Sunday 19th November 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘british columbia’

Threatened B.C. mining heritage site gets a new lease on life

October 10th, 2017

by Greg Klein | October 10, 2017

A structure vital to Vancouver Island mining history might not be doomed for destruction after all. The Morden mine headframe and tipple date to 1913 but remain the last significant signs of the Nanaimo region’s coal industry, where British Columbia’s first successful mining began in 1852. Located on a provincial park in an NDP-voting region, the site had been neglected by B.C.’s previous Liberal government. But on October 6 the new NDP government announced a $25,000 conservation grant.

Threatened B.C. mining heritage site gets a new lease on life

Closed in by encroaching forest and deteriorating seriously, the Morden
headframe and (right) tipple still provide a monument to the past.

While encouraging to the volunteer Friends of Morden Mine Society, the money falls far short of the $2.7 million that a previous engineering study estimated necessary for the structure’s preservation. That amount included $500,000 for emergency repairs.

For years the FMMS website has warned that the structure’s preservation faces “a race against time. The deterioration of concrete components of the headframe and tipple structures is escalating at an alarming rate. Every spring more dislodged chunks of concrete can be found on the ground below the structures and more reinforcing steel becomes exposed to the elements.”

Some 22.5 metres tall and built of concrete-encased steel, the headframe and tipple, which dumped coal into railcars, collectively hold status as one of only three such structures ever built and one of two still standing.

“This work will bring history to life and, at the same time, honour the coal miners who lived, worked and died in Vancouver Island coal mines while building families and creating strong communities,” a government communique quoted forests and lands minister Doug Donaldson.

The statement made no mention of further funding but FMMS representative Sandra Larocque sounded optimistic. The engineering study looked at “quite an elaborate plan,” she told ResourceClips.com. “We’re just looking at saving the mine from falling down, doing some basic stabilization, taking down some timbers that have deteriorated…. $25,000 isn’t going to go very far, no, but it’s a start and the structure’s in dire straits of falling down.”

The money will be used to inspect the shaft, remove loose timbers from the headframe, clean out organic muck in and around the tipple and begin stabilizing the structure.

The perseverance of Helen Tilley, an early FMMS member, proved instrumental in getting the provincial support, Larocque said. She hopes for more money from the province, as well as the Regional District of Nanaimo and private donors.

As daughter of a coal miner who died of black lung, she’s well aware of the industry’s dark side. Calamitous accidents and bitter labour disputes also characterized local mining history. But she emphasizes the structure’s value, especially to young people, as a link to previous generations.

“It’s a tangible thing people can look at…. Just to save it, to make sure it’s still standing, is everything to me.”

Read more about the Morden mine.

First visit yields surface grades up to 7.32% on 92 Resources’ new Quebec lithium property

October 5th, 2017

by Greg Klein | October 5, 2017

First visit yields surface grades up to 7.32% on 92 Resources’ new Quebec lithium property

A single day of due diligence on a new acquisition brought high lithium values for 92 Resources TSXV:NTY. Selected grab samples from the Corvette property in northern Quebec assayed 0.8%, 3.48% and 7.32% Li2O at surface from one pegmatite outcrop and 1.22% from another, which also showed an anomalous tantalum result of 90 ppm Ta2O5.

The 3,891-hectare property comprises one of three prospective lithium acquisitions in Quebec’s James Bay region announced last month.

The two spodumene-bearing pegmatites, about 75 metres apart and trending sub-parallel, “highlight the prospective nature of the property,” 92 Resources stated. With only a small part of the property explored so far, the company has more prospecting as well as channel sampling planned before winter sets in.

In September the company announced a two-week program of prospecting and channel sampling at its flagship Hidden Lake lithium project in the Northwest Territories. Follow-up metallurgical results released the same month on a concentrate produced from Hidden Lake material showed an overall extraction rate of 97%.

92 Resources also has a 43-101 technical report planned for its Golden frac sand project in eastern British Columbia.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with 92 Resources CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

At a regulatory crossroads

October 4th, 2017

It’s time to fix federally induced problems, says the Mining Association of Canada

by Greg Klein

The fundamentals behind the last supercycle remain in place, insists Pierre Gratton. Yet the Mining Association of Canada president/CEO warns that the country has lost ground as a global industry leader. While the current upswing continues, the transition to a cleaner, lower-carbon future will call for even more mineable commodities. Whether Canada participates to its fullest potential, however, depends largely on policies directed by Ottawa.

