Friday 2nd December 2016

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Posts tagged ‘bc’

Prima’s TSX Venture debut

April 19th, 2013

Prima Fluorspar advances a critical mineral in a safe jurisdiction

by Greg Klein

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Is this any time to join the TSX Venture? According to Prima Fluorspar Corp TSXV:PF president/CEO Robert Bick, his company’s April 19 trading debut comes at exactly the right time. He maintains Prima has a necessary commodity for a niche market, a big, high-grade, near-surface historic resource, a strong team with past success and the likelihood of future interest from some very big players.

For all that, fluorspar’s hardly well-known. Yet it’s all around us. The lower-priced metallurgical grade finds its way into iron, steel, aluminum and cement. As for the pricier acid grade, modern refrigeration wouldn’t exist without it. Most new medicines rely on its derivatives. An EU-designated critical mineral, fluorspar plays a crucial role in producing a wide range of products we’d rather not live without. As emerging countries improve their living standards, those societies will find fluorspar products increasingly important.

Purple fluorspar right at surface offers encouraging signs for Prima’s Liard project in B.C.

Purple fluorspar right at surface offers encouraging signs
for Prima’s Liard project in B.C.

That probably explains China’s export restrictions. It’s both the fluorspar world’s largest producer and largest consumer, in the latter role mostly as a manufacturer of goods for export. Last year the country produced 61% of global supply, according to the U.S. Geological Survey, a slight decrease from the previous year. Mexico produced another 17.5% in 2012, with third-place Mongolia offering a mere 6%, demonstrating the enormous imbalance in world production.

Prices, meanwhile, have climbed 225% between 2005 and 2012.

Despite China’s overwhelming share of production, the country’s expected to become a net importer within five years. As Simon Moores of the authoritative journal Industrial Minerals has explained, country risk was a major factor in fluorspar’s designation as a critical mineral.

Located in a friendly jurisdiction, Prima’s Liard fluorspar project looks all the more appealing. The northern British Columbia property holds 22,500 hectares along the Alaska Highway in a region that is, by B.C. standards, not particularly rugged. And there’s certainly fluorspar in them there hills.

Chemical companies absolutely need what we do and there have been companies in Europe in the past, for example Bayer, who actually did their own fluorspar mining. But chemical companies have no idea what exploration is all about.—Robert Bick, president/CEO
of Prima Fluorspar

Some 3.2 million tonnes grading 32% calcium fluoride (CaF2, also known as fluorite), according to an historic, non-43-101 resource. That’s a big, high-grade—albeit non-compliant—asset that the Prima team plan to prove up and expand. “With fluorspar projects, it’s very difficult to get such high-grade deposits,” says geologist Neil McCallum of Dahrouge Geological Consulting. “And most of the high-grade deposits out there are vein-type deposits where you might only have widths of one or two metres. So we’ve got pretty wide mineralization. What we tested was exposed on surface.”

The 61 historic holes found 20 showings, seven of them major, along a 30-kilometre strike potential. Prima’s preliminary work last fall tested two showings to find channel samples of 23.76% CaF2 over 19.55 metres and 23.49% over 74.55 metres. By spring or early summer McCallum plans to be back with a field crew doing geophysics and setting up a base camp prior to this year’s drill campaign of up to 100 holes and 10,000 metres.

“We’ll mostly do confirmation holes until we get the geophysical results. Then we’ll focus on building resources. What we’re aiming for is something that could be mined cheaply. Having something at surface that’s open-pittable will be important,” McCallum explains.

“With rare earths and a lot of the specialty metals, a project sinks or floats on the right metallurgy,” he adds. “But with most fluorspar deposits, it’s a fairly simple process.” Historic metallurgical tests brought results over 97% CaF2, the threshold for the more expensive, more highly demanded acid grade fluorspar, known as acidspar. More recent improvements in metallurgical science suggest even better results to come, McCallum points out.

