Thursday 27th October 2016

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Posts tagged ‘bolivia’

Equitas Resources appoints advisers for its new Brazil gold producer

May 2nd, 2016

by Greg Klein | May 2, 2016

Days after acquiring a Brazilian gold operation, Equitas Resources TSXV:EQT announced a new advisory board to help develop the project further. Last week the company announced its takeover of Alta Floresta Gold and a large portfolio including a modest gold operation. The Cajueiro project’s Baldo zone produces approximately one kilogram of gold a month, an amount Equitas hopes to improve through greater recovery.

Equitas Resources appoints advisers for its new Brazil gold producer

A sample from the Cajueiro operation offers
evidence of additional near-surface gold potential.

Michael Bennett and Jon Coates comprise the new advisory board.

Bennett has spent 23 of his 30-year geologist career in South America, where he’s credited with three gold discoveries, Cajueiro and Coringa in Brazil, as well as Puquio North in Bolivia. A Brazilian resident who speaks Portuguese and Spanish, Bennett also serves as general manager for Brazil Manganese and a director and officer of Equitas subsidiary Alta Floresta Gold Mineracao.

Coates’ 36-year career encompasses mining geology and business development on five continents. He spent much of that time with BHP Billiton NYSE:BHP, where he held positions including regional manager Latin America, VP of business development China and chief geoscientist, exploration. Until recently he acted as executive geoscience adviser for the Saudi Arabian mining company Ma’aden.

In addition, Equitas announced filing an updated 43-101 technical report that recalculates data from a 2013 resource estimate, providing new numbers for four zones of sulphides and oxides. Sulphides now total 214,100 gold ounces indicated and 203,500 ounces inferred. Oxides total 78,400 ounces inferred.

An upcoming program of drilling, bulk sampling and trenching will seek additional oxide resources at Baldo.

Sulphides for Cajueiro’s four zones show:

Crente zone

  • indicated: 8.64 million tonnes averaging 0.771 g/t for 214,100 gold ounces

  • inferred: 5.83 million tonnes averaging 0.628 g/t for 117,700 ounces

Baldo zone

  • inferred: 1.32 million tonnes averaging 0.777 g/t for 33,000 ounces

Matrincha zone

  • inferred: 1.6 million tonnes averaging 0.797 g/t for 40,900 ounces

Marines zone

  • inferred: 785,000 tonnes averaging 0.472 g/t for 11,900 ounces

Total sulphides

  • indicated: 8.64 million tonnes averaging 0.771 g/t for 214,100 gold ounces

  • inferred: 9.53 million tonnes averaging 0.664 g/t for 203,500 ounces

Oxides for the four zones show:

Crente zone

  • inferred: 381,000 tonnes averaging 1.482 g/t for 18,200 ounces

Baldo zone

  • inferred: 309,000 tonnes averaging 3.029 g/t for 30,100 ounces

Matrincha zone

  • inferred: 155,000 tonnes averaging 2.717 g/t for 13,500 ounces

Marines zone

  • inferred: 529,000 tonnes averaging 0.977 g/t for 16,600 ounces

Total oxides

  • inferred: 1.37 million tonnes averaging 1.775 g/t for 78,400 ounces

Equitas sees near-surface oxide expansion potential in all four zones, as well as exploration potential in five other anomalies.

Read more about Equitas Resources.

Pay as you go

April 28th, 2016

New gold producer Equitas Resources sees revenue for incremental expansion

by Greg Klein

New gold producer Equitas Resources sees revenue for incremental expansion

Equitas Resources meets Alta Floresta during due diligence in Brazil.


Negotiations with minority shareholders dragged out longer than expected but on April 27 Equitas Resources TSXV:EQT officially made the transition from Labrador nickel explorer to Brazil gold producer. On closing its acquisition of Alta Floresta Gold, Equitas now takes over a modest gold operation with the intention of increasing production—and cash flow—incrementally. Should all go to plan, that would bring a step-by-step payback for each new stage of the operation, as well as funding for further exploration.

That certainly contrasts with the traditional exploration model, with which investors can be quick to show impatience. Equitas experienced that first hand after just one season of drilling its Garland project, despite its compelling nickel-cobalt-copper story south of Voisey’s Bay.

New gold producer Equitas Resources sees revenue for incremental expansion

In operation since June, the Cajueiro project holds potential
for greater recovery, as well as expansion of near-surface oxides.