Addressing a 230-strong Greater Vancouver Board of Trade audience on September 27, Gratton noted that by 2015 Canada lost its first-place spot for exploration investment. The usurper was Australia, which proved itself “much more strategic and successful over the past decade.” Meanwhile this country’s list of active projects has fallen to nearly half its 2011 peak of 2,700. Only two new projects came up for federal environmental assessment in 2016, an historic low. “We’ve got world class deposits sitting idle,” he added, citing Ontario’s Ring of Fire, Nunavut’s Izok Corridor and British Columbia’s New Prosperity.

It’s time to fix federally induced problems, says the Mining Association of Canada

Pierre Gratton: “Hopefully we’ll get it right this time, we’ll lock
it in, we’ll know what the rules are and get down to business.”
(Photo: Matt Borck, courtesy Greater Vancouver Board of Trade.)

Yet opportunities have been improving, he maintained, and not just because of stronger commodity prices. In addition to continued growth among emerging economies, carbon-reducing measures call for new technologies that require more mining products. That’s the case for electrified transportation, wind and solar generation, and energy storage.

“The transition to a low-carbon future is not years away from now—it has already started and it’s accelerating at a rapid pace.” Unless Canada turns that to its competitive advantage, “we will lose this opportunity to other countries… It’s going to be us, Australia or someone else.”

Moreover, Canada can produce these commodities “as a leader in sustainability.” This country “already operates some of the lowest-emitting, highest-tech and most socially responsible mines in the world.” Gratton credited companies that implemented MAC’s Towards Sustainable Mining program with reducing greenhouse gas emissions. And altruism can be rewarding: “Our Canadian-made mining standard has caught the attention of Apple and other global companies that see it as a program robust enough to demonstrate responsible sourcing.”

But if environmental progress bodes well for Canadian mining, the policy environment remains uncertain. The 2012 regulatory reforms of the previous Conservative government lost both public and investor confidence, Gratton argued.

Ottawa now needs to put “the principle of one project/one review squarely into action. We need a federal process that no longer places an unfair and unequal burden on Canada’s mining sector alone, which has sadly been the case since 2012.”

For a couple of these pieces, like the Fisheries Act and the Navigation Protection Act, I think the mining industry is probably going to come out fine. The Environmental Assessment Act, I don’t know.

The Liberals, he said, are “committed to review and replace all of the federal reforms of the previous Harper government…. For a couple of these pieces, like the Fisheries Act and the Navigation Protection Act, I think the mining industry is probably going to come out fine. The Environmental Assessment Act, I don’t know. At this point it is still so much in flux it is hard to know exactly where this will land.”

Six years of regulatory uncertainty with the prospect of more to come contributes to “this question mark in Canada. And hopefully we’ll get it right this time, we’ll lock it in, we’ll know what the rules are and get down to business.”

Returning to climate change, Gratton noted some industry initiatives, including wind energy reducing diesel dependency at Diavik and Raglan, and the transformation of B.C.’s former Sullivan mine into a community-owned solar plant that sells electricity to the grid. Goldcorp’s (TSX:G) Borden project, anticipated for 2019 production, would be Canada’s first all-electric underground mine.

Not only would the battery-powered fleet cut emissions, it “will significantly reduce ventilation costs,” Gratton stated.

“But we need to do more to spur innovation.” MAC proposes government support for innovation superclusters, a possible “catalyst to achieve transformative outcomes for our industry and help re-establish Canada as a global leader for mining innovation.”

Northern infrastructure, bringing both roads and electricity to isolated areas, again complements both the industry and the environment. Gratton pointed to the Northwest Territories’ planned $150-million all-season road to the Tlicho community, and the federal/Yukon $360-million road that would access the Coffee and Casino projects, two potential mines that would “contribute billions in new investment … and thousands of direct and indirect jobs.”

With federal funding available for green infrastructure, here’s an opportunity to take more communities off diesel, fully open up B.C.’s Golden Triangle and deliver to Yukon and the projects up there reliable, clean energy.

