Friday 18th January 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘british columbia’

Ximen Mining/GGX Gold report near-surface 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres in B.C.

January 14th, 2019

by Greg Klein | January 14, 2019

Ximen Mining GGX Gold report near-surface 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres in B.C.

Gold Drop gives up high grades near surface at B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp.

 

With assays from seven of 11 November holes now in, Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM and GGX Gold TSXV:GGX report high gold and silver grades along with tellurium at the Gold Drop project in southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp. All from near-surface intervals on the southern extension of the property’s COD vein, the batch featured a standout result of 129.1 g/t gold and 1,154.9 g/t silver over 7.28 metres. GGX operates the project under option from Ximen.

A closer look at hole COD18-67 shows the breakdown of sub-intervals:

  • 129.1 g/t gold and 1,154.9 g/t silver over 7.28 metres, starting at 23.19 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 106 g/t gold, 1,250 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.37 metres)
  • (and including 232.1 g/t gold, 2,001.1 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 3.13 metres)
  • (and including 143 g/t gold, 1,372.9 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.77 metres)
Ximen Mining GGX Gold report near-surface 129 g/t gold and 1,154 g/t silver over 7.28 metres in B.C.

Some of the program’s other highlights showed:

COD18-61

  • 5.29 g/t gold, 32.4 g/t silver and 31.4 g/t tellurium over 1.38 metres, starting at 22.62 metres

COD18-63

  • 28 g/t gold, 424.7 g/t silver and 150.4 g/t tellurium over 1.17 metres, starting at 26.14 metres
  • (including 49.7 g/t gold, 787 g/t silver and 245 g/t tellurium over 0.59 metres)

COD18-66

  • 6.97 g/t gold, 46.8 g/t silver and 34.4 g/t tellurium over 0.94 metres, starting at 22.96 metres

True widths were unavailable.

The autumn campaign followed two initial holes sunk last August within 25 metres’ distance. Again at near surface, those results featured 50.15 g/t gold and 375 g/t silver over 2.05 metres for COD18-45, along with 54.9 g/t gold and 379 g/t silver over 1.47 metres for COD18-46.

Drilling and trenching have traced COD’s mineralized vein system for about 400 metres in strike, remaining open to the northeast, at depth and possibly to the southwest, the operator stated.

Gold Drop was one of the sites of historic gold and silver mining in the Greenwood camp, roughly 500 kilometres by highway east of Vancouver.

The Gold Drop option allows GGX to earn 100% of the project, with Ximen retaining a 2.5% NSR. If GGX completes the 100% earn-in, Ximen may form a JV by reimbursing GGX 30% of its work expenses to that date.

Ximen’s flagship Brett project in southern B.C.’s Okanagan region has underground drilling and remedial work planned for spring. In November the company announced that results from a batch test supported an historic report of 4 g/t to 5 g/t gold from material stockpiled when a mine portal was built during the 1990s. Ximen plans further metallurgical tests on the stockpiled material.

In southwestern B.C., Ximen holds the Treasure Mountain property proximal to Nicola Mining’s (TSXV:NIM) Treasure Mountain silver project, where underground mining took place briefly in 2008 and 2013.

After closing a private placement of $540,000 in late December, Ximen offered another private placement of $250,000.

B.C. votes down Greens’ voting reform proposal, but do Greens need it?

December 20th, 2018

by Greg Klein | December 20, 2018

If a new electoral system might have reduced British Columbian voter apathy, not many voters showed interest. Only 42.6% of registered voters bothered to take part in a mail-in referendum on proportional representation and 61.3% of them rejected change. Results were released late December 20, after the voting deadline ended December 7.

British Columbians vote down Greens’ voting reform proposal

With or without electoral changes, Greens increasingly
make inroads in B.C. and some other parts of Canada.

B.C.’s ruling NDP put the matter to test as part of an agreement with the province’s three-MLA Green Party, whose legislative support is necessary to the minority government. In theory proportional representation would give smaller parties like the Greens a better chance of electing members.

