Tuesday 17th January 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘copper’

Rockcliff Copper releases gold samples, plans state-of-the-art airborne at former Manitoba mine

January 16th, 2017

by Greg Klein | January 16, 2017

Calling it the “first systematic, scientific exploration program on the property in over 70 years,” Rockcliff Copper TSXV:RCU has a high-resolution airborne survey planned for its Laguna gold property in central Manitoba’s Flin Flon-Snow Lake camp. Twenty-five recent grab samples from four vein systems on the former mine site brought grades ranging from 0.01 grams per tonne gold up to 25 g/t and 34.77 g/t. The results indicate a trend covering over six kilometres within the 3,499-hectare property, the company stated.

Rockcliff Copper releases grab samples, plans state-of-the-art airborne for former Manitoba gold mine

A magnetic survey conducted by a state-of-the-art helicopter-style drone will allow the program to “economically fly extremely tight line spacings with high-density ground sampling distances without the need for linecutting,” Rockcliff added.

“It is now possible to resolve individual magnetic anomalies that were previously indistinguishable when surveyed using conventional ground and airborne surveys—perfect for structurally controlled gold exploration targets like that at the Laguna property.”

Located 20 kilometres from a Hudbay Minerals TSX:HBM gold mill now on care and maintenance, the Laguna project comprises part of Rockcliff’s 45,000-hectare Snow Lake portfolio. Included are 43-101 estimates for the Talbot and Rail copper-gold-zinc-silver resources, as well as historic, non-43-101 zinc deposits.

Financing, permitting bring King’s Bay closer to Labrador copper-cobalt exploration

January 15th, 2017

by Greg Klein | January 15, 2017

With a provincial permit in hand and a $938,752 private placement that closed earlier this month, King’s Bay Gold TSXV:KBG readies for airborne EM over its Lynx Lake copper-cobalt project in south-central Labrador. The survey will precede a proposed first-ever drill program for the 2,000-hectare property.

Financing, permitting bring King’s Bay closer to Labrador copper-cobalt exploration

Previous work began after construction of the Trans-Labrador Highway in 2008, which unlocked some of the region’s geology. Grab samples from a quarry on the property’s east side showed non-43-101 results up to 1.39% copper, 0.94% cobalt, 0.21% nickel and 6.5 g/t silver. Other non-43-101 grab sample results from a west-side quarry ranged up to 1.03% copper, 0.566% cobalt, 0.1% nickel, 5 g/t silver, 0.36% chromium, 0.39% molybdenum and 0.23% vanadium.

Preliminary evidence of strong conductors in the area came from the province’s regional low-res magnetic surveys and a hand-held EM-16 device.

With highway and powerlines running adjacent to the property, Lynx Lake can be reached by a 1.5-hour drive from the town of Happy Valley-Goose Bay.

Cobalt, one of the energy metals essential to battery manufacture, presents especially troubling supply concerns due to the instability and human rights infractions of the metal’s largest producer, the Democratic Republic of Congo. See an infographic about cobalt’s precarious supply chain.

Cobalt: A precarious supply chain

January 14th, 2017

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist

Cobalt: A precarious supply chain

 

How does your mobile phone last for 12 hours on just one charge? It’s the power of cobalt, along with several other energy metals, that keeps your lithium-ion battery running.

The only problem? Getting the metal from the source to your electronics is not an easy feat, and this makes for an extremely precarious supply chain for manufacturers.

This infographic comes to us from LiCo Energy Metals TSXV:LIC and it focuses on where this important ingredient of green technology originates from, and the supply risks associated with its main sources.

What is cobalt?

Cobalt is a transition metal found between iron and nickel on the periodic table. It has a high melting point (1493° C) and retains its strength to a high temperature.

Similar to iron or nickel, cobalt is ferromagnetic. It can retain its magnetic properties to 1100° C, a higher temperature than any other material. Ferromagnetism is the strongest type of magnetism: it’s the only one that typically creates forces strong enough to be felt and is responsible for the magnets encountered in everyday life.

These unique properties make the metal perfect for two specialized high-tech purposes: superalloys and battery cathodes.

