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Posts tagged ‘Canada Fluorspar Inc (CFI)’

Private equity to take out Canada Fluorspar

April 2nd, 2014

by Greg Klein | April 2, 2014

An all-cash deal announced April 2 will turn Canada Fluorspar TSXV:CFI over to private equity firm Golden Gate Capital. Under the definitive agreement, and pending shareholder approval, Golden Gate will pay $0.35 for each Canada Fluorspar share, an 87% premium over the 20-day volume-weighted average and a 67% premium to the April 1 close. The company would then de-list. The agreement also gives Canada Fluorspar a $2-million convertible advance to fund the company prior to completing the deal.

Private equity to take out Canada Fluorspar

Canada Fluorspar directors recommend the offer, which requires a two-thirds shareholder vote as well as regulatory approvals. The company has also agreed to a non-solicitation requirement, while Golden Gate has the right to match any superior proposals.

In a statement accompanying the announcement, Canada Fluorspar president/CEO Lindsay Gorrill said, “Golden Gate Capital has a vision for the St. Lawrence fluorspar project that, combined with its financial strength, will help ensure a long-term economically viable project that will benefit the town of St. Lawrence and the Burin Peninsula.” The southern Newfoundland project is a 50/50 joint venture with French chemical giant Arkema.

A pre-feasibility study released in January 2013 used a 5% discount rate to calculate a pre-tax net present value of $124 million and a 16.4% pre-tax internal rate of return. Capex came to $154 million to re-open the former mine.

In December Canada Fluorspar released a resource estimate for its 100%-held deposits outside the Newspar JV.

Prima’s TSX Venture debut

April 19th, 2013

Prima Fluorspar advances a critical mineral in a safe jurisdiction

by Greg Klein

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Is this any time to join the TSX Venture? According to Prima Fluorspar Corp TSXV:PF president/CEO Robert Bick, his company’s April 19 trading debut comes at exactly the right time. He maintains Prima has a necessary commodity for a niche market, a big, high-grade, near-surface historic resource, a strong team with past success and the likelihood of future interest from some very big players.

For all that, fluorspar’s hardly well-known. Yet it’s all around us. The lower-priced metallurgical grade finds its way into iron, steel, aluminum and cement. As for the pricier acid grade, modern refrigeration wouldn’t exist without it. Most new medicines rely on its derivatives. An EU-designated critical mineral, fluorspar plays a crucial role in producing a wide range of products we’d rather not live without. As emerging countries improve their living standards, those societies will find fluorspar products increasingly important.

Purple fluorspar right at surface offers encouraging signs for Prima’s Liard project in B.C.

Purple fluorspar right at surface offers encouraging signs
for Prima’s Liard project in B.C.

That probably explains China’s export restrictions. It’s both the fluorspar world’s largest producer and largest consumer, in the latter role mostly as a manufacturer of goods for export. Last year the country produced 61% of global supply, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, a slight decrease from the previous year. Mexico produced another 17.5% in 2012, with third-place Mongolia offering a mere 6%, demonstrating the enormous imbalance in world production.

Prices, meanwhile, have climbed 225% between 2005 and 2012.

Despite China’s overwhelming share of production, the country’s expected to become a net importer within five years. As Simon Moores of the authoritative journal Industrial Minerals has explained, country risk was a major factor in fluorspar’s designation as a critical mineral.

Located in a friendly jurisdiction, Prima’s Liard fluorspar project looks all the more appealing. The northern British Columbia property holds 22,500 hectares along the Alaska Highway in a region that is, by B.C. standards, not particularly rugged. And there’s certainly fluorspar in them there hills.