Voters who did want change had three options: Mixed Member Proportional, used in Germany, New Zealand and Scotland; Rural-Urban Proportional, a never-tried approach that combines MMP and another system that’s used in Ireland, Australia and Malta; and Dual Member Proportional, a made-in-Canada system that’s used nowhere.

Of those who marked that part of the ballot, 41.24% chose MMP, 29.31% RUP and 29.45% DMP. But First Past the Post prevailed.

Small parties might be disappointed but Greens in B.C. and elsewhere in Canada have been increasing their presence under the current rules. B.C.’s Greens went from one MLA to three in the May 2017 election, holding the balance of power in a very tight result.

In June of this year Ontario elected its first Green MPP. Three months later the New Brunswick legislature increased its Green presence from one to three in an election where the new People’s Alliance also won three seats. Nevertheless electoral reform supporters said the top two parties’ standings showed the need for proportional representation. The Progressive Conservatives won 22 seats with 31.89% of the vote, while the incumbent Liberals won 21 seats with 37.8%. The Liberals managed to retain the government position for over five weeks until a non-confidence vote put the PCs into precarious power.

One week later Québec Solidaire, a new party sometimes described as separatist-environmentalist, won 10 seats in that province’s National Assembly. Three of the four elected Quebec parties support proportional representation.

Prince Edward Island has one Green MLA, while Canada’s sole Green MP represents a B.C. riding.

Greens surged to prominence in Vancouver last October, electing three each to the city’s council, parks board and school board. Neighbouring Burnaby elected its first Green councillor. New municipal electoral rules did play a role, however, by hindering the funding advantages that larger parties once held.

Back to the referendum, the NDP officially supported the Green stance on proportional representation but an NDP promoter ran the official anti-PR campaign. The group quickly pulled a sensationalist TV ad that suggested PR would bring goose-stepping Nazis into the legislature.

If the NDP appeared ambivalent, it might have been because FPTP has historically served the party well. In 1996 the NDP won a majority of provincial seats with 39.5% of the vote, although the rival BC Liberals won 41.8%. And arguably the NDP has more to fear than the BC Liberals from rising Green power.

In a 2005 B.C. referendum, PR got 57.7% support but failed to meet the 60% minimum requirement. B.C. PR support fell to 39.09% in a 2009 referendum.

Ximen Mining announces progress as GGX Gold wraps up fall drilling on B.C. option

December 11th, 2018

by Greg Klein | December 11, 2018

Ximen Mining announces progress as GGX Gold wraps up fall drilling on B.C. option

Core shows a gold-bearing quartz vein from previously released hole COD18-45.
(Photo: GGX Gold)

 

While the company’s focus remains the Brett project, Ximen Mining TSXV:XIM sees continued encouragement from another southern British Columbia gold property. On December 11 the company updated progress on Gold Drop, under option to GGX Gold TSXV:GGX and located in the historic Greenwood mining camp about 500 kilometres east of Vancouver. Assays are now pending for an 11-hole autumn campaign conducted by GGX.

Taking place within 25 metres of two holes sunk earlier this year, the program targeted the southern extension of the property’s COD vein. Assays for the two holes released in August showed:

COD18-45

  • 50.15 g/t gold and 375 g/t silver over 2.05 metres, starting at 27.85 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.34 g/t gold, 13.35 g/t silver and 9.31 g/t tellurium over 0.43 metres)
  • (and including 28.1 g/t gold, 134 g/t silver and 85.5 g/t tellurium over 0.83 metres)
  • (and including 167.5 g/t gold, 1,370 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.46 metres)
  • (and including 5.69 g/t gold, 65.5 g/t silver and 58.2 g/t tellurium over 0.33 metres)
Ximen Mining announces progress as GGX Gold wraps up fall drilling on B.C. option

COD18-46 showed further indication of the
gold-bearing quartz vein. (Photo: GGX Gold)

COD18-46

  • 54.9 g/t gold and 379 g/t silver over 1.47 metres, starting at 29.57 metres
  • (including 5.57 g/t gold, 22.2 g/t silver and 16.85 g/t tellurium over 0.29 metres)
  • (and including 34.8 g/t gold, 239 g/t silver and 191 g/t tellurium over 0.3 metres)
  • (and including 223 g/t gold, 1,535 g/t silver and >500 g/t tellurium over 0.3 metres)
  • (and including 11.4 g/t gold, 127 g/t silver and 95.1 g/t tellurium over 0.14 metres)

True widths were unavailable.