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Carbon chronicles

April 3rd, 2013

A roundup of recent news from the ever-competitive graphite space

by Greg Klein

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While graphite frontrunners like Flinders Resources TSXV:FDR, Northern Graphite TSXV:NGC and Focus Graphite TSXV:FMS work through the pre-development or even pre-production stage, other companies vie for runner-up status. Among news announced April 3, Standard Graphite TSXV:SGH released assays from the final two holes of its 2012 drill campaign. These near-surface results come from the Oat Zone, east of the company’s Mousseau East Deposit in southwestern Quebec, showing 5.69% graphitic carbon over 6.8 metres and 5.73% over 20.1 metres.

True widths weren’t available. The top-most intercept started at a depth of 22 metres down hole while the deepest stopped at 64.6 metres.

A roundup of recent news from the ever-competitive graphite space

Additional assays and metallurgical results are pending
for Rock Tech Lithium’s Lochaber graphite project.

These assays conclude Standard’s 2012 campaign, which verified part of Mousseau East’s historic drilling as well as extending mineralization east and west. (Click here for some previous assays.) The company plans fieldwork and additional drilling this year to better define and expand the mineralization.

The same day Energizer Resources TSX:EGZ reported an analysis that it says further supports the February preliminary economic assessment for its Molo graphite deposit in Madagascar. In a statement accompanying the announcement, Energizer president/COO Craig Scherba said, “If the graphite price falls off by 25% and there is a 20% opex cost over-run, the project still has very positive IRR and NPV values.”

Going back a week, on March 27 Big North Graphite TSXV:NRT announced grab and channel sample assays for its Grand Lac du Nord property in eastern Quebec. The results “confirmed a multiple graphite-bearing structure covering an area approximately four kilometres by two kilometres, with results of up to 5.31% graphite,” the company stated. Its name notwithstanding, Big North also has a southern presence. That’s in Sonora state Mexico, where the company has three projects that include a 50% share in Nuevo San Pedro and 100% of Caraples and La Fortuna, all small-scale past-producing amorphous graphite mines. Last January Big North commissioned an NI 43-101 technical report for Nuevo San Pedro, which the company’s preparing to re-open.

On March 26 Canada Strategic Metals TSXV:CJC announced flake size distribution for grab samples from three parts of its 25-square-kilometre La Loutre property in southern Quebec. The company plans 15 to 20 holes of near-surface Phase I drilling this spring. One day earlier, Graphite One Resources TSXV:GPH announced it commissioned a PEA for its Graphite Creek property, 65 kilometres north of Nome, Alaska. Along with an updated resource, the study is slated for Q1 2014 release.

On March 21 Canada Carbon TSXV:CCB announced more surface sample assays that “confirmed the presence of a high-quality lump/vein graphite deposit” on the former Miller open pit mine about 80 kilometres west of Montreal. The company plans a busy spring with geophysics, channel sampling and drilling.

Speaking of drilling, on March 18 Rock Tech Lithium TSXV:RCK reported more assays from its Lochaber project, also in southwestern Quebec. One hole “intersected 84.56 metres of graphitic carbon at various depths with grades ranging from 1.11% to 4.42% Cg,” while another found 117.99 metres “at various depths with grades ranging from 1.3% to 3.63%.” Still to come are assays for 12 more holes, re-submitted assays from Phase I drilling and test results for flake size distribution and purity.

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Fortnight in review

March 28th, 2013

A mining and exploration retrospect for March 16 to 28, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Qualified person de-qualified

A geologist who faked assays and wrote false news releases has been slammed by the Ontario Securities Commission. On March 28 the OSC announced sanctions against Bernard Boily, a one-time VP of exploration for Bear Lake Gold TSXV:BLG who worked on the company’s Larder Lake gold project in the Cadillac Break of northeastern Ontario.

