Saturday 7th December 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘cobalt’

Updated: Belmont Resources’ Greenwood expansion continues with new acquisitions

November 21st, 2019

Update: On November 21, 2019, the company announced two more Greenwood-area acquisitions totalling 45 hectares in the Pride of the West and Great Bear claims.

by Greg Klein | October 30, 2019

Newly acquired turf shows continued interest in an historic southern British Columbia mining camp. On October 30 Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA announced 127 hectares of new claims to add to its existing holdings in the area.

The Glenora acquisition sits adjacent to Golden Dawn Minerals’ (TSXV:GOM) Golden Crown project, about three kilometres from Golden Dawn’s processing plant and one kilometre from the former Phoenix mine.

Belmont Resources expands its presence in B.C.’s Greenwood camp

Although neighbouring deposits don’t necessarily reflect on the potential of other properties, an idea of Greenwood activity can be gleaned from historic production at Phoenix. The open pit reportedly produced over one million ounces of gold and 500 million pounds of copper up to 1978. Golden Crown reached PEA in 2017 with a resource that uses a 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent cutoff:

Indicated: 163,000 tonnes averaging 11.09 g/t gold and 0.56% copper for 11.93 g/t gold-equivalent containing 62,500 gold-equivalent ounces

Inferred: 42,000 tonnes averaging 9.04 g/t gold and 0.43% copper for 9.68 g/t gold-equivalent containing 13,100 gold-equivalent ounces

Belmont plans further assessment of Glenora while considering other possible acquisitions in the camp.

The new claims will cost the company 420,000 units on TSXV approval, with each unit containing one share and one warrant. Another 420,000 shares are payable within a year and a 1.5% NSR will apply.

Earlier this month Belmont reported sample results from its Greenwood-area Pathfinder project, with grades up to 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 20700 ppm copper and 45.1 ppm cobalt. The autumn campaign followed a summer program that returned sample assays up to 29.2 g/t gold, along with silver, copper and lead. The company currently has contract proposals under review for an airborne VTEM survey over the property.

Belmont’s portfolio also includes a 75% interest in Nevada’s Kibby Basin lithium project, where drill results have graded up to 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres. In northern Saskatchewan the company shares a 50/50 stake with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT in two uranium properties.

Belmont currently has private placements on offer totalling up to $300,000. The company closed a $252,000 private placement last June and arranged two loans totalling $50,000 in August.

EV rare earths demand to increase 350% to 2025, outpacing supply: Adamas Intelligence

November 11th, 2019

by Greg Klein | November 11, 2019

Increasing reliance on electric vehicles will challenge the ability of suppliers to meet rare earths demand, resulting in “shortages if the market continues on a path of business as usual,” according to an independent research and advisory firm.

A new report from Adamas Intelligence forecasts a 350% increase in rare earths demand from EVs alone between 2018 and 2025. Estimates call for another 127% increase from 2025 to 2030. The REs in question consist of neodymium, praseodymium, dysprosium and terbium, key ingredients for the permanent magnets most commonly used in the vehicles.

The report foresees annual EV sales, excluding mild and micro hybrids, to multiply from 4.3 million units last year to 12.5 million in 2025 and 32 million in 2030. Over 80% of those vehicles will use permanent magnet synchronous motors, which rely on RE-bearing magnets. Given their advantages of cost and efficiency over other types of motors, Adamas expects “overwhelming” use in next-generation EV designs.

Adamas forecasts EV demand for neodymium-praseodymium oxide will rise from about 3,000 tonnes last year to 13,000 tonnes in 2025 and 28,000 tonnes in 2030, making up around 20% of total global demand in 2030. With production anticipated to increase at a slower rate, the report predicts a shortfall of 7,500 tonnes by 2030, along with a 300-tonne deficit for dysprosium oxide, “if supply is not increased beyond what is currently anticipated.”