Results announced in November from the as-yet undrilled COD North area included a grab sample grading 15.45 g/t gold, 159 g/t silver and 114.5 g/t tellurium. A chip sample showed 21.7 g/t gold, 216 g/t silver and 149 g/t tellurium over 0.4 metres. COD North has been permitted for a maiden drill program.

Ximen has received two of four annual payments on the option signed in 2016, which totals $400,000 cash, $600,000 in shares, another million shares and $1 million in spending over four years. Ximen retains a 2.5% NSR. Should GGX complete the 100% option, Ximen could form a JV by paying GGX 30% of its work expenses to that date.

In southern B.C.’s Okanagan region, Ximen has underground drilling and remedial work planned for the company’s flagship Brett project next spring. Last month the company stated that a gold recovery batch test supported an historic report of 4 g/t to 5 g/t gold from material stockpiled when a mine portal was built during the 1990s. The company plans additional metallurgical tests on the stockpiled material.

In southwestern B.C., Ximen holds the Treasure Mountain project proximal to Nicola Mining’s (TSXV:NIM) Treasure Mountain silver deposit, the site of short-lived underground mining operations in 2008 and 2013.

Earlier this month Ximen offered a private placement of $540,000.

Zimtu Capital pursues B.C. copper-cobalt with new company

December 10th, 2018

by Greg Klein | December 10, 2018

As recent sampling brings new interest to an historic property south of the Yukon border, Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC has created Core Assets Corp to take the Blue copper-cobalt project further.

Zimtu Capital pursues B.C. copper-cobalt with new company

All areas sampled during the autumn program
returned very promising assays, Zimtu reported.

An autumn field program found rock samples up to 1.56 g/t gold, 43.3 g/t silver and 8.46% copper from the French Adit area of the 1,130-hectare property, as well as up to 1.57 g/t gold, 46.5 g/t silver and 1.86% copper from the North Adit area. The adits date to previous exploration. The property has never been mined.

Referring to a 1950s academic study, Zimtu stated that “sampling the north end of the property using an undescribed sampling method reported grades of 0.6% cobalt over 3 feet. Copper was found at 3.5% and silver at 1 ounce/tonne. Some samples were described to have an erythrite coating on the surface and have cobaltite scattered throughout the magnetite.”

A 1973 drill hole sunk about 15 metres south of the French Adit brought historic, non-43-101 results of 0.27% copper over 175 metres, including 1.2% copper over 27 metres. The assays didn’t test for cobalt.

Next plans include geophysics and drilling on the winter-accessible property, says Core Assets director Scott Rose. The Blue project can be reached by snowmobile, by boat in summer, or by an 11-minute helicopter ride from the town of Atlin, connected by highway to Whitehorse, Yukon.

Blue will cost the privately held Core $100,000 and three million shares payable to Zimtu over two years. Zimtu retains a 2% NSR, half of which may be bought back for $1 million.

In addition to Rose, Core’s experienced board will consist of MGX Minerals CSE:XMG president/CEO Jared Lazerson and geologist Nicholas Rodway, with Zimtu president Dave Hodge also holding the president’s position at Core.