Referring to the 344-kilometre extension of B.C.’s Northwest Transmission Line in 2014, Gratton said: “I’ve a pitch for you today. Why not finish the job and take that line all the way to the Yukon? With federal funding available for green infrastructure, here’s an opportunity to take more communities off diesel, fully open up B.C.’s Golden Triangle and deliver to Yukon and the projects up there reliable, clean energy.”

Undiscouraged by the rugged 800-kilometre gap between the provincial and territorial grids, he added, “I was meeting recently with Yukon officials and they’re very interested in this. I remember also that Premier Horgan, when he was Energy and Mines critic, was a big champion of this project too. So here’s a nation-building project that maybe he can get behind.”

“I could talk about many other things as well, but the key takeaway is that we need to reposition Canada and enhance our competiveness going forward. And it’s critical because other countries are doing the same.”

But in response to an audience question about native consent, was he optimistic or euphemistic? “We’re not in a world of veto,” Gratton insisted. “We’re in a world of deep and meaningful engagement.”

Speaking with ResourceClips.com, he said MAC’s supercluster proposal could create regional centres for excellence focusing on mining and exploration in Sudbury and Vancouver, processing in Quebec City and oil sands in Edmonton.

There are some issues where we’ve made real progress with this new government that we hadn’t been able to make under the previous government.

Although it’s too early to evaluate the Liberals’ performance, the former Chretien-era government communications guy did say, “There are some issues where we’ve made real progress with this new government that we hadn’t been able to make under the previous government.”

Environmental permitting delays, he pointed out, “have been horrendous. At times it takes five years after an environmental assessment before you get your permit. The previous government announced a policy that would shorten that to eight months but didn’t do anything to implement it. This government has actually put in place the tools to make it happen. So we are seeing those timelines shrink.”

Additionally Ottawa now consults with MAC much more than did the previous government. The Conservatives’ lack of dialogue, he stated, “could be why they got things wrong.”

Norman B. Keevil book reveals tactics of 1970s B.C. flirtation with resource nationalism

September 29th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 29, 2017

The year was 1973. No sooner had Teck Resources transplanted its HQ to Vancouver than British Columbia premier W.A.C. Bennett’s 20-year reign fell to defeat at NDP hands. Resource nationalism proved to be one of new premier Dave Barrett’s earliest enthusiasms. But the guy who bragged about his commitment to doing “what was needed and right” showed a peculiar modus operandi.

That’s just one of the stories related by Norman B. Keevil in a history of Teck to be released next week, Never Rest on Your Ores: Building a Mining Company, One Stone at a Time.

Norman B Keevil book reveals tactics of 1970s B.C. flirtation with resource nationalism

Norman B. Keevil
(Photo: Teck)

Keevil relates that on summoning him and Bob Hallbauer into the premier’s Victoria office, Barrett’s first words were, “I want your coal.”

Interest had been growing in northeastern B.C.’s deposits, among them Teck’s Sukunka. “Well, at least he did call it our coal,” Keevil notes. “That would become questionable as the situation evolved.”

The duo declined but Barrett wouldn’t give up. He kept calling them back to Victoria on an almost weekly basis.

At about the seventh such meeting, a very strange thing happened. Barrett had a curtain angled across a corner in his office. We’d never paid much attention to it, but in that seventh meeting the curtain rustled a bit, and a thin, sepulchral, white-haired professorial type jumped out from behind it. It was almost as though he was wearing a superhero cape, or super-villain. I think Dave must have gotten him out of Marvel Comics. Was there a door to another room behind the curtain, or had this strange figure just been hiding behind it, taking it all in? I never did find out.

It turned out this was the patrician Alex Macdonald, Barrett’s attorney general and the upholder of law and order—the NDP way. The honourable gentleman said to us: ‘I want you to understand just one thing. I guarantee that you will never be able to put that coal property into production. All you have is an exploration licence and, if you don’t sell to us right now, I’ll cancel it tomorrow.’

Calling it an “unseemly ultimatum from the upholder of justice,” Keevil states the company reluctantly agreed on a $20-million sale that would close in June, a few months away.

But when June arrived, the government announced it had “dropped its option,” writes Keevil—who insists that it wasn’t an option but a firm deal.

Musing over the new government’s equivocation, Keevil wonders if it just came down to money: “Certainly they had been spending like drunken sailors on redecorating some of the higher-profile, cabinet ministers’ offices.