Chemical companies absolutely need what we do and there have been companies in Europe in the past, for example Bayer, who actually did their own fluorspar mining. But chemical companies have no idea what exploration is all about.—Robert Bick, president/CEO
of Prima Fluorspar

Some 3.2 million tonnes grading 32% calcium fluoride (CaF2, also known as fluorite), according to an historic, non-43-101 resource. That’s a big, high-grade—albeit non-compliant—asset that the Prima team plan to prove up and expand. “With fluorspar projects, it’s very difficult to get such high-grade deposits,” says geologist Neil McCallum of Dahrouge Geological Consulting. “And most of the high-grade deposits out there are vein-type deposits where you might only have widths of one or two metres. So we’ve got pretty wide mineralization. What we tested was exposed on surface.”

The 61 historic holes found 20 showings, seven of them major, along a 30-kilometre strike potential. Prima’s preliminary work last fall tested two showings to find channel samples of 23.76% CaF2 over 19.55 metres and 23.49% over 74.55 metres. By spring or early summer McCallum plans to be back with a field crew doing geophysics and setting up a base camp prior to this year’s drill campaign of up to 100 holes and 10,000 metres.

“We’ll mostly do confirmation holes until we get the geophysical results. Then we’ll focus on building resources. What we’re aiming for is something that could be mined cheaply. Having something at surface that’s open-pittable will be important,” McCallum explains.

“With rare earths and a lot of the specialty metals, a project sinks or floats on the right metallurgy,” he adds. “But with most fluorspar deposits, it’s a fairly simple process.” Historic metallurgical tests brought results over 97% CaF2, the threshold for the more expensive, more highly demanded acid grade fluorspar, known as acidspar. More recent improvements in metallurgical science suggest even better results to come, McCallum points out.

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Industrial Minerals authority Simon Moores on fluorspar projects in Canada

February 11th, 2013

…Read More

Overcoming country risk

January 31st, 2013

Canada Fluorspar and Prima Fluorspar develop critical mineral projects at home

by Greg Klein

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(Update: On April 19, 2013, Prima Fluorspar Corp TSXV:PF began trading on the TSX Venture. Read more here.)

When country risk threatens a vital commodity’s supply, it’s time to find new sources. And it’s because of country risk that fluorspar gained its designation as a critical mineral. Recent news from Canadian juniors, however, offers some reassurance for this widely used but less-widely known commodity.

Canada Fluorspar and Prima Fluorspar develop critical mineral projects at home

The rock looks almost too pretty to be practical,
yet fluorspar products are nearly ubiquitous in their uses.

So what is this stuff? Also known as fluorite and measured in calcium fluoride (CaF2), fluorspar comes in two grades. Metspar, or metallurgical grade, is used to make steel, aluminum, ceramics and glass, among other necessities. The higher grade and more highly valued acidspar, or acid grade, is largely used in hydrofluoric acid, which is used in hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and their successors, hydrofluoro-olefins (HFOs), used in coolants for fridges, freezers and air conditioners. Fluorspar finds its way into several other uses from pharmaceuticals to pesticides and toothpaste to Teflon.

Fluorspar customers can be formidable in size, including such giants as Alcoa, BASF, Honeywell, DuPont, Dow, 3M and Rio Tinto Alcan.

With China producing up to 58% of world fluorspar supply, a familiar story unfolds. The country has restricted exports to protect its own stocks, which the Chinese use to produce value-added products that the rest of the world needs. Mexico, Mongolia and South Africa comprise the planet’s other major sources.

Not surprisingly, country risk was “a huge factor” in the European Union designation of fluorspar as a critical mineral, says Simon Moores. A writer for the authoritative London-based journal Industrial Minerals, Moores spoke to ResourceClips in Vancouver while attending the Mineral Exploration Roundup Conference 2013.

Country risk actually works out to be “positive for the Canadian-based junior companies,” he says. “One of their selling points is having a stable, friendly country to build a new mine.” That doesn’t necessarily mean other supplies will replace China, he emphasizes. But the market needs diversity of supply as a long-term approach.

Hoping to provide some of that supply is Canada Fluorspar TSXV:CFI. On January 30 the company released an updated pre-feasibility study for its St. Lawrence fluorspar project in southern Newfoundland, a 50/50 joint venture with Arkema, a worldwide producer of chemicals headquartered in France.