Association for Mineral Exploration names 2018 award winners as Roundup approaches

December 6th, 2018

by Greg Klein | December 6, 2018

As Roundup approaches, the Association for Mineral Exploration names 2018 award winners

The Chidliak discovery brings another potential diamond mine to Canada’s Arctic.
(Photo: De Beers)

 

Mine finders, financiers and builders will be honoured, but so will others including educators and a gold panner, as well as leaders in social and environmental responsibility and in health and safety. It takes a wide range of abilities to supply the world with the stuff we need and the Association for Mineral Exploration recognizes diverse achievements in its Celebration of Excellence awards. Winners were announced on December 6 in advance of AME’s annual Roundup conference scheduled for January 28 to 31 in Vancouver.

As Roundup approaches, the Association for Mineral Exploration names 2018 award winners

Yukon Dan Moore shares an award with geologist
and social responsibility practitioner Peter Bradshaw.

Al McOnie, Seymour Iles and Jared Chipman of Alexco Resource TSX:AXR win the 2018 H.H. “Spud” Huestis Award for Excellence in Prospecting and Mineral Exploration. The trio gets credit for the recent discovery and delineation of over 60 million silver ounces in the Flame & Moth and Bermingham deposits in Yukon’s Keno Hill Silver District.

John McCluskey wins the Murray Pezim Award for Perseverance and Success in Financing Mineral Exploration. McCluskey played a crucial role in acquiring, financing and encouraging the discoveries of La India (Grayd Resources, bought out by Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM in 2012), Mulatos (Alamos Gold TSX:AGI) and Kemess East (AuRico Metals, acquired by Centerra Gold TSX:CG in January), as well as his ongoing success as CEO of Alamos.

Eric Friedland, executive chairperson of Peregrine Diamonds (acquired by De Beers in September), Geoff Woad, former head of world diamond exploration for BHP Billiton NYSE:BHP and Brooke Clements, former Peregrine president, win the Hugo Dummett Award for Excellence in Diamond Exploration and Development for their part in discovering the Chidliak Diamond Province in Nunavut.

Tom Henricksen wins the Colin Spence Award for Excellence in Global Mineral Exploration  for “outstanding contributions to mineral discovery, and being involved in some monumental discoveries and/or acquisitions across the world.”

Matt Andrews and Monica Moretto win the Robert R. Hedley Award for Excellence in Social and Environmental Responsibility for their work with Pan American Silver TSX:PAAS.

Paycore Drilling wins the David Barr Award for Excellence in Leadership and Innovation in Mineral Exploration Health and Safety for the Paycore crew’s rescue operation following a helicopter crash.

Yukon Dan Moore and Peter Bradshaw share the Gold Pan Award for separate endeavours demonstrating “exceptional meritorious service to the mineral exploration community.”

As Roundup approaches, the Association for Mineral Exploration names 2018 award winners

Norman Keevil’s award honours his achievements
in B.C. and adjacent parts of the Cordillera.
(Photo: Teck Resources)

J. Greg Dawson and Victoria Yehl win the Frank Woodside Award for Distinguished Service to AME and/or Mineral Exploration for achievements that include Dawson’s research in land use planning and Yehl’s work as an AME organizer.

AME’s 2019 Outreach Education Fund grants $10,000 each to two groups: MineralsEd for the Kids & Rocks Classroom Workshop, and Britannia Mine Museum for its Education Program.

Norman Keevil, chairperson emeritus/special adviser for Teck Resources TSX:TECK.A/TSX:TECK.B and author of Never Rest on Your Ores: Building a Mining Company, One Stone at a Time, wins a Special Tribute for his achievements and contributions to exploration, discovery and development.

Congratulating the winners, AME chairperson ‘Lyn Anglin said, “The theme of AME’s 2019 Roundup conference is Elements for Discovery and these individuals and teams, through their remarkable efforts in elements of exploration, development and outreach, have generated discoveries and advancements which will bring benefits to the many diverse communities throughout British Columbia and Canada.”

Winners will be feted at the January 30 Awards Gala, part of AME Roundup from January 28 to 31 at the Vancouver Convention Centre East. Two days of short courses precede the event. Discounted early bird registration remains open until 4:00 p.m. December 14. Click here to register.

Read more about AME’s Celebration of Excellence award winners and their achievements.