Looking for alternative financing, then-president/now-chairperson Kyler Hardy learned about Alta Floresta’s Cajueiro project through a friend in the company. Hardy not only liked its potential. He also recognized a good fit between the two companies’ teams.

Alta Floresta brings to Equitas its 100% interest in six gold properties with four production licences, part of a portfolio covering more than 184,410 hectares in Brazil’s central states of Mato Grosso and Para. The flagship Cajueiro project’s Baldo zone has been in operation since June, producing around a kilogram of gold a month. That amounts to recovery of only about 30% to 35%, achieved by running alluvium and saprolite through a sluice box.

Equitas hopes to see considerable improvement within months by installing a gravity plant, then about 85% recovery with carbon-in-leach processing that could begin early next year. Full open pit production would be a longer-term goal.

We expect the payback for each stage in less than a year, much less for the gravity plant. We’re derisking it that way, by building in stages.—Chris Harris, president/CEO
of Equitas Resources

The plan is to “develop the project in stages and each stage has to pay for itself,” explains new president/CEO Chris Harris. “We expect the payback for each stage in less than a year, much less for the gravity plant. We’re derisking it that way, by building in stages. That could also provide cash flow for a sustaining exploration program which we hope would then beget further development.”

Of course these are perilous times for Brazil, now undergoing serious recession, a wide-ranging corruption scandal and impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff. Compounding the problems are their effect on the Brazilian real, which contrasts with currently high gold prices. “But what that’s doing to our project is creating huge cost compression,” Harris says. “That benefits both capex and opex.” The company has already selected a nearly new gravity plant in the region for purchase. Its price has sunk to less than half of what he projected last year.

Exploration will focus on near-surface oxides, where Equitas sees the greatest potential for resource expansion and low-cost extraction.

Except for one property slightly north, the entire portfolio sits on the Juruena gold belt, which has historic estimates of seven to 10 million ounces of artisanal output. Straddling the border between Para and Mato Grosso states, the 39,053-hectare Cajueiro property’s near-term agenda could include bulk sampling and trenching, as well as diamond and rotary air blast drilling. Exploration will focus on near-surface oxides, where Equitas sees the greatest potential for resource expansion and low-cost extraction.

A just-filed 43-101 technical report recalculates data from a 2013 resource estimate to allow for different gold price and opex numbers. The new study bases a cutoff of 0.25 grams per tonne on a near-surface deposit that can be processed by cyanidation or gravity processing. The report provides separate numbers for four zones of sulphides and oxides.

Total sulphide zones:

  • indicated: 8.64 million tonnes averaging 0.771 g/t for 214,100 gold ounces

  • inferred: 9.53 million tonnes averaging 0.664 g/t for 203,500 ounces

Total oxide zones:

  • inferred: 1.37 million tonnes averaging 1.775 g/t for 78,400 ounces

All four zones show near-surface oxide expansion potential, Equitas states. Five other anomalies offer additional encouragement.

The project has road access to the city of Alta Floresta, 95 kilometres north. A hydro dam now under development should bring electricity within two years, if not sooner.

The arrangement combines talent from both companies. Harris casts a close eye on the accounts, having 30 years’ experience in energy, commodity trading and mining finance with companies like Ernst & Young, CIBC, Enron UK and BHP Billiton NYSE:BHP.

Hardy, through 16 years as a resource sector entrepreneur and executive, demonstrates a facility for operating remote, logistically complex exploration projects. Director Alan Carter, who also sits on the board of Eric Friedland’s Peregrine Diamonds TSX:PGD, brings 30 years’ exploration experience with the likes of Rio Tinto NYSE:RIO, BHP, and ECI Exploration and Mining, among others.

Equitas Resources closes acquisition of Brazilian gold operation

Cajueiro’s alluvial lure suggests
expansion potential to Equitas.

Co-director David Hodge also serves as president of Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC, a project generator that supports several juniors with acquisitions and advisory services. VP of exploration Everett Makela began his career with Inco, eventually retiring as Vale’s (NYSE:VALE) principal geologist for North America. His international experience includes Brazil.

Mike Bennett, a local resident and director of Equitas subsidiary Alta Floresta Mineração, has spent 23 of his 30 exploration years in South America where he took part in three gold discoveries, Puquio North in Bolivia, as well as Coringa and Cajueiro in Brazil.

