year brought grades including 0.27% Nb2O5 and 773 ppm TREE, while two historic, non-43-101 samples showed 0.13% and 0.1% TREE.

Arctic Star also holds a 40% interest in the Northwest Territories’ Diagras diamond project, where JV partner Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA conducted a short geophysical program last May.

Diamond explorer Arctic Star to drill B.C. property for rare earths and rare metals

July 19th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 19, 2017

With a crew now en route, Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD prepares to begin a summer field program at its Cap project in east-central British Columbia. Located in the Rocky Mountain Rare Metal Belt, the 2,825-hectare property has undergone geochemical and geophysical surveys suggesting potential for carbonatite intrusions which might host niobium, tantalum and/or rare earth elements. A program of about three holes and 1,000 metres will further investigate the potential.

Diamond explorer Arctic Star to drill B.C. property for rare earths and rare metals

Piquing interest in the property is a circular magnetic anomaly measuring about three to five kilometres in diameter that the company interprets to represent a carbonatite or similar intrusion. Geochem sampling in 2010 on two dykes near the most prominent mag anomaly brought grades including 0.14% Nb2O5, 3,191 ppm zirconium and 547 ppm total rare earth elements, Arctic Star reported.

In 2011, following radiometrics and additional magnetics, the company found more highly anomalous grades with samples containing 0.27% Nb2O5 and 773 ppm TREE. Two historic, non-43-101 samples assayed 0.13% and 0.1% TREE.

Contrasting luxuries with critical minerals, Arctic Star last week announced plans to acquire a diamond project in Finland. The diamondiferous kimberlites of the Timantti property sit on the Fennoscandian Shield, home to the major Russian diamond mines Lomonosov and Grib.

In May the company announced a short program of geophysics on the Diagras diamond project in the Northwest Territories, where Arctic Star has a 40% stake with JV partner Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA holding the rest.

Arctic Star sees new diamond frontier in Finland

July 12th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 12, 2017

A plan that so far has been a year in the making would have Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD shift its diamond exploration focus from northern Canada to northern Finland. The Timantti (Finnish for “diamond”) project would begin with exploration rights over 243 hectares of kimberlites, with an additional 95,700 hectares of land to come under an exploration reservation permit for which the company has applied.

Arctic Star sees new diamond frontier in Finland

Small bulk samples dating to 2005 have revealed diamonds, while a more recent due diligence program confirmed 58 small stones in an 18.9-kilogram sample from the project’s White Wolf kimberlite.

The Wolf kimberlites lie on the Fennoscandian Shield, which also hosts the major diamond mines Lomonosov and Grib in Russia’s Arkhangelsk region.

Because kimberlites tend to occur in clusters, the Wolf kimberlites could indicate a more extensive group, according to Roy Spencer, who discovered the Wolf kimberlites. Data in the public domain shows a “cloud” of kimberlite indicator minerals across an approximately 80-kilometre-wide area roughly centred on the Wolf kimberlites, the company added. “The exploration reservation will allow Arctic Star to explore the entire region,” Spencer said.

A diamond exploration veteran with De Beers and other companies, Spencer “was largely responsible for the discovery of the world-class Grib kimberlite,” Arctic Star added. Spencer joins the company as a director.

On closing the acquisition, Arctic Star plans magnetic, gravity and EM surveys prior to drilling and a subsequent bulk sample on the road-accessible property, as well as regional airborne surveys.

Ranking fifth globally in the annual Fraser Institute survey of overall mining investment attractiveness, Finland boasts arctic infrastructure in relative profusion to northern Canada.

The deal would involve Arctic Star taking over Foriet Oy, a Finnish company that would become a wholly owned subsidiary, for 14.5 million shares at a deemed price of $0.20.

Arctic Star also welcomed Scott Eldridge’s appointment to the board. A co-founder and president/CEO of Euroscandic International Group, which provides accounting and investment banking services to resource companies, he has raised over $500 million in equity and debt for mining-related projects around the world.