Anchorage shakes, West Coasters quake

November 30th, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 30, 2018

“Waiting for the big one” comprises a fairly common West Coast refrain. So far on November 30 three destructive earthquakes have hit Anchorage. More may be coming.

The first and biggest, reaching magnitude 7 on the Richter scale, struck at 8:29 a.m. local time at an epicentre 13 kilometres north, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. Six minutes later a magnitude 5.7 emanated from four kilometres northwest of the city of almost 300,000 people. Nearly two hours later the Richter scale measured 4.9 at an epicentre 17 kilometres northwest.

Anchorage shakes, West Coasters quake

Police block traffic on a highway north of Anchorage
following the November 30 earthquakes.
(Photo: JT Fisherman/Shutterstock.com)

More shocks came from the town of Big Lake, about 35 crow-flying kilometres northwest of Anchorage, ranging in magnitude from 3.7 to 5.1.

By press time no deaths or serious injuries were reported. But highways and roads have been mangled out of shape, power has been knocked out, rail transport and the 1,290-kilometre Trans-Alaska pipeline have been shut down and at least one hospital has postponed non-emergency surgeries. A tsunami warning was issued and cancelled.

The Alaskan events serve as a warning to those living in tectonically troubled regions farther afield. Some of them have experienced lighter quakes just recently. One day earlier, magnitude 4 and 4.5 quakes struck near Fort St. John in northeastern British Columbia. A November 19 magnitude 4.1 event took place in the Juan de Fuca Strait 78 kilometres southeast of Sooke, B.C. The Pacific seafloor west of the northern Vancouver Island town of Port Alice had a busy autumn with six quakes measuring between 4.2 and 6.8 at epicentres between 233 and 174 kilometres southwest of the town. Other quakes in the last six months have struck the vicinity of Victoria on Vancouver Island’s southern tip and Port Hardy on the Island’s north, as well as the southern Vancouver suburb of Tsawwassen.

In fact about 400 quakes a year take place between northern Vancouver Island and Seattle, according to Natural Resources Canada, although only a dozen or so shake things up enough to grab people’s attention.

This region’s activity comes from the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a route running from the northern Island to California in which the oceanic Juan de Fuca Plate pushes its way beneath the continental North American Plate “at roughly the same rate as fingernails grow—about four centimetres per year,” NRCan explains.

Anchorage shakes, West Coasters quake

A common sign in coastal communities.

Quakes along the plate boundaries can reach a monumentally destructive 9 on the Richter scale. The region experiences them every 200 to 800 years, with the last occurrence in January 1700.

Getting back to Alaska, where the Pacific and North American plates rub each other the wrong way, magnitude 9.2 fell upon Anchorage, Seward, Valdez and other southern state locations on Good Friday 1964. The worst quake ever recorded after Chile’s magnitude 9.5 in 1960, it killed about 140 people amid widespread destruction. A tsunami hammered towns along the coasts of Alaska, northern B.C. and western Vancouver Island, reaching as far as Hawaii.

Today, West Coast communities tend to show awareness about seismic building standards, earthquake preparedness and tsunami evacuation routes. But that wasn’t always the case. The Cold War generation of 1964 likely worried more about Soviet nukes from above than tectonic tribulations below. That might explain why some Vancouverites, on that Good Friday in 1964, actually flocked to the shoreline to watch the “tidal wave” roll in.

Luckily for them, it spared their city.

The November 30 Anchorage quakes follow new earthquake preparedness legislation passed by U.S Congress just three days earlier.

 

Update: The earthquakes in the Fort St. John district were probably caused by fracking, a Geological Survey of Canada scientist told Canadian Press.

92 Resources adds B.C. vanadium project to Quebec lithium package

November 20th, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 20, 2018

Expanding its portfolio of energy metals, 92 Resources TSXV:NTY moves into a vanadium exploration region in eastern British Columbia. The 3,735-hectare Silver Sands property sits directly east of Ethos Gold’s (TSXV:ECC) Pine Pass project, where a recent trenching program brought results including 0.48% V2O5 over 130 metres, part of a cumulative, non-continuous extent averaging 0.43% V2O5 over 218 metres. Ethos reports approximately 20 kilometres of subcrop strike distance on the property.