Also residing locally, Portuguese/English-fluent Richard Crew acts as operations consultant for Alta Floresta Mineração. His 30 years of experience includes positions as operations manager and COO for numerous companies worldwide. Another nearby resident, project manager and exploration geologist Elvis Alves knows the community as well as the minerology.

The deal has Equitas issuing 103.65 million shares to former Alta Floresta shareholders and 5.28 million options, exercisable at $0.15 for three years, to former Alta Floresta option holders. A 1.75% NSR applies to licences acquired two years ago from a former minority shareholder of Alta Floresta.‎

Earlier this month Equitas closed the final tranche of a private placement that totalled $1.5 million from 30 million units. Insiders bought 10.4 million units.

“We’ll be talking about implementing the gravity plant very shortly,” Harris says. “We’ll also be talking about starting our drilling plan, the drill results and possibly a revised 43-101. We’ll have a steady news flow.”

Canada to boost support for mining, but faces challenges

September 18th, 2013

by Cecilia Jamasmie | September 18, 2013 | Reprinted by permission of

Canada’s Prime Minister Stephen Harper is ready to launch an aggressive campaign to promote the country’s mining sector abroad, in an effort to redirect trade spending and foreign affairs to core economic interests.

Canada to boost support for mining, but faces challenges

Prime Minister Stephen Harper announces support
for Northern Innovation in Mining, August 2013.
(Photo: PMO)

Ed Fast, the international trade minister, began Wednesday a cross-country campaign to get feedback from experts and actors on what kind of support they think the government should offer mining companies.

According to the Globe and Mail, the move comes as the Harper administration starts warming up its campaign machine for the 2015 elections.

But Harper faces a challenging scenario. As a result of the global mining slowdown, Canada’s mining sector has been hit hard by weak commodity prices and lack of interest from foreign and local investors.

For the first time in a decade, Canada’s normally bustling resource industry failed to book a single initial public offering (IPO) on either the Toronto Stock Exchange or the TSX Venture Exchange in the first quarter of the year, a PwC survey revealed.

Tarnished name

While Canada remains the world’s top destination for mining investments, the sector has built a less-than-popular reputation abroad. Local miners have faced domestic opposition to their projects in all parts of the globe, including Greece, Colombia, Nicaragua, Peru, Bolivia, the Dominican Republic, Slovakia, Romania and Israel.

In January, for example, hundreds of Greeks protested in Thessaloniki against several gold mining projects owned by Vancouver-based Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD.

The following month, Catholic priests and small-scale miners marched with 5,000 locals in Matagalpa, Nicaragua, against a project owned by Vancouver-based B2Gold TSX:BTO.

In April tens of thousands of Colombians took to the streets of Bucaramanga, the country’s sixth-largest city, to defend their water supply from Vancouver-based Eco Oro Minerals’ TSX:EOM gold project.

Recently, Toronto-based Barrick Gold TSX:ABX admitted before a Chilean judge it had committed several violations in regards to its touted $8.5-billion Pascua Lama gold and silver project, straddling the border of Chile and Argentina.

And the most fresh example is the renewed opposition Gabriel Resources TSX:GBU faces in Romania because of its Rosia Montana gold project. Only yesterday the country’s president, Traian Basescu, asked Parliament to withdraw a bill that would allow the London-based Canadian miner to move forward.

However the future looks auspicious. Canada is among the top five producers of potash, uranium, nickel, platinum, aluminum, diamonds and steel-making coal. And global demand for commodities is expected to grow by up to 75% over the next 15 years, according to the world’s No. 1 miner, BHP Billiton NYE:BHP.

Reprinted by permission of

Rating the risks

February 28th, 2013

A Fraser Institute survey shows how miners and explorers see the world they work in

by Greg Klein

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“Great mineral assets, highly corrupt government….” That’s sometimes the conundrum under which exploration and mining companies operate. And that was just one comment published by the Fraser Institute as it evaluated a world of challenges and opportunities in its annual Survey of Mining Companies released on February 28.

Between October 2012 and January 2013, 742 companies rated 96 jurisdictions which included countries and, in the case of Canada, Australia, the U.S. and Argentina, provinces, states and territories. Respondents considered 15 policy factors affecting investment decisions in those jurisdictions, for a possible maximum score of 100. Some factors included regulations, corruption, taxation, aboriginal land claims, infrastructure, the local workforce, political stability and physical security.