Superalloys

High-performance alloys drive 18% of cobalt demand. The metal’s ability to withstand intense temperatures and conditions makes it perfect for use in:

  • Turbine blades

  • Jet engines

  • Gas turbines

  • Prosthetics

  • Permanent magnets

Lithium-ion batteries

Batteries drive 49% of demand—and most of this comes from cobalt’s use in lithium-ion battery cathodes:

Type of lithium-ion cathode Cobalt in cathode Spec. energy (Wh/kg)
LFP 0% 120
LMO 0% 140
NMC 15% 200
LCO 55% 200
NCA 10% 245

The three most powerful cathode formulations for li-ion batteries all need cobalt. As a result, the metal is indispensable in many of today’s battery-powered devices:

  • Mobile phones (LCO)

  • Tesla Model S (NCA)

  • Tesla Powerwall (NMC)

  • Chevy Volt (NMC/LMO)

The Tesla Powerwall 2 uses approximately seven kilograms and a Tesla Model S (90 kWh) uses approximately 22.5 kilos of the energy metal.

The cobalt supply chain

Cobalt production has gone almost straight up to meet demand, more than doubling since the early 2000s.

But while the metal is desired, getting it is the hard part.

1. No native cobalt has ever been found.

There are four widely distributed ores that exist but almost no cobalt is mined from them as a primary source.

2. Most cobalt production is mined as a byproduct.

Mine source % cobalt production
Nickel (byproduct) 60%
Copper (byproduct) 38%
Cobalt (primary) 2%

This means it is hard to expand production when more is needed.

3. Most production occurs in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country with elevated supply risks.

Country Tonnes %
Total 122,701 100.0%
United States 524 0.4%
China 1,417 1.2%
DRC 67,975 55.4%
Rest of World 52,785 43.0%

(Source: CRU, estimated production for 2017, tonnes)

The future of cobalt supply

Companies like Tesla and Panasonic need reliable sources of the metal and right now there aren’t many failsafes.

The United States hasn’t mined cobalt in significant volumes since 1971 and the USGS reports that the U.S. only has 301 tonnes of the metal stored in stockpiles.

The reality is that the DRC produces about half of all cobalt and it also holds approximately 47% of all global reserves.

Why is this a concern for end-users?

1. The DRC is one of the poorest, most corrupt and most coercive countries on the planet.

It ranks:

  • 151st out of 159 countries in the Human Freedom Index

  • 176th out of 188 countries on the Human Development Index

  • 178th out of 184 countries in terms of GDP per capita ($455)

  • 148th out of 169 countries in the Corruption Perceptions Index

2. The DRC has had more deaths from war since WWII than any other country on the planet.
Recent wars in the DRC:

  • First Congo War (1996-1997)—An invasion by Rwanda that overthrew the Mobutu regime.

  • Second Congo War (1998-2003)—The bloodiest conflict in world history since WWII, with 5.4 million deaths.

3. Human rights in mining

The DRC government estimates that 20% of all cobalt production in the country comes from artisanal miners—independent workers who dig holes and mine ore without sophisticated mines or machinery.

There are at least 100,000 artisanal cobalt miners in the DRC and UNICEF estimates that up to 40,000 children could be in the trade. Children can be as young as seven years old and they can work up to 12 hours with physically demanding work earning $2 per day.

Meanwhile, Amnesty International alleges that Apple, Samsung and Sony fail to do basic checks in making sure the metal in their supply chains did not come from child labour.

Most major companies have vowed that any such practices will not be tolerated in their supply chains.

Other sources

Where will tomorrow’s supply come from and will the role of the DRC eventually diminish? Will Tesla achieve its goal of a North American supply chain for its key metal inputs?

Mining exploration companies are already looking at regions like Ontario, Idaho, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories to find tomorrow’s deposits.

Ontario: Ontario is one of the only places in the world where cobalt-primary mines have existed. This camp is near the aptly named town of Cobalt, which is located halfway between Sudbury, the world’s nickel capital, and Val-d’Or, one of the most famous gold camps in the world.

Idaho: Idaho is known as the Gem State while also being known for its silver camps in Coeur d’Alene—but it has also been a cobalt producer in the past.

B.C.: The mountains of B.C. are known for their rich gold, silver, copper, zinc and met coal deposits. But cobalt often occurs with copper and some mines in B.C. have produced cobalt in the past.