Some examples of his fanciful figures follow, with real results in brackets:

  • 8.5 grams per tonne gold over 1.2 metres true width (2.6 g/t over 1.2 metres)
  • 10.6 g/t over 6.5 metres (3.6 g/t over 6.5 metres)
  • 9.9 g/t over 6.5 metres (1.3 g/t over 2.1 metres)
  • 23.4 g/t over 0.6 metres (3.1 g/t over 0.6 metres)
  • 10.5 g/t over 2.1 metres (1.7 g/t over 2.1 metres).
A mining and exploration retrospect

His scam came to light in July 2009 after Bear Lake hired an independent firm, InnovExplo Inc, to compile a resource estimate. Bear Lake then hired other independents to investigate. Investors, meanwhile, launched a class action suit. That was settled in April 2010 under confidential terms.

The OSC banned Boily from trading securities for 15 years, fined him $750,000 with $50,000 costs, and barred him from QP-ing for life.

In a statement announcing the penalties, OSC director of enforcement Tom Atkinson said Boily’s behaviour ran “contrary to the important gatekeeper role played by qualified persons in the securities disclosure regime.”

But Larder Lake’s not barren. Drilling continues by Bear Lake’s JV partner Gold Fields Abitibi Exploration, a subsidiary of the multi-billion-market-cap Gold Fields Ltd.

In January a Vancouver ex-QP, John Gregory Paterson, got a six-year prison term for faking assays while CEO of Southwestern Resources.

Speaking of fraud

Bre-X, the outrage that brought about QPs and NI 43-101 in the first place, is coming to an anti-climactic end. That’s according to an Ontario judge quoted in the March 21 Globe and Mail as he granted a bankruptcy trustee’s request to drop its legal action against Bre-X, its former officers and other companies involved. The G&M stated that an Alberta court is likely to approve a similar request and an Ontario class action suit will likely be dropped.

But some people made money and it wasn’t just company insiders. Clint Docken, the lawyer representing the Alberta class action suit, told the paper that trustees Deloitte & Touche got $3.9 million in fees and paid its lawyers $8 million, leaving $79,000 in Bre-X coffers. “A lawyer representing the trustee was not available for comment,” the G&M stated.

No charges were ever laid and “little also came of a move by the trustee to freeze the assets of [John] Felderhof, his ex-wife Ingrid and former Bre-X chief executive officer David Walsh, who died in 1998.” Nor is there any trace of the $75 million the Felderhofs got by selling Bre-X shares, the story added.

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From Greenpeace to mining

March 19th, 2013

Eco-activist Patrick Moore on how environmentalism lost its way

by Greg Klein

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What does it signify when Greenpeace founder Patrick Moore joins the board of a mineral exploration company—the final break with his former principles? Or the continuation of “sensible environmentalism,” a lifelong vocation that eventually severed him from mainstream activists? Moore discussed his background, beliefs and work with ResourceClips on March 19, the day Astur Gold TSXV:AST announced his appointment as an independent director.

Astur hopes to begin underground gold production at its Salave project in northern Spain by late 2014. At first this company might seem an odd fit for Moore, who came to prominence in the early 1970s while protesting U.S. hydrogen bomb tests in Alaska. That was when he and his fellow protestors harried the American military from a boat they called Greenpeace. In those early days of environmentalism, that boat lent its name to their scrappy little group. It grew tremendously, along with the movement. Moore continued to play a prominent role, serving nine years as president of Greenpeace Canada and seven as a director of Greenpeace International. But by 1986 he left—both Greenpeace and the wider mainstream movement.

Eco-activist Patrick Moore on how environmentalism lost its way

Left: Patrick Moore in 1971, on his way to protest American
H-bomb testing in Alaska. Right: The eco-activist today.

Since then he’s scandalized more conventional activists with his support for a number of supposedly unenvironmental causes including forestry, genetically modified food and nuclear energy. And mining, which is “how I cut my teeth on environmental research.”