While the full report provides breakdowns by category, here are the top 10 jurisdictions for overall scores. The 2011-to-2012 rankings are in parentheses.

A Fraser Institute survey shows how miners and explorers see the world they work in

The Fraser Institute’s annual survey rates jurisdictional risk
for a number of factors concerning mining and exploration.

1. Finland (New Brunswick)
2. Sweden (Finland)
3. Alberta (Alberta)
4. New Brunswick (Wyoming)
5. Wyoming (Quebec)
6. Ireland (Saskatchewan)
7. Nevada (Sweden)
8. Yukon (Nevada)
9. Utah (Ireland)
10. Norway (Yukon)

Last but least, here are the bottom 10:

87. Greece (Vietnam)
88. Philippines (Indonesia)
89. Guatemala (Ecuador)
90. Bolivia (Kyrgyzstan)
91. Zimbabwe (Philippines)
92. Kyrgyzstan (India)
93. Democratic Republic of the Congo (Venezuela)
94. Venezuela (Bolivia)
95. Vietnam (Guatemala)
96. Indonesia (Honduras)

Utah and Norway knocked Saskatchewan and Quebec out of the top 10. Greece was added to the survey for the first time, only to join Zimbabwe and the Democratic Republic of the Congo for their bottom 10 debut. Another first-timer, French Guiana placed 27th overall, a fairly impressive ranking for a newcomer and non-First-World country.

Crisis-torn South Africa dropped to 64th place overall compared to 54th last year, retaining its fourth-from-last spot for “labour regulations, employment agreements and labour militancy or work disruptions.”

Of Canadian jurisdictions, Nunavut ranked worst at number 37.

Some anonymous concerns listed under “horror stories” ranged from uncertainty about native rights in Ontario to potential corruption in Quebec. One response stated that “endless ‘community consultation’” in the Northwest Territories costs the company more than exploration. Others noted confiscation of mining rights in Indonesia and expropriation in Bolivia.

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Year in review: Part II

December 29th, 2012

A mining and exploration retrospect for 2012

by Greg Klein

Read Part I of Year in Review.

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Graphite boom, bust and echo

One of the commodities that excited the 2012 market, graphite began stirring interest in 2011 and really gained momentum early this year. But the precipitous fall, right around April Fool’s Day, let cynics bask in schadenfreude. It was a bubble all along, they insisted.

Well, not quite. Despite reduced share values, work continued as the front-runners advanced their projects and earlier-stage companies competed for position in graphite’s second wave of potential producers. By autumn some of the advanced-stage outfits, far from humbled by last spring’s events, boldly indulged themselves in a blatant bragging contest.

Old king coal to regain its throne

If clean carbon doesn’t excite investors like it used to, plain old dirty carbon might. By 2017 coal’s share of the global energy market will rival that of oil. So says the International Energy Agency, which issued its Medium-Term Coal Market Report in December.

A mining and exploration retrospect for 2012

The forecast sees China consuming over half the world’s production by 2017. “Even if Chinese GDP growth were to slow to a 4.6% average over the period, coal demand would still increase both globally and in China,” the report stated. India, with the world’s “largest pocket of energy poverty,” will take second place for consumption.

Coal’s growth in demand is slowing, however. But its share of the energy mix continues to increase even though Europe’s “coal renaissance” (sic) appears to be temporary.

Bringing coal miners to new hassle

Chinese provide much of the market and often the investment. So why shouldn’t they provide the workers too? That seems to be the rationale of Chinese interests behind four British Columbia coal projects.

The proponents plan to use Chinese underground workers exclusively at the most advanced project, HD Mining International’s Murray River, for 30 months of construction and two additional years of mining. Only then would Canadians be initiated into the mysteries of Chinese longwall mining. But with only 10% of the workforce to be replaced by Canadians each year, Chinese “temporary” workers would staff the mine until about 2026. The B.C. government has known about these intentions since at least 2007.

The HD Mining saga has seen new developments almost every week since the United Steelworkers broke the story on October 9.

As Greenland’s example suggests, the scheme might represent another facet of China’s growing power.

Geopolitical geology

Resource imperialism aside, resource nationalism and other aspects of country risk continued throughout 2012. South American Silver TSX:SAC continues to seek compensation after spending over $16 million on a silver-polymetallic project that the Bolivian government then snatched as a freebie. Centerra Gold TSX:CG escaped nationalization in Kyrgyzstan but works its way through somewhat Byzantine political and regulatory intrigue, as does Stans Energy TSXV:HRE. In November the latter claimed a court victory over a hostile parliamentary committee.