Northwest Territories: Cobalt can also be found up north, as the NWT becomes a more interesting mineral destination for companies. One hundred and sixty kilometres from Yellowknife, a gold-cobalt-bismuth-copper deposit is being developed.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

A 2016 retrospect

December 20th, 2016

Was it the comeback year for commodities—or just a tease?

by Greg Klein

Some say optimism was evident early in the year, as the trade shows and investor conferences began. Certainly as 2016 progressed, so did much of the market. Commodities, some of them anyway, picked up. In a lot of cases, so did valuations. The crystal ball of the industry’s predictionariat often seemed to shine a rosier tint. It must have been the first time in years that people actually stopped saying, “I think we’ve hit bottom.”

But it would have been a full-out bull market if every commodity emulated lithium.

By February Benchmark Mineral Intelligence reported the chemical’s greatest-ever price jump as both hydroxide and carbonate surpassed $10,000 a tonne, a 47% increase for the latter’s 2015 average. The Macquarie Group later cautioned that the Big Four of Albermarle NYSE:ALB, FMC Corp NYSE:FMC, SQM NYSE:SQM and Talison Lithium had been mining significantly below capacity and would ramp up production to protect market share.

Was this the comeback year for commodities—or just a tease?

That they did, as new supply was about to come online from sources like Galaxy Resources’ Mount Cattlin mine in Western Australia, which began commissioning in November. The following month Orocobre TSX:ORL announced plans to double output from its Salar de Olaroz project in Argentina. Even Bolivia sent a token 9.3 tonnes to China, suggesting the mining world’s outlaw finally intends to develop its lithium deposits, estimated to be the world’s largest at 22% of global potential.

Disagreeing with naysayers like Macquarie and tracking at least 12 Li-ion megafactories being planned, built or expanded to gigawatt-hour capacity by 2020, Benchmark in December predicted further price increases for 2017.

Obviously there was no keeping the juniors out of this. Whether or not it’s a bubble destined to burst, explorers snapped up prospects, issuing news releases at an almost frantic flow that peaked in mid-summer. Acquisitions and early-stage activity often focused on the western U.S., South America’s Lithium Triangle and several Canadian locations too.

In Quebec’s James Bay region, Whabouchi was subject of a feasibility update released in April. Calling the development project “one of the richest spodumene hard rock lithium deposits in the world, both in volume and grade,” Nemaska Lithium TSX:NMX plans to ship samples from its mine and plant in Q2 2017.

A much more despairing topic was cobalt, considered by some observers to be the energy metal to watch. At press time instability menaced the Democratic Republic of Congo, which produces an estimated 60% of global output. Far overshadowing supply-side concerns, however, was the threat of a humanitarian crisis triggered by president Joseph Kabila’s refusal to step down at the end of his mandate on December 20.

Was this the comeback year for commodities—or just a tease?

But the overall buoyant market mood had a practical basis in base metals, led by zinc. In June prices bounced back from the six-year lows of late last year to become “by far the best-performing LME metal,” according to Reuters. Two months later a UBS spokesperson told the news agency refiners were becoming “panicky.”

Mine closures in the face of increasing demand for galvanized steel and, later in the year, post-U.S. election expectations of massive infrastructure programs, pushed prices 80% above the previous year. They then fell closer to 70%, but remained well within levels unprecedented over the last five years. By mid-December one steelmaker told the Wall Street Journal to expect “a demand explosion.”

Lead lagged, but just for the first half of 2016. Spot prices had sunk to about 74 cents a pound in early June, when the H2 ascension began. Reaching an early December peak of about $1.08, the highest since 2013, the metal then slipped beneath the dollar mark.

Copper lay at or near five-year lows until November, when a Trump-credited surge sent the red metal over 60% higher, to about $2.54 a pound. Some industry observers doubted it would last. But columnist Andy Home dated the rally to October, when the Donald was expected to lose. Home attributed copper’s rise to automated trading: “Think the copper market equivalent of Skynet, the artificial intelligence network that takes over the world in the Terminator films.” While other markets have experienced the same phenomenon, he maintained, it’s probably the first, but not the last time for a base metal.

Was this the comeback year for commodities—or just a tease?

Nickel’s spot price started the year around a piddling $3.70 a pound. But by early December it rose to nearly $5.25. That still compared poorly with 2014 levels well above $9 and almost $10 in 2011. Nickel’s year was characterized by Indonesia’s ban on exports of unprocessed metals and widespread mine suspensions in the Philippines, up to then the world’s biggest supplier of nickel ore.