As a doctoral candidate from 1969 to 1974, he studied the environmental impact of British Columbia’s Island Copper Mine, which was eventually taken over by BHP Billiton. “It became a very political thesis because the mining industry didn’t like what I was doing,” Moore says. “They stacked my thesis committee with pro-mining people—not that I was anti-mining, I just wanted to get at the truth.”

He adds, “I’ve been close to the mining issue all through my time as an environmental activist. Recently in my consulting career I’ve worked with Newmont Mining [NEM] on their environmental and social programs in Indonesia, Peru, Africa, Nevada, so I’ve seen a fair bit of mining all my life.”

His work focuses on sustainable mining. “What I mean by sustainable mining is that you leave the environment in a condition that is going to heal itself. The second thing is leaving the community better than it was when you came, in terms of education, health care, industry training, capacity of all sorts. That’s why I’m involved in the mining industry.”

Since leaving Greenpeace he’s found more fulfilling work through endeavours like Greenspirit Strategies Ltd, a company that encourages corporate social responsibility and sustainability, and his current work as an independent scientist and consultant. He’s written extensively for a number of journals, in his Greenspirit Website and books like Confessions of a Greenpeace Dropout. But to accentuate the positive, he finds it necessary to expose the negative. As the rise of Greenpeace mirrored that of the wider movement, Moore uses the organization to explain how environmentalism lost its way.

“In Confessions I describe the insanity of Greenpeace today,” he says. “Basically they’re against mining. If you ask them to show you a mining operation that is being done in a way that they consider acceptable, you’ll get no reply because they will not tell you that there is one. And yet they at the very least ride bicycles and use cellphones and laptops and ride in trains and perhaps an airplane or two when they go to their international meetings. Those are all made of metal. Where else can you get it?” he asks.

“They say, ‘Well maybe mining in general is needed, but not here—or here, or here, or there or anywhere.’”

Greenpeace began by opposing nuclear weapons, “which seemed an obvious target because nuclear war would have been a terrible disaster for humanity and the environment,” he says. Next was the save-the-whales campaign which protected a species from needless extinction.

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Deer Horn Metals chairman Tony Fogarassy on his company’s plan for a gold-silver-tellurium mine in B.C.

March 19th, 2013

…Read More

Week in review

March 15th, 2013

A mining and exploration retrospect for March 9 to 15, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Getting a fix on “the fix”

“When the Libor scandal broke, my first reaction at the time was, ‘Wait ‘til they look at gold.’” Dow Jones Newswires reporter and Wall Street Journal contributor Tatyana Shumsky discussed “the fix” in a Thursday WSJ Live interview after breaking the news that the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission was looking into the way gold prices are set.

In a Thursday follow-up, Reuters explained the process this way:

The subject of gold price manipulation hit CNBC, Reuters and the Wall Street Journal this week

The subject of gold price manipulation hit CNBC,
Reuters and the Wall Street Journal this week.

“Currently, gold-fixing happens twice a day by teleconference with five banks: Bank of Nova Scotia-ScotiaMocatta [BNS], Barclays Bank Plc (BARC.L), Deutsche Bank AG (DBKGn.DE), HSBC Bank USA, NA and Société Générale (SOGN.PA). The fixings are used to determine prices globally.

“At the start of each gold price-fixing, the chairman announces an opening price to the other four members who relay that to their customers and, based on orders received from them, instruct their representatives to declare themselves as buyers or sellers at that price. The gold price is adjusted up and down until demand and supply is matched at which point the price is declared “fixed.” The fixings are used to determine spot prices for the billions of dollars of the two precious metals traded each day. Buyers and sellers can get insight on price changes and the level of interest during the fixing process. They can cancel, increase or decrease their interest based on that information.”

According to Ross Norman, owner of bullion broker Sharps Pixley, “The fix is open, consequential, transparent and has stood the test of time,” he told Reuters. “It’s not open to manipulation in the same way as Libor.” But Shumsky told WSJ Live, “To even deal with these banks, you have to have 20, 50 million dollars in gold alone.”