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Week in review

October 12th, 2012

A mining and exploration retrospect for October 6 to 12, 2012

by Greg Klein

«Le Plan Nord est enterré»

Plan Nord was nothing more than “marketing” for projects that were already in the pipeline. So says Quebec’s new natural resources minister, according to Sunday’s Montreal Gazette. But industry observers still don’t know how the newly elected Parti Quebecois will treat the mining sector.

Prior to the province’s September 4 election, then-premier Jean Charest vowed his Liberal government would spend $2.1 billion on a massive infrastructure program to develop Quebec north of the 49th parallel. Over a 25-year period, Plan Nord would attract $80 billion in private and public investment, he said. During the election campaign, however, PQ leader Pauline Marois called the Liberals’ planned expenditure a $2.1-billion giveaway to the private sector.

A mining and exploration retrospect

Marois also talked of imposing a 5% royalty on all minerals extracted and a 30% tax on all mining profits above 8%. Her election victory raised obvious concerns throughout the sector.

“People involved in the Plan Nord are very anxious to know the position of the government,” Nochane Rousseau, a partner in PricewaterhouseCoopers’ Montreal office, told the Gazette. He pronounced the Plan Nord “brand” dead but added, “In order to create wealth, we absolutely will have to develop our natural resources, and northern Quebec is overflowing with them.”

Natural Resources Minister Martine Ouellet made her dismissive comment in a meeting with the editorial board of La Presse. She refused the Gazette’s requests for an interview.

New regulations disappoint Ontario explorers

Ontario’s exploration sector suffered a setback with a new mining law that takes full effect April 1. Probably the industry’s biggest chagrin is the requirement to consult native bands prior to early-stage exploration drilling on Crown land. The bands will have 30 days to express concerns, which could then block a permit, according to a Tuesday dispatch from Bloomberg. “It’s going to cost a lot more now and there are going to be a lot more delays,” the news agency quoted Mistango River CEO Robert Kasner.

Solid Gold Resources TSXV:SLD CEO Darryl Stretch told Bloomberg, “It should be the government’s duty to consult with first nations, not the mining industry’s.”

Stretch was a vocal member of Miners United, a group representing about 60 companies that surfaced at last spring’s Toronto PDAC convention to express concern about native relations. In a March 27 Globe and Mail story about the group, Ontario Prospectors Association Executive Director Garry Clark said that native bands charge companies for exploration drilling in confidential deals that often surpass $100,000.

Bullish, but …

Among those predicting more merger-and-acquisition activity are the three principals of NewGen Asset Management, which was written up in Friday’s Financial Post. “Our strategy is to identify those [most] likely M&A candidates,” said Manager David Dattels. The FP explained that one of the company’s portfolios “typically has about 20 core holdings, with others used as trading positions, including short positions that usually represent 5% to 20% of the portfolio.”

Dattels’ enthusiasm for the industry has its limits. “Mining has traditionally been a poorly managed industry. Corporate governance is probably the worst relative to other industries. Investors are smartening up to that.”

Consumers acquire critical commodity companies

Increasing demand and a 15% Chinese export tax have put another EU-designated critical mineral in the spotlight. Fluorspar “is used throughout the world, primarily by the chemical industry, for refrigerants and foam products and in the manufacturing of aluminum, Teflon, refined petroleum products, glass and medicine,” the Gold Report quoted Jennings Capital Analyst Ken Chernin on Tuesday. “There are virtually no substitutes for many of its uses and it is an essential ingredient in hydrofluoric acid.”

Chernin added that companies with deposits outside China are candidates for acquisition—and not necessarily by other miners. “In February 2012, the aluminum company RUSAL acquired the remaining 50% of Russia’s only fluorspar producer, [Yaroslavsk Mining Company], from Russkaya Gornorudnaya Kompaniya,” he said. “Fluorspar is used to produce aluminum fluoride, which is used in the production of aluminum. And in January 2012, the chemical group Solvay announced it acquired a 30,000 tonne-per-year fluorspar mine in Bulgaria from Italy’s M&M Group. DuPont and Honeywell are also big consumers of fluorspar.”