More controversial for other reasons, Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte began ordering suspensions shortly after his June election. His environmental secretary Regina Lopez then exhorted miners to surpass the world’s highest environmental standards, “better than Canada, better than Australia. We must be better and I know it can be done.”

Uranium continued to present humanity with a dual benefit—a carbon-free fuel for emerging middle classes and a cautionary example for those who would predict the future. Still oblivious to optimistic forecasts, the recalcitrant metal scraped a post-Fukushima low of $18 in December before creeping to $20.25 on the 19th. The stuff fetched around $72 a pound just before the 2011 tsunami and hit $136 in 2007.

Polymetallic promise

December 16th, 2016

Pistol Bay Mining brings regional exploration to Ontario’s VMS-rich Confederation Lake

by Greg Klein

During the doom and gloom of mid-2015 Charles Desjardins saw a hopeful sign in zinc. A search for prospective sources led the president of Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST to the volcanogenic massive sulphide deposits of western Ontario’s Confederation Lake greenstone belt. There he found different operators left what he considered a mixed legacy—work that was very impressive but carried out in a rather unco-ordinated manner. Now, with a commodity that’s justified his optimism and a portfolio that’s poised to be the belt’s largest, his company’s launching an ambitious new program to take a region-wide approach to Confederation Lake.

“Even though there’s been a lot of money spent in that region there really hasn’t been a lot of continuity in exploration programs,” says Desjardins. “For example we found 8,000 rock geochemistry samples that Noranda did. In today’s terms that’s about $300,000 worth of work just for the analysis, never mind actually acquiring all those samples. We don’t know if Noranda did anything with this, it might have been right when they were getting out of there. But it showed us some obvious things, including a couple of new, big, big targets and extensions of known targets.”

Pistol Bay Mining brings regional exploration to VMS-rich Confederation Lake

That’s just part of the inspiration for a two-tiered program to begin in January. Drilling would start with about six holes and a few thousand metres, he says. “Beyond that, the plan is to do a regional airborne survey with new technology that can see VMS-style mineralization at 600 to 700 metres. When you look at Flin Flon and Snow Lake, geophysics there found two major deposits at the 500-metre level.”

Confederation Lake characterizes the tendency of VMS deposits to appear in clusters, Desjardins points out. He attributes the region’s largest mine, South Bay, for around 354 million pounds of zinc, 57.6 million pounds of copper and 3.74 million ounces of silver produced between 1972 and 1981. Grades averaged about 11.06% zinc, 1.8% copper and 72.7 g/t silver.

Pending exchange approval for a four-year option on AurCrest Gold’s (TSXV:AGO) regional holdings, Pistol Bay’s turf comprises 7,050 hectares along a 43-kilometre stretch of the 60-kilometre-long belt. The projects include four historic deposits.

Already under a four-year option is a contiguous group of properties named Dixie 17, 18, 19 and 20 that’s been consolidated into a single project. Dixie comes with a 1992 historic, non-43-101 “mineral inventory” from Noranda estimating 150,000 short tons with an average 14% zinc.

Some eight kilometres southeast, the Dixie 3 property, formerly called Snake Falls, hosts another historic, non-43-101 Noranda estimate, this one 91,000 short tons averaging 1% copper and 10% zinc.

Roughly 20 kilometres northeast sits the Arrow zone, one of the acquisitions waiting approval. Arrow comes with a 2007 resource compiled by AurCrest predecessor Tribute Minerals that Pistol Bay isn’t treating as 43-101 and intends to re-do. Using three cutoff grades, the estimate showed:

3% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 2.07 million tonnes averaging 5.92% zinc, 0.75% copper, 21.1 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

  • inferred: 120,552 tonnes averaging 2.6% zinc, 0.56% copper, 18.6 g/t silver and 0.4 g/t gold

5% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 1.76 million tonnes averaging 6.75% zinc, 0.79% copper, 22.3 g/t silver and 0.61 g/t gold

  • inferred: 51,631 tonnes averaging 3.86% zinc, 0.79% copper, 23.9 g/t silver and 0.58 g/t gold

10% zinc-equivalent cutoff

  • indicated: 633,000 tonnes averaging 14.3% zinc, 1.11% copper, 31.7 g/t silver and 0.85 g/t gold

That acquisition includes the contiguous Copperlode A or Fredart zone, with its historic, non-43-101 estimate of 425,000 tonnes averaging 1.56% copper and 33.6 g/t silver.