CFTC head Scott O’Malia downplayed his office’s interest. “I think we’ve had a couple of conversations. We’re looking at energy, indexes, prices, how they’re set,” Reuters quoted him. “We’ll look at all of the range of index-setting.”

Shumsky acknowledged, “It is very early days right now. But it is interesting that they’re looking at it because a lot of commodities markets are opaque like this. You have coal, iron ore, platinum….” And silver, the interviewer added.

GATA on CNBC

Chris Powell, on the other hand, said he’s “always suspicious” of the CFTC. “This is not an investigation,” the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee secretary/treasurer said in a Thursday CNBC interview. “They’ve been investigating silver for four and a half years and have not issued any report…. The attorney general of the United States said before the Senate judiciary committee a few days ago that the big banks and investment houses in the United States are not only too big to fail, they’re too big to jail.”

An interviewer asked, “What needs to be done to make the market more transparent, less susceptible to manipulation? Do we need to scrap the gold fix?”

“No, I think we need to commit journalism,” Powell responded. “You simply have to ask the central banks very specific questions about gold, as GATA has done over the years … what are you doing in the gold market today? Show us your gold books, your gold swaps, your gold leases. What is the purpose of your trading secretly in the gold market?”

While Eastern central banks keep buying gold, their Western counterparts swap, lease and sell the stuff to protect their currencies, he maintained. “None of us alive today has ever seen a free gold price.”

CNBC buried the video within a story that quotes Jeffery Christian of the commodities research firm CPM Group, who said he thinks GATA are “outright liars … pretty much what they do is nonsense.”

Who’ll get Venezuela’s gold?

As for gold repatriation, it might prove tumultuous to Venezuela. A Wednesday Reuters commentary by Peter Christian Hall said the 160 tons President Hugo Chavez brought home in 2011 would be worth about $9 billion today. But during the first eight months of 2012 about $550 million was sold. “Did further sales follow over the past six months, with proceeds partly paying for the public largesse that helped fuel Chavez’s victorious up-from-the-sickbed presidential run?” Hall asked.

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Association for Mineral Exploration BC president/CEO Gavin Dirom

March 14th, 2013

…Read More

Economy of size

March 13th, 2013

Deer Horn Metals reaches PEA with B.C. gold, silver and tellurium

by Greg Klein

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It would be a small mine but a nano-cap company has big hopes for a gold-silver-tellurium project in west-central British Columbia. On March 13 Deer Horn Metals TSXV:DHM released a preliminary economic assessment for a 74,000-tonne-per-annum operation that would run six months a year. The modest size offers a number of advantages in permitting, financing and garnering community support, the company believes.

Deer Horn Metals hits PEA with B.C. gold, silver and tellurium

Deer Horn Metals based its PEA on about 450 metres of a
2.4-kilometre vein system 36 klicks south of the Huckleberry mine.

The Deer Horn project’s base case, using three-year metal price trailing averages and a 5% discount rate, estimates a net present value of $39.5 million and a 32% internal rate of return. Initial capital costs are projected at $27.8 million with payback in 2.4 years. Over a 14-year lifespan the open pit would produce an estimated total of 67,000 ounces gold, 2.11 million ounces silver and 63,000 kilograms tellurium.

The project would include a conventional flotation mill producing a combined gold-silver-tellurium concentrate.

Apart from the base case, the PEA offers separate numbers projected on recent metal prices, resulting in a $49.3-million NPV, 38% IRR and a 2.2-year payback.

The rugged region makes infrastructure an obvious challenge. The capex includes the cost of upgrading an eight-kilometre road from the mine site to a lake. From there, barge traffic would connect with other roads, including a route to Imperial Metals’ TSX:III Huckleberry mine.

