Tuesday 12th November 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘british columbia’

Belmont Resources director George Sookochoff extols the potential of an historic southern B.C. region

November 6th, 2019

…Read more

OSC promotes financial literacy, BCSC to get new powers of investigation and enforcement

November 1st, 2019

by Greg Klein | November 1, 2019

That “sociopathic securities regulator,” as Conrad Black called it, has new programs scheduled to help protect investors from, well, other sociopaths. The Ontario Securities Commission will present in-person, online and over-the-phone events throughout November to mark Financial Literacy Month.

People need the tools to make informed financial decisions, and through our financial literacy and investor education activities we’re helping millions of people get smarter about money.—Tyler Fleming,
Ontario Securities Commission

Among them are community seminars, a November 19 telephone town hall, a multilingual website expanded with 16 more languages, a video series, further editions of Investor News and additional resources on the OSC’s consumer website GetSmarterAboutMoney.ca.

“Improving people’s financial knowledge, skills, confidence and behaviour is a key area of focus of the OSC,” said the commission’s Tyler Fleming. “People need the tools to make informed financial decisions, and through our financial literacy and investor education activities we’re helping millions of people get smarter about money.”

Late last month the British Columbia Securities Commission joined the provincial government to announce “sweeping changes” that would give the BCSC “some of the strongest powers in the country.” The proposed legislation would be the first significant amendments of the province’s Securities Act since 2011 and the most extensive since the act became law in 1996.

The new measures would boost maximum fines and prison terms, with minimum sentences applied to some repeat offenders. In some cases the BCSC could impose fines without a hearing. The commission would also gain stronger investigative powers.

OSC promotes financial literacy, BCSC to get new powers of investigation and enforcement

Other measures would allow the BCSC to seize property transferred to third parties, prevent fraudsters from getting a driver’s licence or vehicle plates, and seize registered retirement savings plans.

The commission would also gain stronger control over derivatives trading and corporate transactions.

“B.C. is setting the bar high when it comes to protecting people’s investments,” said Ermanno Pascutto of the Canadian Foundation for Advancement of Investor Rights. “These amendments to improve fine collection rates are some of the most far-reaching in Canada and align with international best practice. We are pleased that the B.C. government and the BCSC will make it a priority to return funds to victims of investment fraud.”

The stronger measures apparently respond to a series of 2017 stories by Postmedia journalist Gordon Hoekstra detailing several cases of unenforced sanctions despite scammers holding significant assets. Over the previous decade the BCSC collected less than 2% of $510 million in fines and payback orders while the OSC enforced about 18% of its penalties, he reported.

“Immediately after the Postmedia investigation, the BCSC filed at least 10 writs of seizure and sale in B.C. Supreme Court for financial fraudsters owing nearly $70 million in penalties, and renewed three enforcement orders, “ Hoekstra wrote in June 2018. “Also following the investigation, B.C. Finance Minister Carole James ordered the BCSC to improve its collection record and called for new tools and modernization of the Securities Act to improve collection.”

Belmont Resources expands its presence in B.C.’s Greenwood camp

October 30th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 30, 2019

Newly acquired turf shows continued interest in an historic southern British Columbia mining region. On October 30 Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA announced 127 hectares of new claims to add to its existing holdings in the area.

The Glenora acquisition sits adjacent to Golden Dawn Minerals’ (TSXV:GOM) Golden Crown project, about three kilometres from Golden Dawn’s processing plant and one kilometre from the former Phoenix mine.

Belmont Resources expands its presence in B.C.’s Greenwood camp

Although neighbouring deposits don’t necessarily reflect on the potential of other properties, an idea of Greenwood activity can be gleaned from historic production at Phoenix. The open pit reportedly produced over one million ounces of gold and 500 million pounds of copper up to 1978. Golden Crown reached PEA in 2017 with a resource that uses a 3.5 g/t gold-equivalent cutoff:

Indicated: 163,000 tonnes averaging 11.09 g/t gold and 0.56% copper for 11.93 g/t gold-equivalent containing 62,500 gold-equivalent ounces

Inferred: 42,000 tonnes averaging 9.04 g/t gold and 0.43% copper for 9.68 g/t gold-equivalent containing 13,100 gold-equivalent ounces

Belmont plans further assessment of Glenora while considering other possible acquisitions in the camp.

