Sunday 20th October 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘Cambridge House International’

Battlefield correspondent

January 24th, 2019

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

by Greg Klein

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

An SRO audience paid rapt attention to Rex Murphy’s VRIC speech.

 

There’s something inspiring about a Newfoundlander—a Newfoundlander born in Newfoundland before it even joined Canada—coming to the West Coast largely to defend Alberta’s oil and gas sector. Actually Rex Murphy’s message applies to Canada’s resource industries overall, focusing on the people who work in them, their families and others who helped build the country. He sees the chasm between those who find fulfillment in employment and those who would shut down the industries that provide it.

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

A National Post columnist who’s somehow tolerated by the CBC, Murphy proved a huge hit with an overflow crowd at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2019. “As a journalist, I’m in a room full of achievers,” he quipped. “This is a very awkward spot.” But unlike most journalists, he neither ignores nor celebrates an enormous shift in Canadian society.

He remembers miners from Baie Verte and Buchans who frequented his mother’s restaurant in the 1950s, “the gentlest of men” despite their gruelling work. But important as mining was, Newfoundland’s main source of survival was fishing. That changed dramatically in 1992.

That’s when 31,000 people, “at the stroke of a pen on a single day, were completely removed from the Newfoundland inshore fishery. Something that had gone on for 450 years, that defined the culture, the humour, the idiom, the songs, the pattern of settlement, the whole idea of Newfoundland, was wrapped up in that fishery…. For the first time in 500 years no one could jig a codfish and have it for supper. But also it was 31,000 people abruptly unemployed.”

Proportionately that would have been 660,000 people in Ontario, he added. One man he knew, desperately hoping for a job in Hamilton, sold his house for seven plane tickets. “That’s how rough it was.”

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

But as one regional resource economy collapsed, another boomed. Alberta’s oilpatch needed workers. Murphy calls it “one of the great rescue operations of Canadian Confederation, which most people still haven’t even heard about…. It was one of the great moments, unsung, of Confederation at work, where one region of the country, very willingly, allowed a strange bunch with certainly a stranger language to wander into their province … one of the great songs that we should be singing, that the enterprise of Alberta and a primary industry rescued one of the great social and cultural blows of another part of the Confederation. Did you ever hear about it?”

We more likely heard vilification, often coming from activists, celebrities, media and increasingly Ottawa, he maintained. “You heard every criticism you could hear about poor Fort McMurray. Even after the fire they went after it…. You had the oil price decline, you had the burning of Fort McMurray, you had a flood in Fort McMurray, you had the departure of capital from Fort McMurray, you had the layoff of engineers in Fort McMurray, and what did they decide was the cure? Let’s bring in a carbon tax.

“I mean, the poor creature’s already laid out on the morgue table and they want to take another few shots at the head.”

Rex Murphy sees human casualties in the war on Canada’s resource industries

Resource extraction was vital to the generations who built this country, Murphy emphasized. “It is only in a country as prosperous as our own that we get to the point where we denigrate and derogate the essential industries that brought us precisely to where we are.”

Prosperity, or at least just simply work, can provide intangible benefits too, he pointed out.

“Do you know what it’s like not to have work? There’s no psychological stress greater except loss of a loved one or breakup of a family…. It’s not just the work, it’s not just the paycheque, it is the fulfillment of the human personality.”

Although often incredulous, Murphy’s cri de coeur falls short of actual despair, especially when laced with homespun humour. Nevertheless a despairing thought might occur to listeners who wonder whether the intangible value of an earned paycheque matters much in a culture of entitlement, or among those who find remuneration in activism. As for work’s fulfillment of the human personality, maybe another type of personality has gained prominence, one that finds fulfillment in espousing fashionable convictions and obstructing useful projects.

What remains to be seen is whether the people he speaks for are declining, in numbers as well as influence. Maybe previous generations could have offset such a fate by producing a few more Rex Murphys.

Videos of VRIC 2019 presentations will be posted online in the coming weeks by Cambridge House International.

Getting Frank

January 23rd, 2019

Frank Holmes discusses tips, disruptors, M&A, what drives HIVE, and more

by Greg Klein

Frank Holmes discusses tips, cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

With over 7,000 attendees, VRIC 2019’s numbers and enthusiasm suggested a buoyant market mood.

