Thursday 22nd August 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘copper’

Belmont Resources plans September follow-up to high-grade gold sampling in southern B.C.

August 15th, 2019

by Greg Klein | August 15, 2019

Inspired by recent surface samples as high as 29.2 g/t gold, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA plans another field program on its recently acquired Pathfinder project in British Columbia’s Greenwood camp. Scheduled to start early next month, the two-week campaign follows encouraging assays released late last month. Out of 15 samples, seven exceeded 1 g/t gold, with the best result bringing 29.2 g/t gold, 16.4 g/t silver, 365 ppm copper and 4 ppm lead.

Belmont Resources plans September follow-up to high-grade gold sampling in southern B.C.

Historic work at Pathfinder included trenching and drilling.

Now, backed by data gleaned from historic records, Belmont plans soil and grab sampling from the Pathfinder zone to the Diamond Hitch zone, on a target area averaging about 2,500 metres by 600 metres. Samples will be collected every 50 metres along the grid lines, with higher resolution possible for some areas.

The results would prepare for possible sub-surface exploration that could include geophysics and drilling. Pathfinder underwent trenching and 17 drill holes from 2008 to 2009. The 296-hectare property is surrounded on three sides by KG Exploration, a subsidiary of Kinross Gold TSX:K.

In Nevada, Belmont’s Kibby Basin lithium project has undergone drilling by MGX Minerals CSE:XMG, which has so far earned 25% of the project. Last May the companies announced a drill hole averaging 100 ppm lithium. Previous holes graded up to 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres.

In northern Saskatchewan, Belmont and International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT each hold 50% of two uranium properties.

Belmont expects to close a private placement of $252,000, subject to exchange approval.

92 Resources finds new potential for gold, copper, lithium in northern Quebec

August 8th, 2019

by Greg Klein | August 8, 2019

With the conclusion of a productive summer field program, additional areas of interest open up at the James Bay-region Corvette-FCI property. A four-person, 23-day campaign discovered a new copper prospect, further explored a gold prospect and found several spodumene-bearing pegmatites, among other showings. Encouraging visual evidence has 92 Resources TSXV:NTY looking forward to assays.

About three-quarters of the program focused on the project’s FCI-East and FCI-West blocks, optioned under a 75% earn-in from Osisko Mining TSX:OSK. The rest targeted 92’s 100%-held Corvette claims. 

92 Resources finds new potential for gold, copper, lithium in northern Quebec

Chalcopyrite mineralization at the Elsass copper
prospect opens a new area of interest for 92 Resources.

Discovered late in the season, the Elsass copper prospect features chalcopyrite mineralization at surface over widths estimated from 40 to 60 metres along a strike of at least a kilometre. Pending lab results for surface samples, the crew could return this fall for further exploration.

The company also awaits assays from the property’s Lac Bruno gold prospect. Finding similar mineralogy up-ice from a boulder field where historic, non-43-101 samples graded between 1 g/t and 38 g/t gold, the crew collected soil samples on the 100%-held Corvette claims.

Apart from precious and base metals, Corvette-FCI shows potential for energy minerals. The summer program found the project’s largest known pegmatite so far. An outcrop about 220 metres long and 20 to 40 metres wide was located about a kilometre southwest along strike of the property’s CV1 and CV2 pegmatites. Lithium-tantalum channel samples released last year from CV1 reached up to 2.28% Li2O and 471 ppm Ta2O5 over six metres. Still to come are this summer’s assays.

The campaign also targeted the Golden Gap prospect at FCI West, where historic results include outcrop samples between 3.1 g/t and 108.9 g/t gold, a drill intercept of 10.5 g/t over seven metres, and a channel sample of 14.5 g/t over two metres.

The summer program also focused on the southern copper trend and other historic mineral showings, 92 reported.

Corvette-FCI sits within the Lac Guyer Greenstone Belt, part of the La Grande Greenstone Belt, about six to 18 kilometres south of the Trans-Taiga Road and powerline.

The company’s Quebec portfolio also includes the Eastman, Lac du Beryl and Pontax properties. Grab samples from the latter graded up to 0.94% Li2O and 520 ppm Ta2O5.