“As to Alex Macdonald, a quote of his survives all of this: ‘In politics, your opponents are on the other side of the legislature, but your enemies are all around you.’ With him, I’m not too surprised.”

Viewing that vignette in a wider context, Keevil sees much of the mining world as chaotic for much of the 1970s and early ’80s, whether it was in B.C., Panama, Chile, El Salvador or Saskatchewan. Compounding the mess were peripheral problems ranging from the OPEC oil embargo to Trudeauvian taxes.

But as for Sukunka, it never did go into production. Teck lost interest and, with intercession from pre-prime ministerial Jean Chretien, unloaded it on BP, which eventually abandoned the project.

Yet the BP deal let Teck retain 100% of the adjacent Bullmoose project. Partly thanks to new infrastructure from a new B.C. government, Bullmoose became Teck’s first coal mine. Now Canada’s largest diversified resource company is also the world’s second-largest supplier of seaborne steelmaking coal.

Read more about Never Rest on Your Ores.

Mountain Boy Minerals hits high-grade gold as drills turn on three B.C. properties

September 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 28, 2017

With initial results in from one of Mountain Boy Minerals’ (TSXV:MTB) three current drill programs at British Columbia’s Golden Triangle, assays show some of the grades that make the region so attractive. So far 33 holes have been completed at the Red Cliff property, 28 on the Montrose zone and five on the Red Cliff zone. The first batch of assays covered five holes from each zone, with Montrose hitting as high as 19.9 g/t gold over 4.12 metres and 9.98 g/t over 3.35 metres. Drilling extended Montrose at depth and along strike, showing the campaign’s best results:

Hole DDH-MON-3

  • 1.53 g/t gold over 3.05 metres, starting at 227.44 metres in downhole depth
Mountain Boy Minerals hits high-grade gold as drills turn on three B.C. properties

  • 1.06 g/t over 0.46 metres, starting at 231.55 metres

  • 9.98 g/t over 3.35 metres, starting at 248.48 metres

DDH-MON-4

  • 2.61 g/t over 2.28 metres, starting at 244.97 metres

  • 19.5 g/t over 0.76 metres, starting at 256.25 metres

  • 5 g/t over 2.13 metres, starting at 264.33 metres

DDH-MON-5

  • 2 g/t over 5.74 metres, starting at 279.73 metres

  • 1.07 g/t over 0.74 metres, starting at 310.52 metres

  • 19.9 g/t over 4.12 metres, starting at 311.28 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Two selected chip samples from Lower Montrose excelled with grades of 390 g/t and 35.7 g/t gold.

Five other holes targeted the Red Cliff zone, about 1.2 kilometres south. Highlights showed:

RC-17-3

  • 6.4 g/t gold and 3.37% copper over 0.61 metres, starting at 53.23 metres

RC-17-4

  • 1.6 g/t gold and 4.89% copper over 0.46 metres, starting at 37.01 metres

Again, true widths weren’t provided. Two other Red Cliff zone holes showed low values, the company stated.

At the project’s Waterpump zone, meanwhile, a grab sample returned 11.6 g/t gold and a chip sample graded 19.2 g/t.

Mountain Boy considers Montrose, Lower Montrose and Waterpump to be a single zone that was displaced by faulting. Expected to continue another six weeks, the Red Cliff program has several holes slated at depth on Montrose and to the west, as well as six to eight others for Waterpump.

Mountain Boy holds a 35% interest in Red Cliff in a joint venture that has recently acquired additional claims.

The Silver Coin project’s current drill program calls for about 2,000 metres to extend and upgrade lenses of high-grade gold mineralization within the Main Breccia zone to the northwest and to test targets along strike to the south and east.

Using a 2 g/t gold cutoff, a 2013 resource for Silver Coin’s four zones totals:

  • indicated: 702,000 tonnes averaging 4.46 g/t gold, 17.89 g/t silver, 0.88% zinc, 0.33% lead and 0.07% copper

  • inferred: 967,000 tonnes averaging 4.39 g/t gold, 18.98 g/t silver, 0.64% zinc, 0.25% lead and 0.04% copper

Mountain Boy holds a 20% interest in Silver Coin, with the remainder held by JV partner Jayden Resources TSXV:JDN.