 

Definitely one of the busiest people at this year’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference, Frank Holmes kicked off the event with a keynote speech to a capacity crowd, one of a number of times he took the stage during the two-day event. Even so, the CEO and chief investment officer of U.S. Global Investors found time to sit down with Resource Clips and discuss some wide-ranging issues.

A new feature at this year’s VRIC was the Top Picks Competition, which pitted three companies he chose against three selected by Marin Katusa. The fast pace had the rivals briefly introduce each of his three picks, followed by a company rep giving a concise six-minute presentation. The packed audience rated each company from one to 10. While waiting for results to appear on the big screen, Katusa said, “Man, I’ll be depressed if I lose to Frank.”

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

The mainstay of this year’s VRIC, Holmes
tackled issues ranging from peak gold to data mining.

But the chart showed no definite winner, at least not to those who struggle with mental math. Katusa pronounced the results a tie but Holmes confidently told Resource Clips: “I won.”

As for the format, “that model of 20 seconds per slide, capped at 20 slides, 6.4 minutes, that model is working in 900 cities,” he explained, adding that it began in 2003 with the Tokyo-based Klein-Dytham architectural firm. “The PechaKucha model will drive more interest to a company’s booth than anything else.”

But isn’t there a danger that stock tips from influential people can affect share prices more than company performance does?

“I’ve invested in all six of those companies so I’m not getting up there with anyone I haven’t vetted.”

Are they long-term holds? “They have been.”

Katusa stuck with miners but Holmes’ list included two disruptors—a soon-to-be-listed company that creates gold and platinum jewelry as tradable investments, and another company that applies machine learning to mineral exploration as well as combining quantitative and fundamental analyses of mining investment.

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Investors heard first-hand pitches from company reps.

Disruption seems to increasingly command Holmes’ attention, but not at the expense of good old-fashioned gold. He sees peak gold as one application for AI and machine learning.

“There are fundamental supply-demand issues, there has to be a new way to replace it. The world’s GDP per capita for China, India and America is so strong and when you look at China and India, their GDP per capita is highly correlated to gold demand for love.

“When I first got in the business there was a four-year cycle from exploration to discovery to production. Now it’s a minimum eight to 12 years. We have declining reserves and each year the mines are getting deeper and deeper, the grades are getting lower and lower, and there’s also a falloff in exploration success. The timeline for getting projects on stream is getting longer and longer. We do have peak supply.”

With the Newmont-Goldcorp buyout following closely on the Barrick-Rangold merger, M&A has returned to prominence. When asked whether the activity could have a trickle-down effect on junior explorers, the Toronto native brought up a nationalist perspective.

A locally headquartered major means “a junior explorer or mid-cap developer can knock on their door, pitch them a story and maybe they’re your partner. But now you’d have to go to Denver, and the process of what they look at is very different from what Canadians look at. So I think there’s a vacuum being created and it’s not helping the Canadian mining industry.”

Additionally, “I think Canada will be hurt because the geological brain trust that was with Barrick in Toronto will go to Europe or South Africa. With Newmont, the brain trust will go to Denver.”

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Attendees gleaned intel from speakers, exhibitors and each other.

He suggested gold might attract more M&A than other metals because it’s “more bullish.” Elsewhere in metals, he expects to see further shareholder activism as seen by Waterton Global Resource Management with Hudbay Minerals and Paulson & Co with Detour Gold. “I’m surprised there isn’t more in the mid-cap space,” he noted.

He considers the activism constructive—“anything that keeps people accountable.” As chairperson of cryptocurrency miner HIVE Blockchain Technologies, however, he has to account for a share price that’s plunged about 78% over the last year.

“All of us are down, but it’s only because of the Bitcoin and Ethereum prices,” he said. “With gold stocks, most of them rise or fall as gold rises or falls that day. They correlate. What HIVE has done is become a proxy [for buying cryptos]. So HIVE has become incredibly liquid and moves every day with the price action of Bitcoin and Ethereum. Bitcoin and Ethereum have a volatility such that if gold’s daily volatility is 1%, their daily volatility is 6% to 8%. So that’s what drives HIVE. If Bitcoin goes this quarter to $10,000, we’ll go to a dollar. And if Bitcoin falls, we’ll go down with it. We’re at the mercy of where the cryptocurrencies are going. But the positive part for an investor or trader is that you can call up during market hours and use that as a proxy.”