92 Resources adds B.C. vanadium project to Quebec lithium package

Silver Sands hosts similar features, 92 states. The company interprets the property’s rock types as “an adjacent thrust sheet, of analogous or identical lithologies” to those at Pine Pass, with both properties hosting “regionally mapped early Triassic-aged Spray River Group rocks (containing the Toad River and Grayling formations), which have been known to host vanadium-bearing horizons associated with phosphatic shales.

“Specifically, the project is host to the Lemoray phosphate prospect, a phosphatic horizon which has been historically noted in the academic literature, but its relation to vanadium mineralization has not yet been tested.”

92 hopes to begin initial field work once snow melts, says Neil McCallum of Dahrouge Geological Consulting.

92 president/CEO Adrian Lamoureux said the acquisition suits the company’s strategic plans. “With a focus on future energy metals such as lithium and frac sand, we have now positioned the company with a key vanadium asset in a mine-friendly jurisdiction. We will now evaluate and put together our winter exploration plans that should contain our Phase I drill program at the Corvette-FCI lithium project in Quebec.”

An option signed in September with Osisko Mining TSX:OSK gives 92 a 75% earn-in on the 10,000-hectare FCI claims adjacent to the flagship Corvette project. Corvette channel samples released that month averaged 1.35% Li2O, along with tantalum averaging 109 ppm Ta2O5.

Vanadium prices now approach an all-time high, having jumped over 550% since September 2016, Lamoureux added. Chinese steel accounts for most demand but vanadium-redox flow batteries offer additional future potential.

Pine Pass regional infrastructure includes Highway 97, the Canadian National Railway, transmission lines and natural gas pipelines.

92 gets Silver Sands by paying staking costs of $15,000, while the vendor keeps a 2% NSR.

In addition to Silver Sands and Corvette, the company holds three other Quebec lithium projects, Pontax, Eastmain and Lac du Beryl, as well as the Golden frac sand project in southern B.C.

Read more about 92 Resources.

Drill-ready money

November 19th, 2018

Canada’s hitting a six-year high in exploration spending

by Greg Klein

Canada’s hitting a six-year high in exploration spending

Osisko Mining’s (TSX:OSK) Windfall project offers one reason why
Quebec leads Canada and gold leads metals for exploration spending.
(Photo: Osisko Mining)

 

Blockchain might offer intrigue and cannabis promises a buzz, but mineral exploration still attracts growing interest. A healthy upswing this year will bring Canadian projects a nearly 8% spending increase to $2.36 billion, the industry’s highest amount since 2012. According to recently released data, that’s part of an international trend that puts Canada at the top of a worldwide resurgence.

The $2.36 billion allotted for Canadian exploration and deposit appraisal forms just a small part of the year’s total mineral resource development investments, which see $11.86 billion committed to this country, up from $10.61 billion in 2017.

Those numbers come from Natural Resources Canada, which surveyed companies between April and September on their spending intentions within the country for 2018. The $2.36-billion figure includes engineering, economic and feasibility studies, along with environmental work and general expenses.

Canada’s hitting a six-year high in exploration spending

Trial extraction for Pure Gold Mining’s (TSXV:PGM)
Madsen feasibility studies encourages interest in
Ontario’s Red Lake region. (Photo: Pure Gold Mining)

Of that number, Quebec edges out Ontario for first place with $623.1 million in spending this year, 26.4% of Canada’s total. Ontario’s share comes to $567.5 million or 24%. Last year’s totals came to $573.9 million for Quebec and $539.7 million for its western neighbour. Prior to that, however, Ontario held a comfortable lead year after year.

Third-place British Columbia gets $335.5 million or 14.2% of Canada’s total this year, an increase from $302.6 million in 2017.