Last May Arctic Star announced a brief geophysical program at the Diagras diamond project in the Northwest Territories, with work expected to finish mid-month. The company has a 40% stake in the JV, with Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA holding the rest and acting as project operator.

Closeology helps Zimtu Capital close in on NWT diamonds

June 21st, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 21, 2017

A surprisingly neglected property in an especially prospective location gets some overdue attention as a crew mobilizes for the Northwest Territories’ Munn Lake diamond project. Held 50% each by Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC and a staking partner, the property has ground geophysics and till sampling about to begin.

The property does have diamonds, as historic work shows. Non-43-101 results from a 581-kilogram sample on the Yuryi boulder field revealed 226 diamonds, 62 of them macro-diamonds. Non-43-101 results from a 42-kilogram sample on the Munn Lake kimberlite sill showed 14 diamonds, including two macros and 12 micro-diamonds.

There’s closeology and then there’s closeology, as Zimtu Capital closes in on NWT diamonds

Southern Slave kimberlites show an incomparably
higher success rate than those of the northern craton.

The Munn Lake sill is the source of one of five kimberlite indicator mineral trains. The other four have seen little follow-up work, leaving their sources unknown.

The current agenda calls for further till sampling and a tight magnetic survey, explains Neil McCallum of Dahrouge Geological Consulting, which will conduct the program. Using GPS that wasn’t available to the previous operator, he expects “more focused” results.

One of the distinctions that really intrigues McCallum is Munn Lake’s especially prospective location. The Slave Craton has three diamond mines in operation, two past producers and an advanced stage project. But chances of a kimberlite actually holding diamonds are much higher in the southern Slave, home to Munn Lake.

“There are some 250 or so known kimberlites in the northern Slave’s Lac de Gras field whereas the southern Slave has only about 16 that are known,” McCallum explains. “Of those 16, six have been mined, are currently producing or are in advanced stages.” He points to De Beers’ former Snap Lake operation, the high-grade Kelvin and Faraday kimberlites being advanced by Kennady Diamonds TSXV:KDI and three kimberlites going into Gahcho Kué, the De Beers/Mountain Province Diamonds TSX:MPV JV that officially opened last September as the world’s largest new diamond mine in 13 years.

That’s notwithstanding the Lac de Gras success stories in the north, home to the Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO/Dominion Diamond TSX:DDC Diavik JV and Dominion’s majority-held Ekati mine.

Kimberlites of the south Slave are much older (by nearly 500 million years) and much rarer than those of the north. But when they’re found, they’re much more likely to bear diamonds—and diamonds of economic grades, McCallum adds.

“The Munn Lake property is closer to the kimberlites of the southern Slave cluster and the Munn Lake kimberlite sill is similar in geometry to the others in the southern Slave. So with the proposed expansion of the Munn Lake kimberlite sill and the potential for several new kimberlites on the project, the Munn Lake property has very good odds for a high-grade discovery.”

Munn Lake also benefits from a winter road running through the 14,000-hectare property, connecting Gahcho Kué with Yellowknife.

McCallum expects the mag results to arrive about one week after the survey finishes, with the till samples taking about a month. “I’m really looking forward to see what comes out,” he says.

“I’d like to see some drilling on the project too. On the kimberlite that the past operators did intercept, I’m not sure they hit the best target.”

Numismatic news: Loonie turns 30, Rio Tinto unveils precious metal/diamond coins

June 8th, 2017

by Greg Klein | June 8, 2017

Its size and weight wore out pockets, its value raised panhandlers’ expectations and its name puzzled foreign visitors. But following its appearance 30 years ago this month, the loonie “found its way into our hearts,” the Royal Canadian Mint maintains. To celebrate this anniversary, the Mint released a limited edition set of two silver dollars. One depicts the loon, the other shows the originally intended canoe, a design that graced Canadian silver dollars from 1935 to 1986. The two $1 coins will cost collectors $79.95.