92’s diverse projects extend to British Columbia and the Northwest Territories. In B.C. the company holds the Silver Sands vanadium prospect and, adjacent to Northern Silica’s high-grade Moberly silica mine, the Golden frac sand project. 92 also has a 40% stake in the NWT’s Hidden Lake lithium project, where Far Resources CSE:FAT holds the remainder. All 10 holes of last year’s 1,079-metre drill campaign found grades above 1% Li2O, with one intercept showing 1.6% over 9.2 metres. A mini pilot plant produced 40 kilograms of concentrate grading 6.11% Li2O, with recovery surpassing 80%, from Hidden Lake material.

Belmont Resources samples 29.2 g/t gold at B.C.’s Greenwood camp

July 30th, 2019

by Greg Klein | July 30, 2019

Recent work suggests new potential for an historic gold- and copper-producing region in southern British Columbia. Surface sampling results on a property acquired last March by Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA have graded up to 29.2 g/t gold.

Belmont Resources samples 29.2 g/t gold at B.C.’s Greenwood camp

An adit bears witness to Pathfinder’s auriferous history.

The project, now expanded to 295 hectares, formed part of the historic Pathfinder property in the Greenwood camp, where mining began in the late 1880s. Something like 26 former mines produced over 1.2 million ounces of gold and 270,000 tonnes of copper, along with silver, lead and zinc, according to Geoscience BC. More recent exploration includes work by Kinross Gold TSX:K subsidiary KG Exploration, which holds property neighbouring Belmont on three sides.

Following a detailed review of historic data, Belmont conducted a five-day field program of mapping and sampling from outcrops and mine waste. Seven out of 15 samples surpassed 1 g/t gold, with five standouts showing:

  • 29.2 g/t gold, 16.4 g/t silver, 365 ppm copper and 4 ppm lead

  • 4.51 g/t gold, 90.4 g/t silver, 21.6 ppm copper and 14,250 ppm lead

  • 3.23 g/t gold, 0.61 g/t silver, 383 ppm copper and 4.3 ppm lead

  • 2.44 g/t gold, 16.7 g/t silver, 5,180 ppm copper and 24.2 ppm lead

  • 1.08 g/t gold, 14.75 g/t silver, 47 ppm copper and 62.7 ppm lead

With continued analysis of historic data along with recent findings, Belmont will plan Pathfinder’s next stage of exploration. Among the earlier work was a 2008-2009 program that included trenching and 17 drill holes.

In Nevada the company holds the 2,056-hectare Kibby Basin lithium project, subject to an earn-in by MGX Minerals CSE:XMG. A drill hole announced last May brought results ranging from 38 ppm to 127 ppm lithium, with an average of 100 ppm. Previous holes graded up to 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres.

Belmont also shares a 50/50 stake in two northern Saskatchewan uranium properties with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Subject to exchange approval, Belmont expects to close an oversubscribed private placement of $252,000.

Site visits for sightseers III

July 26th, 2019

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

by Greg Klein

Small local museums, historic mines, a major science centre and massive operations demonstrate the industry’s importance and also offer diversions for summer road trips. After covering Yukon and British Columbia in Part 1 and the prairie provinces in Part 2, our survey continues east through Ontario and Quebec. Omitted were museums not primarily devoted to mining, although many do include worthwhile mining memorabilia among other exhibits. Be sure to contact sites to confirm opening times, ask about footwear and other clothing requirements, and inquire about age restrictions if you have little ones in tow.

Part 4 covers the Atlantic provinces.

Ontario

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

One of many Dynamic Earth attractions
makes mining a family experience.
(Photo: Science North/Dynamic Earth)

Where better than Sudbury for a mining showcase of global stature? Dynamic Earth visitors can don hard hats to tour a demonstration mine seven storeys below surface, or virtual reality headsets to mingle with imaginary miners and gargantuan equipment. Other simulations provide aspiring miners with training on mining equipment and rescue operations. Films, multimedia and interactive exhibits enhance the experience. Much more than a museum, this is an exposition of mining’s past, present and future, with enough attractions to justify repeat visits.

Located at 122 Big Nickel Road, Sudbury. Open daily 10:00 to 6:00 until September 2, then reduced hours until September 29. Reopens for Halloween events on October 4

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Cobalt’s silver heritage comes alive in the Colonial Adit Tour.
(Photo: Town of Cobalt)

Despite the recent speculative boom sparked by the town’s namesake mineral, Cobalt’s largely a relic of the past—or a collection of relics strewn about the town and surrounding countryside. And it was silver, not cobalt, that made this town so important to Canadian mining history. To experience that history, check out the Cobalt Mining Museum, with seven galleries that include the world’s largest display of native silver. Take a guided tour of the Colonial underground mine, and self-guided tours that show off a nearby route hosting 19 mining-related sites and the town itself, which sometimes looks like a movie setting in search of a movie.