While hybrids and fully battery-dependent vehicle sales combined rose 23% between 2010 and 2018, the study found battery-only EVs such as the Tesla Model S and Nissan Leaf increased at a compound average growth rate of 118% during that time. Battery-only vehicles showed 133% CAGR. Fully electric models will constitute about 63% of the 32 million EVs forecast for 2030, the report estimates.

Despite a general trend to cut subsidies, national, regional and municipal governments worldwide have set goals for EV use to offset climate change. But “ambitious targets alone will not drive EV penetration into the mass market,” the report maintains. “Falling costs and improved EV economics will.”

Besides rare earths, Adamas sees accelerated EV demand for lithium, nickel, cobalt, manganese, graphite and copper, as well as other metals and materials.

Read the Adamas Intelligence report: Electric Growth: EVs, Motors and Motor Materials.

Northern challenge

November 8th, 2019

NWT prosperity depends on rebuilding investor confidence, miners warn

by Greg Klein

NWT prosperity depends on rebuilding investor confidence, miners warn

 

What happens when a mining-based economy runs out of mines? The Northwest Territories risks finding out the hard way but the reason won’t be a lack of mineral resources. For too long, investors have been discouraged from backing territorial exploration. That’s the message the NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines delivered to the legislative assembly in Yellowknife last month. Now the industry group awaits a response, one backed with action, as the newly elected government prepares for its four-year term.

The territory’s three mines, all diamond operations, have passed peak production, facing closures over the coming decade. The NWT hosts only a few advanced projects, none comparing in potential economic clout with the big three. The problem contrasts with the NWT’s two northern neighbours, where the industry continues to thrive.

Projections released in July by the Conference Board of Canada call for Nunavut to lead the country in annual economic expansion, with an average 4.6% up to 2025. “Mining will be the main driver of growth, as Agnico Eagle prepares to bring its Meliadine mine and Amaruq satellite deposit into operation, and Sabina works on its Back River project.”

More tepid growth in mining will have repercussions on other areas of the economy, with growth in services-based industries remaining flat for much of the forecast. In all, economic growth in the Northwest Territories is forecast to contract by an average annual pace of 1.6% between now and 2025.—Conference Board of Canada

Yukon “will also experience a boom, with growth of 4.6% this year and 6.2% in 2019,” again thanks to mining. But the NWT faces decline:

“Two new metal mines should help offset some of the losses for the mining sector, but not until after 2020,” the Board stated. “More tepid growth in mining will have repercussions on other areas of the economy, with growth in services-based industries remaining flat for much of the forecast. In all, economic growth in the Northwest Territories is forecast to contract by an average annual pace of 1.6% between now and 2025.”

A lack of exploration spending explains the lack of projects in the pipeline, according to the Chamber of Mines. “The NWT has basically been flat-lining for the last 12 years,” says executive director Tom Hoefer. “That’s a problem because that’s the very investment you need to come up with new mines.”

But it’s a problem industry can’t solve without government help, he emphasizes.

“The government goes to Roundup and other conferences with really good marketing tools and they’re putting out all the right messages, such as: ‘Come unlock our potential.’ But if it’s that easy, why hasn’t the industry picked up?” Hoefer asks.

“Well, it’s because these other things happen.”

His group outlined a number of causes in its presentation to the assembly: high cost of living, relative lack of infrastructure, regulatory uncertainty, unsettled land claims and additional expanses of land (over 30% of the territory) deemed off limits for exploration and development.

NWT prosperity depends on rebuilding investor confidence, miners warn

Benefiting from previously built infrastructure,
NorZinc hopes to begin zinc-lead-silver mining
at Prairie Creek by 2022. (Photo: NorZinc)

Hoefer also mentions “contortions” imposed on companies. As examples he cites some early-stage exploration projects that were sent to environmental assessment, “something that would never happen in southern Canada,” and two companies being required to collect data about lakes from which they might or might not draw water in small amounts for diamond drilling, “a totally new requirement, totally out of step with what happens in the rest of the country.

