Wednesday 21st August 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘british columbia’

Update: Saville Resources/Commerce Resources hit more near-surface, high-grade niobium, with tantalum and phosphate in Quebec

June 6th, 2019

This story has been expanded and moved here.

Ximen Mining gold acquisition continues southern B.C. expansion

June 4th, 2019

by Greg Klein | June 4, 2019

Adding to its portfolio of southern British Columbia past-producers, Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM announced the 100% acquisition of the former Amelia gold operation. Amelia’s 199.46 hectares cover the Cariboo-Amelia mine, which underwent intermittent operation from 1894 to 1962. During that time it produced 124,452 tonnes for 81,602 ounces of gold, 32,439 ounces of silver and, since 1940, 113,302 pounds of lead and 198,140 pounds of zinc, according to B.C. government data cited by Ximen. Gold grades averaged 24.68 g/t.

Ximen Mining gold acquisition continues southern B.C. expansion

On TSXV approval, Ximen gets the Kootenay-region property for 212,888 shares.

The company’s southern B.C. holdings include a 100% stake in the Brett property about 29 kilometres west of Vernon. The 20,025-hectare epithermal gold project features historic grades as high as 168 g/t gold over 1.3 metres, as well as surface trench samples of 291 tonnes averaging 28 g/t gold and 64 g/t silver. Epithermal deposits provide some of the world’s largest and highest-grade gold mines, Ximen states.

In B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp, Ximen has optioned its Gold Drop project to GGX Gold TSXV:GGX, which began spring drilling in April. (Update: On June 6 Ximen and GGX announced the program had finished, with assays pending for 20 holes totalling 1,217 metres. Further drilling is planned.) An extensive campaign last year found high-grade, near-surface gold-silver intercepts, along with tellurium.

Also in April Ximen staked the Providence claim, another 12,900 hectares surrounding Gold Drop and bordering other active projects in this busy camp dotted with former workings. The company has rock and soil sampling, along with trenching planned for Providence.

A few days after that acquisition, Ximen optioned a numbered company whose chief asset is an option on another Greenwood property, the Kenville project.

Last month a program of sampling, trenching and drilling began on Ximen’s Treasure Mountain silver property by option partner New Destiny Mining TSXV:NED. Located about four hours northeast of Vancouver, the 10,700-hectare property is proximal to Nicola Mining’s (TSXV:NIM) Treasure Mountain silver project, where underground mining most recently took place in 2008 and 2013.

On April 16 Ximen closed a private placement of $405,000.

Saville Resources/Commerce Resources hit near-surface niobium high grades, with tantalum and phosphate in Quebec

June 3rd, 2019

This story has been updated and moved here.

Commerce Resources and two Inuit corporations sign LOI to advance northern Quebec rare earths

May 15th, 2019

by Greg Klein | May 15, 2019

Commerce Resources and two Inuit corporations sign LOI to advance northern Quebec rare earths

The parties consider Inuit involvement critical to this critical minerals project.

 

While a project that would provide essential raw materials continues towards pre-feasibility, a letter of intent ensures Inuit participation, the signatories announced May 15. The Nayumivik Landholding Corporation of Kuujjuaq and the Makivik Corporation signed the LOI with Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE regarding the Ashram rare earths deposit in arctic Quebec’s Nunavik region.

The letter marks “a first for Nunavik mining development, specifically for a pre-development project,” said Maggie Emudluk, Makivik VP of economic development. The LOI ensures “Inuit will be directly involved upstream in any discussions and proposed planning of this project. They will also be enabled to provide insights and share concerns during the progression of the project. Makivik is pleased that the LOI is in accordance with the Nunavik Inuit Mining Policy objectives that look forward to establishing clear lines of communication with the industry.”

Commerce Resources and two Inuit corporations sign LOI to advance northern Quebec rare earths

The Nunavik Mineral Exploration Fund held the recent
Nunavik Mining Workshop to discuss the region’s
mineral potential as well as its rich culture.

With one of the most advanced deposits outside China hosting these elements deemed critical by the U.S., Ashram shows favourable metallurgy as well as grade. The project’s rare earths occur within carbonatite host rock and the minerals monazite, bastnasite and xenotime, which are familiar to commercial REE processing. Near-surface mineralization further optimizes potential cost advantages.