Located at 24 Silver Street, Cobalt. Open daily 10:00 to 4:00 until September 2, then Tuesday to Friday 11:00 to 3:00 during fall and winter. Call 705-679-8301 to book the one-hour Colonial Adit Tour.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Visitors find themselves engrossed in Red Lake’s mining story.
(Photo: Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre)

After the 1926 rush that spawned something like 29 mines, the town’s still churning out yellow metal at one of Canada’s largest gold operations. In recognition, the Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre’s permanent exhibit presents Beneath It All: Red Lake’s Mining Story, with displays, films and audio clips.

Located at 51A Highway #105, Red Lake. Open Monday to Friday 9:00 to 5:00 year-round, also open summer Saturdays 10:00 to 4:00 until August 31.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

A former mica mine, Silver Queen can evoke a sense of wonder.
(Photo: Ontario Parks)

About 115 crow-flying klicks southwest of Ottawa, the Silver Queen Mine was one of hundreds of operations in a world centre of mica production. Visitors to Murphys Point Provincial Park can descend 20 metres underground and also check out an open pit on either guided or self-guided trips.

Tours leave from the Lally Homestead at Murphys Point, off Highway #21. Guided trips take place Wednesday evenings at 8:30 p.m. and Friday mornings at 10:00 a.m., self-guided tours from 10:00 a.m. to noon on Sundays until September 1. Call 613-267-5060 for reservations, fall hours and other info.

 

Quebec

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Tourists explore Lamaque’s birthplace in the valley of gold.
(Photo: Corporation du Village minier de Bourlamaque)

This might be the best place to begin an historical pilgrimage to Abitibi-Témiscamingue. Just over a kilometre southwest of Eldorado Gold’s Lamaque and on the eastern edge of Val-d’Or sits la Cité de l’Or, with the original Lamaque mine and Bourlamaque Mining Village. A four-hour tour takes visitors 91 metres underground before viewing a number of surface buildings, while an express two-hour tour explores the underground mine and a laboratory. An audio guide tour also covers the town, with still-occupied 1930s to ’40s-era log houses and a 1949 home-turned-museum. La Cité also offers Gold in our Veins, a permanent exhibit about mining life and, en français seulement, a geocaching rally.

Located at 90 avenue Perrault, Val-d’Or. Open daily 8:00 to 5:30 to August 31, Wednesday to Sunday 8:30 to 5:00 in September, Thursday to Sunday 8:30 to 3:00 in October. Phone to inquire about off-season visits from November to May. Call 819-825-1274 or toll-free 1-855-825-1274 for tour reservations and other info.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Malartic’s sheer scale can be appreciated from an observation deck.
(Photo: Abitibi-Témiscamingue Mineralogical Museum)

Twenty-five kilometres west of Val-d’Or, the Abitibi-Témiscamingue Mineralogical Museum offers displays about regional geology and mining, and interactive exhibits as well as tours to one of the world’s largest gold producers, the Agnico Eagle/Yamana Gold Canadian Malartic mine, a technological marvel with some really big machines rumbling around.

Located at 650 rue de la Paix, Malartic. Open Tuesday to Sunday until September. Call 819-757-4677 for opening hours and reservations.

 

Watch as molten copper flows at Glencore’s Horne smelter in Rouyn-Noranda. Guides lead visitors through a museum and into the heart of one of the world’s most specialized plants.

Located at 1 Carter Avenue, Rouyn-Noranda. Tours begin Monday to Sunday at 9:00, 10:30, 1:30 and 3:00 until mid-August. Call 819-797-3195 or 1-888-797-3195 for reservations. Not suitable for pregnant women.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Visitors get in the spirit at Thetford Mines.
(Photo: Musée minéralogique et minier de Thetford Mines)

About 107 kilometres south of Quebec City in a building sheathed with an asbestos-cement coating, le Musée minéralogique et minier de Thetford Mines depicts the history, geology and mineralogy of an area where mining began in 1876. Tours take visitors around buildings, open pits and mountains of tailings left over from the now-banned practice of asbestos extraction.

