Monday 24th July 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘british columbia’

BCSC warns investors of “Vancouver Stock Exchange”

July 20th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 20, 2017

Juniors, brokers, promoters desert Toronto to revive the Vancouver Stock Exchange

Better late than never, a warning sign
stands guard outside the former VSE building.

Whether inspired by a death wish or sheer audacity, an alleged scam has been named after the reputed scam capital of the world. On July 19 the British Columbia Securities Commission warned investors that a company called Vancouver Stock Exchange Corp “appears to have been issuing stock exchange listings to companies in China and B.C…. VSEC holds itself out as being the old Vancouver Stock Exchange (VSE). In fact, the VSE no longer exists.”

Moreover the new entity has no authorization to operate as an exchange in B.C.

The VSE merged with the Alberta exchange in 1999 to form the Calgary-based Canadian Venture Exchange, which was taken over in 2001 by the TMX Group’s (TSX:X) predecessor. But according to the commission, “VSEC claims that, in June of 2016, the old Vancouver Stock Exchange was reinstated as an independent exchange.”

VSEC’s Chinese-language website “identifies the companies that it purports to have approved for listing and capital raising,” the BCSC added. Anyone with info about VSEC is asked to contact BCSC Inquiries at 604-899-6854, 1-800-373-6393 or inquiries@bcsc.bc.ca.

On April 1, 2016, ResourceClips.com spoofed that a group of stock promoters planned to re-open the infamous VSE. See other April 1 stories:

Diamond explorer Arctic Star to drill B.C. property for rare earths and rare metals

July 19th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 19, 2017

With a crew now en route, Arctic Star Exploration TSXV:ADD prepares to begin a summer field program at its Cap project in east-central British Columbia. Located in the Rocky Mountain Rare Metal Belt, the 2,825-hectare property has undergone geochemical and geophysical surveys suggesting potential for carbonatite intrusions which might host niobium, tantalum and/or rare earth elements. A program of about three holes and 1,000 metres will further investigate the potential.

Diamond explorer Arctic Star to drill B.C. property for rare earths and rare metals

Piquing interest in the property is a circular magnetic anomaly measuring about three to five kilometres in diameter that the company interprets to represent a carbonatite or similar intrusion. Geochem sampling in 2010 on two dykes near the most prominent mag anomaly brought grades including 0.14% Nb2O5, 3,191 ppm zirconium and 547 ppm total rare earth elements, Arctic Star reported.

In 2011, following radiometrics and additional magnetics, the company found more highly anomalous grades with samples containing 0.27% Nb2O5 and 773 ppm TREE. Two historic, non-43-101 samples assayed 0.13% and 0.1% TREE.

Contrasting luxuries with critical minerals, Arctic Star last week announced plans to acquire a diamond project in Finland. The diamondiferous kimberlites of the Timantti property sit on the Fennoscandian Shield, home to the major Russian diamond mines Lomonosov and Grib.

In May the company announced a short program of geophysics on the Diagras diamond project in the Northwest Territories, where Arctic Star has a 40% stake with JV partner Margaret Lake Diamonds TSXV:DIA holding the rest.

Barite concentrate from Mountain Boy Minerals’ B.C. project surpasses industry standards

July 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 18, 2017

It’s a commodity essential to oil and gas drilling and one that the North American industry relies mostly on imports. But Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB has found barite on its Surprise Creek property in northwestern British Columbia’s Golden Triangle. Now metallurgical tests have produced a concentrate that far exceeds standards of the American Petroleum Institute, the company announced July 18.

Barite concentrate from Mountain Boy Minerals’ B.C. project surpasses industry standards

Mountain Boy explores the Golden Triangle for base
and precious metals, as well as industrial minerals.

“We are talking about a mineral which, according to the 2016 USGS report on barite, sells for an average of $198 f.o.b. mill with industry relying on imports for 78% of its needs,” said chairperson René Bernard. “With this knowledge in hand we can now promote our location within short trucking distance to deep water port, infrastructure, metal credits and proximity to key markets to attract industry partnerships. Our goal is to have a 43-101 industrial mineral resource later this year after all drilling is completed.”