The new claims will cost the company 420,000 units on TSXV approval, with each unit containing one share and one warrant. Another 420,000 shares are payable within a year and a 1.5% NSR will apply.

Earlier this month Belmont reported sample results from its Greenwood-area Pathfinder project, with grades up to 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 20700 ppm copper and 45.1 ppm cobalt. The autumn campaign followed a summer program that returned sample assays up to 29.2 g/t gold, along with silver, copper and lead. The company currently has contract proposals under review for an airborne VTEM survey over the property.

Belmont’s portfolio also includes a 75% interest in Nevada’s Kibby Basin lithium project, where drill results have graded up to 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres. In northern Saskatchewan the company shares a 50/50 stake with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT in two uranium properties.

Belmont currently has private placements on offer totalling up to $300,000. The company closed a $252,000 private placement last June and arranged two loans totalling $50,000 in August.

PDAC infographics: Highlighting mining’s contributions to Canada’s economy

October 28th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 28, 2019

Although Canadian miners hold global stature, Canadians don’t always recognize the industry’s importance to our own country. Yet the numbers tell a story that’s not only impressive but vital to understanding an economy in which mining supports one in 29 jobs and provides the largest private sector source of native employment.

To state the case clearly, the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada created a series of infographics outlining the industry’s contributions. Check them out yourself by scrolling down to see facts and figures for Canada overall and for each province or territory. Or click on the menu below for a direct link to each jurisdiction.

Canada nationwide | Yukon | Northwest Territories/Nunavut | British Columbia | Alberta | Saskatchewan | Manitoba | Ontario | Quebec | New Brunswick/Nova Scotia | Newfoundland and Labrador/Prince Edward Island

Posted with permission of the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada.

 

PDAC infographics Highlighting mining’s contributions to Canada’s economy

 

PDAC Yukon mining infographic

 

PDAC NWT Nunavut mining infographic

 

PDAC BC mining infographic

 

PDAC Alberta mining infographic

 

PDAC Saskatchewan mining infographic

 

PDAC Manitoba mining infographic

 

PDAC Ontario mining infographic

 

PDAC Quebec mining infographic

 

PDAC Nova Scotia New Brunswick mining infographic

 

PDAC Newfoundland Labrador PEI mining infographic

Posted with permission of the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada.

Over a Barrel: Documentary now online about Vivian Krause vs. the U.S.-funded campaign against Canadian oil

October 25th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 25, 2019

What they’ve done to us is actually brilliant—it’s pure brilliance. Because they’re not doing it to themselves. They’re getting Canadians to do it to ourselves. And I don’t think Canadians understand that this is what’s happening to them. On a larger scale, they’re doing to Canada what they did to my community. So I don’t think Canada really understands that the real war here is an outside force pitting Canadians against Canadians.—Ellis Ross, B.C. MLA and former chief councillor of the Haisla Nation, from the documentary Over a Barrel

The impressive work of a singularly remarkable activist has come to the screen, both in movie theatres and on computers. Over a Barrel presents a half-hour documentary on the research of Vivian Krause into the American-backed anti-oilsands campaign. Having already appeared in Alberta theatres, the film’s now online and, until October 31, for free (although donations are accepted).

Starting November 1, and in lieu of rich U.S. backers, an online viewing will cost $4.99.

Through well over a decade of perseverance, Krause has documented a money trail leading to powerful American interests whose more than half a billion in funding, tactics of disinformation, and interference in Canadian elections targets Albertans and other Canadians to the benefit of Americans and their oil industry.

The documentary also portrays a human cost to the campaign, as native spokespeople discuss how foreign interference and urban activists deprive their communities of badly needed economic development.

Click here to watch Over a Barrel online, for free or by donation until October 31 and for $4.99 after that.

Read an October 22 op-ed by Vivian Krause: Obama wasn’t the only American interfering in the Canadian election.

Read more about Vivian Krause and her work.