“What that says to investors is, ‘You’d better be careful when you come up to the NWT because there are these surprises coming out of the woodwork.’”

Convincing the territorial government calls for a different approach than in most of Canada. With no political parties, the Chamber deals with 19 individual MLAs tasked with working on consensus. They put together collective priorities, Hoefer explains, then create a mandate for their four-year term. His group looks forward to seeing the current mandate, expected to be released soon.

“Candidates don’t run on a platform but on a community-by-community basis, saying ‘this is what I would do for our community.’ So the challenge is pulling them all together to serve the entire NWT and try to keep them on that path over the next four years.”

Should problems remain unresolved, however, the territory risks an unfortunate repeat of late 1990s history.

NWT prosperity depends on rebuilding investor confidence, miners warn

Considerable infrastructure remains at the former
Pine Point operation, where Osisko Metals upgrades
Canada’s “largest pit-constrained zinc deposit.”
(Photo: Osisko Metals)

“We were in a similar situation before the first diamond mine opened because the gold mines were winding down. At the same time Nunavut was created, and the new territory pulled a lot of funding away to create a parallel government. The Yellowknife economy really took a dive and housing prices went way down. At the time the government was actually offering $10,000 grants to encourage people to buy homes. We went through a lot of pain then, but I think a lot of people have forgotten that.”

Even Ekati seemed insufficient to buoy the economy. “But when Diavik got its approval the change was palpable. There was this big sigh of relief, money started to flow and the economy turned around.”

Now the challenge is to overturn 12 years of neglect that have made investors “gun shy about the NWT,” he says. “We have to rebuild that trust by showing that things are different now. It’s going to take all of us working together to help make it better.”

With no other industries ready to take mining’s place, “we have to encourage companies to come up here and bring their expertise to do what government can’t do, and that’s turn rock into opportunity.”

 

Current and potential mines: Comparing job numbers and durations

 

NWT prosperity depends on rebuilding investor confidence, miners warn

While updating indicated and inferred resources,
Vital Metals sees near-term potential for a short-lived
operation at its Nechalacho rare earths deposits.
(Photo: Avalon Advanced Materials)

Employment numbers reported by the Chamber for the NWT’s existing diamond mines in 2018 show 1,625 workers at Dominion Diamond Mines’ majority-held Ekati, 1,113 at Rio Tinto’s (NYSE:RIO)/Dominion’s Diavik and 527 at De Beers’/Mountain Province Diamonds’ (TSX:MPVD) Gahcho Kué.

Projections for the territory’s four likeliest potential mines show estimated average annual employment of 363 workers at Prairie Creek (for 15 years), 300 at Pine Point (13 years), 225 at NICO (21 years) and 30 at Nechalacho (four years).

The NWT’s next mine will be Prairie Creek, according to NorZinc TSX:NZC. Built to near-completion by 1982 but never operated, the zinc-lead-silver project reached feasibility in 2017. The company hopes to receive its final permit, for an all-season road, this month. Should financing fall in place, NorZinc plans to begin production in 2022.

Having operated from 1964 to 1987, the Pine Point zinc-lead camp retains infrastructure including an electrical substation and an all-season 96-kilometre link to Hay River, the head of Canada’s only industrial railway north of 60. A previous operator reached PEA in 2017 but current owner Osisko Metals TSX:OM has been drilling the property to upgrade a 2018 inferred resource of 38.4 million tonnes averaging 4.58% zinc and 1.85% lead, for 6.58% zinc-equivalent, Canada’s “largest pit-constrained zinc deposit.”

Fortune Minerals’ (TSX:FT) NICO cobalt-gold-bismuth-copper project reached feasibility in 2014 based on a mill production rate of 4,650 tpd for a combined open pit and underground operation. A further study considered but rejected a rate of 6,000 tpd. Fortune now has several other proposals under consideration to improve the project’s economics and “align the development schedule with the expected deficit in cobalt supply in 2022-23.”

