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Posts tagged ‘colombia’

October 20th, 2015

Canadian business community ruminates on impact of massive Liberal majority Stockhouse
Paul Harris preaches investor patience in Colombia Streetwise Reports
Copper seen near bottom as China soaks up supply NAI 500
Mining for cosmetics: Mineralogy and the ancient art of looking good Geology for Investors
TiO2 World Summit 2015: “Suppliers listen but they don’t hear” Industrial Minerals
The world’s 10 most competitive countries GoldSeek
When stock traders become market cheerleaders Equities Canada

October 19th, 2015

Paul Harris preaches investor patience in Colombia Streetwise Reports
Nuclear deal between U.S. and Iran finally takes effect Stockhouse
Copper seen near bottom as China soaks up supply NAI 500
Mining for cosmetics: Mineralogy and the ancient art of looking good Geology for Investors
TiO2 World Summit 2015: “Suppliers listen but they don’t hear” Industrial Minerals
The world’s 10 most competitive countries GoldSeek
When stock traders become market cheerleaders Equities Canada

Museo del Oro director Maria Alicia Uribe Villegas explains why pre-Conquest Colombians chose gold for objects of spiritual and political importance

June 24th, 2015

…Read more

Gold—pricey or priceless?

May 27th, 2015

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

by Greg Klein

Gold’s allure, where it exists at all, can manifest itself in different ways. British Columbia natives, for example, remained indifferent to the metal until the arrival of prospectors. Those gold-hungry newcomers, on the other hand, were driven almost entirely by rapacity. But the pre-Conquest indigenous peoples of today’s Colombia saw nothing of value in the metal itself until, converted by metallurgy and craftsmanship, it became an object not only of beauty but of symbolic importance or transformational power.

That’s demonstrated by Allure of Gold, an exhibit within the exhibit called Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum. Holding 137 pieces of pre-Hispanic artefacts dating to 500 BC, the display makes its first North American appearance from Bogota’s Museo del Oro. Even now the pieces symbolize the Colombian peoples’ identity, pride and shared past, Museo director Maria Alicia Uribe Villegas told ResourceClips.com.

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

This gold pendant, in a style dating between 900 and 1600, would “transform” political or religious leaders into batmen, bestowing such
powers as the ability to fly, see at night and rest upside-down.
(Photo: Museo del Oro)

“These were objects that were produced mainly for display and to build power—political and religious power—by transmitting the properties of the materials,” she explained. People believed the objects asserted status, hosted spirits, or enhanced fertility and the overall quality of life.

According to belief, many objects wielded power to transform the person wearing it into another being. “They could for example acquire the identity of the jaguar, of birds, of bats,” Uribe said. “By wearing the ornament they believed they transformed their body, and by transforming their body they changed their perspective and their identity. So the power of many rulers came from that transformation. They believed that by transforming into a bird, you could fly to other worlds, to other dimensions, to the spiritual dimension, meet the spirits and the gods and ask for things, ask for hunting prey or for rain or things that your group needed.”

Some objects also presented a view of cosmology, she pointed out. “In most of these societies there isn’t this difference between nature and culture. Animals and people were nature and culture at the same time. Animals are also humans, different kinds of humans than people, so the relations between animals and humans were understood as social relations…. When you hunt you have to seduce the prey and you have to give the spiritual owner of the animal a gift in exchange.” Uribe said gold then functioned in “a transactional world,” but in a symbolic sense, not as currency.

Why was gold chosen for such representations? “It’s interesting because it’s a cultural choice,” she replied, noting that B.C. aboriginals knew about gold but didn’t use it. “It’s a wonderful material,” she added. “It’s beautiful for its colour and the shine you can give it, it doesn’t corrode, it lasts forever, and also you can give it the shape you want by hammering it or casting it.”

Although natives north of Mexico didn’t practise metallurgy, those of Colombia produced gold-copper and gold-silver alloys. When silver was used it was normally in the country’s south, which had cultural connections with today’s Peru and Ecuador. Colombians used platinum too. They couldn’t melt it because of the metal’s exceptional resistance to heat but South Americans were “the only people in the ancient world that used platinum.”