Flotation tests were applied to a VMS-mineralized intercept that assayed 0.12 g/t gold, 28 g/t silver, 1.21% zinc, 0.03% lead, 0.31% copper and 46.73% barite over 18.94 metres. The hole remained open as drilling was suspended due to bad weather.

Flotation first separated copper and zinc, producing a concentrate of 26.2% copper at 70.5% recovery and 53.8% zinc at 89.1% recovery in an open cycle batch test. Higher recovery would be anticipated in a closed circuit test, the lab reported.

The tailings then underwent open circuit flotation, producing 91.6% BaSO4 at 83.2% recovery. The lab estimated that locked cycle tests could bring barite recovery closer to 90%.

The core comes from a drill hole on the Ataman zone, which extends over 1,200 metres of strike and comprises one of a number of the 100%-optioned property’s VMS zones. Last year’s surface work found a 25-metre-wide barite zone with significant base metals values 120 metres west of the hole, Mountain Boy stated. “Surface work also indicated barite zones extending to the mountaintop.”

This year’s Surprise Creek plans include further definition of sulphide/sulphide-barite zones and natural barite veins, along with additional metallurgical work on 2017 drill core, as well as the 43-101 resource.

Reporting on another northwestern B.C. project earlier this month, Mountain Boy announced the third hole in a row showing visible gold from its 35%-held Red Cliff property.

The company’s Golden Triangle portfolio also includes a 100% option on the BA project; a 20% stake in Silver Coin, a gold-silver-base metals project with a resource estimate; the MB property, with historic, non-43-101 polymetallic estimates; a 50% stake in the George property, with non-43-101 copper-silver-gold estimates; the American Creek and Bear Valley silver-base metals projects; as well as copper-gold claims. In southern B.C., Mountain Boy plans to begin PEA studies on its Manuel Creek zeolite project.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Initial metallurgy looks positive for 92 Resources’ NWT lithium project

July 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 18, 2017

Encouraging metallurgical results have come early for 92 Resources’ (TSXV:NTY) Hidden Lake project. Preliminary beneficiation tests for the road-accessible Northwest Territories property suggest favourable liberation characteristics and “amenability to simple and conventional spodumene mineral processing methods,” the company announced July 18. The lab conducted five flotation tests on a composite sample from four pegmatites on the Northwest Territories project. A standard flowsheet was used.

Initial lithium metallurgy brings 92 Resources a 6.16% concentrate at 79% recovery for NWT project

Backed by encouraging lab work, 92 Resources reactivates
its Hidden Lake camp this summer for another field program.

Results brought a “high-grade” spodumene concentrate of 6.16% LiO2 at 79% recovery, with an average spodumene lithium content of 3.8% lithium (or about 8.2% LiO2), close to the maximum theoretical limit, 92 Resources stated.

A low iron content also suggests the high quality of Hidden Lake spodumene. In a further advantage to mineral processing, the company added, tests confirmed the property’s dominant mica to be muscovite with low levels of lithium. Muscovite with high lithium levels “would dilute the lithium content of a final concentrate, as typically the lithium content would be significantly less than that of spodumene.”

“This initial work demonstrates the high-lithium/low-iron nature of the spodumene at Hidden Lake, as well as its favourable upgrading characteristics, both of which are highly attractive attributes of the project,” said president/CEO Adrian Lamoureux.

Phase II beneficiation tests will include magnetic separation, heavy liquid separation and further flotation on material collected during the upcoming summer field program.

Channel sampling last year tested four of the property’s six known lithium-bearing spodumene dykes, bringing assays up to 1.58% Li2O and 31 ppm Ta2O5 over 8.78 metres.

In January the company filed a 43-101 technical report for Hidden Lake. The 1,659-hectare property has year-round road access to Yellowknife, about 40 kilometres southwest.

92 Resources also keeps busy with its Golden frac sand project in eastern British Columbia, adjacent to Heemskirk Canada’s Moberly silica mine. Last month’s 10-day field program at Golden will provide data for a 43-101 technical report.