International Montoro Resources moves into Ontario’s Red Lake camp

October 23rd, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 23, 2019

A new acquisition brings another player into a busy northwestern Ontario mining and exploration region. Under an agreement announced October 23, International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT can earn a 51% interest in the 2,250-hectare Camping Lake property on the Birch-Uchi-Confederation Lakes greenstone belt, home to the Red Lake gold deposits and Great Bear Resources’ (TSXV:GBR) attention-grabbing Dixie Lake property 20 kilometres north.

International Montoro Resources moves into Ontario’s Red Lake camp

Previous work at Camping Lake includes petrographic studies, rock, soil and lake sediment samples, IP and ground geophysics, as well as drilling. Conducted between 2010 and 2013, the work was carried out by Laurentian Goldfields, Kinross Gold TSX:K and AngloGold Ashanti NYSE:AU. Montoro plans an immediate compilation of exploration data prior to its own program.

Under the JV agreement with Falcon Gold TSXV:FG, Montoro would issue 1.5 million shares over one year and assume Falcon’s payments of $65,000 over four years. Montoro’s exploration commitments would call for $100,000 within one year and another $200,000 over the second year. On earning the initial 51%, Montoro could up its stake to 75% by paying $500,000. A 2% NSR applies.

In Ontario’s Elliot Lake district, Montoro has found nickel-copper-PGE potential in addition to historic uranium and rare earths mineralization on the company’s Serpent River project. Last month Montoro engaged Mira Geoscience to undertake an extensive study of the company’s drilling and geophysics data, along with previous work on or around the property by other companies and regional programs by the Ontario Geological Survey.

In central British Columbia’s Cariboo region, Montoro holds a 2,138-hectare property bordering Defense Metals’ TSXV:DEFN Wicheeda rare earths project.

In southern Quebec’s Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region, Montoro holds the Duhamel titanium-vanadium-chromium prospect. The company’s portfolio also includes two northern Saskatchewan uranium properties held 50/50 with Belmont Resources TSXV:BEA.

Earlier this month Montoro closed a private placement first tranche of $47,500.

Read more about International Montoro Resources.

Read more about Ontario’s Red Lake camp.

Belmont Resources announces B.C. gold-silver-cobalt samples, appoints Greenwood veteran to BOD

October 17th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 17, 2019

Recent surface sampling at southern British Columbia’s Greenwood camp brought further encouragement to Belmont Resources’ (TSXV:BEA) Pathfinder project. The field program follows a summer campaign that yielded samples grading up to 29.2 g/t gold, as well as silver, copper and lead, from the historic mining region. The current batch shows anomalous cobalt as well:

  • 4.999 ppm gold, 35.86 ppm silver, 20700 ppm copper, 45.1 ppm cobalt
Belmont Resources announces BC gold-silver-cobalt samples, appoints Greenwood veteran to BOD

  • 0.153 ppm gold, 6.46 ppm silver, 6234 ppm copper, 148.8 ppm cobalt

  • 1.329 ppm gold, 14.07 ppm silver, 6540 ppm copper, 1486.8 ppm cobalt

  • 4.374 ppm gold, 19.5 ppm silver, 6667 ppm copper, 31.7 ppm cobalt

  • 2.172 ppm gold, 14.31 ppm silver, 6551 ppm copper, 931.6 ppm cobalt

  • 5.228 ppm gold, 17.39 ppm silver, 7302 ppm copper, 47.9 ppm cobalt

Further plans call for an airborne VTEM survey to identify drill targets. Three sides of the 296-hectare project border claims held by Kinross Gold TSX:K subsidiary KG Exploration.

Belmont also announced George Sookochoff’s appointment as director. Coming from a southern B.C. mining family, Sookochoff has served as president of GGX Gold TSXV:GGX and executive VP of Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM, two other companies active in the Greenwood camp. He’s also served as president/CEO of International PBX Ventures, now Chilean Metals TSXV:CMX, which holds copper and gold projects in Chile.

“Throughout my long career in the junior mining sector and having worked on numerous exploration projects around the world, it has always been my strong belief that the Greenwood mining camp, with its rich history in mining, still remains to be one of the best exploration areas in the world,” Sookochoff commented.

In Nevada Belmont holds a 75% interest in the Kibby Basin lithium project, where drill results have graded up to 393 ppm lithium over 42.4 metres and 415 ppm over 30.5 metres.

The company’s portfolio also includes two northern Saskatchewan uranium properties shared 50/50 with International Montoro Resources TSXV:IMT.