Ancient Colombian cultures put another perspective on the metal’s precious qualities

In a style dating between 1 BC and 700 AD, this breastplate would “transform” a chieftain or priest into a jaguar, allowing him to communicate with jaguar spirits and granting him deep respect and obedience. (Photo: Museo del Oro)

Almost all that effort was motivated by symbolism and spirituality, not practicality. But Colombians did make some metal tools for fashioning other metal objects, for example to hammer gold, Uribe noted. They also fashioned metal into needles and fishing hooks. But “those were the only practical tools they made.” Otherwise precious metals were used “for these objects of meaning.”

It’s a wonder that any of it survived the efficiently bloodthirsty business of confiscating the artwork and turning it into bullion. As Matthew Hart wrote about Francisco Pizarro’s 16th century conquest of Peru, “The artistic output of a thousand years vanished into the furnaces. It must be one of the most potent images in history—the transformation of a culture into cash.”

Most of what survived were funerary offerings hidden in tombs. “But the Spanish learned how to identify these tombs and many of them were looted,” Uribe said. Incredibly, ancient artefacts were still being melted as late as the 19th and even 20th century.

Where’s that gold now? You might be wearing some of it. The global gold supply comes from diverse and sometimes ancient sources, one of the museum displays points out. The bling in your ring could come from a Colombian chief or an Egyptian pharaoh.

But some of Colombia’s treasures were preserved by local collectors and European museums. The Museo del Oro’s collection started in 1939, after Colombia’s minister of education prevailed on the country’s national bank, then holding a monopoly on gold ownership, “to keep these objects out of the market, being taken abroad and melted,” Uribe said.

Now all such artefacts belong to the country’s entire population, she explained. A private collector must register with the office of archeological heritage and may ask for tenancy on a privately held collection. But Colombia retains ownership. “You cannot buy it, sell it or even inherit it.”

So while the commodity’s spot price keeps gold bugs guessing, these objects remain priceless.

Allure of Gold appears with Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum until October 31.

Read more about the Colombian national collection.

Read more about Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia.

B.C.’s gold rushes revisited

May 20th, 2015

Avaricious adventurers came for quick cash, left a lasting legacy

by Greg Klein

Avaricious adventurers came for quick cash, left a lasting legacy

Once considered North America’s biggest city west of Chicago and north of San Francisco,
Barkerville is pictured here in 1868, about three years after the Cariboo rush ended.
(Photo: Royal B.C. Museum)

 

Gold, gold, gold! Powerful as the passion it provokes, gold’s mania can be temporary, its effects short-lived. But a new exhibit at Victoria’s Royal B.C. Museum examines a critical stage in western Canadian history that was part of an international movement. Gold Rush! El Dorado in British Columbia puts fascinating new perspectives on a subject of wide-ranging appeal.

If James Douglas was trying to avert a gold rush in 1858, his plan backfired. The Hudson’s Bay Company chief factor and governor of the colony of Vancouver Island had been quietly buying gold from prospectors who came north from the California diggings and other mining camps. He apparently thought his purchases would keep B.C.’s bounty a secret.

If so, he sure screwed up. When he sent a gold shipment for refining at San Francisco, word got out and the rush was on.

Avaricious adventurers came for quick cash, left a lasting legacy

A four-day journey from Victoria to Barkerville featured roadhouses every 18 miles along the stagecoach portion of the route to supply meals and fresh horses. (Photo: Royal B.C. Museum)

Without warning one Sunday morning, a ship suddenly arrived at the HBC’s once-placid Fort Victoria to unload hundreds of California veterans headed for the new goldfields across the strait. Among their baggage was gear, guns and American attitudes that ranged from lawless anarchy to Manifest Destiny.

Douglas acted swiftly with a unilateral declaration of sovereignty over the B.C. mainland. Britain later backed him up by formally declaring the mainland a colony, dispatching a soldier/settler detachment of Royal Engineers, enforcing British law and building a road to Barkerville, roughly the 19th century equivalent of opening up Ontario’s Ring of Fire.

By that time the world was arriving. Hundreds of thousands of hopefuls from diverse backgrounds and far-flung parts of the planet poured into the new colony as the Fraser River rush of 1858 morphed into the Cariboo rush of 1862. Would anything ever be the same?

The first, largely American, wave threatened British sovereignty. Even so, “if there hadn’t been a gold rush we might have ended up as part of the United States,” museum deputy director Kathryn Bridge told ResourceClips.com. “The gold rush stimulated the British government to create the colony of British Columbia, which secured formal British presence on the west coast.”