One indication of continuing crypto enthusiasm, he added, was a very strong turnout at the previous week’s North American Bitcoin Conference in Miami, despite a hefty admission fee.

As for VRIC, he likes the event for “energy—it’s the vibe, what people are talking about. Are they skewing to optimism, or to doubt and fear and pessimism? I get the energy and vibrations here, and whether there’s an appetite for risk. This is all venture capital. Most of these companies are speculation. As I said at the opening, I’m so happy people came here and didn’t go to the casino or buy a lottery ticket to speculate.”

Watch for videos of VRIC presentations to be posted in the coming weeks by Cambridge House International.

Frank Holmes discusses cryptos, disruptors, peak gold, M&A and more

Moderated by Daniela Cambone, the Ultimate Gold Panel
included Holmes, Peter Hug, Roy Sebag and Peter Schiff.

 

Frank Holmes discusses tips, disruptors, M&A, what drives HIVE, and more

Although soliciting was strictly prohibited,
a hint of hustle might have been evident.

‘The great enabler’

January 16th, 2019

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

by Greg Klein

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

 

Gold and precious metals can attract people seeking wealth or beauty, while diamonds and other gems convey an intrigue of their own. But who becomes downright passionate about a base metal? To those who’ve head him talk, Gianni Kovacevic quickly comes to mind. Copper’s his metal of interest but his real fascination is the future—that, and a vision of the importance this metal holds to a new era of energy history.

Chairperson of CopperBank Resources CSE:CBK, an authority on energy systems and author of My Electrician Drives a Porsche?, he’s an especially engaging public speaker who’s possibly more effective than anyone in communicating mining’s importance to non-mining people.

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

The era of electrification offers promise to both
developed and emerging economies, says Kovacevic.

But those in the industry find his message captivating too. He calls mining, metals and especially copper “the great enabler” of electrification. And electrification’s the key to a new era in which copper usage will grow by magnitudes, he declares.

That’s happening already as developed countries wean themselves off fossil fuels and emerging countries use more and more electricity for consumer items and transportation or—from village to village and home to home—as they adopt electricity for the first time.

Among other vital metals are aluminum, lithium, vanadium and cobalt. “I like anything that enables electrification,” Kovacevic explains. “The sensitive one is cobalt. If people are talking about reducing cobalt in batteries or eliminating it altogether, who wins? Nickel. But no question about it, we will require hundreds of millions, in fact billions, of new battery cells.”

Overall, approximately 19% of energy use now comes from electricity, he says. But he expects the number to reach about 50% by 2050. His data for current and planned copper production, however, shows alarming shortfalls in capacity.

Half of the world’s primary copper production now comes from 25 mines. Just two countries, Peru and Chile, provide a combined 45%. One major copper mine, First Quantum Minerals’ (TSX:FM) Cobre Panama, has commissioning planned this year. Nothing else over 110,000 tonnes is expected until around 2022.

A new era of energy depends on mining and especially copper, says Gianni Kovacevic

First Quantum’s Cobre Panama will be the only
major new copper mine until about 2022, Kovacevic says.

In 2010 the 15 largest copper producers boasted average grades around 1.2%. The 2016 average was 0.72% and falling. Over the next half-century he expects average grades to slip below 0.5%.

Clearly more copper production will require much higher prices to make lower grades economic, Kovacevic emphasizes. He’s not alone in that outlook. Among others extolling the metal’s virtues is Robert Friedland, who also considers copper the key to electrification and maintains that declining grades will require higher prices.

Over the last nine months, however, prices haven’t co-operated. In late May spot copper approached a five-year high in the range of $3.30 a pound, but fell steeply after June 1. Current prices sit around $2.60 to $2.65, although that’s well above levels seen through most of 2015 and 2016. But Kovacevic says warehouse inventories suggest the market has reached a supply deficit.

Two decades of prices show an ironic connection with the commodity that fueled the previous energy era, he adds. “Copper’s never left its long-term bull market but it’s been pushed around by oil, because 90% of the time it’s correlated with oil. But now the prices have to decouple. Copper has to go much, much higher.”