On a per-capita basis, Yukon’s enjoying an exceptional year with an expected $249.4 million or 10.6% of Canada’s total. That’s the territory’s second substantial increase in a row, following $168.7 million the previous year.

Saskatchewan dips this year to $187.2 million (7.9%) from $191.2 million in 2017. But the Fraser Institute’s last survey of mining jurisdictions placed the province first in Canada and second worldwide.

Nunavut drops too, for the third consecutive time, to $143.9 million (6.1%), compared with $177 million in 2017. The Northwest Territories’ forecast declines to $86.2 million (3.7%) this year after $91.2 million last year.

Canada’s hitting a six-year high in exploration spending

Among companies leading Yukon’s exceptional performance
is White Gold TSXV:WGO, with substantial backing from
Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM and Kinross Gold TSX:K.
(Photo: White Gold)

Especially troubling when contrasted with Yukon’s performance, data for the other territories prompted NWT & Nunavut Chamber of Mines president Gary Vivian to call on federal, territorial and native governments and boards to help the industry “by creating certainty around land access, by reducing unnecessary complexity and by addressing the higher costs they face working in the North. Sustaining and growing future mining benefits depend on it.”

The pursuit of precious metals accounts for $1.5 billion in spending, nearly 64% of Canadian exploration. Ontario gets almost 31% of the precious metals attention, with 27% going to Quebec.

Base metals, mostly in Quebec, B.C. and Ontario, get 15.5% of the year’s total. Uranium gets 5%, almost entirely in Saskatchewan. Diamonds get nearly 4%, most of it going to the NWT and Saskatchewan. But nearly 11% of this year’s total goes to a category vaguely attributed to other metals, along with coal and additional non-metals.

Getting back to this year’s exploration total ($2.36 billion, remember?), senior companies commit themselves to nearly 55%, compared with nearly 51% last year. But the juniors’ share remains proportionately much larger than the pre-2017 years.

Additional encouragement—and on an international level—comes from S&P Global Market Intelligence. Using different methodology to produce different results, the Metals and Mining Research team found worldwide budgets for nonferrous exploration jumping 19% this year to $10.1 billion.

Juniors have been reaping the biggest budget gains at 35%. Over 1,651 functional exploration companies represent an 8% improvement over last year and the first such increase since 2012. But that’s “still about 900 companies less than in 2012, representing a one-third culling of active explorers over the past five years.”

The most dramatic spending increase hit cobalt and lithium, this year undergoing an 82% leap in exploration spending. That’s part of a 500% climb since 2015, SPGMI says.

Canada’s hitting a six-year high in exploration spending

Nemaska Lithium’s Whabouchi project in Quebec
contributes to the enthusiasm for energy metals.
(Photo: Nemaska Lithium)

Even so, precious and base metals retained their prominence as gold continues “to benefit the most from the industry recovery.” The global strive for yellow metal will claim $4.86 billion this year, up from $4.05 billion in 2017. Base metals spending will grow by $600 million to $3.04 billion. “Copper remained by far the most attractive of the base metals, although zinc allocations have increased the most, rising 37% in 2018, the report states. “Budgets are up for all targets except uranium.”

SPGMI finds Canada keeping its global top spot for nonferrous exploration with a 31% year-on-year budget increase. Second-place Australia achieved a 23% rise. The U.S. total places third, although with a 34% increase over the country’s 2017 performance.

In each of the top three countries, over 55% of the budgets focused on gold.

“Improved metals prices and margins since 2016 have encouraged producers to expand their organic efforts the past two years,” commented SPGMI’s Mark Ferguson. “Over the same period, equity market support for the junior explorers has improved, leading to an uptick in the number and size of completed financings. This allowed the group to increase exploration budgets by 35% in 2018.”

You’re invited—Geoscience BC presents webinar on Peace region groundwater research

November 14th, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 14, 2018

November 21 marks the date for a live, interactive online event open to anyone interested in a four-year groundwater study conducted at northeastern British Columbia’s oil- and gas-producing Peace River region. Hosted by Geoscience BC through YouTube Live, the two-hour webinar will feature researchers from around the world who’ll present their findings and take audience questions.