Even though there’s been a lot of money spent in that region there really hasn’t been a lot of continuity in exploration programs.—Charles Desjardins,
president of Pistol Bay Mining

Obviously these deposits cry out for 43-101 treatment. Pistol Bay intends to begin with Arrow, the most recent resource but with another 16 holes to consider. Desjardins hopes to have that done within six months.

He points to assays that followed historic estimates on the other deposits, like 7.34% zinc and 1.4% copper over 9.5 metres, and another 15.44% zinc and 0.43% copper over 4.3 metres at Dixie. Intriguing zinc-copper intercepts also came from the Joy-Caravelle area, part of the AurCrest package. Historic sampling at Copperlode A found molybdenum grading up to 1.46%.

Then there’s the 8,000 geochemistry samples left by Noranda. Additionally, Pistol Bay has MPH Consulting at work on an extensive review of previous geophysics. Add to that the new airborne and drilling to begin in January and Desjardins looks forward to a wealth of data with considerable potential waiting to be unlocked.

There’s strong community support too, he adds. “One First Nation invested I think about $600,000 in AurCrest,” he says.

In Saskatchewan’s uranium-prolific Athabasca Basin, Pistol Bay JVs with a Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO subsidiary on the C-5 project. Having earned 75% of its option already, Rio has stated its intention to acquire the full 100% by the end of 2019. That would bring Pistol Bay $5 million and a 5% net profit interest.

The company expects to soon close the first tranche of a private placement offered up to $810,000. Other financings would follow, as Confederation Lake’s regional exploration continues in stages.

“We already have significant deposits that might be developed with one central mill,” Desjardins says. “But we’ll be looking for an elephant too.”

Crown Mining begins metallurgical study of California copper deposits

December 14th, 2016

by Greg Klein | December 14, 2016

Crown Mining TSXV:CWM expects to have a metallurgical review of its Moonlight-Superior copper deposits finished in Q1, the company announced December 14. The study aims to verify recoveries found by Placer-Amex in the 1960s and update processing cost estimates. The northern California deposits sit about two kilometres apart.

Crown Mining begins metallurgical study of California copper deposits

Depression-era copper prices
shut down the former Superior mine.

Crown also reported receipt of an engineering and economic report on Moonlight-Superior that includes an examination of previous resource estimates and of Whittle pit shells using different copper prices. The report will be used to consider commissioning a PEA, the company stated.

Previous owners released a resource for Moonlight in 2007 and Superior in 2013. Using a 0.2% cutoff, the estimates showed:

Moonlight

  • indicated: 146.5 million tonnes averaging 0.32% for 1,044 million pounds copper

  • inferred: 80 million tonnes averaging 0.28% for 496 million pounds

Superior

  • inferred: 54.4 million tonnes averaging 0.41% for 487 million pounds

The deposits form part of Crown’s 18,000-hectare Lights Creek property, which also includes the Engels deposit. At a 0.2% cutoff, its 2013 resource showed:

  • inferred: 2.6 million tonnes averaging 1.05% for 60 million pounds

Totals for the three deposits come to 1.044 billion pounds indicated and 1.043 billion pounds inferred. Superior and Engels operated between the 1890s and 1930s. Moonlight was a 1960s discovery.

Crown now plans a small drill program to better define and assess the higher-grade areas of Moonlight-Superior.

Read more about Crown Mining.

Golden Dawn Minerals continues revival of B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp

December 13th, 2016

by Greg Klein | December 13, 2016

A well-financed company working to bring new life to a cluster of past-producers 500 kilometres east of Vancouver, Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM released assays from former mines on December 13. The results come from the Amigo, Glory Hole, May Mac and Sylvester K sites, part of the mostly contiguous 16,000 hectares comprising the Greenwood project.

At May Mac, two of three surface holes from the same collar missed the Skomac vein system. But BF16-26 showed these highlights:

  • 79.6 g/t silver, 0.57 g/t gold, 1.9% lead and 1.4% zinc over 6.07 metres, starting at 177.47 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 281.6 g/t silver, 1.42 g/t gold, 7.2% lead and 4.9% zinc over 0.96 metres)

  • 49.4 g/t silver, 2.15 g/t gold, 0.7% lead and 2.7% zinc over 0.47 metres, starting at 184.2 metres
Golden Dawn Minerals continues revival of B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp

Golden Dawn hopes to begin bulk
sampling next year at May Mac’s #7 level.