Referring to himself as a “realistic environmentalist,” Kovacevic says the metals and mining crucial to the new energy era also remain crucial to emerging societies. Blocking new mines from development hinders new economies from development. “I can’t say to someone in India, for example, that they’re never going to have electricity or running water in their homes. You can’t say ‘build absolutely nothing anywhere near anyone.’ People want basic human progress. Fortunately, as we go into this new pivot of energy we’re going to bypass the old ways of receiving energy in many applications.”

Kovacevic expands on his message in an illustrated keynote speech and also hosts a lithium investment panel discussion at the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference on January 20 and 21. To avoid the $30 admission fee, click here for free registration.

Extended: Free registration for Vancouver Resource Investment Conference

January 11th, 2019
Vancouver Resource Investment Conference Free registration for limited time

A capacity crowd attends a keynote speech at VRIC 2018.

 

Taking place January 20 to 21, the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference returns with hundreds of resource companies, thousands of investors, scores of vital commentators and all-new content. To skip the registration fee, just click here and use promo code RESOURCECLIPS. This offer has been extended.

The world’s largest event of its kind, VRIC 2019 presents market insights along with the chance to meet company executives one-on-one, hear their stories and ask key questions. Workshops and interactive events broaden the experience, fostering better-informed investors who can make better-informed decisions.

Considered a bellwether of the junior mining market for the last 25 years, VRIC helps investors understand market forces and find their way to opportunity.

Click here for free registration using promo code RESOURCECLIPS.

Read more about the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference.

Visual Capitalist: The bull case for energy metals going into 2019

January 10th, 2019

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist | January 10, 2019

 

The rapid emergence of the world’s renewable energy sector is helping set the stage for a commodity boom.

While oil has traditionally been the most interesting commodity to investors in the past, the green energy sector is reliant on the unique electrical and physical properties of many different metals to work optimally.

To build more renewable capacity and to store that energy efficiently, we will need to increase the available supply for these specific raw materials, or face higher costs for each material.

Metal bull cases

Ahead of Cambridge House’s annual Vancouver Resource Investment Conference on January 20 and 21, 2019, we thought it would be prudent to highlight the “bull case” for relevant metals as we start the year.

It’s important to recognize that the commodity market is often cyclical and dependent on a multitude of factors, and that these cases are not meant to be predictive in any sense.

In other words, the facts and arguments illustrated sum up what we think investors may see as the most compelling stories for these metals—but what actually happens in the market, especially in the short term, may be different.

Overarching trends

While we highlight 12 minerals ranging from copper to lithium, most of the raw materials in the infographic fit into four overarching, big-picture stories that will drive the future of green energy:

Solar and wind
The world hit 1 TW of wind and solar generation capacity in 2018. The second TW will be up and running by 2023, and will cost 46% less than the first.

Electric vehicles
Ownership of electric vehicles will increase 40 times in the next 13 years, reaching 125 million vehicles in 2030.

Energy storage
The global market for energy storage is rapidly growing, and will leap from $194 billion to $296 billion between 2017 and 2024.

Nuclear
150 nuclear reactors with a total gross capacity of about 160,000 MW are on order or planned, and about 300 more are proposed—mostly in Asia.

Which of these stories has the most potential as a catalyst for driving the entire sector?

Based on these narratives, and the individual bull cases above, which metal has the most individual potential?

Visit Visual Capitalist at Booth #1228 at #VRIC19.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Click here for free VRIC registration up to January 11.

Read more about the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference.

Two days left: Free registration for Vancouver Resource Investment Conference

January 10th, 2019
Vancouver Resource Investment Conference Free registration for limited time

A capacity crowd attends a keynote speech at VRIC 2018.

 

Taking place January 20 to 21, the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference returns with hundreds of resource companies, thousands of investors, scores of vital commentators and all-new content. To skip the registration fee, just click here and use promo code RESOURCECLIPS. This offer ends January 11.

The world’s largest event of its kind, VRIC 2019 presents market insights along with the chance to meet company executives one-on-one, hear their stories and ask them key questions. Workshops and interactive events broaden the experience, fostering better-informed investors who can make better-informed decisions.

Considered a bellwether of the junior mining market for the last 25 years, VRIC helps investors understand market forces and find their way to opportunity.

Click here for free registration using promo code RESOURCECLIPS. This offer ends January 11.