When: Wednesday, November 21, from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PST

Where: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Zy354jH49M

For more info: http://www.geosciencebc.com/s/Workshops.asp?ReportID=839811&_Type=Workshops-and-Conferences&_Title=Peace-Project-Technical-Webinar-to-be-held-November-21-2018

Geoscience BC presents webinar on Peace region groundwater research

The Peace Project used airborne geophysics
as well as drilling in the first large-scale program
to map northeastern B.C. groundwater.
(Photo: Geoscience BC)

Draft agenda:

8:30 a.m. Peace Project introduction, Carlos Salas

8:40 a.m. Airborne geophysical survey, SkyTEM and Aarhus Geophysics, Q&A

9:05 a.m. Characterization of sediments and groundwater wells, Brad Hayes and Mel Best, Q&A

9:40 a.m. Summary of final report, Samantha Morgan, Q&A

10:10 a.m. Peace Project conclusions, next steps, Carlos Salas, Q&A

10:30 a.m. Close

Following the event, a video of the webinar will appear at the same YouTube location.

The non-profit group says the project’s maps, data and interpretations “provide an increased understanding of the aquifers and shallow groundwater in northeast B.C. and make it possible for First Nations, energy companies, communities and government to make informed decisions about the use and protection of water resources in the Peace region.”

Having undertaken over 160 projects so far, Geoscience BC encourages informed use of land, water and resources by making its findings available to local communities, governments, industry and the wider public.

Read more about the Peace Project.

See the Peace Project Final Report.

Read more about Geoscience BC here and here.

Canada’s spy agency monitors pipeline opposition, B.C. to overhaul environmental process

November 6th, 2018

by Greg Klein | November 6, 2018

An analysis from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service “clearly indicates the spy service’s ongoing interest in anti-petroleum activism,” Canadian Press reports. The news agency obtained the June document, originally classified top secret, through the Access to Information Act.

The CSIS review outlines opposition to the federal government’s $4.5-billion purchase of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline, saying some critics call it a betrayal of Canada’s positions on global warming and native rights.

Canada’s spy agency monitors pipeline opposition, B.C. to overhaul environmental process

Over 200 people have been arrested for breaching court orders at a Burnaby Mountain demonstration site in British Columbia, while other protests have taken place across Canada. But CP added that the report concedes “no acts of serious violence” took place. While activists questioned the spy agency’s interest, the report was heavily redacted, making any CSIS concerns unclear.

CSIS spokesperson Tahera Mufti told CP the agency follows legislation forbidding investigations into lawful protest. The news service quoted her saying, “While we cannot publicly disclose our investigative interests, we can say that it is important for the service to pose important analytical questions on these types of issues, such as the question of whether developments such as the purchase of a pipeline could give rise to a national security threat to Canada’s critical infrastructure.”

Ottawa bought the Trans Mountain project after a federal Court of Appeal rejected a proposed extension that the federal government had approved. The same court had previously rejected Enbridge’s Northern Gateway pipeline proposal, which won federal government approval in 2016. The court attributed both decisions to “inadequate” consultations with natives.

On November 5 the B.C. government introduced legislation to create a new Environmental Assessment Act requiring native participation at the outset of the review process.

“Having indigenous collaboration from the beginning means a more certain and efficient process where good projects can move forward more quickly, providing benefits to indigenous peoples while respecting their rights, values and culture,” said a statement from environmental minister George Heyman. “We want to reduce the potential for the types of legal challenges we’ve too frequently seen in B.C. These have impacted our province’s economic development, eroded public trust, alienated indigenous communities and left project proponents trying to navigate through a costly, time-consuming process.”

Although B.C.’s First Nations Leadership Council praised some aspects of the proposed act, the group objected that it would allow projects to proceed without native consent, according to another CP dispatch.

The legislation forms part of the Confidence and Supply Agreement in which B.C.’s Green Party agrees to support the minority NDP government.