More of the same for Venezuela

Hugo Chavez “gets six more years to squeeze industries.” That’s how the Globe and Mail commemorated the results of Venezuela’s Sunday election. His 54% vote gives Chavez another six years in office, which would extend his presidency to 20 years. The Reuters commentary notes that “the nationalization campaign Mr. Chavez launched in 2007 has saddled the state with scores of loss-making companies.” Nevertheless he plans to continue nationalizing companies and confiscating mining operations.


“Vehement” was South American Silver’s TSX:SAC denial of the latest allegations from the Bolivian government. The company’s Tuesday statement responded to an October 5 threat of legal action from Minister of Mines Mario Virreira, who claimed South American Silver had been working in Bolivia illegally.

The accusations “are patently false and have no factual basis,” the company said, repeating its intention to seek international arbitration “to obtain full compensation, including the fair market value of the Malku Khota Project.” Bolivia confiscated the silver-indium project in July, after SAC had sunk over $16 million building a resource. On October 3 Virreira stated the company would get zero compensation.

Cry the troubled country

Reports from South Africa said two more people died in labour-related violence early Thursday, while on Friday the three-week truck drivers’ strike ended. Also on Friday Atlatsa Resources TSXV:ATL announced that 2,161 fired employees would be reinstated provided they return to work at the company’s Bokoni Platinum Mines by October 15.

An attempt at reassurance came from Platinum Group Metals TSX:PTM. On Friday the company stated that progress continues on its application for a $260-million loan to build the WBJV Project 1 Platinum Mine in South Africa. Phase I development “has been progressing steadily and well…. There are approximately 325 people on site and the project has completed 880,000 man hours with a single minor lost-time incident.”

Not surprisingly the news was buried by allegations that surfaced on Thursday. South African President Jacob Zuma reportedly spent $23 million of public money renovating his home.

On Monday Kitco News summarized the situation for 10 major companies recently affected by South African strikes.

Canadian juniors explore the world. But beyond?

It’s twice the size of earth, mostly diamond with some graphite thrown in—but credit for the discovery goes to astronomers, not geologists. Apparently not the first diamond planet ever discovered, 55 Cancri e, as it’s unhelpfully named, “is the first time one has been seen orbiting a sun-like star and studied in such detail,” according to a Thursday report from Reuters.

And, as the news agency pointed out, “any fortune-hunter not dissuaded by The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s jazz age morality tale of thwarted greed, will find Cancri e about 40 light years, or 230 trillion miles, from Park Avenue.”

Week in review

October 5th, 2012

A mining and exploration retrospect for September 29 to October 5, 2012

by Greg Klein

So much for the environmental review

Monday’s news from British Columbia indicates another level of uncertainty has hit the province’s mining sector. Two B.C. cabinet ministers refused an environmental assessment certificate for Pacific Booker Minerals TSXV:BKM, even though the company passed a provincial environmental review. As a result, the half-billion-dollar Morrison copper-gold-molybdenum proposal has been put on hold.

A new development at the provincial level, it does have similarities to a federal decision to reject Taseko Mines’ TSX:TKO Prosperity gold-copper mine proposal for B.C. A November 2010 report from the Canadian Environmental Assessment Authority convinced the federal government to reject the $800-million proposal. The three-member CEAA panel found few significant adverse environmental effects but emphasized significant adverse effects on established native rights, potential rights, potential title, tradition and culture.

Mining and exploration week in review

Now B.C. has taken a comparable approach, although the supposedly “environmental” arguments come from politicians, not the people who conducted the environmental review. In fact the provincial review repeatedly stated that, with successful implementation of mitigation measures and conditions, the Morrison mine is “not likely to have significant adverse effects.”

Nevertheless Derek Sturko, who’s both executive director of B.C.’s Environmental Assessment Office and an associate deputy minister of the environment, seemed to reject his own department’s 270-page report. He suggested instead that the government take a “risk/benefit approach.” Sturko also emphasized strong native opposition and a “moderate to strong prima facie case for aboriginal title.” On that basis, two cabinet ministers representing mining and the environment nixed the proposal.

The decision might be related to the pre-election BC Liberal government’s prevaricating but currently negative stance towards the proposed Northern Gateway pipeline. But the province’s decision, like the federal decision regarding Taseko, also raises the question of whether native rights are handled according to the principle of law or appeasement.