Read more about the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference.

VRIC returns

January 9th, 2019

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference turns opportunity into an event

by Greg Klein

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference turns opportunity into an event

Capacity crowds packed keynote speeches at VRIC 2018.

 

Described as the bellwether of junior mining for 25 years, the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference maintains that reputation by adapting its content to ever-changing times. The event returns January 20 to 21 with a busy agenda and new features to keep the Convention Centre buzzing with insights, perspectives and the always anticipated tips. With about 360 exhibitors and nearly 70 speakers signed so far, Jay Martin expects to see 8,000 to 9,000 attendees, a number that bodes well for the sector overall.

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference turns opportunity into an event

Impromptu discussion brought together speakers,
company reps and investors at last year’s conference.

“I’m really happy with the advance registration—it’s above last year even though the market hasn’t been fantastic,” says the president/CEO of Cambridge House International. “But Q4 was really strong for gold compared to the Dow and the S&P, and gold stocks did relatively well.”

Although just one of many commodities to come under VRIC scrutiny, gold has regained its importance to market watchers. But Martin’s also excited about some new events scheduled this year, among them a competition that pits two of the best-known stock pickers against each other. Audience participation promises to make the contest even more unpredictable.

“When you walk into the Main Speaker Hall on Sunday morning, you’ll be handed a little electronic voting device, kind of like a cellphone but much simpler. Frank Holmes will open up with a 20-minute keynote and then we get into a battle between Frank Holmes and Marin Katusa with their top three stock picks. The companies get up and give a really quick six-minute pitch. Then we ask the audience to vote in real time on their top pick. The results go live on the big screen.

“Then we ask the audience a second question: ‘Which fund manager, Marin or Frank, would you trust with your money?’ That’ll really put some pressure on these guys.”

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference turns opportunity into an event

Of course the ultimate test will be the stocks’ subsequent performance. But another first for VRIC will be the iconoclastic Rex Murphy. Far beyond the narrow pale of Canadian journalism, the social and political commentator nevertheless is tolerated by the National Post and CBC, probably because he delivers his scathing pronouncements with such entertaining wit.

“He’s kind of an ambassador for the Canadian resource sector, he’s always been very outspoken in its defence,” Martin points out. “He’ll do a keynote and also sit on a panel to discuss the future of Canada’s resource economy and the junior mining sector. Rex has strong views on the resource sector although he doesn’t come from the industry. He’ll have a different perspective on how things work and how things will turn out.”

More iconoclasm, on the geopolitical front, will likely come from Jayant Bhandari who joins a roster of speakers including Katusa, Holmes, Gianni Kovacevic, Daniela Cambone and Brent Cook among other mining commentators, portfolio managers, newsletter writers, commodities analysts and company executives.

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference turns opportunity into an event

The latter category will be out in force at the Exhibit Hall too, representing 360 or more firms and ready to discuss their projects in person. Attendees can also sign up to meet CEOs over coffee in the Deal Room.

An exciting VRIC agenda and impressive pre-registration has Martin buoyant about the market’s prospects.

“I’ve been cautiously optimistic for a couple of years but there’s a lot going on right now that could suggest there’s going to be a rally,” he explains. “There’s a lot of uncertainty in the U.S. markets, more than we’ve seen since 2008, bigger corrections than we’ve seen since 2008, and historically we’ve seen investors trend towards hard assets and conservative investments, and that’s gold and gold stocks. We’re seeing that boost already. If you look at Kirkland, Newmont, the big gold producers, they had a great fourth quarter. No other big stocks did. That’s classic behaviour. If you look at the gold price in Q4, we haven’t seen that in a long time. I look at investor registration at gold conferences, public company treasuries and marketing spend, and I see an increase in all three of those. I’m seeing all the right things.”

As a result, he expects yellow metal to regain prominence. “At our last three or four events, energy metals were the biggest draw. What we’re seeing leading up to this show is that gold is taking that position. We’re getting more interest in our gold companies, speakers and features. I expect the gold topics, conversations and panels to be the best-attended of this event.”

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference turns opportunity into an event

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2019 takes place January 20 to 21 at the
Vancouver Convention Centre West. To avoid the $30 admission fee, click here for free registration.