The project sits about 50 kilometres north of Whati, which will have an all-season connection to Yellowknife via the Tlicho road now under construction.

Avalon Advanced Materials TSX:AVL brought its Nechalacho rare earths project to feasibility in 2013 but this year divided the property with another company, privately owned Cheetah Resources which was taken over by ASX-listed Vital Metals in October. Under a $5-million property acquisition that closed soon after the takeover, Vital gets two near-surface deposits while Avalon retains the ground below that. Now working on an update to the indicated and inferred resources, Vital says its deposits show near-term “potential for a start-up operation.”

See the Chamber’s PowerPoint presentation to the NWT government.

Related:

Belmont Resources expands its presence in B.C.’s Greenwood camp

October 30th, 2019

This story has been updated and moved here.

Belmont Resources announces B.C. gold-silver-cobalt samples, appoints Greenwood veteran to BOD

October 17th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 17, 2019

Recent surface sampling at southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp brought further encouragement to Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) Pathfinder project. The field program follows a summer campaign that yielded samples grading up to 29.2 g/t gold, as well as silver, copper and lead, from the historic mining region. The current batch shows anomalous cobalt as well:

  • 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 20700 ppm copper, 45.1 ppm cobalt
Belmont Resources announces BC gold-silver-cobalt samples, appoints Greenwood veteran to BOD

  • 0.153 ppm gold, 6.46 ppm silver, 6234 ppm copper, 148.8 ppm cobalt

  • 1.329 ppm gold, 14.07 ppm silver, 6540 ppm copper, 1486.8 ppm cobalt

  • 4.374 ppm gold, 19.5 ppm silver, 6667 ppm copper, 31.7 ppm cobalt

  • 2.172 ppm gold, 14.31 ppm silver, 6551 ppm copper, 931.6 ppm cobalt

  • 5.228 ppm gold, 17.39 ppm silver, 7302 ppm copper, 47.9 ppm cobalt

Further plans call for an airborne VTEM survey to identify drill targets. Three sides of the 296-hectare project border claims held by Kinross Gold TSX:K subsidiary KG Exploration.

Belmont also announced George Sookochoff’s appointment as director. Coming from a southern B.C. mining family, Sookochoff has served as president of GGX Gold TSXV:GGX and executive VP of Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM, two other companies active in the Greenwood camp. He’s also served as president/CEO of International PBX Ventures, now Chilean Metals TSXV:CMX, which holds copper and gold projects in Chile.

“Throughout my long career in the junior mining sector and having worked on numerous exploration projects around the world, it has always been my strong belief that the Greenwood mining camp, with its rich history in mining, still remains to be one of the best exploration areas in the world,” Sookochoff commented.

In Nevada Belmont holds a 75% interest in the Kibby Basin lithium project, where drill results have graded up to 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres.

The company’s portfolio also includes two northern Saskatchewan uranium properties shared 50/50 with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Last month Belmont offered a private placement of up to $510,000. The company closed a $252,000 placement in June and arranged two loans totalling $50,000 in August.

Paved with promises

October 7th, 2019

The North’s infrastructure needs get some attention from campaigning politicians

by Greg Klein

This is the first of a two-part series. See Part 2.

Could this be the time when decision-makers finally get serious about Northern infrastructure? With one territorial election just concluded and a deficit-budget-friendly incumbent federal party campaigning for re-election, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut might have reason to expect definitive action demonstrated by men, women and machinery at work. But while some projects show real progress, much of Canada’s Northern potential remains bogged down in talk and studies.

The North’s infrastructure deficit gets some attention from campaigning politicians

That’s despite some $700 million allocated to the North in Ottawa’s pre-election budget and months of Liberal spending promises since then. Not all that money was intended for infrastructure, however, and even some of the projects labelled that way turn out to be social or cultural programs. Not necessarily new money either, much of it comes out of Ottawa’s $2-billion National Trade Corridors Fund, now two years into an 11-year program that promised up to $400 million for transportation infrastructure in the three territories by 2028.