Located at 711 Frontenac Boulevard West (Highway #112), Thetford Mines. Open daily 9:00 to 5:00 to September 2, off season Tuesday to Friday 9:00 to 4:00, weekends 1:00 to 5:00. Summer mine tours begin at 1:30. Call 418-335-2123 for reservations.

 

One of three nearby former copper producers in the Eastern Townships, the Capelton Mine welcomes visitors to an operation that lasted from 1863 to 1907. One tour travels by wagon to the mine entrance, another offers a gold panning experience. Additional attractions include a small museum and a bike path through the mine site.

Located at 5800 Capelton Road (Highway #108), North Hatley. Call 819-346-9545 or 1-888-346-9545 for reservations.

See Part 1 about Yukon and British Columbia, Part 2 about the prairie provinces and Part 4 about the Atlantic provinces.

Site visits for sightseers

July 19th, 2019

Mining history offers additional destinations for summer road trips

by Greg Klein

Mining history offers additional destinations for summer road trips

A fun but informative underground tour brings B.C.’s former
Britannia copper mine to life. (Photo: Britannia Mine Museum)

 

Follow this industry closely enough and you’ll likely want to visit one or more mines yourself. One way to do that would be to get a job as a miner, although that’s an occupation requiring competence, a capacity for hard work and at least rudimentary English or French. People lacking those qualifications, however, need not despair. They might still find employment writing up sponsored site visits for investor newsletters and mining publications. Still a third approach involves touring historic sites.

Of course they emphasize mining’s past, but that puts perspective on the present. These endeavours helped build our country economically and socially, while inspiring lots of romantic lore and providing stuff that we consider essential. But they also brought about dangerous, sometimes disastrous working conditions, bitter labour conflicts and some primitive environmental standards.

That said, family visits can be entertainingly informative without abjuring history’s serious side.

In this first installment, we provide a list of historic Yukon and British Columbia mines and mining museums open this summer. Also included are a few operating mines that offer public tours. Generally not included, however, are museums of mineralogy and museums not entirely dedicated to mining. The latter category, omitted for space reasons, includes some excellent exhibits and should be considered by mining enthusiasts when visiting any current or former mining region.

Use the links to confirm opening times and other info. Also check tour requirements for footwear and other clothing.

See Part 2 about the prairie provinces, Part 3 about Ontario and Quebec, and Part 4 about the Atlantic provinces.

 

Yukon

Mining history offers additional destinations for summer road trips

For some Dawson visitors, gold’s allure overpowers
that of the theme park. (Photo: Parks Canada)

Putting aside the fact that the lack of a gold rush would have meant far fewer tourists, tourism has far outshone the gold rush’s economic importance to Dawson City. The town and its environs abound in Klondike references, real and imagined, from the goldfields themselves to the Dawson City Museum, Dredge #4, a gaudy streetscape (arguably authentic in spirit if not accuracy) and the bard of the Yukon’s log home. (Overheard from an American in Dawson’s visitor info centre: “We’ve heard about your Robert Service. Is he any relation to Robert Frost?”)

A variety of sites and activities can be previewed here, here and even here. And if a can-can dancer hauls you onto the stage at Diamond Tooth Gertie’s, just consider it an act of revisionist history.

 

Only a few kilometres outside Whitehorse, the MacBride Copperbelt Mining Museum focuses on a base metal play overshadowed by Klondike mania. Attractions include an interpretive train ride along 2.5 kilometres of narrow-gauge track. Back in town, look for the MacBride Museum’s other location, right by Sam McGee’s cabin.

Mile 919.28 Alaska Highway. Open Friday to Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., until August 31. More info.

 

About 290 kilometres east of Dawson City, in a former boom town now down to maybe 20 people, the Keno City Mining Museum displays tools, equipment and memorabilia about local gold-silver mining from the early 1900s.

Located at the end of the Silver Trail, Main Street. Open daily 10:00 to 6:00 until mid-September and “by chance/appointment” during the off-season. More info.

 

British Columbia

Mining history offers additional destinations for summer road trips

Britannia’s multi-storey mill strikes an industrial presence
amid spectacular natural beauty. (Photo: Greg Klein)

Amid stunning scenery halfway between Vancouver and Whistler, the Britannia Mine Museum comprises B.C.’s top such attraction. In operation from 1904 to 1974, this was for a while the British Commonwealth’s biggest copper producer. Now a National Historic Site, its features include 45-minute tours with a short underground train ride, entertaining and knowledgeable guides, gold panning, interactive exhibits and, in a multi-storey mill along the mountainside, a light, sound and special effects show “unlike anything else in North America.” Just outside the museum, early- and mid-20th century buildings remain from what was once an isolated company town.