Using a base case 1.25% cutoff, a 2012 resource shows:

  • measured: 1.59 million tonnes averaging 1.77% total rare earth oxides

  • indicated: 27.67 million tonnes averaging 1.9% TREO

  • inferred: 219.8 million tonnes averaging 1.88% TREO

The deposit also features some of the most sought-after REEs, with a strong distribution of neodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium. Metallurgical tests also show potential for a fluorspar byproduct.

“We look forward to working closely with Commerce and Makivik Corporation to implement the LOI during the pre-development phase of the proposed Ashram deposit,” commented Sammy Koneak, Nayumivik Landholding president. “We are confident that continued communication between the parties under the terms and spirit of the LOI will result in ongoing respect for our rights and our environment.”

Commerce president Chris Grove heralded the LOI as “a milestone that speaks to the cooperation between all parties— a document that recognizes the primacy of the James Bay Agreement, the practicalities of advancing our Ashram deposit through the next few years of development, the practicalities of getting our material to world markets, and the best way to achieve our collective goals of a new producing mine in Nunavik through the cooperation of the Inuit and Commerce towards our mutual benefit. We look forward to this future with the Inuit in Nunavik.”

The urgency of securing rare earths and other critical minerals has been recognized in a number of American government initiatives. This week the U.S. exempted rare earths and other critical minerals from tariffs imposed on China, emphasizing America’s reliance on a trade war enemy for commodities essential to the economy and defence. Last week a bipartisan group of U.S. senators proposed legislation to reduce their country’s reliance on unreliable sources of critical minerals.

Looking at other critical minerals, Commerce holds the Niobium Claim Group just a few kilometres from Ashram. Working towards a 75% earn-in, Saville Resources TSXV:SRE awaits assays from this year’s spring drill program. Previous intervals of near-surface, high-grade niobium along with tantalum support the company’s optimism.

Commerce also holds the Blue River tantalum-niobium deposit in southern British Columbia, which reached PEA in 2011.

Friends of Morden Mine president Sandra Larocque welcomes plans to restore the historic B.C. site

May 15th, 2019

…Read more

B.C. minister of energy and mines Michelle Mungall exaggerates deeply in a Black Press interview

May 10th, 2019

…Read more

Car-dependent carbon culture votes Green in B.C.’s Nanaimo-Ladysmith

May 6th, 2019

by Greg Klein | May 6, 2019

The latest Canadian riding to go Green is a town that lives and breaths—literally—carbon fuels.

If Greens officially subscribe to a morally-superior hierarchy of CO2-reducing modes of transportation, walking would probably hold the apex. And Nanaimo-Ladysmith, in a March 6 federal by-election the latest Canadian riding to vote Green, offers great places to walk. But that’s provided walkers stick to the greenbelts and harbourfront pathway. Anywhere else they’re subjected to car culture at possibly Canada’s most overbearing extreme, far surpassing Calgary and Edmonton.

Speed limits surprise newcomers. So do the speeders, who generally exceed limits with impunity, routinely running stop signs, red lights and pedestrian-inhabited crosswalks. Apparently one recent exception will be the local RCMP superintendent’s commuting route. He’s finally gotten sick of getting the finger from drivers zooming past his unmarked vehicle.

Gasp! Carbon culture votes Green in B.C.’s Nanaimo-Ladysmith

“Honk if you’re Green”: The party woos its constituency.
(Photo: Green Party)

What accompanies the high speeds is the noise, that relentless Nanaimo noise. It drowns out all the sounds of nature that Greens should appreciate: the wind in the trees, birds singing, crickets chirping in late summer. You can hear them alright, during brief lulls in roaring traffic. But shortly after moving here, newcomers become acutely aware of how vehicles rocketing around at tremendous speeds make an awfully, awfully much louder racket than those roaming about at normal city speeds.

Intensifying the high-speed noise are the faulty mufflers. Do Nanaimo drivers actually tamper with them to accentuate their presence? Or does some regional malady cause Nanaimo mufflers to malfunction like nowhere else?

Driving habits might be considered a Green issue too, if they discourage walking and cycling. Most Nanaimo drivers reflect the city’s general good nature, but a significant minority bomb around with reckless disregard for others, especially pedestrians. People in Nanaimo who do a lot of walking (there aren’t all that many) get used to scrambling out of the way of drivers.

They’re not just young punks flexing their vicarious muscles or arrogant old farts who came of age in an era of driver entitlement. Far too many young, middle-aged and old men and women, even parents with kids on board, drive as if they hunger for pedestrian roadkill. Experienced Nanaimo walkers tend to avoid crossing streets at intersections, where dangerous drivers can tear towards them from four directions.