True widths weren’t provided.

The results show that historically mined mineralization continues another 75 metres vertically, remaining open at depth and along strike to the northeast, Golden Dawn stated. The company plans further drilling in that direction early next year.

An underground percussion hole at May Mac’s #7 drift showed these highlights from two consecutive 1.2-metre samples of cutting sludge:

  • 156 g/t silver, 3.04 g/t gold, 2.91% lead, 1.1% zinc and 0.33% copper

  • 135 g/t silver, 7.95 g/t gold, 0.6% lead, 1.3% zinc and 0.08% copper

Cautioning that accuracy might be affected by material loss, Golden Dawn stated the results show substantial mineralization within five metres of the end of the #7 level.

That level also underwent nine diamond drill holes totalling 805 metres, with assays pending for eight. Hole MU16-01 was drilled horizontally from the end of the adit to determine the distance to the vein. One intercept showed:

  • 131.3 g/t silver, 2.34 g/t gold, 0.59% lead and 0.42% zinc over 2.33 metres, starting at 17.45 metres
  • (including 250 g/t silver, 4.96 g/t gold, 1.2% lead and 0.89% zinc over 1.1 metres)

One kilometre south of May Mac, the former Amigo and Glory Hole mines underwent a surface drill program of 16 holes totalling 904 metres to search out extensions of known veins. Highlights include:

  • Hole BF16-10: 3 g/t silver and 1.04 g/t gold over 1.15 metres, starting at 41.31 metres in downhole depth

  • BF16-11: 5.8 g/t silver and 6.12 g/t gold over 0.74 metres, starting at 19.26 metres

  • BF16-15: 28 g/t silver and 0.98 g/t gold over 0.2 metres, starting at 5.5 metres

  • BF16-17: 2.8 g/t silver and 1.3 g/t gold over 1.32 metres, starting at 44.94 metres

  • BF16-18: 0.5 g/t silver and 1.13 g/t gold over 0.5 metres, starting at 14.5 metres

  • BF16-18: 1.8 g/t silver and 1.37 g/t gold over 1.26 metres, starting at 36.57 metres

  • BF16-24: 148 g/t silver over 0.25 metres, starting at 31.35 metres

Due diligence on a proposed property acquisition included seven channel samples at the Sylvester K past-producer, three kilometres from Golden Dawn’s mill. Six in a continuous line averaged 9.92 g/t gold over a true width of 15.2 metres.

Following the Christmas break, a program of 20 to 25 holes begins at the Greenwood project in mid-January. Permitting is in process to extract a 10,000-tonne bulk sample at May Mac adit #7, which would be processed at Golden Dawn’s mill, 15 kilometres from the former mine.

Last month the company closed a $1.18-million private placement, part of $3.97 million in private placements, $2.93 million in exercised warrants and US$2.4 million in long-term debt raised in 2016 that totals about $10.03 million.

Read more about Golden Dawn Minerals..

Aurvista Gold selects initial drill targets to update Abitibi resources

December 12th, 2016

by Greg Klein | December 12, 2016

Analysis has identified the next seven drill locations for Aurvista Gold’s (TSXV:AVA) Douay project in Abitibi. Totalling about 3,700 metres, this phase of drilling’s intended to update resources for four of the project’s zones, Douay West, Northwest, Porphyry (Adams section) and Central, the company reported December 12. The 14,500-hectare property hosts eight zones with resource estimates along a five-kilometre northwest-southeast trend. That, in turn, sits within a 20-kilometre trend of lower-grade porphyry.

Aurvista Gold selects initial drill targets to update Abitibi resources

In a 2012 resource estimate using a 0.3 g/t cutoff, the eight zones totalled:

  • indicated: 2.69 million tonnes averaging 2.76 g/t for 238,435 gold ounces

  • inferred: 114.65 million tonnes averaging 0.75 g/t for 2.75 million ounces

Meanwhile work continues on geological, geochemical, assay and geophysical data to build a 3D model by Q1 2017. The agenda includes re-logging more than 300 historic holes totalling 98,135 metres. About 4,000 samples of historic core have been sent for gold-copper-zinc assays. The core also underwent analysis with a hand-held XRF device to take magnetic and conductive readings.