Taseko submitted a revised $1.1-billion New Prosperity proposal to the feds on September 20. On Tuesday Business in Vancouver cited analysts, for some reason speaking anonymously, who said Taseko’s $300-million revision remains viable despite a drop in copper prices. But “with a large question mark as to whether the federal government will approve the project on a second go-round, they’re currently ascribing no value to the project in their target stock prices for the company,” BIV reported.

On Tuesday Pacific Booker Director Erik Tornquist told ResourceClips his company is reviewing its options.

Confiscation without compensation

If miners haven’t given up on B.C., it might be a case of the devil they know. Wednesday’s announcement that the Bolivian government would not provide compensation for nationalizing the Malku Khota Project followed months of uncertainty for South American Silver TSX:SAC. Since 2007, the company had spent over $16 million building a resource of 158 million ounces silver and 1,184 tonnes indium with lead, zinc and copper credits.

The company claimed the support of 43 out of 46 land-owning indigenous groups. SAC blamed illegal artisanal miners and activists from outside the region for intense opposition from the three dissident communities.

But last May, the company said, Mining Minister Mario Virreira signed an agreement with the 43 supportive groups stating that the government will not reverse the mining concession and that the company should continue exploration.

Protests turned violent in June, with one death and several injuries. Later that month seven people were taken hostage, including three drill contractors, two SAC employees, a government prosecutor and a police officer. The final three hostages were released unharmed after 11 days, when the government decreed that it would nationalize Malku Khota.

Reuters quoted a confident-sounding Vice-President Alvaro Garcia saying, “If we have to invest $500 million or $700 million or even $1 billion for a large-scale project at Malku Khota, which benefits Bolivia, the state is prepared and has the capacity to do that.”

At the time he added that government might pay compensation of $2 million or $3 million. Then came Wednesday’s decree. In an Agence France-Presse dispatch printed in the Globe and Mail, Virreira stated, “The nation has no financial obligation to South American Silver.”

By press time South American hadn’t responded. In an August 2 statement Greg Johnson, then the company’s president/CEO, said the company is prepared to go to international arbitration.

But, as Financial Times correspondent Andres Schipani pointed out, “Getting fair compensation, or any for that matter, from Bolivia has proved tricky since 2007. A year after [President Evo] Morales took office, the Andean country pulled out of the World Bank body that conducts arbitration between businesses and governments …”

Schipani noted other troubled nationalizations in Bolivia, including the Colquiri tin mine taken from Glencore in June. The government rationalized the move by saying it could then end disputes between independent and unionized miners. But the conflict flared up again with more violent clashes which shut down operations. On September 14 Reuters quoted Hector Cordova, president of the state-owned mining company, who said, “We’re losing more than $250,000 per day through lost production and this has been going on for two weeks. That means an accumulated loss of almost $4 million.”

Last Sunday the government said it solved the dispute by dividing the mine’s richest vein between the rival groups.

Friends and foes in the Kyrgyz Republic

On Friday three Kyrgyzstan MPs faced criminal charges while political unrest focused on Centerra Gold’s TSX:CG Kumtor Gold Mine. Prosecutors say the three attempted to overthrow the government by leading a mob that stormed the parliament building on Wednesday, Reuters reported. The incident grew out of a protest demanding that Kumtor be nationalized.

Violence has turfed previous Kyrgyzstan governments in 2005 and 2010. Last June a motion to nationalize Kumtor failed to pass parliament but MPs did pass a motion to consider increasing the country’s 33% stake in the Centerra subsidiary that owns the mine, as well as redefining the concession and boosting taxes.

But reassuring news came on Monday when Kyrgyzstan’s new president Zhantoro Satybaldiyev declared, “Kumtor will not be nationalized.” He told Reuters, “Problems will be resolved. I asked [the Kumtor venture] to keep up its output.” He added, “The way they extract gold, it’s really a state-of-the-art job. To be honest, I am jealous of their skills.”

The news agency pointed out, however, that the government had cancelled a televised auction of mining licences on August 28 after protesters stormed the TV studio.

Kumtor produced 583,156 gold ounces in 2011 at $482 an ounce. But in August the company blamed its $54.6-million Q2 loss largely on Kumtor’s “abnormal mining costs.”

Last September Kyrgyzstan ordered Stans Energy Corp TSXV:HRE to suspend drilling at its Kutessay II REE Deposit. According to the company, the government wanted “a firm proposal for the gratuitous transfer of a percentage of ownership” of a company subsidiary to the state. The stop-work order ended as the company met with Satybaldiyev and Economic Minister Temir Sariev.