But getting back to living and breathing carbon fuels, especially breathing them—is there any place in Canada with so much really filthy vehicle exhaust? Experienced walkers try to hold their breath for extended periods as obviously filthy vehicles pollute their presence. Regular lungs-full of toxins occur frequently in a routine Nanaimo walk.

As a result frequent spitting, perhaps not the most environmentally conscientious habit, takes place in efforts to purge a body of Nanaimo’s carbon culture.

So who here voted Green—a crunchy granola elite detached from all this? Green winner Paul Manly’s lawn signs coincided unabashedly on residential properties with typically big-ass Nanaimo gas-guzzlers.

Although the riding had been considered a New Democratic Party safe seat, the incumbent NDP came in third with 23.1% of the vote, behind Greens with 37.3% and Conservatives with 24.8% but well above the Liberals’ 11%.

Certainly the third-place NDP asked for a rebuke. The federal seat came open after the former NDP MP resigned to campaign for provincial MLA. That seat came open after the previous NDP MLA resigned to campaign for mayor. Taxpayers have paid millions of dollars to satisfy these NDP career moves.

Another possible issue, although not one in which the Greens offer any realistic response, was last year’s very sudden influx of homeless people. As is elsewhere in southwestern B.C., the problem of how to help the poor and mentally disturbed becomes frustrated by addiction-driven crime.

The Nanaimo-Ladysmith victory gives the Greens only its second federal seat, but follows a string of provincial and municipal successes in Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Vancouver and Burnaby that have greatly expanded the party beyond its original vehicle-dependent Vancouver Island stronghold.

But Nanaimo, of all places—can this possibly be a sincere environmental movement? Or is something else, maybe confused disenchantment with the older parties or just attraction to a fashionable new brand, driving the Greens’ continuing success?

Belmont Resources announces Nevada lithium results

May 2nd, 2019

by Greg Klein | May 2, 2019

Reporting from the Kibby Basin project in Nevada, Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA released assays from the most recent hole on the 2,056-hectare property. After reaching a depth of 256 metres into lakebed sediments, the hole averaged 100 ppm lithium, ranging from 38 ppm to 127 ppm.

Belmont Resources announces Nevada lithium results

With only four holes sunk so far, most
of the 2,056-hectare Kibby Basin project
remains unexplored.

Groundwater samples showed the presence of saline, rather than fresh water that’s rich in sodium and magnesium but low in lithium, the company stated. “The presence of shallow aquifers containing saline groundwater with chemical composition similar to, but lower than that of lithium brines is encouraging for the discovery of lithium brines deeper in the basin.”

Results from previous drilling indicate continued potential for lithium brines in unexplored areas of the property, Belmont added. A 2018 hole about 2,300 metres southwest brought intervals of 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres, reaching a high of 580 ppm.

MGX Minerals CSE:XMG has spent $300,000 on exploration so far to earn 25% of the project. The company may increase its interest to 50% with another $300,000 of work.

In March the companies announced a “milestone” water rights permit that might be the first of its kind for Nevada. The permit allows extraction of up to 943.6 million U.S. gallons of water annually for brine processing and potential production of lithium compounds. About 91% of the water would be returned to the source, the companies stated.

Also last March, Belmont announced a foray into southern British Columbia’s busy Greenwood camp with the acquisition of a 253-hectare property in a region of historic gold, copper, silver, lead and zinc mining. The company has historic data under review to prepare for exploration this year.

In northern Saskatchewan, Belmont shares a 50/50 interest in two uranium properties with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Saville Resources reports favourable geology, plans Phase II drilling at Quebec niobium-tantalum project

April 29th, 2019

by Greg Klein | April 29, 2019

Assays are pending but the first drill program since 2010 has Saville Resources TSXV:SRE optimistic about results. With five holes totalling 1,049 metres, the season devoted four holes to the Mallard target in the property’s southeastern area. Historic, non-43-101 results from Mallard’s previous campaign brought near-surface high grades that included:

  • 0.82% Nb2O5 over 21.89 metres, starting at 58.93 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.72% over 21.35 metres, starting at 4.22 metres
  • (including 0.9% over 4.78 metres)
Saville Resources reports favourable geology, plans Phase II drilling at Quebec niobium-tantalum project

A spring campaign under winter conditions
comprised the project’s first drill program since 2010.

True widths were unknown.

The spring campaign sunk an additional hole 60 metres from another location of high-grade, near-surface results that included an historic, non-43-101 interval of 0.71% Nb2O5 over 15.33 metres, starting at 55.1 metres. The new hole tested the intercept down-dip as well as the strike extension of the main mineralized zone.