And the third drill program has just begun, as the Ataman zone on Mountain Boy’s 100%-held Surprise Creek undergoes 500 to 600 metres to test and sample barite, a mineral essential to oil and gas exploration. Last July the company announced production of a barite concentrate exceeding American Petroleum Institute standards.

Earlier this week Mountain Boy closed a private placement of $586,400.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Golden Dawn Minerals to refurbish former B.C. gold-silver-copper mine and mill for trial operation

September 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 28, 2017

Slated to begin imminently, a dewatering and rehab program could help Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM bring new life to a southern British Columbia past producer. Under a previous operator the former Lexington mine produced 5,486 ounces of gold, 3,247 ounces of silver and 860,259 pounds of copper from April to December 2008. Processing took place about 17 kilometres away at the Greenwood mill. With a 212-tpd capacity expandable to 400 tpd, the mill now comprises an important asset in Golden Dawn’s portfolio of nearby former mines.

Golden Dawn Minerals to refurbish former B.C. gold-silver-copper mine and mill for trial operation

Built in 2007 only to be shuttered months later by the downturn,
the Greenwood mill holds a key position in Golden Dawn’s plans.

Lexington’s rehab will focus on two declines prior to installing electrical service and ventilation. The agenda then calls for mapping, sampling and definition drilling to support test mining.

A 2016 resource used a base case 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent cutoff, giving Lexington:

  • measured: 58,000 tonnes averaging 6.98 g/t gold, 1.1% copper and 8.63 g/t gold-equivalent for 16,100 gold-equivalent ounces

  • indicated: 314,000 tonnes averaging 6.38 g/t gold, 1.04% copper and 7.94 g/t gold-equivalent for 80,200 gold-equivalent ounces

  • inferred: 12,000 tonnes averaging 4.42 g/t gold, 1.03% copper and 5.96 g/t gold-equivalent for 2,300 gold-equivalent ounces

Although Lexington remains the company’s current priority, surface drilling continues on the company’s Golden Crown property, host to the Greenwood mill. Fifteen holes have been completed so far, with a plan to further delineate and extend the project’s 2016 resource. Using a 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent cutoff, the estimate shows:

  • indicated: 163,000 tonnes averaging 11.09 g/t gold, 0.56% copper and 11.93 g/t gold-equivalent for 62,500 gold-equivalent ounces

  • inferred: 42,000 tonnes averaging 9.04 g/t gold, 0.43% copper and 9.68 g/t gold-equivalent for 13,100 gold-equivalent ounces

Another summer drill program at May Mac, another past producer, wrapped up with eight surface holes totalling 1,886 metres. One interval found 1.13 g/t gold, 23 g/t silver and 0.7% lead over 0.36 metres starting at 204.34 metres in downhole depth. Another intersection revealed previously unknown copper, grading 0.24% over 0.79 metres starting at 45 metres in depth.

Following up on a spring campaign, the program showed May Mac’s Skomac vein system extending at least 215 metres beyond the former mine’s workings. Golden Dawn now has permitting underway for underground drilling to avoid the topographical challenges encountered over the extension.

As for the mill, contractors agree the 2007-built facility “is in excellent shape,” Golden Dawn stated. Estimates call for about $270,000 and three to five weeks to put the plant back into operation. The company anticipates that happening as feed becomes available from the Lexington mine.

Golden Dawn also spent the summer prospecting additional former mine sites and mineral showings on other holdings within an approximately 15-kilometre radius of the mill.

Given the portfolio’s existing resources, infrastructure and potential, Golden Dawn hopes to enter production without de-risking at the feasibility level. The properties lie approximately 500 kilometres by highway east of Vancouver.

Earlier this month the company closed a $2-million private placement first tranche. Subject to approvals, Golden Dawn expects to close an additional $640,000.

Read more about Golden Dawn Minerals.

Arctic Star Exploration finds “highly anomalous” niobium, rare earths and phosphate at B.C. project

September 25th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 25, 2017

Highly anomalous means highly encouraging, especially at such an early stage of exploration. That’s how Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD characterized its first batch of assays from the Cap property in east-central British Columbia. The news follows last month’s announcement of an extremely rare carbonatite-syenite discovery, suggesting potential for a range of commodities. Now assays for grab samples and the first drill hole show highly anomalous niobium, rare earths and phosphate, the company stated.