Yukon, once again home to active mining, has $157 million planned to upgrade the North Klondike Highway from Carmacks up to the mineral-rich White Gold region, where the Dempster Highway branches off towards Inuvik.

The Klondike section slated for upgrades has connections to a new mine and a soon-to-be revived operation. Highway #11 turns east from the Klondike, meeting with a 90-kilometre year-round service road to Victoria Gold’s (TSXV:VIT) recently opened Eagle operation.

The Minto copper-silver-gold mine that Pembridge Resources plans to restart in Q4 has a 20-kilometre access road with seasonal barge service or ice bridge crossing the Yukon River to the Klondike Highway at Minto Landing. From there, the company will ship concentrate to the Alaska Panhandle deep water port of Skagway.

The North’s infrastructure deficit gets some attention from campaigning politicians

With no deep water facilities of its own, Yukon connects
with the Alaskan port of Skagway and, pictured above,
the B.C. port of Stewart. (Photo: Stewart Bulk Terminals)

Intended to increase safety and capacity while addressing permafrost thaw, the North Klondike Highway project gets $118 million from Ottawa and $29 million from the territory. The money will be spent over seven years beginning in 2020.

A July feasibility report for BMC Minerals’ Kudz Ze Kayah polymetallic copper mine foresees concentrate shipment along a 24-kilometre access road to southern Yukon’s Highway #4, part of a 905-kilometre journey to Stewart, British Columbia, the continent’s most northerly ice-free port.

Another project approaching development but more distant from highways, Newmont Goldcorp’s (TSX:NGT) proposed Coffee gold mine calls for a 214-kilometre all-season road north to Dawson City. But with upgrades to an existing service road, the route would require only 37 kilometres of new construction.

In the NWT, work began last month on the Tlicho all-season road to connect the hamlet of Whati with Yellowknife, 97 kilometres southeast. Expected to finish by fall 2022, the $200-million P3 project would replace an existing ice road, giving communities year-round access to the highway system and encouraging resource exploration and development.

[The Tlicho road], which includes Indigenous participation from the Tlicho Government, is great news for our industry and a positive step forward in addressing the infrastructure deficit in the Northwest Territories.—Gary Vivian, NWT and Nunavut
Chamber of Mines president

About 50 kilometres north of Whati, Fortune Minerals’ (TSX:FT) NICO cobalt-gold-bismuth-copper project undergoes studies for a scaled-down feasibility update in light of lower cobalt and bismuth prices. Fortune has already received environmental approval for a spur road to Whati, part of a plan to truck NICO material to Hay River where the territories’ only rail line (other than short tourist excursions in southern Yukon) connects with southern Canada.

A much more ambitious priority of the NWT’s last legislative assembly was supposed to have been the Mackenzie Valley Highway, a Diefenbaker-era dream that would link the territory’s south with the hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk on the Arctic Ocean. The subject of numerous studies, proposals and piecemeal construction for about 60 years, the proposal has received more than $145 million in taxpayers’ money since 2000.

A 149-kilometre stretch from Inuvik to Tuk opened in 2017, linking the ocean with the Dempster route to the Yukon. Now underway are studies for a 321-kilometre route between Wrigley and Norman Wells, where further driving would depend on an ice road. Assuming receipt of environmental approvals, native agreements and an estimated $700 million, the NWT’s last assembly hoped construction on the Wrigley-to-Wells portion would begin in September 2024.

Far more ambitious proposals for the NWT and Nunavut took initial steps forward with funding announcements made just prior to the federal election campaign’s official start. Part 2 of this series discusses the Slave Geological Province Corridor and Grays Bay Road and Port projects.

International Montoro Resources employs high-tech analysis of Elliot Lake-region nickel-copper prospect

September 10th, 2019

by Greg Klein | September 10, 2019

A geophysical analysis on the property released last March found targets described as “good candidates for semi-massive nickel-copper mineralization.” Now International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT has contracted Mira Geoscience to compile and analyze a much larger data set for the Pecors Lake project, part of the 1,840-hectare Serpent River property in Ontario’s Elliot Lake district.