Massive immigration followed. “The estimates are up to 300,000 during the gold rush time,” she explained. “A lot of those people came and left but a substantial quantity stayed. They stayed because they found other means of livelihood, not necessarily because they made their fortunes … so it was the real beginning of immigration and the multicultural base of British Columbian society.”

Avaricious adventurers came for quick cash, left a lasting legacy

Natives were the first to discover, placer mine and trade gold in B.C.
(Photo: Royal B.C. Museum)

Among the exhibit’s many features are “dozens of archival documents that have been available to researchers but haven’t been on exhibit before,” Bridge pointed out. “These are really pivotal documents, diaries, records of gold mining claims. One of the things we wanted to do was introduce personal stories so that it wouldn’t just be an event, it would be an experience that we shared.”

The stories include the Chilcotin War and, much less known but supported by recent research, the Fraser River War, in which a native coalition nearly had to fight for survival against a private army of Americans.

There’s also the earlier story of what Bridge calls an “attempted rush” at the Queen Charlotte Islands in 1851. Natives repulsed British and American boats, holding one crew for ransom.

Then there’s the story of “Harry,” supposedly a man searching the almost all-male goldfields for his brother, but in fact Harriet Collins looking for her husband. Her cover was blown when she gave birth.

Over 400 artefacts include prospecting and mining gear, contemporary miners’ guidebooks, weapons and the 52-ounce Turnagain nugget, along with a wealth of other 19th century frontier memorabilia. Photos, posters, video and interactive displays also convey the stories of those turbulent times.

Another feature qualifies as an exhibit in itself, 137 pieces of pre-Hispanic gold artwork from El Museo del Oro in Bogota making their first North American appearance. The country’s indigenous people saw no value in gold until it was transformed, through metallurgy and artistry, into objects denoting status or bestowing spiritual power.

Avaricious adventurers came for quick cash, left a lasting legacy

With a face value of $1 million, this gold coin weighs
100 kilograms. (Photo: Royal Canadian Mint)

Whether the Fraser and Cariboo rushes were two separate events is an oft-debated subject, Bridge said. But they did differ. “It was mainly alluvial gold in the lower Fraser and by the time they moved up to the Cariboo it was hard rock mining, hydraulics. It wasn’t an individual miner, people formed companies. So it was more big business.”

By 1865 the rush was over. Some would-be miners left, others settled down to logging, fishing, farming or ranching. But the more determined individuals fanned out again, part of a movement that would bring the great Klondike discovery and another dramatic rush sometimes portrayed as the western frontier’s last stand against encroaching modernity.

Gold’s allure continues, of course. That’s demonstrated by the museum’s more recent artefacts such as Olympic gold medals, a gold Oscar, gold coins from around the world and, under the watchful eye of security, a Canadian gold coin with a face value of $1 million. Not something you’d pop in a parking meter, it’s over two feet in diameter, weighs 100 kilos and, at $1,200 per ounce, would be worth over US$3.85 million.

B.C.’s gold rush era lives on too, in place names and historic sites dotting the Gold Rush Trail that leads visitors to Barkerville, now a restored tourist attraction.

Gold Rush! El Dorado in B.C. runs until October 31 before moving to the Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau, Quebec. A version of the exhibit will also travel to Guangzhou, China. The Victoria event coincides with publication of New Perspectives on the Gold Rush, a collection of 10 essays edited by Bridge.

Read more about B.C. mining history here and here.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 9th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 2 to 8, 2014

by Greg Klein

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High grades, wide intervals from neighbours Fission and NexGen

Nearly simultaneous announcements from two adjacent projects once again evoke a sense of wonder about the Athabasca Basin’s southwestern rim. Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South still comes out ahead with an August 7 best result of 12.12% U3O8 over 27 metres. Still, NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) same-day best of 3.42% over 22.35 metres can hardly be dismissed. Fission also retains the shallower depths. But NexGen’s relatively recent Arrow discovery suggests something big might have spread beyond Fission’s 31,039-hectare property.

First, a look at NexGen.