Located on the Sea-to-Sky (#99) Highway, 45 minutes north of Vancouver and the same distance south of Whistler. Open seven days 9:00 to 5:30. More info.

 

South of Nanaimo, the four-hectare Morden Colliery Historic Provincial Park hosts the only substantial remnants of a coal industry that predominated on Vancouver Island starting in the 1850s. This mine operated between 1913 and 1921, and features a 22.5-metre concrete reinforced headframe and a coal-tipping structure that’s one of just two of its kind left in North America. While in town, stop by the Nanaimo Museum for a small but excellent coal mining exhibit.

Directions: On Highway 1 about nine kilometres south of Nanaimo, turn east on Morden Road and follow it for one or two minutes. Long-overdue restoration work might cause temporary closures. Try BC Parks’ website for more info.

 

In the upper altitudes of southern B.C.’s east Kootenay district, an open-air train escapes downtown Kimberley’s “Bavarian” kitsch to take visitors through a scenic valley and into Sullivan, a 1909-to-2001 operation that once boasted itself the world’s largest lead-zinc mine. Guides from the Kimberley Heritage Museum and Kimberley Underground Mining Railway present demonstrations at the underground interpretive centre and the powerhouse. Other displays include a core shack.

Buy tickets at the train station 200 metres west of Kimberley’s pedestrian mall. Mining tours leave daily at 11:00, 1:00 and 3:00. Sightseeing train trips that bypass the mine leave at 10:00 on Saturdays, Sundays and holiday Mondays. More info.

 

Mining history offers additional destinations for summer road trips

Barkerville crowds notwithstanding, there’s history
in them thar theme parks. (Photo: Barkerville Heritage Trust)

More social history than mining history and with a focus on family fun, Barkerville Historic Town and Park offers entertaining interpretations of the gold rush boom town founded in 1862. Costumed actors lead tours along streets lined with reconstructed period buildings and displays of 19th century mining infrastructure. Plays, concerts and variety shows at the Theatre Royal continue the theme park ambience, while the “immersive experience” offers activities ranging from gold panning to heritage cooking lessons and a blacksmithing workshop. Accommodation in and around the park includes a small hotel, B&Bs, cottages and campgrounds.

Located at the end of Highway 26, 204 kilometres northeast of Williams Lake and 86 kilometres east of Quesnel, all towns on B.C.’s Gold Rush Trail driving route. Open 8:00 to 8:00 until September 2. Museum exhibits close during the off season but the town’s main street remains open for parts of the year. Check the schedule for dates and times. More info.

 

Another historic theme park, although not directly related to mining despite being borne of a gold rush, Fort Steele Heritage Town got its name from Sam Steele, a Mountie whose exploits would have made him a frontier legend in the U.S. or Australia. The reconstructed town’s extensive attractions focus on town life and offer insights into a number of skills including gold panning. About six kilometres away and part of the provincial heritage site sit a few remains of Fisherville, where an 1864 discovery sparked the Wildhorse Creek rush. Self-guided brochures are available.

Located off Highway 93 (for some reason aka Highway 95), 16 kilometres northeast of Cranbrook. Open 10:00 to 5:00 until September 1, with some attractions open during the off season. More info.

 

Mining history offers additional destinations for summer road trips

Teck Resources digs deep while a tour group looks on.
(Photo: Kootenay Rockies Tourism)

Step back into the present with tours of actual working mines in B.C.’s east Kootenays operated by Teck Resources TSX:TECK.A/TECK.B. Three of the company’s open pit metallurgical coal operations welcome the public this summer. Saturday bus tours leave the town of Elkford during July for two-hour trips to Greenhills and during August for two-and-a-half-hour trips to Fording River. Bus tours from the town of Sparwood leave Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays for two-hour trips to the Elkview mine.

Elkford and Sparwood are about 34 kilometres apart on opposite ends of Highway 43. For further info and reservations, call the Elkford Visitor Centre at 1-855-877-9453, and the Sparwood Chamber of Commerce at 1-877-485-8185. Last trips leave Elkford August 31 and Sparwood August 29. Sparwood’s CoC also hosts a Mining History Walking Tour that points out mining machinery and other memorabilia around town.