In a statement issued Monday, Stans quoted Sariev saying, “Our state does not have the necessary financial and technical resources for the development of deposits and we have, so far, no such specialists. Development of the mining industry of our country at this stage is only possible by attracting investment. And the investors will come to our country when they will be confident in the safety of their financial investments.”

South Africa: A tragic outcome from a positive move?

Another striking miner was killed in South Africa Thursday night. On Friday Anglo-American Platinum fired 12,000 strikers. A Reuters dispatch in the Globe and Mail stated, “When rival Impala Platinum fired 17,000 workers in January to squash a union turf war, it led to a six-week stoppage in which three people were killed, the company lost 80,000 ounces in output and platinum prices jumped 21%.”

One disturbing aspect of the crisis is that a generous pay hike in a poor country can cause so much controversy. In last month’s “Lonmin settlement,” the platinum producer raised miners’ wages between 11% and 22%. Nic Borain, described as “an independent political analyst,” told Reuters, “Amplats had been giving signals that it was going to hold the line after Lonmin had folded—but it’s a huge gamble. Someone had to take it on the chin or this would have kept on unravelling and spread through the economy. It’s difficult to know whether this causes the unrest to spread or whether it takes some of the sting out of it. It could go either way.”

New World reports Bolivia Assays of 2 g/t Gold, 1.28% Copper over 121.6m

February 15th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningNew World Resource Corp TSXV:NW announced drill results from its Lipeña/Bonete project in southern Bolivia. Highlights include

2 g/t gold, 14.07 g/t silver and 1.28% copper over 121.6 metres
(including 3.89 g/t gold, 32.04 g/t silver and 3.33% copper over 34.2 metres)
0.69 g/t gold over 65.4 metres (including 2.35 g/t gold over 7.5 metres)
2.72 g/t gold over 2.5 metres
0.92 g/t gold over 80.6 metres (including 1.13 g/t gold over 56.4 metres)

The Lipeña/Bonete project has an NI 43-101 mineral resource estimate of 240,193 ounces gold, 152 million pounds copper and 3.6 million ounces silver in the indicated category; 93,763 ounces gold, 91 million pounds copper and 3.7 million ounces silver inferred.

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John Lando

by Ted Niles

Apogee reports Bolivia Silver Assays up to 129 g/t over 30m

January 30th, 2012

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningApogee Silver Ltd TSXV:APE announced results from its Pulacayo deposit in southwest Bolivia. Assays include

79.3 g/t silver over 20.8 metres (including 119.7 g/t over 9 metres)
129 g/t over 30 metres
130 g/t over 9 metres
186.7 g/t over 6 metres
67.2 g/t over 19 metres
50.2 g/t over 23 metres (including 109.3 g/t over 6 metres)

President Chris Collins said, “We are very excited by the first set of assay results from the silver-oxide diamond drilling program at Pulacayo. These results confirm that the extensive silver-lead-zinc mineralization associated with the main Veto Tajo Structure at the Pulacayo Deposit continues through the oxide zone to the surface. These results coupled with positive results from oxide zone metallurgical testing undertaken last year offer excellent potential for a significant increase in silver ounces in resources at Pulacayo with the addition of oxide-zone mineralization. A further potential benefit is that oxide-zone mineralization would generally be amenable to lower cost mining and leaching methods.”

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Marilia Bento
VP Corporate Development

or G. Scott Paterson
Chairman of the Board

by Ted Niles

Apogee reports Bolivia Silver assays including 664 g/t over 2m

December 22nd, 2011

Resource Clips - essential news on junior gold mining and junior silver miningApogee Silver Ltd TSXV:APE announced assays from its Pulacayo deposit in southwest Bolivia. Results include

291 g/t silver over 1 metre
254.5 g/t over 2 metres
411.7 g/t over 3 metres
515 g/t over 3 metres
462.9 g/t over 2.9 metres
613.5 g/t over 2 metres
664 g/t over 2 metres

CEO Neil Ringdahl remarked, “The results of our exploration initiatives continue to encourage and these results to the east reinforce our belief in the potential to develop profitable mining on a second front, lending weight to the theory that large production can be achieved through several independent underground sections. Currently the company continues with its trial mining program and development of underground infrastructure in the central or San Leon area for commercial production later in 2012.”

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Marilia Bento
VP Corporate Development

or G. Scott Paterson

by Ted Niles