Based on a fluorspar price of $500 a tonne and using a discount rate of 5%, the pre-feas projects a pre-tax net present value of $124 million and a 16.4% pre-tax internal rate of return. Should fluorspar average $550 a tonne, the numbers would change to a pre-tax NPV of $182 million and a 21.1% pre-tax IRR.

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Fluorspar for investors

October 23rd, 2012

A capacity crowd gets an essential perspective on this critical mineral

by Greg Klein

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A capacity crowd gets an essential perspective on this critical mineral

Over 200 people attended the Vancouver 2012 Fluorspar Pre-Conference Workshop aimed at investors.

(Update: On April 19, 2013, Prima Fluorspar Corp TSXV:PF began trading on the TSX Venture. Read more here.)

Since 2001 Industrial Minerals’ annual Fluorspar Conference has been touring the globe, bringing together producers and consumers of this widely used but apparently obscure commodity. What might distinguish this year’s Vancouver event, however, was the October 22 pre-conference workshop, which attracted over 200 potential investors. As the keynote speakers explained, fluorspar now tops the list of critical minerals and it’s irreplaceable in most of its uses. Shortages threaten unless new deposits are found and developed—and that, the audience heard, is exactly what some Canadian juniors are doing already.

Given the commodity’s low public profile, a quick Fluorspar 101 was presented by Simon Moores, a writer and Manager of Industrial Minerals Data for the authoritative journal Industrial Minerals. Miners report fluorspar (also known as fluorite) in percentages of calcium fluoride or CaF2. It can be processed into either of two grades. Metspar, or metallurgical grade, is widely used in steel making as well as ceramics and glass. About 60% of fluorspar production is acidspar, or acid grade, which starts at 97% CaF2 and is the most widely used, highly desired and expensive product, largely due to its use in hydrofluoric (HF) acid, one of the world’s most widespread industrial chemicals. “It’s the underlying and only feedstock raw material that feeds all these much, much higher-value products that some of the biggest industrial chemicals companies make,” says Moores. The list of applications goes on, but some of the most common include the coolants essential to refrigerators, freezers and air conditioners.

For most of its applications, fluorspar has no substitute. While North American chemical giants rank among the world’s consumers, neither Canada nor the U.S. currently mines fluorspar.

Simon Moores of Industrial Metals presented a Fluorspar 101 seminar to an October 22 Vancouver audience.

Simon Moores of Industrial Minerals presented a Fluorspar 101 seminar to an October 22 Vancouver audience.

Last year’s global production came to 6.3 million tonnes, with a drop projected for this year, Moores says. But as in other critical commodities, China looms large. “It produces 58%,” he says. “This has risen from 51% in 2006.” Although China’s not the biggest consumer of the high-value products, it’s the biggest end-user in the fluorspar production chain. “They’re decreasing fluorspar exports, they’ve also got resource taxes in place, so fluorspar is on their radar. Although it’s earlier days than graphite, ‘control’ is the underlying word for China’s approach.”

By factoring in the country risk of fluorspar producers, Moores points out, the EU assigns the mineral higher risk than graphite, lithium, cobalt, vanadium, molybdenum, tantalum, copper, zinc and titanium.

Although fluorspar prices have dropped a bit since January, “over 12 years it’s been price increase over price increase over price increase,” Moores says. “There was a 225% increase for acidspar between 2005 and 2012.”

Jon Hykawy, Head of Global Research, Clean Technologies and Materials Analyst at Byron Capital Markets offered some future projections. “We see very significant growth by 2017,” he says. “A large portion of that growth is in metallurgical applications, but more so in chemical applications. We see a very, very healthy growth in demand for acidspar, more than the Chinese can supply or other existing projects can supply through expansion.”

Hykawy sees 4% to 4.6% annual growth for basic uses such as catalysts, water fluoridation, glasses and ceramics, fluorine gas and steel manufacture. But the growth in fluorochemicals, he states, will be far more impressive.