“In each hole, favourable rock types and coarse-grained pyrochlore mineralization were visually identified over varying widths and concentrations,” the company stated. “Portable XRF data and detailed geological logging further support these observations.”

Saville plans further drilling at Mallard, as well as Miranna and several other targets, to build a 43-101 resource estimate. Previous boulder samples from Mallard include an exceptional 5.93% Nb2O5, as well as 2.75%, 4.24% and 4.3% Nb2O5. Tantalum samples from the area reached up to 1,040, 1,060 and 1,220 Ta2O5.

Work on the 1,223-hectare Niobium Claim Group takes place under a 75% earn-in from Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE, whose Ashram rare earths deposit a few kilometres away moves towards pre-feasibility.

In early April Saville released assays from last year’s campaign on the Bud property in southern British Columbia’s historic Greenwood mining camp, with samples reaching as high as 4.57 g/t gold, 27.7 g/t silver and 6.7% copper.

A private placement first tranche that closed in December brought Saville $311,919. In March the company optioned its James Bay-region Covette nickel-copper-cobalt property to Astorius Resources TSXV:ASQ. A 100% fulfillment would bring Saville $1.25 million over three years, with Astorius spending another $300,000 on exploration within two years. Saville retains a 2% NSR.

Read more about Saville Resources.

92 Resources increases its Quebec lithium-polymetallic potential with expanded acquisition

April 24th, 2019

by Greg Klein | April 24, 2019

An amended option with “no additional share, cash or work commitment” brings more land and greater prospects in northern Quebec’s James Bay region to 92 Resources TSXV:NTY. A 4,253-hectare increase to a previous 75% earn-in with Osisko Mining TSX:OSK now covers that company’s entire FCI property. Combined with 92’s adjacent and wholly owned Corvette project, the Corvette-FCI property now comprises three contiguous claim blocks in a 14,496-hectare parcel that stretches for over 25 kilometres along the Lac Guyer greenstone belt.

92 Resources increases its Quebec lithium-polymetallic potential with expanded acquisition

Past work at the newly acquired FCI West found 16 showings of base and precious metals along two parallel trends extending over 10 kilometres in length. Historic, non-43-101 assays from FCI West’s Golden Gap prospect included outcrop samples as high as 108.9 g/t gold, a 2003 drill interval of 10.5 g/t gold over seven metres and a channel sample of 14.5 g/t gold over two metres.

FCI West’s Tyrone-T9 prospect includes an historic, non-43-101 channel sample of 1.15% copper over 2.1 metres. Despite high-grade lithium showings at Corvette, FCI West has never been evaluated for the energy metal, the company stated.

Immediately south and west of 92’s new turf sits Azimut Exploration’s (TSXV:AZM) Pikwa property. Adjacently north of FCI West, Midland Exploration’s (TSXV:MD) 2018 field program on the Mythril project found outcrop and boulder samples grading 16.7% copper, 16.8 g/t gold and 3.04% molybdenum. 92 anticipates significant activity by multiple companies along the Lac Guyer greenstone belt this year “as the magnitude of the Mythril-style copper-gold mineralization unfolds.”

Regional infrastructure includes a powerline and the all-season Trans-Taiga Road 10 kilometres north of Corvette-FCI.

This year’s exploration program will follow evaluation of historic data, with work expected to wrap up in summer.

The amended option with Osisko would give 92 the additional claims by satisfying terms of the 75% earn-in on FCI East. That deal calls for an initial million shares, another million shares and $250,000 of work in year one, another $800,000 in year two and a further $1.2 million in year three, while Osisko acts as project operator. At that point the companies would form a 50/50 JV. Another $2 million in expenditures from 92 would raise the company’s stake to 75%. With FCI West now incorporated into that agreement, “no additional share, cash or work commitment is required by the company,” 92 emphasized.

The company retains a 100% interest in Corvette’s 172 claims.

92’s Quebec portfolio also includes the Pontax, Eastman and Lac du Beryl properties. Lithium-tantalum grab samples from Pontax have reached up to 0.94% Li2O and 520 ppm Ta2O5.

In British Columbia 92 holds the Silver Sands vanadium prospect and the Golden frac sand project. In the Northwest Territories, Far Resources CSE:FAT works towards a 90% earn-in on 92’s Hidden Lake lithium project.

92 closed a private placement of $618,000 last December.

Read more about 92 Resources here and here.