See Part 2 about the prairie provinces, Part 3 about Ontario and Quebec, and Part 4 about the Atlantic provinces.

Update: 92 Resources explores polymetallic potential of Quebec’s James Bay region

July 8th, 2019

by Greg Klein | updated July 8, 2019

Lithium, gold, copper and molybdenum are among the goals of a program now underway at 92 Resources’ (TSXV:NTY) Corvette-FCI project. A four-person crew expects to spend three to four weeks on the property, which consists of 92’s 100%-held Corvette claims as well as the FCI-East and FCI-West turf, optioned under a 75% earn-in from Osisko Mining TSX:OSK. Work will be conducted by Dahrouge Geological Consulting.

92 Resources to explore polymetallic potential of Quebec’s James Bay region

Over a campaign of three to four weeks, 92 Resources hopes to
build on previous success with energy, precious and base metals.

The agenda calls for prospecting along with rock and soil sampling. Among the priorities will be the Golden Gap Prospect at FCI-West, where historic, non-43-101 outcrop samples have graded between 3.1 g/t and 108.9 g/t gold, along with an historic drill intercept of 10.5 g/t over seven metres and a channel sample of 14.5 g/t over two metres.

Past reports of molybdenum occurrences on the area’s southern copper trend will also come under scrutiny.

The Lac Bruno prospect provides another area of interest, where a boulder field produced 13 samples exceeding 1 g/t gold, with one sample hitting 38.1 g/t. Up-ice soil sampling will extend from FCI-East to the boulders’ interpreted source on 92’s wholly owned Corvette claims.

Energy metals also attract interest, as the company’s previous work identified a well-mineralized lithium pegmatite system over a strike extending at least three kilometres on Corvette, with further potential on FCI-East. Lithium-tantalum channel samples released last year from Corvette’s CV1 pegmatite averaged 1.35% Li2O and 109 ppm Ta2O5, reaching as high as 2.28% Li2O and 471 ppm Ta2O5 over six metres. Three other spodumene-bearing pegmatites also show promise.

Located within the Guyer group of the Greater La Grande Greenstone Belt, the property sits about 10 kilometres south of the all-season Trans-Taiga Road and powerline, adjacently south of Midland Exploration’s (TSXV:MD) Mythril copper-gold-molybdenum-silver project and immediately east of Pikwa, a polymetallic project of Azimut Exploration TSXV:AZM and Ressources Québec’s SOQUEM subsidiary.

92’s Quebec portfolio also includes the Pontax, Eastman and Lac du Beryl properties. Grab samples from Pontax have reached up to 0.94% Li2O and 520 ppm Ta2O5.

In British Columbia 92 holds the Silver Sands vanadium prospect and the Golden frac sand project, the latter adjacent to Northern Silica’s high-grade Moberly silica mine and subject of a 43-101 technical report filed by 92 last year.

In the Northwest Territories, the company has a 40% stake in the Hidden Lake lithium project, with Far Resources CSE:FAT holding the remainder. In a 1,079-metre drill program last year, all 10 holes found grades above 1% Li2O, with one intercept showing 1.6% over 9.2 metres. Using Hidden Lake material, a mini pilot plant produced 40 kilograms of concentrate grading 6.11% Li2O with recovery over 80%.

An infographic intro into in-situ mining

June 25th, 2019

by Nicholas LePan | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | June 25, 2019

 

An intro to in-situ mining

 

How do you mine without moving a rock?

When most people think of mining they think of massive open pits or deep underground tunnels. But there is one mining method that does not move a rock and leaves the landscape as is.

This infographic from Excelsior Mining TSX:MIN outlines a unique mining method, in-situ recovery or ISR, also known as in-situ mining.

ISR is not a recent innovation in the mining sector. In fact, ISR has been used for the past 50 years in uranium mining and 48% of the world’s uranium gets mined this way. Uranium is not the only mineral ISR can extract; there is also silver, copper and sometimes gold.

ISR involves dissolving a mineral deposit in the ground and then processing it at surface, all without moving any rock. It is cost effective and environmentally friendly.

But if this method is so great, why don’t more companies mine this way?

The right geology

ISR is not widely used because the geological conditions have to be just right. There are few locations around the world that meet the following criteria:

Highly permeable ore body: In the case of copper, the ore body must be naturally broken, fractured and permeable.

Mineable: The target mineral must be soluble with the right fluid, typically a weak acid.