In northern Quebec, 92 Resources also holds the 5,536-hectare Pontax River lithium project.

The company closed an oversubscribed $895,199 private placement in February and received a $140,000 award under the NWT Mining Incentive Program in June to offset Hidden Lake expenditures.

How green are their ridings?

July 13th, 2017

A vehicle-deprived vagabond travels through Canada’s Green Party stronghold

by Greg Klein

A vehicle-deprived vagabond travels through Canada’s Green Party stronghold

A Cowichan Valley boat ramp parking lot shows the region’s preferred
mode of transport. Those tow hitches aren’t for canoes or kayaks, either.

 

The traffic’s fast and furious. That’s alarmingly apparent as you risk crossing the road to any of the locally famous caffeineries after perusing the locally produced arts, crafts and food tempting visitors at Salt Spring Saturday Market. This is Ganges, a charming town in Saanich North and the Islands, one of three ridings that awarded the balance of power to the Greens in last May’s British Columbia election. But it’s unmistakeably car country.

Green MLAs will hold considerable influence in B.C.’s legislature as long as they can prop up the New Democratic Party minority government. Part of Canada’s Green power base, Saanich North and the Islands nearly coincides with the federal constituency of Green MP Elizabeth May and forms part of a trio of nearby provincial ridings that elected one incumbent and two new Green MLAs.

By comparison the rest of Canada has just two Green MLAs (one each in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island) and zero MPs.

A vehicle-deprived vagabond travels through Canada’s Green Party stronghold

B.C. Green leader Andrew Weaver represents
a beautiful but largely car-dependent suburb.

A nice spring afternoon in this Salt Spring Island town notwithstanding, Ganges hosts many more people behind the wheel than on foot. And they seem to be in one hell of a hurry. In their defence, some residents say Salt Spring has Canada’s highest proportion of EV ownership.

Speaking to CBC, one island dweller divulged unofficial data showing “111 electric cars [out of 10,640 people, over half of them old enough to drive], when statistically in Canada we should only have five.” Maybe, but the noise of this little town’s hustle and bustle suggests overwhelming loyalty to fossil fuels.

Like the other islands in Green MLA Adam Olsen’s constituency, Salt Spring’s linked to the outside world mostly by B.C. Ferries. To the frustration of foot passengers, the provincially owned company typically locates its terminals in out-of-the-way spots to provide plenty of parking space. One of the riding’s biggest employers, B.C. Ferries normally makes vehicle ownership a job requirement for employees at its terminals.

To the further frustration of the car-less, B.C. Ferries schedules sync poorly with those of B.C. Transit, the provincial purveyor of municipal and regional bus service. It offers very occasional service on Salt Spring and none on the riding’s other islands.

 

Stroll along Oak Bay Avenue or any other Oak Bay-Gordon Head main drag and you’ll probably notice drivers exercising an un-Salt Spring km/h restraint. Nevertheless cars far outnumber pedestrians in this suburban Victoria riding bordering Saanich North. That’s despite this being a highly walkable neighbourhood with lots of convenient shops and services. There’s even, by Canadian standards, reasonably good bus service. This very affluent turf constitutes the domain of B.C. Green leader Andrew Weaver. Once again, vehicle-dependency seems to be taken for granted.

Like some of his party’s Salt Spring supporters, Weaver is said to tool around in an electric car. Maybe, like most politicians, he also takes token transit trips for political bragging rights. Of course the pyramid of CO2-reducing moral superiority builds from a car-dependent base to greater heights by ditching fossil-fuel engines for EVs, ditching EVs for transit, and ditching transit for walking or cycling. But the very apex of GHG-avoidance, according to one recent study, would be ditching parenthood. It turns out that babies—little scoundrels that they are—put other Big Oil lackeys to shame with their GHG profligacy.

That would seem to take the low-birthrate Western world off the hook, placing almost the entire climate-change blame on emerging societies. But the B.C. Greens’ push for free childcare and payments to stay-at-home parents seems irresponsibly averse to the big issue of our time.