Two days after announcing the “strongest and shallowest mineralization to date” from Rook 1’s Arrow zone, the company rushed to market with two stock-propelling assays from a single hole. Announced August 7, the results come from AR-14-15, the zone’s 15th hole so far. NexGen released the numbers in a sort of Russian doll formation of intervals within intervals, showing ever-higher grades as the widths contracted:

  • 3.42% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 22.35 metres, starting at 564 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 10.72% over 6.85 metres)
  • (which includes 15.74% over 4.5 metres)
  • (which includes 26.1% over 2.6 metres)
  • (which includes 55.8% over 0.45 metres)

  • 1.52% over 32 metres, starting at 594 metres
  • (including 2.98% over 15.85 metres)
  • (which includes 10.4% over 3.15 metres)
  • (which includes 43.7% over 0.35 metres)

True widths weren’t provided but the hole was sunk at a dip of -70 degrees.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 2 to 8, 2014

The assays follow an August 5 batch of radiometric readings. Those eight holes, which included AR-14-15, extend Arrow’s strike by 45 metres to about 515 metres in length for a zone that’s up to 180 metres wide and open in all directions. Encouraged by a near 100% hit rate, the company has increased its summer program from 13,500 metres to 18,500 metres of drilling.

These results come from a handheld scintillometer that measures gamma radiation from drill core in counts per second. They’re no substitute for assays.

The zone’s shallowest finding came from hole AR-14-20, which showed a composite of 51.3 metres of mineralization within a 284.45-metre section starting at 118.55 metres in downhole depth. True widths weren’t provided.

The strongest results came from AR-14-15.

Two regional holes totalling 558 metres at Rook 1’s Area K failed to find mineralization. The company now plans regional drilling at Area A on an electromagnetic conductor that NexGen interprets to be PL-3B, which hosts the PLS discovery. Rook 1 has two other conductors as well.

Not including one abandoned hole, the eight Arrow holes bring the zone’s total to 22 so far. Just one failed to find mineralization. Radiometric results have been reported previously for the first six summer holes, while assays have been released for last winter’s eight-hole campaign.

With Arrow clearly the project’s focus, NexGen has changed Rook 1’s protocol for identifying holes. Arrow hole numbers now begin with the letters AR, while regional holes retain the prefix RK.

AR-14-15’s assay came out with remarkable speed. Both NexGen and Fission use the same lab (SRC Geoanalytical Laboratories in Saskatoon). But while Fission is still releasing assays from last winter’s drilling, months after publishing their radiometric results, NexGen somehow released a summer assay just two days after reporting the same hole’s radiometrics.

Fission hits with six holes from winter, 12 from summer

As has been the case for most of last winter’s PLS drilling, the half-dozen holes released August 7 came from the project’s R780E zone, the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. Fission’s most outstanding results showed:

Hole PLS14-201

  • 2.51% U3O8 over 12 metres, starting at 128 metres
  • (including 5.6% over 5 metres)

  • 12.12% over 27 metres, starting at 149 metres
  • (including 26.41% over 12 metres)

PLS14-205

  • 0.54% over 43 metres, starting at 132.5 metres
  • (including 1.54% over 7.5 metres)

  • 2.65% over 10 metres, starting at 229 metres
  • (including 11.57% over 1.5 metres)

  • 0.59% over 35.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres

PLS14-213

  • 4.05% over 34 metres, starting at 147.5 metres
  • (including 11.37% over 11 metres)

True widths weren’t provided. One additional hole on the R00E zone failed to find significant mineralization. Still to come are assays for another 17 holes from last winter’s 92-hole program.

Like NexGen, Fission’s assays followed radiometric results by two days. And, like NexGen, those measurements expand the size of a zone. Taking advantage of barge-based angle drilling, a new technique first announced the previous week, the crew sunk 12 angled holes into the lake, all of them showing wide mineralization.

Hole PLS14-248 expanded the zone’s eastern half approximately 40 metres south while PLS14-236 showed mineralization about 50 metres north. The usual scintillometer disclaimer applies.

The $12-million, 63-hole summer program continues its progress towards a December resource.

U3O8 Corp Argentinian PEA sees payback in 2.5 years

U3O8 Corp TSX:UWE emphasized low cash costs as the company announced a preliminary economic assessment for its Laguna Salada deposit in Argentina on August 5. The deposit’s characteristics would make it “competitive with low-cost in-situ recovery uranium projects and with high-grade deposits in the Athabasca Basin,” the company stated.

Taking into consideration a vanadium credit and a 3% NSR, cash costs for the 10-year mine life would average $21.62 per pound of uranium. The study estimates even lower initial cash costs of $16.14 a pound as production starts in higher-grade zones, bringing payback in just 2.5 years.