Arctic Star Exploration finds “highly anomalous” niobium, rare earths and phosphate at B.C. project

Some intervals of
carbonatite from CAP17-004.

Five selected grab samples assayed 0.2% niobium pentoxide, hitting a peak of 0.96% Nb2O5, while three grab samples brought more than 0.2% total rare earth oxides, peaking at 0.39% TREO. Three samples contained over 5% phosphorus pentoxide with a peak value of 12.62% P2O5.

CAP17-004, the first of four drill holes, showed:

  • 0.35% Nb2O5 over 10.42 metres, starting at 85.24 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 0.63% Nb2O5 over 2.26 metres)

  • 9.94% P2O5 over 19.63 metres, starting at 98.87 metres
  • (including 20.97% P2O5 over 2.55 metres)

  • 0.81% TREO over 2.4 metres, starting at 136.1 metres

True widths weren’t provided. The last interval also showed a peak value of 69 ppb gold and over 1% TREO.

Along with sampling and drilling, the summer program included mapping and prospecting over an area of about three kilometres by one kilometre.

“The discovery of highly anomalous concentrations of niobium, phosphate and REOs at such an early stage in the exploration of the Cap project should be considered highly encouraging,” said consulting geologist Jody Dahrouge. “Future exploration at Cap will follow up on surface samples that contained highly anomalous concentrations of niobium and may be related to drill hole CAP17-004.”

Reporting from their Diagras diamond project in the Northwest Territories late last month, Arctic Star and 60% JV partner Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA announced geophysical results that could potentially indicate “the largest kimberlite complex in the Lac de Gras field.” Further geophysics are on the 18,699-hectare property’s spring agenda, with drilling to follow.

As for Arctic Star’s recently acquired Timantti diamond project in Finland, assays released in July from historic core on the White Wolf kimberlite showed 111 microdiamonds. The company had earlier found 58 microdiamonds in an 18.9-kilogram sample taken from the same kimberlite.

Timantti covers part of the Fennoscandian Shield, host to major Russian diamond mines Lomonosov and Grib.

In July the company offered a $1.25-million private placement.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Arctic Star president/CEO Patrick Power.

92 Resources adds three Quebec properties to its lithium portfolio

September 21st, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 21, 2017

While work continues on the flagship Hidden Lake project in the Northwest Territories, 92 Resources TSXV:NTY expanded its holdings with three more lithium prospects. All located in Quebec’s James Bay region, the newcomers total 5,953 hectares, with each property showing pegmatite outcrop.

92 Resources adds three Quebec properties to its lithium portfolio

An outcrop on the Corvette acquisition shows coarse-
grained spodumene crystals with lengths up to a metre.

The 3,891-hectare Corvette property hosts an outcrop measuring about 150 metres by 30 metres showing abundant coarse-grained spodumene crystals up to one metre in length, the company stated. Other potential pegmatite outcrops along trend are priorities for follow-up work.

Sitting less than 12 kilometres from an all-weather highway, Corvette covers the eastern continuation of the Guyer greenstone belt, offering precious metals potential as well.

On the 1,109-hectare Eastmain property, 92 Resources interprets a large pegmatite outcrop to be along strike from ASX-listed Galaxy Resources’ James Bay deposit. An all-weather highway passes less than seven kilometres away.

The 953-hectare Lac du Beryl property features several pegmatite outcrops, “many of which display characteristic pathfinder minerals commonly associated with spodumene pegmatites,” the company added. Lac du Beryl sits 16 kilometres from a transmission line.

Three days earlier 92 Resources reported a 97% overall extraction rate on a spodumene-montebrasite concentrate produced from Hidden Lake material. The tests used industry-standard techniques, the company stated. Phase II tests are planned while a two-week channel sampling program wraps up.

In eastern British Columbia, the company also holds the Golden frac sand project, which underwent a 10-day field program this summer.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with 92 Resources CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

92 Resources advances NWT hardrock lithium metallurgy

September 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 18, 2017

92 Resources advances NWT hardrock lithium metallurgy

Follow-up tests using standard methods brought high-grade lithium results for 92 Resources’ (TSXV:NTY) Hidden Lake project in the Northwest Territories. After further work on a spodumene-montebrasite concentrate of 6.16% Li2O produced in July, the company now reports an overall extraction rate of 97%. The tests consisted of roasting followed by acid baking and water leaching, industry-standard extraction techniques for lithium, 92 Resources stated.