Numismatic news: Loonie turns 30, Rio Tinto unveils precious metals/diamond coins

The originally intended design for Canada’s dollar coin
distinguishes one of the anniversary set’s two silver pieces.
(Photo: Royal Canadian Mint)

The original voyageur design’s fate comprises a minor legend of numismatic history and bureaucratic bungling. The dies disappeared in November 1986 en route from Ottawa to Winnipeg, where they were supposed to generate an initial 450 million coins. But the Mint did save nearly $80 by using regular courier instead of an armoured courier.

According to media reports at the time, federal officials covered up the suspicious loss and made excuses for the new coin’s delayed appearance. Finally, to foil counterfeiters, the Mint replaced the canoe with an uninspiring Plan B.

The missing dies never did turn up, Mint spokesperson Alex Reeves informs ResourceClips.com.

With no embarrassment in calling the loonie one of Canada’s “most recognizable symbols,” Mint president/CEO Sandra Hanington said it’s “also known around the world as an innovative trailblazer for its composition and cutting-edge security features.”

Additionally the loonie “changed stripping forever,” according to the National Post. Those who’ve experienced pre-1987 peelers’ bars might agree. But the NP writer’s expertise sounds less certain when he claims the loonie amounts to a hidden tax because “banknotes get spent almost immediately, whereas coins get stashed into jars and piggy banks.”

Australian icons got more majestic treatment when Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO teamed up with the Perth Mint to produce three magnificent coins celebrating that country’s unique fauna and rich resources. Although declared legal tender, they’re not likely to see circulation. Weighing a kilo each, respectively made of gold, platinum and rose gold (an alloy used in jewelry) and set with coloured diamonds from Rio’s Argyle mine, the three-coin Australian Trilogy comes with a price tag of AU$1.8 million.

Just one set has been struck.

Argyle, by the way, “produces virtually the world’s entire supply of rare pink diamonds, and yet less than 0.1% of the diamonds produced by the Argyle mine are pink,” Rio stated.

Numismatic news: Loonie turns 30, Rio Tinto unveils precious metals/diamond coins

Gold, platinum and rose gold combine with pink, violet and
purple-pink diamonds in this one-of-a-kind set. (Photo: Perth Mint)

Related:

‘Everyone’s hiring again’

May 24th, 2017

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting presages a wave of M&A

by Greg Klein

As an executive search firm, the Mining Recruitment Group might serve as a bellwether for the industry. Founder and self-described mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says, “I put together management teams for companies, I connect people with opportunities and opportunities with people.” In that role, he experienced the upturn well before many industry players did.

To most of them, the long-awaited resurgence arrived late last year. Pollard saw it several months earlier.

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting could presage a wave of M&A

“The market came back in a huge way, at least in the hiring side, early last year when my phone started ringing a hell of a lot more,” he explains. “There was a huge volume. And what I’ve found is that the available talent pool for executives shrank in a period of about six months. In January 2016, for example, I was working on a search and there was almost a lineup out the door of some really big-name people. What I’m finding now, a year and a half later, is that the available talent has almost evaporated. It’s much harder to recruit for senior positions.”

Lately his work suggests another industry development. “The major upturn I’m seeing in the market now is a huge demand for corporate development people who can do technical due diligence on projects. Over the last few years large mining companies and investment banks cut staff almost to the bone in that regard because no one was interested in doing deals or looking at acquisitions.”

Just completed, his most recent placement was for Sprott. “They had me looking for someone with a technical background who can do due diligence for their investments. In doing so I spoke with everyone on the street, from investment banks to some big name corporate development people and they all said the same thing: Everyone’s hiring again. These are people who couldn’t get job offers a year ago, now every single candidate on the short list for this last search has multiple offers from companies looking to get them. I haven’t seen that in five years.

“So that leads me to believe companies have been staffing up their corporate development teams. I see that as a major sign that you’re going to see M&A pick up in a huge, huge way, probably over the next three to six months.”

An early example would be last week’s Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD buyout of Integra Gold TSXV:ICG—“one of my best clients over the years”—in a deal valued at $590 million.

Mining headhunter Andrew Pollard says executive recruiting could presage a wave of M&A

Andrew Pollard: Executive recruiting “leads me to believe companies have been staffing up their corporate development teams.”