International Montoro Resources employs high-tech analysis of Elliot Lake-region nickel-copper prospect

Nickel-copper potential brings new interest to
International Montoro Resources’ Serpent River property.

Historic drilling on Serpent’s southwestern area found uranium-rare earths mineralization. But extensive geophysical programs completed last year alerted Montoro to nickel-copper-PGE potential as well. A 3D model revealed that three assumed magnetic anomalies at Pecors actually comprise one contiguous anomaly estimated to be five kilometres long, two kilometres wide and two kilometres deep.

Considered pioneers of advanced geological and geophysical 3D and 4D modelling, Mira Geoscience will enter a library of data into its Geoscience Analyst 3D interactive platform. Included will be Ontario Geological Survey geochem and petrographic studies; OGSEarth data from drilling conducted by Teck Resources TSX:TECK.A/TSX:TECK.B, Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO, BHP Billiton NYSE:BHPand others on or near the property; federal government regional gravity and magnetic surveys; Montoro’s 22 drill holes; and downhole EM data for two holes reaching depths of one and 1.3 kilometres respectively.

In central British Columbia, Montoro had a 43-101 technical study completed in April for its recently acquired Wicheeda North property, adjacent to the Wicheeda rare earths deposit currently being drilled by Defense Metals TSXV:DEFN under option from Spectrum Mining. The report states that Wicheeda North “has the potential to host, and should continue to be explored for, rare earth element mineralization because it occurs within a favourable geological belt known to contain carbonatite-hosted REE mineralization.”

A 3D magnetic inversion was completed in June for the property, which Montoro has expanded to 2,138 hectares.

The company’s portfolio also includes the 2,300-hectare Duhamel property in central Quebec, considered prospective for nickel-copper-cobalt, as well as titanium-vanadium-chromium.

Along with Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA, Montoro shares 50/50 ownership of two uranium properties in northern Saskatchewan’s Uranium City area.

Last month Montoro closed a private placement first tranche of $47,500.

Site visits for sightseers III

July 26th, 2019

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

by Greg Klein

Small local museums, historic mines, a major science centre and massive operations demonstrate the industry’s importance and also offer diversions for summer road trips. After covering Yukon and British Columbia in Part 1 and the prairie provinces in Part 2, our survey continues east through Ontario and Quebec. Omitted were museums not primarily devoted to mining, although many do include worthwhile mining memorabilia among other exhibits. Be sure to contact sites to confirm opening times, ask about footwear and other clothing requirements, and inquire about age restrictions if you have little ones in tow.

Part 4 covers the Atlantic provinces.

Ontario

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

One of many Dynamic Earth attractions
makes mining a family experience.
(Photo: Science North/Dynamic Earth)

Where better than Sudbury for a mining showcase of global stature? Dynamic Earth visitors can don hard hats to tour a demonstration mine seven storeys below surface, or virtual reality headsets to mingle with imaginary miners and gargantuan equipment. Other simulations provide aspiring miners with training on mining equipment and rescue operations. Films, multimedia and interactive exhibits enhance the experience. Much more than a museum, this is an exposition of mining’s past, present and future, with enough attractions to justify repeat visits.

Located at 122 Big Nickel Road, Sudbury. Open daily 10:00 to 6:00 until September 2, then reduced hours until September 29. Reopens for Halloween events on October 4

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Cobalt’s silver heritage comes alive in the Colonial Adit Tour.
(Photo: Town of Cobalt)

Despite the recent speculative boom sparked by the town’s namesake mineral, Cobalt’s largely a relic of the past—or a collection of relics strewn about the town and surrounding countryside. And it was silver, not cobalt, that made this town so important to Canadian mining history. To experience that history, check out the Cobalt Mining Museum, with seven galleries that include the world’s largest display of native silver. Take a guided tour of the Colonial underground mine, and self-guided tours that show off a nearby route hosting 19 mining-related sites and the town itself, which sometimes looks like a movie setting in search of a movie.