Using U.S. dollars for all figures, the PEA forecast a $134-million capex and used a 7.5% discount rate to calculate a net present value of $55 million and an 18% post-tax internal rate of return. The numbers were based on presumed prices of $60 a pound U3O8 and $5.50 a pound vanadium.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 10th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 3 to 9, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Paladin releases Labrador infill results, plans Q2 resource update

From Labrador’s Central Mineral Belt, Paladin Energy TSX:PDN announced winter infill drilling results on May 7. Thirteen holes sunk 3,871 metres into the Michelin deposit, with each hole finding mineralization and six revealing significant intervals, the company stated. The best results showed:

Hole M14-151

  • 0.109% uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) over 10 metres, starting at 302 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 3 to 9, 2014

Paladin considers Labrador’s Central Mineral Belt “one of the
few remaining under-explored uranium districts globally.”

Hole M14-154

  • 0.14% over 15 metres, starting at 214 metres

  • 0.13% over 8 metres, starting at 256 metres

Hole M14-156

  • 0.095% over 12 metres, starting at 230 metres

Hole M14-158

  • 0.096% over 16 metres, starting at 191 metres

Hole M14-162

  • 0.102% over 28 metres, starting at 348 metres

Hole M14-163

  • 0.114% over 9 metres, starting at 355 metres

Information about true widths wasn’t provided. The deposit remains open in both directions and at depth. On the agenda is a Q2 resource update in which Paladin hopes the last few years of drilling will boost confidence as well as produce a small size increase.

Michelin’s resource currently shows:

  • measured: 7.1 million tonnes averaging 0.08% for 13.06 million pounds U3O8

  • indicated: 23 million tonnes averaging 0.11% for 54.06 million pounds

  • inferred: 16 million tonnes averaging 0.1% for 36.09 million pounds

Adding in five other deposits within 50 kilometres of a potential Michelin mill, the CMB project totals:

  • measured: 8.1 million tonnes averaging 0.08% for 15.1 million pounds

  • indicated: 32 million tonnes averaging 0.1% for 68.7 million pounds

  • inferred: 29.1 million tonnes averaging 0.08% for 53 million pounds

Three kilometres south of Michelin, two holes totalling 561 metres failed to find depth extensions to the Rainbow deposit. But Paladin considers the Michelin-Rainbow trend highly prospective as a result of radiometric surveying, mapping, prospecting and some drilling. Interpretation of a 608-line-kilometre ground magnetic survey will help guide exploration in the Michelin vicinity. More drilling is planned for next winter.

Paladin holds interests in five other exploration projects in Australia and another in Niger. Last February, declining prices forced the company to place its Kayelekera mine in Malawi on care and maintenance. Paladin hopes to close the sale of a 25% interest in its Langer Heinrich flagship in Namibia in June.

Northwest Manitoba radon-in-water might be second only to PLS, MPVC says

Having reported results of a land-based radon survey last month, MPVC Inc TSXV:UNO announced preliminary but optimistic findings from a radon-in-water survey at its Northwest Manitoba project on May 7. “To the author’s knowledge” only Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South has shown higher readings for a water-based survey, MPVC stated. More detailed analysis could change the results by about 10% either way.

Of the 1,399 samples from Maguire Lake, 41 showed results above 100 picocuries per litre (pCi/L), 14 went beyond 200 pCi/L, eight exceeded 300 pCi/L and four surpassed 400 pCi/L.

The readings extend linear trends identified in last month’s land-based survey results, MPVC added.

Still to come are results from a ground gravity survey to fill in areas missed by a 2012 survey. The area has also undergone an airborne magnetic/VLF/radiometric survey in 2006 and an airborne VTEM survey in 2007.

Among future work, the company plans to scan drill cuttings with a high-resolution gamma spectrometer system to “detect young uranium which is not radioactive and therefore not detectible with other field instruments…. The detection of anomalous young uranium, radon or lead 210 ascending along fractures would signal the presence of a uranium deposit at depth.” Drilling might descend as far as 1,000 metres in search of deeper deposits.

Previous prospecting in the area has found in-situ mineralization up to 9.5% U3O8 and boulders grading above 65%.

The company’s 80% option with CanAlaska Uranium TSXV:CVV calls for $3.2 million worth of exploration on the 143,603-hectare project by 2015.