Under the water table: The mineral deposit must be below the water table to allow for the movement of fluids throughout the ore body.

If geologists can find these conditions and it is a large-enough mineral deposit, it is time to mine.

The ISR process for copper

Once the right conditions are met and drill holes are sunk into the ore body, mining can begin.

  • Leaching solution is pumped through injection wells

  • The solution moves through the naturally fractured rock and leaches the copper

  • Recovery wells extract the copper-rich solution

  • Solution is pumped to the surface to the plant for processing

  • Copper is extracted from the solution to create pure copper sheets

  • Mining solution is recycled back to the wellfield

Once an area is mined, the wells are flushed with water to clean out any remaining leaching solution. Meanwhile, the surface is returned back to pre-mining conditions, allowing it to be used for any purpose in the future.

Advantages of in-situ mining

The environmental advantages include minimal noise, dust or greenhouse gas emissions, along with minimal visual disturbance. In addition, ISR also lowers capital and operating costs while creating a safer environment for mine workers.

Too bad not all mines can operate without moving a rock.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

92 Resources to explore polymetallic potential of Quebec’s James Bay region

June 19th, 2019

by Greg Klein | June 19, 2019

Lithium, gold, copper and molybdenum are among the goals of a program that begins next month at 92 Resources’ (TSXV:NTY) Corvette-FCI project. The property consists of 92’s 100%-held Corvette claims as well as the FCI-East and FCI-West turf, optioned under a 75% earn-in from Osisko Mining TSX:OSK. Work will be conducted by Dahrouge Geological Consulting.

92 Resources to explore polymetallic potential of Quebec’s James Bay region

Over a campaign of three to four weeks, 92 Resources hopes to
build on previous success with energy, precious and base metals.

The agenda calls for prospecting along with rock and soil sampling. Among the priorities will be the Golden Gap Prospect at FCI-West, where historic, non-43-101 outcrop samples have graded between 3.1 g/t and 108.9 g/t gold, along with an historic drill intercept of 10.5 g/t over seven metres and a channel sample of 14.5 g/t over two metres.

Past reports of molybdenum occurrences on the area’s southern copper trend will also come under scrutiny.

The Lac Bruno prospect provides another area of interest, where a boulder field produced 13 samples exceeding 1 g/t gold, with one sample hitting 38.1 g/t. Up-ice soil sampling will extend from FCI-East to the boulders’ interpreted source on 92’s wholly owned Corvette claims.

Energy metals also attract interest, as the company’s previous work identified a well-mineralized lithium pegmatite system over a strike extending at least three kilometres on Corvette, with further potential on FCI-East. Lithium-tantalum channel samples released last year from Corvette’s CV1 pegmatite averaged 1.35% Li2O and 109 ppm Ta2O5, reaching as high as 2.28% Li2O and 471 ppm Ta2O5 over six metres. Three other spodumene-bearing pegmatites also show promise.

Located within the Guyer group of the Greater La Grande Greenstone Belt, the property sits about 10 kilometres south of the all-season Trans-Taiga Road and powerline, adjacently south of Midland Exploration’s (TSXV:MD) Mythril copper-gold-molybdenum-silver project and immediately east of Pikwa, a polymetallic project of Azimut Exploration TSXV:AZM and Ressources Québec’s SOQUEM subsidiary.

92’s Quebec portfolio also includes the Pontax, Eastman and Lac du Beryl properties. Grab samples from Pontax have reached up to 0.94% Li2O and 520 ppm Ta2O5.

In British Columbia 92 holds the Silver Sands vanadium prospect and the Golden frac sand project, the latter adjacent to Northern Silica’s high-grade Moberly silica mine and subject of a 43-101 technical report filed by 92 last year.

In the Northwest Territories, the company has a 40% stake in the Hidden Lake lithium project, with Far Resources CSE:FAT holding the remainder. In a 1,079-metre drill program last year, all 10 holes found grades above 1% Li2O, with one intercept showing 1.6% over 9.2 metres. Using Hidden Lake material, a mini pilot plant produced 40 kilograms of concentrate grading 6.11% Li2O with recovery over 80%.

Saville Resources/Commerce Resources report best-yet niobium hole from Quebec critical minerals project

June 11th, 2019

This story has been expanded and moved here.

Update: Saville Resources/Commerce Resources hit more near-surface, high-grade niobium, with tantalum and phosphate in Quebec

June 6th, 2019

This story has been expanded and moved here.