Last month Belmont offered a private placement of up to $510,000. The company closed a $252,000 placement in June and arranged two loans totalling $50,000 in August.

MGX Renewables/Zinc8 provides unique energy storage for innovative building

October 16th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 16, 2019

New technology will help conserve energy in an architecturally distinct new home now under construction in suburban Vancouver. MGX Renewables’ (CSE:MGXR) zinc-air energy storage system has been chosen for 75.9 House, a design by acclaimed architect Omer Arbel. The building’s structure will be distinguished by cement poured into fabric forms instead of plywood structures, providing not only strong thermal insulation but also a sculpted look that blends into the landscape. Arbel’s design was one of only two Canadian projects shortlisted for the future homes award at the World Architecture Festival to be held in Amsterdam next December.

MGX Renewables Zinc8 provides unique energy storage for innovative building

A depiction of 75.9 House,
now under construction in Surrey, B.C.

The energy storage system uses proprietary and patented technology of MGX Renewables, soon to be renamed Zinc8 Energy Solutions. President/CEO Ron MacDonald called the project “a significant milestone towards the commercialization of our breakthrough, long-duration, energy storage technology.”

Drawing on solar-generated energy, storage capacity for 75.9 House will start at 40 kW and 160 kWh and can be modified to accommodate increased demand.

As a modular system, Zinc8 can deliver power ranging from 20 kW to 1 MW or more, and energy from 160 kWh to 8 MWh or more, the company stated. The rechargeable zinc-air battery “can be configured to support a wide range of discharge power, recharge power and duty cycle requirements…. A very cost-effective and scalable solution now exists as an alternative to the fixed power/energy ratio of the lithium-ion battery for users requiring high storage capacity.”

“We are extremely excited to be working with Zinc8 to implement a new innovative zinc-air energy storage system for our build,” commented property owner Joe Haley. “Working with our world class architect with the intention to achieve a net zero home in this all-concrete modern structure, we feel this house will be one for the ages with its forward thinking and design.”

Paved with promises II

October 9th, 2019

The North’s infrastructure deficit impacts sovereignty, the economy and quality of life

by Greg Klein

The North’s infrastructure deficit impacts sovereignty, the economy and quality of life

The Chinese government’s majority-held Izok Corridor project
would benefit from Canadian infrastructure. (Photo: MMG Ltd)

 

This is the second of a two-part series. See Part 1.

Canada would gain a deep-water arctic port, Nunavut would get its first road out of the territory and mineral-rich regions would open up if two mega-proposals come to fruition. Recent funding announcements to study the Northwest Territories’ Slave Geological Province Corridor and Nunavut’s Grays Bay Road and Port projects could lead to a unified all-season route from a highway running northeast out of Yellowknife to stretch north through the Lac de Gras diamond fields, past the Slave and Izok base and precious metals regions, and on to Arctic Ocean shipping.

In mid-August, as federal and NWT elections neared, representatives from both levels of government announced a $40-million study into a possible 413-kilometre all-season route linking the NWT’s Highway #4 with a proposed Nunavut road. The project would also extend the NWT electrical grid to the Slave region, which straddles both sides of the NWT-Nunavut border.

The North’s infrastructure deficit impacts sovereignty, the economy and quality of life

Isolated Grays Bay could become an arctic shipping hub,
helping fulfill a dream that dates back to John Diefenbaker
and, not exactly a contemporary, Martin Frobisher.
(Photo: Grays Bay Road and Port Project)

That same month the federal and Nunavut governments, along with the Kitikmeot Inuit Association, announced $21.5 million to study a possible 230-kilometre Nunavut section. That proposal includes building a deep-sea port at Grays Bay, about midway along the Northwest Passage. Supporters hope to reach the “shovel-ready” stage in two to three years.

A “champion and proponent” of the project, KIA president Stanley Anablak said, “We know that this is only the first step, but if it is constructed, this infrastructure project will be a game-changer with respect to improved community re-supply, marine safety, arctic sovereignty, regional economic development and international investment.”

KIA perseverance helped revive the proposal after Ottawa refused to provide majority funding for the $527-million estimate in April of last year, 18 months before the federal election.