Located at 24 Silver Street, Cobalt. Open daily 10:00 to 4:00 until September 2, then Tuesday to Friday 11:00 to 3:00 during fall and winter. Call 705-679-8301 to book the one-hour Colonial Adit Tour.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Visitors find themselves engrossed in Red Lake’s mining story.
(Photo: Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre)

After the 1926 rush that spawned something like 29 mines, the town’s still churning out yellow metal at one of Canada’s largest gold operations. In recognition, the Red Lake Regional Heritage Centre’s permanent exhibit presents Beneath It All: Red Lake’s Mining Story, with displays, films and audio clips.

Located at 51A Highway #105, Red Lake. Open Monday to Friday 9:00 to 5:00 year-round, also open summer Saturdays 10:00 to 4:00 until August 31.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

A former mica mine, Silver Queen can evoke a sense of wonder.
(Photo: Ontario Parks)

About 115 crow-flying klicks southwest of Ottawa, the Silver Queen Mine was one of hundreds of operations in a world centre of mica production. Visitors to Murphys Point Provincial Park can descend 20 metres underground and also check out an open pit on either guided or self-guided trips.

Tours leave from the Lally Homestead at Murphys Point, off Highway #21. Guided trips take place Wednesday evenings at 8:30 p.m. and Friday mornings at 10:00 a.m., self-guided tours from 10:00 a.m. to noon on Sundays until September 1. Call 613-267-5060 for reservations, fall hours and other info.

 

Quebec

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Tourists explore Lamaque’s birthplace in the valley of gold.
(Photo: Corporation du Village minier de Bourlamaque)

This might be the best place to begin an historical pilgrimage to Abitibi-Témiscamingue. Just over a kilometre southwest of Eldorado Gold’s Lamaque and on the eastern edge of Val-d’Or sits la Cité de l’Or, with the original Lamaque mine and Bourlamaque Mining Village. A four-hour tour takes visitors 91 metres underground before viewing a number of surface buildings, while an express two-hour tour explores the underground mine and a laboratory. An audio guide tour also covers the town, with still-occupied 1930s to ’40s-era log houses and a 1949 home-turned-museum. La Cité also offers Gold in our Veins, a permanent exhibit about mining life and, en français seulement, a geocaching rally.

Located at 90 avenue Perrault, Val-d’Or. Open daily 8:00 to 5:30 to August 31, Wednesday to Sunday 8:30 to 5:00 in September, Thursday to Sunday 8:30 to 3:00 in October. Phone to inquire about off-season visits from November to May. Call 819-825-1274 or toll-free 1-855-825-1274 for tour reservations and other info.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Malartic’s sheer scale can be appreciated from an observation deck.
(Photo: Abitibi-Témiscamingue Mineralogical Museum)

Twenty-five kilometres west of Val-d’Or, the Abitibi-Témiscamingue Mineralogical Museum offers displays about regional geology and mining, and interactive exhibits as well as tours to one of the world’s largest gold producers, the Agnico Eagle/Yamana Gold Canadian Malartic mine, a technological marvel with some really big machines rumbling around.

Located at 650 rue de la Paix, Malartic. Open Tuesday to Sunday until September. Call 819-757-4677 for opening hours and reservations.

 

Watch as molten copper flows at Glencore’s Horne smelter in Rouyn-Noranda. Guides lead visitors through a museum and into the heart of one of the world’s most specialized plants.

Located at 1 Carter Avenue, Rouyn-Noranda. Tours begin Monday to Sunday at 9:00, 10:30, 1:30 and 3:00 until mid-August. Call 819-797-3195 or 1-888-797-3195 for reservations. Not suitable for pregnant women.