 

Two bucks gets you a B.C. Transit ride all the way from the small Vancouver Island city of Duncan to Lake Cowichan. This weekend wayfarer took the trip on Canada Day, as one of only two passengers throughout the 29-kilometre, 45-minute trip traversing much of Green MLA Sonia Furstenau’s Cowichan Valley riding. The bus careens down Cowichan Lake Road, roughly parallel to much-busier Highway 18 and presumably the route that walkers and cyclists would take.

Would take. If there were any. There pretty much weren’t.

Big vehicles, mostly pickup trucks, dominate the town of Lake Cowichan. How can this Green valley reconcile this anti-Green lifestyle? Not easily. Still, even more than in Oak Bay, traffic moves slowly, at a relaxed rate that the average Salt Spring Green might achieve only with a heavy dose of environmentally correct Ativan. Downtown Lake Cow’s quite the experience actually, like witnessing a monster truck extravaganza in slow motion and with the volume turned way down.

Residential development sprawls about 15 klicks northwest to the former mill town of Youbou, now home to some fairly recently built large homes for fairly affluent people. Walking seems limited to very short distances to or from a vehicle. The one cyclist I saw looked as conspicuous as the magnificent elk ambling by.

Leave Furstenau’s constituency past Youbou and the road suddenly changes into a rough-hewn dust-cloud topsy-turvy gravel route with potholes big enough to swallow Elon Musk’s next Great Big Idea. For those residents who might drive EVs, that pretty much limits their egress to the road back to Duncan.

So, if the typically Canadian vehicle-based lifestyle of B.C.’s Green ridings seems to contradict Green values, what drives—oops, shoulda said “inspires”—their ballot box choice? Did voters not consider their own reliance on vehicles and all the resources used to manufacture, maintain and fuel them? Or did voters just want to send a message to B.C.’s two cynicism-inducing establishment parties? That would be a reassuring thought, one that might restore a smidgeon of faith in our troubled species.

Nevertheless, these ridings make nice places to visit. Parts of them have bus service too, but you’ll have to check out the schedules for yourself. Not likely you’ll find many locals who use transit.

Commerce Resources signs MOU for tantalum-niobium processing

July 11th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 11, 2017

While focused on its Ashram rare earths deposit in Quebec, Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE has plans for its other critical minerals project. Under a memorandum of understanding announced July 11, a one-tonne sample from the company’s Upper Fir tantalum-niobium deposit in British Columbia would be tested for suitability under a proprietary separation process developed in Estonia by Alexander Krupin.

Commerce Resources signs MOU for tantalum-niobium processing

Previous drilling has established a resource estimate for two
critical minerals on Commerce Resources’ Upper Fir deposit.

The sample should arrive within the next several weeks, with tests expected to begin immediately afterward. The goal would be to process Upper Fir feed stock into independent tantalum and niobium products.

Krupin’s background includes over 35 years in this area, including more than 15 years processing high-grade tantalum and niobium ore concentrates, Commerce stated. “His research activities have developed new technologies for the chemical upgrading of low-grade tantalum and niobium ore concentrates.”

Based on a tantalum price of $381 a kilo, Upper Fir has a 2013 resource showing:

  • indicated: 48.41 million tonnes averaging 197 ppm Ta2O5 and 1,610 ppm Nb2O5 for 9,560 tonnes Ta2O5 and 77,810 tonnes Nb2O5

  • inferred: 5.4 million tonnes averaging 191 ppm Ta2O5 and 1,760 ppm Nb2O5 for 1,000 tonnes Ta2O5 and 9,600 tonnes Nb2O5

The road-accessible east-central B.C. project has transmission lines and CN Rail crossing the western part of the 105,373-hectare property, and a 20-MW run-of-river electricity facility situated adjacently.