In addition, a mapping program focused on the property’s 10-kilometre by three-kilometre Adam Creek area “that encompasses the former Douay-style mineralization sector containing the higher- and lower-grade gold zones associated with the nine individual east-west shear zones and three subparallel structural domains,” Aurvista stated. Fifty-eight grab samples were collected west of the area.

Last month the company closed a private placement of just under $6 million.

Read more about Aurvista Gold.

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures to create gold-copper spinco

November 23rd, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 23, 2016

With a gold-copper asset in British Columbia and a diamond project with gold prospects in Nunavut, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI proposes to distribute its portfolio between two companies. On November 23 Dunnedin announced plans to spin out the non-diamond assets into a new listing.

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures to create gold-copper spinco

The company currently holds the 60,000-hectare Kahuna diamond project in Nunavut, where an inferred resource for two kimberlites totals 4.02 million carats, using a +0.85 mm cutoff. Till samples collected last year also showed anomalous gold of 50 ppb or more in 84 of 129 samples.

Meanwhile previous drill results from Dunnedin’s 4,000-hectare Trapper porphyry project in northwestern B.C. showed strong gold intercepts, with silver, lead and zinc showings as well.

“We believe that separate corporate vehicles for diamond and metal assets will yield the best long-term value to shareholders,” said CEO Chris Taylor.

Subject to approvals, Trapper and rights to gold at Kahuna would go to a newly created subsidiary with working capital for exploration. The new company’s shares would be distributed to Dunnedin shareholders on a pro rata basis. The new company would apply for a TSXV listing.

Dunnedin shareholders will vote on the proposed spinout early next year.

Dunnedin also plans to accelerate expiration of over six million warrants to December 23. Should all warrants be exercised, proceeds would come to about $632,708.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

NRG Metals completes due diligence on Argentinian lithium properties

November 21st, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 21, 2016

Among the companies active in South America’s Lithium Triangle, NRG Metals TSXV:NGZ has finished due diligence on two properties that would comprise the Carachi Pampa project in northwestern Argentina. Totalling 6,387 hectares, the contiguous properties sit in an area hosting geological features common to other lithium-rich salars in the region, the company stated on November 18. “The lithium target is a paleo salar (basin) at depth that has the potential to host lithium-enriched brines.”

NRG Metals completes due diligence on Argentinian lithium properties

NRG sees potential for lithium-enriched brines
in the Lithium Triangle’s Carachi Pampa project.

Located 40 kilometres from the town of Antofagasta de la Sierra at about 3,000 metres in elevation, the properties have winter access, a paved road 10 kilometres away and nearby services.

NRG has retained experienced lithium explorers Rojas and Associates and Sergio Lopez and Associates to review the project, with Rojas to complete a 43-101 technical report.

The properties are subject to different four-year purchase agreements, according to an LOI announced September 21. With all dollar figures in U.S. currency, one property calls for $120,000 on signing a definitive agreement, $200,000 in each of three annual payments and $600,000 at the end of the fourth year. A 1% NSR applies, which NRG may buy back for $1 million.

The other project would cost $160,000 on signing, $100,000 in two annual payments, $250,000 in year three and $625,000 in year four. Again, the company may buy back the 1% NSR for $1 million.

NRG offered a private placement up to C$1 million. Additionally, the company has negotiations underway on other properties.

In October NRG announced a management team for its Argentinian subsidiary, NRG Metals Argentina S.A. Executive director James Duff has written several 43-101 reports for Argentinian projects and served as COO of McEwen Mining TSX:MUX acquisition Minera Andes and president of South American operations for Coeur Mining NYSE:CDE.

Non-executive director José Gustavo de Castro is a chemical engineer with extensive experience in the evaluation and development of Argentinian lithium projects including the continent’s largest lithium producer, FMC Corp’s Hombre Muerto operation.

Manager of business development and corporate relations José Luis Martin’s 35-year career includes senior positions with Galaxy Lithium S.A. and Rio Tinto’s (NYSE:RIO) Argentinian projects.

Director Jorge Vargas specializes in property, mining and business law in Argentina.

Also last month NRG announced plans to spin out other assets to concentrate on lithium. The portfolio currently includes the LAB graphite project in Quebec and the Groete gold-copper resource in Guyana.