Another supporter is MMG Ltd, with two advanced base metals deposits in the region: Izok holds 15 million tonnes averaging 13% zinc and 2.3% copper, while High Lake shows 14 million tonnes averaging 3.8% zinc and 2.5% copper.

The North’s infrastructure deficit impacts sovereignty, the economy and quality of life

The Nunavut portion of a grand trans-territorial proposal.
(Map: Grays Bay Road and Port Project)

The Kitikmeot region “hosts some of the world´s more attractive undeveloped zinc and copper resources,” MMG stated. “However, located near the Arctic Circle and with no supporting infrastructure, these resources have remained undeveloped since their discoveries roughly 50 years ago.”

But could a supposed nation-building project become a nation-buster, compromising sovereignty for the sake of another country’s new silk roads? The proposal’s main beneficiary “will be the Chinese government, more so than the government of Nunavut or the government of Canada,” Michael Byers told the National Post in August.

About 26% of MMG stock trades on the ASX. China’s state-owned China Minmetals Corp owns the rest.

Byers, a political science prof and holder of the Canada Research Chair in Global Politics and International Law, “does not see a problem with a Chinese-controlled company operating mines in Canada,” the NP stated, “but he wonders if the company will be allowed to bring in Chinese workers to build the road and if Canadian taxpayers should foot the bill.”

The prospect of a Chinese company importing Chinese workers for a Canadian resource project has already been demonstrated by HD Mining International. In 2012 the company planned to staff underground operations at a proposed British Columbia coal mine exclusively with Mandarin-speaking Chinese. The mine was later put on hold, but not before an 18-month bulk sampling program conducted entirely by Chinese workers.

A new Grays Bay port and 350-kilometre all-season road formed part of the 2012 pre-feasibility study for MMG’s proposed mine. The company has since backed away from the estimated $6.5-billion price tag, calling for collaboration with others to build regional infrastructure.

We know that this is only the first step, but if it is constructed, this infrastructure project will be a game-changer with respect to improved community re-supply, marine safety, arctic sovereignty, regional economic development and international investment.—Stanley Anablak,
president of the
Kitikmeot Inuit Association

Certainly other companies would benefit too, as would the communities represented by the KIA. And as for sovereignty, neglecting infrastructure would cause the greater setback. That’s the perspective of a Senate report issued in June that called for several measures to expand the northern economy and enhance its culture. “The impact of federal under-investment hits hardest on the Arctic’s greatest asset, Indigenous youth,” the committee emphasized. “Opportunities for nation-building can no longer be missed.”

Among the senators’ priorities were energy and communications, as well as transportation, for the benefit of communities and industry. The committee recognized that mining comprises “the largest private sector employer in the Arctic, contributing to 20% to 25% of the GDP of the northern territories and supporting about 9,000 jobs directly, or one in every six jobs.”

The report also noted “growing global interest in the Arctic and rising international rivalry outside of the Arctic. Several non-arctic states in Europe and Asia have developed arctic policies or strategies.” Canada’s sovereignty over the Northwest Passage and other arctic waters depends on the principle of use it or lose it, the committee suggested.

The Northwest Passage route to Asia had been an alternative considered by Baffinland Iron Mines, the Nunatsiaq News reported last month. With ambitious infrastructure proposals of its own, the Baffin Island company currently relies on  trans-Atlantic routes to Europe and has also used Russia’s Northern Sea Route to reach Asia.

As part of its Phase II plans to increase production, Baffinland has applied for permission to build the territories’ second railway, which would run north from the Mary River mine to the company’s Milne Inlet port, now reached by a 100-kilometre freight road. The new track would precede a 150-kilometre southern rail extension to a port the company would build at Steensby Inlet. The Steensby route and facilities received environmental approvals in 2014.

This is the second of a two-part series. See Part 1.

Related reading: Reaching arctic mines by sea.

Paved with promises

October 7th, 2019

The North’s infrastructure needs get some attention from campaigning politicians

by Greg Klein

This is the first of a two-part series. See Part 2.

Could this be the time when decision-makers finally get serious about Northern infrastructure? With one territorial election just concluded and a deficit-budget-friendly incumbent federal party campaigning for re-election, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut might have reason to expect definitive action demonstrated by men, women and machinery at work. But while some projects show real progress, much of Canada’s Northern potential remains bogged down in talk and studies.