Commerce has found niobium in Quebec too, where samples showed very high grades up to 5.9% Nb2O5 on the company’s property about a kilometre from Ashram. Nevertheless the advanced-stage rare earths deposit remains the company’s priority, as it advances towards pre-feasibility. Among Ashram’s features are high grades, an impressive distribution of magnet feed elements and, crucial to the REE space, relatively simple mineralogy amenable to commercial processing. The deposit shows potential for a fluorspar byproduct as well.

Last month Commerce signed an MOU with Ucore Rare Metals TSXV:UCU to assess the suitability of Ashram concentrate for a proprietary method of REE processing at a plant Ucore plans to build in Utah. A Colorado pilot plant has already produced an Ashram concentrate exceeding 45% rare earth oxides at about 75% recovery.

The U.S. Geological Survey lists tantalum, niobium and rare earths among the critical minerals that the United States depends entirely on imports.

Read more about Commerce Resources’ Ashram rare earths deposit.

92 Resources president/CEO Adrian Lamoureux comments on potential markets for the company’s eastern B.C. frac sand project

July 6th, 2017

…Read more

Three in a row as another hole hits visible gold for Mountain Boy Minerals

July 5th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 5, 2017

The first three holes testing the Montrose zone of Mountain Boy Minerals’ (TSXV:MTB) Red Cliff project have all revealed yellow-tinged core. With assays still to come, the company announced visible gold in galena-sphalerite stringers at depths lower than expected, showing up at core lengths of 163 metres, 227 metres and 229 metres in a wide mineralized intrusive. Two weeks earlier Mountain Boy reported similar results for the second hole of the Phase I underground program in northwestern British Columbia’s Golden Triangle.

Three in a row as another hole hits visible gold for Mountain Boy Minerals

While assays are pending, the core looks
pleasing to Mountain Boy Minerals.

Another three holes have been completed on the property’s Red Cliff zone, about 900 metres south of Montrose. Findings so far indicate a mineralized zone five to six metres wide with strong chalcopyrite-pyrite within quartz veins and silicified intrusive, Mountain Boy stated.

Mountain Boy has a 35% interest in the joint venture, while Decade Resources TSXV:DEC holds the rest. Adjacently north, Decade works towards a 100% interest on the Silver Crown 6 claim. North of Silver Crown 6, Mountain Boy holds a 100% interest in the MB property, with historic, non-43-101 polymetallic estimates. Decade’s 100%-held Red Cliff Extension claim sits along the east side of Silver Crown 6.

Mountain Boy’s other Golden Triangle interests include a 20% stake in Silver Coin, with a 2011 gold-silver-zinc resource; 100% options on the Surprise Creek base metal-silver-barite project and BA silver-lead-zinc project; a 50% stake in the George property, with non-43-101 copper-silver-gold estimates; the American Creek and Bear Valley silver-base metals projects; as well as copper-gold claims. In southern B.C., meanwhile, the company’s Manuel Creek zeolite project has PEA studies slated to begin.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

A cornucopia in B.C.

June 30th, 2017

Isabel Belger discusses precious and base metals, industrial commodities with René Bernard of Mountain Boy Minerals

 

Isabel Belger discusses precious and base metals, industrial minerals with Rene Bernard of Mountain Boy Minerals

Isabel Belger

Isabel: I would like to introduce the new chairman of Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB, René Bernard. Hi René, it is a pleasure to talk to you again and congratulations on becoming chairman. Tell us a little bit about your background, and the decision for you to become chairman of Mountain Boy Minerals.

René: Thank you Isabel, it is always a pleasure to talk to you. Several years ago, I researched a number of junior exploration companies to invest in. I came across Mountain Boy Minerals and was attracted by their 20% carried interest in the Silver Coin property, a 43-101 resource next to a mature mining camp, and their ownership in several other properties with high-grade gold and silver mineralization. After my initial investment, I started talking to management and had an opportunity to visit the properties. As my share position grew over time I offered the company experience I had gained as CEO, president and director of several listed companies in the mineral resource sector. When I agreed to be a director, I was asked by the board to be chair and to actively help with their vision to advance the company’s mining assets.

Isabel: Mountain Boy Minerals projects are all in British Columbia. Could you give a little overview of your properties?