 

Travel Ontario and Quebec one mining destination at a time

Visitors get in the spirit at Thetford Mines.
(Photo: Musée minéralogique et minier de Thetford Mines)

About 107 kilometres south of Quebec City in a building sheathed with an asbestos-cement coating, le Musée minéralogique et minier de Thetford Mines depicts the history, geology and mineralogy of an area where mining began in 1876. Tours take visitors around buildings, open pits and mountains of tailings left over from the now-banned practice of asbestos extraction.

Located at 711 Frontenac Boulevard West (Highway #112), Thetford Mines. Open daily 9:00 to 5:00 to September 2, off season Tuesday to Friday 9:00 to 4:00, weekends 1:00 to 5:00. Summer mine tours begin at 1:30. Call 418-335-2123 for reservations.

 

One of three nearby former copper producers in the Eastern Townships, the Capelton Mine welcomes visitors to an operation that lasted from 1863 to 1907. One tour travels by wagon to the mine entrance, another offers a gold panning experience. Additional attractions include a small museum and a bike path through the mine site.

Located at 5800 Capelton Road (Highway #108), North Hatley. Call 819-346-9545 or 1-888-346-9545 for reservations.

See Part 1 about Yukon and British Columbia, Part 2 about the prairie provinces and Part 4 about the Atlantic provinces.

U.S. continues push for domestic rare earths supply

July 23rd, 2019

by Greg Klein | July 23, 2019

Five presidential memos issued July 22 further show American commitment to develop rare earths deposits and supply chains unbeholden to China. Under Section 303 of the U.S. Defense Production Act, Donald Trump formally declared production capability for a number of critical elements to be essential for national defence:

U.S. continues push for domestic rare earths supply

  • separation and processing of heavy rare earth elements

  • separation and processing of light rare earth elements

  • neodymium-iron-boron-rare earth sintered material and permanent magnets

  • samarium-cobalt-rare earth permanent magnets

  • rare earth metals and alloys

Without presidential action under section 303, Trump stated, American industry “cannot reasonably be expected to provide the production capability [for these elements] adequately and in a timely manner. Further, purchases, purchase commitments or other action pursuant to section 303 of the act are the most cost-effective, expedient and practical alternative method for meeting the need for this critical capability.”

One week earlier the U.S. reportedly began an inventory of rare earth deposits and facilities, asking that companies respond to a Request for Information by July 31, “a short time frame that underscores the Pentagon’s urgency,” according to Reuters.

With China supplying 93% of U.S. rare earths supply for these defence necessities, military dependency on a geopolitical rival has given REEs top priority out of an official list of 35 critical minerals. In June, after the U.S. unveiled a new critical minerals strategy calling for closer co-operation with allies, Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau agreed “to develop a joint action plan on critical minerals collaboration,” according to another Reuters report.

MGX Renewables introduces new fuel cell, anticipates July trading

June 28th, 2019

by Greg Klein | June 28, 2019

Having completed its spin-out from a parent company, gained conditional listing approval and closed a financing, a new company prepares to bring new technology to the green energy market. MGX Renewables expects to begin CSE trading on or before July 11.

MGX Renewables introduces new fuel cell, anticipates July trading

Over 20 patents went into the creation of the company’s first product, an energy storage system using rechargeable zinc-air fuel cell technology. Offering greater stability to solar- and wind-generated electricity, the system provides backup power that can range from 5 kW to 100 kW by enlarging the fuel tank. Modular design allows the addition of greater capacity.

MGX Renewables says the system overcomes limitations of lithium-ion batteries that are constrained by “a fixed power-to-energy ratio severely limiting flexibility and significantly increasing cost of energy storage when limited output power is required.”

The company says much lower storage costs reflect “a paradigm shift essentially eliminating the traditional fixed power-energy ratio and allowing for scaleable power with highly flexible energy storage.”

Parent company MGX Minerals CSE:XMG spun out approximately 40% of MGX Renewables, retaining about 18 million shares. Gross proceeds of $2,005,000 from a previous subscription have been released to the new company. MGX Renewables received conditional CSE trading approval in April.