“Chlorofluorocarbons [CFCs] were shown to be significant contributors to ozone depletion,” he explains. “It wasn’t the fluorine that was the problem, it was the chlorine.” CFCs were eventually replaced by hydrofluorocarbons [HFCs], a cause of global warming. “The current and best choice, and the chemical of the future, are HFOs, hydrofluoro-olefins—not a particularly more complex chemical, just different,” Hykawy explains. “CFCs are about 15% fluorine by weight, HFCs came in about 60% and HFOs about 67% fluorine by weight. So as you have a global economy that’s growing and increasingly using refrigerants, you also have an increasing proportion of fluorspar.”

As for fluoropolymers, “the one most of us knows is DuPont’s Teflon. It’s ubiquitous because it’s highly chemically and thermally stable. You can put it in frying pans, heat the bejeezus out of them and it doesn’t break down,” he says.

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October 10th, 2012

A critical mineral and a burgeoning Canadian industry

by Joel Chury

Reprinted by permission of Resource World

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(Update: On April 19, 2013, Prima Fluorspar Corp TSXV:PF began trading on the TSX Venture. Read more here.)

Fluorspar (the commercial name for fluorite or CaF2) may just be the most important but least-known industrial mineral. Among other applications, it’s most commonly used in manufacturing aluminum, steel, concrete and toothpaste. It’s also the precursor ingredient for hydrofluoric acid, which is vital to the manufacture of all fluorocarbons, which are used in refrigerators, air conditioners and propellants.

The global market for fluorspar consumes approximately six million tonnes a year, to be used in products that generate over $30 billion in annual sales. That being the case, it’s a wonder that the mineral is relatively unknown to investors. But like the meteoric rise of rare earth elements in 2010 and the more recent surge in graphite, fluorspar might soon get the attention it deserves.

A critical mineral and a burgeoning Canadian industry

As colourful and translucent as a gemstone, fluorspar has so many practical uses that it’s gained EU designation as a critical mineral.

“The problem with fluorspar is that nobody understands what it is, yet it’s a part of everyone’s life,” says Lindsay Gorrill, President/CEO of Canada Fluorspar Inc TSXV:CFI, which could become a fluorspar producer within the next two years. “I think one of our biggest issues is in explaining to the market what fluorspar is and where it’s used. There is currently no replacement for it in its uses.”

Like rare earths and graphite, fluorspar is mostly produced in China, although not in the same proportion compared to other countries. China currently represents approximately 53% of global fluorspar production. China also consumes 52% of global production. To protect its supply, the government has imposed a 15% export tax on the mineral.

As a result, fluorspar prices soared from approximately $130 a tonne in 2003 to a current price in the $550-to-$600 range. The price varies depending on the source. Much of the fluorspar used in North America comes from Mexico, where acid-grade fluorspar sells for $550 a tonne, compared to Chinese acid-grade fluorspar which sells for $600.

Like the differences between large flake and amorphous graphite, fluorspar comes in two different forms—metallurgical grade and acid grade.

Acid grade is considered most desirable. Consumers include multi-billion-dollar entities like DuPont and Honeywell, which use fluorspar to produce fluorocarbons and fluoropolymers. They rely largely on Mexican supply, despite the fact it requires additional, costly refining to remove traces of arsenic that are unique to the Mexican product. Currently there are only four plants in the world that can complete the arsenic-removal process; DuPont and Honeywell each own one.

Metallurgical grade is also useful in manufacturing, though its applications aren’t quite as diverse. Metallurgical grade is often used as a flux in iron, steel and aluminum smelting, as well as in cement making. Though slightly cheaper, metallurgical grade represents approximately 15% of the overall fluorspar market.

Acid grade’s greater demand is driven by the global market for hydrofluoric acid, the primary use of the mineral. As much as 45% to 60% of hydrofluoric acid consumption is used to make hydrofluorocarbons (or HFCs) to be used in coolants.

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