René: Ed [Kruchkowski], our president and CEO, has worked as a geologist in the Golden Triangle of northwestern B.C. for decades. This has allowed him to acquire over time some of the most promising properties. All of our properties, from the gold-rich Silver Coin and Red Cliff claim blocks to the MB Silver, which hosts Bonanza-grade silver mineralization, to the two large VMS zones present on the BA and Surprise Creek properties, have the potential to be operating mines. Not to take away from our precious and base metal assets, we also find industrial metals in our properties which could be profitably mined due to the proximity of roads, power and a deep water port within 30 to 40 kilometres. Earlier this year, we acquired a zeolite property in southern B.C. which is also close to the markets this mineral targets for its use.

Isabel: What have been the highlights so far?

René: There are many, but what comes to mind is the 43-101 report on the Silver Coin showing a large gold resource, our continued success in drilling into high-grade gold mineralization at Red Cliff, and our recent acquisition of the 50% interest in the BA and Surprise Creek properties.

Isabel: Cobalt and lithium have gained a lot of attention within the last year or so. MTB owns properties with the interesting commodities barite and zeolite. Could you explain to the readers what these two (maybe not so well known) commodities are used for and shed some light on why they are interesting?

Isabel Belger discusses precious and base metals, industrial minerals with Rene Bernard of Mountain Boy Minerals

René Bernard took up Mountain Boy
Minerals’ board leadership in May.

René: There would be no oil and gas exploration as we know it today without barite. It is a heavy non-metal mineral which is used as a weighing agent in drilling fluids to control pressure. There are no real alternatives to the use of this mineral. It is deemed a critical mineral as there is not enough local supply to meet demand. As per USGS, 78% of the North American demand was met through imports in 2016, mostly from China, India and Morocco. The USGS quotes the average value per ton as $198 f.o.b. mill. Our situation is unique in that we identified … barite within a large VMS system. The embedded barite zones also carry significant base and precious metal values, as observed by surface sampling and drilling, which adds value in the processing stage. The property is within eight kilometres of a B.C. Hydro transmission line and within 30 minutes’ trucking distance to the deep water port of Stewart.

At our zeolite property we have large zeolite beds with similar favourable infrastructure. Zeolite is called the mineral of a thousand uses. You will see its application in agriculture, water filtration, municipal wastewater treatment, oil spill and soil remediation, and much more.

Isabel: What‘s your strategy and your next steps with the two projects, maybe relating to how much easier it is to produce these in comparison to gold, and how that could help to make revenue—which could be used for developing the other projects?

René: On the barite project, we need to establish a 43-101 resource through systematic drilling. We have submitted material to an analytical lab to show metal recovery and barite specification through gravity and flotation treatment. Later in the year we will have to perform larger-scale testing to show that the process will work in a large operation. We will soon seek to engage industry partners in this exciting discovery.

At the zeolite property we are in the process of conducting several studies which will help us to get the support of the provincial government and local First Nations stakeholders in applying for a quarry licence in the future. We will also need to block out significant volumes through drilling and trenching, and submit samples for testing. The idea has been floating within the company to engage an engineering firm to test for processes to create a slow-release fertilizer. A value-added product like this could be marketed in large quantities and add great value for the company.

Isabel: What is the most exciting thing happening right now at Mountain Boy?

Isabel Belger discusses precious and base metals, industrial minerals with Rene Bernard of Mountain Boy Minerals

An intercept from late last year on the Ataman zone of Mountain Boy’s
50%-held Surprise Creek project showed 4.31% zinc, 44.75 g/t silver,
0.33% copper and 67% barite over 4.58 metres.

René: Our current drill program on the Red Cliff property, which started a couple of weeks ago, and getting ready to do work on the Ataman zone, a 600-metre-wide VMS system we discovered recently on the Surprise Creek property.

Isabel: What are the plans for the rest of 2017?