The next stage calls for magnetic separation, heavy liquid separation and additional flotation on material collected during the current field program. So far work has used analytical reject material, but whole rock material will be preferred for Phase II, the company added.

Earlier this month a crew returned to the property, about 40 kilometres by road from Yellowknife, for a program of channel sampling and prospecting for additional pegmatites.

The summer agenda also included field work at the company’s Golden frac sand project in eastern British Columbia. The property sits adjacent to Heemskirk Canada’s Moberly project, a former source of silica sand for the glass industry that’s now being redeveloped as a frac sand production and processing operation.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with 92 Resources CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

Drilling, sampling, optioning: Mountain Boy Minerals updates B.C. activities

September 13th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 13, 2017

Demonstrating that a diverse portfolio doesn’t necessarily mean idle properties, Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB updated several projects in northwestern British Columbia’s Golden Triangle.

Drilling has just resumed at Silver Coin, held 20% by Mountain Boy and 80% by joint venture partner Jayden Resources TSXV:JDN. Acting as operator is Sprott Mining Inc on a campaign of about 6,000 metres mostly focusing on stepouts. The agenda also calls for regional exploration on the 1,470-hectare property.

Silver Coin hosts a 2013 43-101 resource that uses a 2 g/t gold cutoff to show a total for four zones:

  • indicated: 702,000 tonnes averaging 4.46 g/t gold, 17.89 g/t silver, 0.88% zinc, 0.33% lead and 0.07% copper

  • inferred: 967,000 tonnes averaging 4.39 g/t gold, 18.98 g/t silver, 0.64% zinc, 0.25% lead and 0.04% copper
Drilling, sampling, optioning: Mountain Boy Minerals updates B.C. activities

Mountain Boy awaits assays from Red Cliff,
where core from five holes has revealed visible gold.

Drilling continues at the Red Cliff property, where 25 holes have been completed so far with assays pending. In July Mountain Boy reported visible gold in the program’s first five holes. Red Cliff also has sampling underway at the Lower Montrose and Waterpump zones. The latter has drilling planned, once sampling assays arrive.

Mountain Boy has a 35% interest in Red Cliff, with JV partner Decade Resources TSXV:DEC holding the rest. The ownership gets more complicated, however, now that the two companies have teamed up on additional claims to the southeast. The acquisition gives the JV an earn-in total of up to 80% of the extension, with 28% to be held by Mountain Boy and 52% by Decade. The size of neither the original Red Cliff property nor the additional claims was reported. Mountain Boy and Decade share overlapping management and directors.

TSXV approval came through earlier this month for Mountain Boy’s 100% options on the Surprise Creek and BA properties, both formerly 50/50 JVs with Great Bear Resources TSXV:GBR. Over $12 million of exploration has gone into the nearby projects over the last 10 years, revealing zones of high-grade zinc, lead and silver, as well as zinc, copper and silver.

Prior to a drill program expected later this month, the 7,472-hectare Surprise Creek has sampling underway on a large barite zone and on areas of VMS mineralization revealed by historic sampling. In July the company announced successful production of a barite concentrate that surpassed American Petroleum Institute standards. The mineral is considered essential to oil and gas exploration.

Additional sampling has taken place on the 9,489-hectare BA VMS project, just north of a 2016 channel sample result that returned 3.84% zinc, 1.25% lead and 108 g/t silver over 15 metres. That included a sub-interval of 5.31% zinc, 1.97% lead and 132 g/t silver over 7.5 metres.

Mountain Boy also optioned 60% of West George, a 288-hectare copper property adjacent to the company’s George copper project that the company now holds 100%. The original George has non-43-101 copper-silver-gold estimates. West George has sampling underway.

Meanwhile assays are pending for recent sampling from MB Silver, a project with historic, non-43-101 polymetallic estimates. In southern B.C., Mountain Boy plans to begin PEA studies on its 100%-held Manuel Creek zeolite project.

The company expects to soon close a private placement of up to $1 million.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.