The North’s infrastructure deficit gets some attention from campaigning politicians

That’s despite some $700 million allocated to the North in Ottawa’s pre-election budget and months of Liberal spending promises since then. Not all that money was intended for infrastructure, however, and even some of the projects labelled that way turn out to be social or cultural programs. Not necessarily new money either, much of it comes out of Ottawa’s $2-billion National Trade Corridors Fund, now two years into an 11-year program that promised up to $400 million for transportation infrastructure in the three territories by 2028.

Yukon, once again home to active mining, has $157 million planned to upgrade the North Klondike Highway from Carmacks up to the mineral-rich White Gold region, where the Dempster Highway branches off towards Inuvik.

The Klondike section slated for upgrades has connections to a new mine and a soon-to-be revived operation. Highway #11 turns east from the Klondike, meeting with a 90-kilometre year-round service road to Victoria Gold’s (TSXV:VIT) recently opened Eagle operation.

The Minto copper-silver-gold mine that Pembridge Resources plans to restart in Q4 has a 20-kilometre access road with seasonal barge service or ice bridge crossing the Yukon River to the Klondike Highway at Minto Landing. From there, the company will ship concentrate to the Alaska Panhandle deep water port of Skagway.

The North’s infrastructure deficit gets some attention from campaigning politicians

With no deep water facilities of its own, Yukon connects
with the Alaskan port of Skagway and, pictured above,
the B.C. port of Stewart. (Photo: Stewart Bulk Terminals)

Intended to increase safety and capacity while addressing permafrost thaw, the North Klondike Highway project gets $118 million from Ottawa and $29 million from the territory. The money will be spent over seven years beginning in 2020.

A July feasibility report for BMC Minerals’ Kudz Ze Kayah polymetallic copper mine foresees concentrate shipment along a 24-kilometre access road to southern Yukon’s Highway #4, part of a 905-kilometre journey to Stewart, British Columbia, the continent’s most northerly ice-free port.

Another project approaching development but more distant from highways, Newmont Goldcorp’s (TSX:NGT) proposed Coffee gold mine calls for a 214-kilometre all-season road north to Dawson City. But with upgrades to an existing service road, the route would require only 37 kilometres of new construction.

In the NWT, work began last month on the Tlicho all-season road to connect the hamlet of Whati with Yellowknife, 97 kilometres southeast. Expected to finish by fall 2022, the $200-million P3 project would replace an existing ice road, giving communities year-round access to the highway system and encouraging resource exploration and development.

[The Tlicho road], which includes Indigenous participation from the Tlicho Government, is great news for our industry and a positive step forward in addressing the infrastructure deficit in the Northwest Territories.—Gary Vivian, NWT and Nunavut
Chamber of Mines president

About 50 kilometres north of Whati, Fortune Minerals’ (TSX:FT) NICO cobalt-gold-bismuth-copper project undergoes studies for a scaled-down feasibility update in light of lower cobalt and bismuth prices. Fortune has already received environmental approval for a spur road to Whati, part of a plan to truck NICO material to Hay River where the territories’ only rail line (other than short tourist excursions in southern Yukon) connects with southern Canada.

A much more ambitious priority of the NWT’s last legislative assembly was supposed to have been the Mackenzie Valley Highway, a Diefenbaker-era dream that would link the territory’s south with the hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk on the Arctic Ocean. The subject of numerous studies, proposals and piecemeal construction for about 60 years, the proposal has received more than $145 million in taxpayers’ money since 2000.

A 149-kilometre stretch from Inuvik to Tuk opened in 2017, linking the ocean with the Dempster route to the Yukon. Now underway are studies for a 321-kilometre route between Wrigley and Norman Wells, where further driving would depend on an ice road. Assuming receipt of environmental approvals, native agreements and an estimated $700 million, the NWT’s last assembly hoped construction on the Wrigley-to-Wells portion would begin in September 2024.

Far more ambitious proposals for the NWT and Nunavut took initial steps forward with funding announcements made just prior to the federal election campaign’s official start. Part 2 of this series discusses the Slave Geological Province Corridor and Grays Bay Road and Port projects.