“I think there’s leverage for other companies to start pulling the trigger faster because they’re adding the expertise to get these things done.”

Having founded the Mining Recruitment Group over a decade ago at the age of 20, “a snotty kid” with only a single year of related experience, he’s placed people in companies with market caps ranging from $5 million to well over $200 million. Now in a position to pick and choose his assignments, Pollard’s business concentrates on “the roles that will have the most impact on a company’s future.” That tends to be CEO, president, COO and board appointments.

Last year he placed five CEOs, as well as other positions. Among those assignments, Pollard worked with Frank Giustra on a CEO search for Fiore Exploration TSXV:F and filled another vacancy for Treasury Metals TSX:TML as it advances Goliath toward production.

But the hiring surge coincides with an industry-wide recruitment challenge. Pollard attributes that to a demographic predicament complicated by mining’s notorious cyclicality.

During the 1990s, he points out, fewer people chose mining careers, resulting in a shortage of staffers who’d now be in their 40s and 50s. Greater numbers joined up during the more promising mid-2000s, only to “get spat out” when markets went south. Now Pollard gets a lot of calls to replace baby boomers who want to retire. Too many of those retirements are coming around the same time, he says, because stock losses during the downturn had forced executives to postpone their exit.

Now, with a wave of retirements coinciding with a demographic gap, Pollard sees a “perfect storm to identify the next batch of young leaders.”

But he also sees promise in a new generation. That inspired him to assemble Young Leaders, one of two panel discussions he’ll present at the International Metal Writers Conference in Vancouver on May 28 and 29.

“By talking with some very successful executives age 35 and under, I want to show that we need to look at people one generation younger, and foster and develop this talent.”

By talking with some very successful executives age 35 and under, I want to show that we need to look at people one generation younger, and foster and develop this talent.

Well, it’s either talent or a precocious Midas touch that distinguishes these panel members. Maverix Metals TSXV:MMX CEO Dan O’Flaherty co-founded the royalty/streaming company just last year, already accumulating assets in 10 countries and a $200-million market cap.

As president/CEO of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Jordan Trimble proved adept at fundraising and deal-making while building a 250,000-hectare uranium-thorium exploration portfolio in Saskatchewan’s Athabasca Basin. Integra president/CEO Steve de Jong raised the company from a $10-million market cap in 2012 to last week’s $590-million takeout.

And, demographic gap notwithstanding, Pollard’s second panel features three other success stories, just a bit older but with lots of potential left after guiding three of last year’s biggest M&A deals. They’ll take part in the Vision to Exit discussion, which closes the conference on May 29.

Eira Thomas burst into prominence at the Lac de Gras diamond fields where she discovered Diavik at age 24. Her most recent major coup took place last year on the Klondike gold fields with Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) $520-million buyout of Kaminak Gold.

Featherstone Capital president/CEO Doug Forster founded and led Newmarket Gold, producing over 225,000 ounces a year from three Australian mines and enticing Kirkland Lake Gold’s (TSX:KL) billion-dollar offer.

Now chairperson of Liberty Gold TSX:LGD and a director of NexGen Energy TSX:NXE, Mark O’Dea co-founded and chaired True Gold Mining, acquired in April 2016 by Endeavour Mining TSX:EDV. Three other companies that O’Dea co-founded, led and sold were Fronteer Gold, picked up by Newmont Mining NYSE:NEM in 2011; Aurora Energy, sold to Paladin Energy TSX:PDN in 2011; and True North Nickel, in which Royal Nickel TSX:RNX bought a majority interest in 2014.

“We’ll be looking at how they go into deals, what their philosophy is, what’s their current reading of the market and what they’re going to do next. They each have a big future ahead of them.”

Pollard’s two panel discussions take place at the International Metal Writers Conference on May 28 and 29 at the Vancouver Convention Centre East. Pre-register for free or pay $20 at the door.

In all, the conference brings generations of talent, expertise and insight to an audience of industry insiders and investors alike.

Read more about the International Metal Writers Conference.