René: To do good work in advancing our properties with a focus on near-production opportunities. On the corporate side, we will focus on showing our shareholders and potential shareholders the value we see in our different properties. We will reach out to the mining and petroleum industry to attract potential equity partners. These partners would offer more to us than just money; their experience with commodities such as gold, silver, zinc, as well as barite and zeolite, and how to mine them and bring them to market. The company will be in early consultation with provincial and local government and the representatives of First Nations communities.

Isabel: How much money do you have in the bank?

René: Money is always a rare commodity with junior mineral explorers as we are tasked to spend it in developing our properties as soon as we receive it. We are contacting potential industry partners for financial participation and will work with the investment industry and individual shareholders to secure the funds necessary.

Isabel: How much of Mountain Boy is held by the management?

René: Management owns approximately 40% of the outstanding shares. We want to show our investors and co-owners that we truly believe in the value of our assets.

Isabel: What do you like about the mineral exploration business?

René: It is exciting and highly rewarding once an economic resource has been discovered and developed.

Isabel: What is your favourite commodity and why?

René: I like gold; though we all like gold (laughs). I favour silver and zinc to be champions due to depleting stockpiles and ever-increasing uses. I like the practical applications industrial minerals such as barite and zeolite are sought for and how fast they can be brought into production with minimal investments, creating much-desired cash flow.

Isabel: Where do you see the gold price?

René: Somewhere within $1,100 and $1,400 from the understanding I have about the markets and what drives supply and demand.

Read more about Mountain Boy Minerals here and here.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

The Greenwood renaissance

June 23rd, 2017

Golden Dawn Minerals moves to revive the historic B.C. mining camp

by Greg Klein

It’s a case of one bold decision leading to another. Among the companies that saw opportunity during the downturn, Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM began picking up past-producers, assembling a cluster of properties radiating around a mill in south-central British Columbia’s fabled Greenwood mining district. Now, with a recently released PEA and some of the permits in place, the company’s ready to boldly venture into trial mining sans feasibility.

Company adviser George Sookochoff credits president/CEO Wolf Wiese with being “very aggressive in making deals, acquiring properties and putting together this fantastic package. Now that markets are looking better, he’s already got his projects and financing lined up.”

Golden Dawn Minerals moves to revive the historic B.C. mining camp

Golden Dawn’s mill plays a vital role in the
company’s plans to re-activate the past-producing mines.

So extensive is Golden Dawn’s portfolio that it reads more like a catalogue. But the initial focal points constitute a mill with three nearby past-producers: the Lexington-Grenoble gold-copper, Golden Crown gold-copper and May Mac gold-silver-lead-zinc mines. The company’s crushing-grinding-gravity-flotation mill and tailings facility has a 212-tpd capacity expandable to 400 tpd. Built in 2007, it’s been on care and maintenance since the end of 2008.

“The mill is key to the potential success of this economic model,” Sookochoff explains. “It enables us to mine and process smaller deposits. We’ll find bigger deposits if they’re there but we could keep feeding the mill with these smaller deposits. All these projects are within 15 kilometres of the mill.”

With the advantages of refurbishable infrastructure straddling a highway 500 kilometres east of Vancouver, the PEA calculates a very high after-tax IRR of 103.4% and NPV of $19.7 million. Capex would come to $27.2 million, including pre-production costs of $3.4 million spent over six months. Payback would come in 1.4 years, while the life of mine would be 4.6 years.

The limited lifespan, of course, highlights the importance of resource expansion, Sookochoff emphasizes.

This week the company announced provincial approval to re-activate Lexington and the mill. The 2,020-hectare Lexington property had its underground infrastructure expanded by a previous operator that mined the project from April to December 2008, producing 5,486 ounces of gold, 3,247 ounces of silver and 860,259 pounds of copper that was processed at the Greenwood mill. Using a 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent cutoff, Lexington has a 2016 resource showing:

  • measured: 58,000 tonnes averaging 6.98 g/t gold, 1.1% copper and 8.63 g/t gold-equivalent for 16,100 gold-equivalent ounces

  • indicated: 314,000 tonnes averaging 6.38 g/t gold, 1.04% copper and 7.94 g/t gold-equivalent for 80,200 gold-equivalent ounces