Vancouver Resource Investment Conference: Free registration for a limited time

January 8th, 2019
Vancouver Resource Investment Conference Free registration for limited time

A capacity crowd attends a keynote speech at VRIC 2018.

 

Taking place January 20 to 21, the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference returns with hundreds of resource companies, thousands of investors, scores of vital commentators and all-new content. To skip the registration fee, just click here and use promo code RESOURCECLIPS. This offer ends January 11.

The world’s largest event of its kind, VRIC 2019 presents market insights along with the chance to meet company executives one-on-one, hear their stories and ask them key questions. Workshops and interactive events broaden the experience, fostering better-informed investors who can make better-informed decisions.

Considered a bellwether of the junior mining market for the last 25 years, VRIC helps investors understand market forces and find their way to opportunity.

Click here for free registration using promo code RESOURCECLIPS. This offer ends January 11.

Rex Murphy to keynote VRIC 2019

December 3rd, 2018

by Greg Klein

Rex Murphy to keynote VRIC 2019

The photo can suggest a crusty curmudgeon incredulous about a world gone mad, but what’s behind that persona? Maybe a crusty curmudgeon incredulous about a world gone mad but responding with scathing wit.

Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2019 attendees can find out for themselves when Rex Murphy keynotes the annual event, held this year on January 20 and 21. Now’s the time to register and save the $30 fee by using promo code RESOURCECLIPS. This free offer expires January 11.

One of the very few commentators who stands apart from the ultra-conventional world of Canadian journalism, Murphy’s well known to National Post readers but is somehow tolerated by the CBC. When it comes to resource-related topics, he combines a no-nonsense defence of this country’s industries with a humorous rebuttal of their critics.

Other speakers will include Marin Katusa, Jayant Bhandari, Daniela Cambone, Brent Cook, Gianni Kovacevic and Frank Holmes, just a few names among a lineup of over 60 commentators. Attendees can also talk face-to-face with company reps offering over 350 opportunities at the world’s largest resource investment conference.

Take advantage of promo code RESOURCECLIPS by January 11 for free registration.

Caught on camera: The International Mining Investment Conference 2018

May 17th, 2018

by Greg Klein | May 17, 2018

Caught on camera International Mining Investment Conference 2018

Investors gathered as resource companies delivered presentations at IMIC 2018.

 

It was a near-record turnout, declared Andrew Pollard. But he quickly admitted that the numbers came from the same guy who inflated attendance figures for Donald Trump’s inauguration. Whether caused by gold’s sudden swing south of $1,300, Vancouver’s first hot summer weather of the year or an experiment in mid-week scheduling, the May 15 to 16 International Mining Investment Conference drew a surprisingly less-than-capacity crowd. Yet enthusiasm remained for a strong agenda with over 30 speakers, including some new faces. Among other topics, the wide-ranging content brought a reinforced emphasis on energy minerals. Exhibits featured over 70 resource companies.

Here’s a quick look at some of the happenings. Videos of all talks and panel discussions will appear on the Cambridge House International website in about 10 days.

 

Caught on camera International Mining Investment Conference 2018

Gianni Kovacevic, Simon Moores and
Chris Parry discussed the future of energy.

 

Caught on camera International Mining Investment Conference 2018

Jayant Bhandari offered practical tips
as well as controversial perspectives.

 

Caught on camera International Mining Investment Conference 2018

Some events drew SRO audiences.

 

Caught on camera International Mining Investment Conference 2018

Mike Hodge, Jared Rushton, Scott Rose and Dave Hodge
of the Zimtu Capital team brought levity to market discussion.

 

Simon Moores met with audience members after hosting
the Vancouver stop of the Benchmark Mineral Intelligence
World Tour 2018.

 

SmallCapPower interviewed David Morgan.

 

The word on the street came to the convention centre floor.

 

Andrew Pollard brought an entertaining style
to his panel of precocious mining titans
Brian Paes-Braga and Steve de Jong.

 

Caught on camera International Mining Investment Conference 2018

Kitco News’ Daniela Cambone interviewed Brent Cook, Ivan Bebek and E.B. Tucker.

 

Cambridge House now has planning underway for the Extraordinary Future conference in Vancouver from September 19 to 20, followed by the Silver and Gold Summit 2018 in San Francisco from October 28 to 29.