Western Athabasca Syndicate reports initial Preston drill results

The four-company Western Athabasca Syndicate announced preliminary results from seven holes totalling 1,571 metres on their Preston property’s Swoosh target May 6. Five holes showed elevated radioactivity measured by a handheld spectrometer and a downhole probe. The project’s best hole so far, PN14007, found 12 radioactive intervals, one of them 1,432 counts per second over 0.75 metres (not true width). The results are no substitute for assays, which are expected in early June.

The alliance consists of Skyharbour Resources TSXV:SYH, Athabasca Nuclear TSXV:ASC, Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Lucky Strike Resources TSXV:LKY.

Six holes reached downhole depths between 200 and 350 metres while poor drilling conditions eliminated one hole. But all seven “intersected a broad, hydrothermally altered and reactivated structural zone,” the syndicate stated. The six-kilometre-long Swoosh was defined by gravity, magnetic and electromagnetic surveys, and surficial geochemical anomalies.

This month the companies plan at least one hole on each of two other targets, Fin and CHA. Swoosh is slated for additional field work and drilling later this year.

Athabasca Nuclear acts as project operator on the 246,643-hectare Preston property, which the syndicate credits with 15 prospective targets.

Anfield collects Colorado claims

Anfield Resources TSXV:ARY has once again expanded its western U.S. turf with 239 unpatented mining claims on federal land in Colorado. As a result the company now “has access to mineral rights” on more than 7,082 hectares in historic uranium and vanadium districts in Colorado and Utah, according to the May 8 announcement.

Subject to approvals, Anfield gets the claims from Alamosa Mining Corp for 1.95 million shares and three years of payments totalling US$600,000.

The company previously announced Utah acquisitions in March and January. All the Utah and Colorado claims lie within a 193-kilometre radius of Energy Fuels’ (TSX:EFR) White Mesa mill. Anfield also holds claims in Arizona.

European Uranium refines portfolio sale, intends to pursue other assets

On May 9 European Uranium Resources TSXV:EUU announced that the planned sale of its entire portfolio has reached a share purchase agreement with Forte Energy that replaces the companies’ previous binding heads of agreement. As in the original deal, the ASX/AIM-listed company issues EUU 915.93 million shares, valued at $7.5 million, and pays EUU $1 million. The latter retains a 1% production royalty.

But the new arrangement calls for the shares to be issued in instalments to avoid breaching the Australia Takeovers Prohibition. On closing, EUU would get 19.9% of the shares with the rest following “from time to time.”

Nor will EUU distribute Forte shares to its own shareholders. Instead it will sell some of them over time to fund its operations. EUU stated the deal would provide initial funding to pursue options or acquisitions “in multiple commodities in the general European area.”

The Forte deal came together shortly after EUU’s planned merger with Portex Minerals CSE:PAX fell through. EUU’s portfolio consists of two Slovakian uranium projects.

The company closed a $100,000 private placement with Forte in mid-April.

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April 14th, 2014

When the major equity market bubble crashes, Michael Berry will take refuge in these gold stocks Streetwise Reports
How Russia is working together with China Equedia
IM22 conference: Innovation will lead the way for industrial minerals Industrial Minerals
Alluvial and placer mineral deposits Geology for Investors
Dark markets may be more harmful than high-frequency trading VantageWire
The promoter, the Colombian gold project and the painful lawsuit Stockhouse
Infographic—Unearthing the world’s gold supply GoldSeek

April 11th, 2014

IM22 conference: Innovation will lead the way for industrial minerals Industrial Minerals
Alluvial and placer mineral deposits Geology for Investors
Zachary Schumacher’s “State of the Rare Earths” address Streetwise Reports
Dark markets may be more harmful than high-frequency trading VantageWire
The promoter, the Colombian gold project and the painful lawsuit Stockhouse
Infographic—Unearthing the world’s gold supply GoldSeek
How the monetary system has changed Equedia

April 9th, 2014

Alluvial and placer mineral deposits Geology for Investors
Zachary Schumacher’s “State of the Rare Earths” address Streetwise Reports
Dark markets may be more harmful than high-frequency trading VantageWire
Still no “killer application” for graphene Industrial Minerals
The promoter, the Colombian gold project and the painful lawsuit Stockhouse
Infographic—Unearthing the world’s gold supply GoldSeek
How the monetary system has changed Equedia