  • inferred: 12,000 tonnes averaging 4.42 g/t gold, 1.03% copper and 5.96 g/t gold-equivalent for 2,300 gold-equivalent ounces

At Golden Crown, meanwhile, permitting is in process for surface drilling to upgrade the resource and test for extensions. The 1,017-hectare property underwent small-scale underground gold-copper mining early last century and extensive exploration on and off since then. Using a 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent cutoff, Golden Crown’s 2016 resource shows:

  • indicated: 163,000 tonnes averaging 11.09 g/t gold, 0.56% copper and 11.93 g/t gold-equivalent for 62,500 gold-equivalent ounces

  • inferred: 42,000 tonnes averaging 9.04 g/t gold, 0.43% copper and 9.68 g/t gold-equivalent for 13,100 gold-equivalent ounces

May Mac also has permit applications under review, these ones for underground drifting, drilling and bulk sampling. A previous round of underground drilling wrapped up in spring, resulting in high-grade silver-gold-base metals assays. Surface drilling continues.

But Golden Dawn’s very extensive assets—again, all proximal to the mill—offer additional potential to keep the facility busy beyond the PEA’s timespan. Among them are 29 former mines covering 11,000 hectares that came with the January acquisition of Kettle River Resources. One focus is the former Phoenix mine that reportedly gave up around 500 million pounds of copper and nearly one million ounces of gold. Sookochoff, a database specialist, has been poring over something like a century’s worth of files including approximately 3,000 maps and 500 reports.

In the last few years especially, junior companies have been able to acquire so much data that it’s a challenge to handle it efficiently.—George Sookochoff
Golden Dawn Minerals adviser

“In the last few years especially, junior companies have been able to acquire so much data that it’s a challenge to handle it efficiently,” he says. Nevertheless, after compiling the archives and incorporating new exploration data, he hopes to see some “deeper-seated feeder systems” underlying the shallow former mines.

Phoenix has deep-penetration airborne VTEM planned for September, he says. “If we get a strong anomaly coincident with a former mine, we’ll know that’s a mineralized geophysical signature and we’ll look for similar signatures around the property. This should be extremely valuable to identify larger systems deeper down, or even smaller ones closer to surface.”

Additional potential, not covered by the PEA, could come from Washington state. Earlier this month Golden Dawn announced an LOI for the Lone Star copper-gold property just across the border and contiguous with Lexington. With “material that looks very suitable to our mill,” the 234-hectare property would come with a 2007 estimate that the company considers non-43-101:

  • indicated: 63,000 tonnes averaging 1.28 g/t gold and 2.3% copper for 2,600 ounces gold and 3.19 million pounds copper

  • inferred: 682,000 tonnes averaging 1.46 g/t gold and 2% copper for 32,000 ounces gold and 30.07 million pounds copper

Big plans notwithstanding, Golden Dawn’s not immune to the typical junior hope that a senior might come knocking. The Greenwood camp’s largest landholder is Kinross Gold TSX:K. As the company’s Buckhorn mine close to the B.C. border in Washington state nears depletion, Kinross might look for other convenient assets to keep its Kettle River mill in operation, Sookochoff suggests. That might make some of Golden Dawn’s primarily gold assets attractive, although the high-grade copper projects would be more suitable for the Greenwood mill, he says.

As a native of Grand Forks, about a half-hour drive east, Sookochoff says the region shows strong community support for mining. A packed open house held in December went very well, he adds, and the company enjoys “very positive relations with the Osoyoos Indian Band. They’re very supportive, very pro-business.”

Earlier this month Golden Dawn closed the final tranche of a private placement totalling $1.76 million. In February the company closed a gold purchase agreement that brought in US$4 million. That same month the company received a US$1-million increase in a convertible security that began the previous August at US$2.4 million. Even with the caveat that the company intends to proceed without feasibility-level de-risking, the PEA allows Golden Dawn to return to the market “with a stronger story now,” says Sookochoff.