The report is based on an April 2012 resource update that used a cutoff of 1 gram per tonne gold, showing:

  • an indicated category of 414,000 tonnes averaging 5.12 g/t gold, 157.5 g/t silver and 160 g/t tellurium for 68,000 ounces gold, 2.1 million ounces silver and 66,000 kilograms tellurium
  • an inferred category of 197,000 tonnes averaging 5.04 g/t gold, 146.5 g/t silver and 137 g/t tellurium for 32,000 ounces gold, 930,000 ounces silver and 27,000 kilograms tellurium.

The update marked the first such 43-101 resource “as far as we know,” Deer Horn chairman Tony Fogarassy tells ResourceClips. “If there’s a company out there with a tellurium resource estimate, we haven’t seen it.”

Eastmain Resources TSX:ER, for example, has been reporting tellurium drill results from its Clearwater (Eau Claire) property in Quebec’s James Bay region. But that project’s October 2012 resource update limited itself to gold.

As for the tellurium market, “an oversupply has existed from late 2011 but it’s expected to get more balanced by the end of this year,” Fogarassy says. “That projection was made about a year ago by First Solar [FSLR ], a multi-billion-dollar manufacturer of solar panels, which are an important use for tellurium…. By the time we could build a mine we’d anticipate the tellurium market to improve.”

He adds, “It’s a very specific element that’s used in phase change technology [for CDs and DVDs], computer chips and appliances, as well as the solar panel sector.”

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Week in review

March 8th, 2013

A mining and exploration retrospect for March 2 to 8, 2013

by Greg Klein

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A city built on gold—and smuggling

“I didn’t ‘out’ anyone in the book and it wasn’t my intention to do that,” said Timmins journalist Kevin Vincent. “If I outed one prominent businessperson, I would have to out everyone in Timmins.” Discussing his book Bootleg Gold in Tuesday’s Northern Ontario Business, Vincent recounted what was once the mining town’s second-largest industry.

A mining and exploration retrospect

“A large percentage of the prominent business community has its roots tied to the gold-smuggling industry,” he told the paper. “In the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s, there was so much gold here every business had to have a set of scales under the counter. If you didn’t, you weren’t in business.”

Highgrading, as it was called, started with miners stealing small amounts, which they sold on a well-organized black market for 50%. “Shift bosses, mine captains and even mine managers were also involved,” Northern Ontario Business stated.

“When the gold was all put together, it was really compiled by just a handful of individuals and they controlled everything,” the paper quoted Vincent. “If you tried to move significant amounts of gold outside of their operation you ran a real, serious risk. Everyone knew it was going on and there were rules of engagement you had to follow.”

The endeavour was pervasive, with spinoff opportunities for seemingly everyone. One way of sneaking loot out of the mine was “inside false teeth constructed by local dentists,” the paper reported.

Due diligence defends against dirty deeds

March has been proclaimed Fraud Prevention Month by Canada’s 13 securities commissions. The regulators have a number of public awareness programs underway, including a provincial tour by the Ontario Securities Commission which highlights the agency’s new Office of the Investor, “the voice of the investor internally at the OSC.” On Tuesday some agencies, including Quebec’s l’Autorité des marchés financiers, cautioned would-be investors to check the registration (here and here) “of any firm or individual selling securities or offering investment advice.”

The following day the British Columbia Securities Commission announced two new features to its Investright program—a guide to private placements for retail investors and a mobile app providing investment advice and up-to-the-minute scam alerts. Like its Ontario counterpart, the BCSC has its own roadshow, this one exposing the province’s top 10 scams.

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Week in review

March 1st, 2013

A mining and exploration retrospect for February 23 to March 1, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Another spring fever for graphite?

As one of Chris Berry’s “energy minerals”, graphite had an energetic week with the biggest news coming from Energizer Resources TSX:EGZ. The company’s Molo graphite deposit in Madagascar reached another milestone Tuesday with its preliminary economic assessment.

But to start with Monday, Rock Tech Lithium TSXV:RCK released drill results from the Plumbago area of its Lochaber project in southern Quebec. The same day Nevado Resources TSXV:VDO did the same thing for its Fermont property in the province’s northeast.

A mining and exploration retrospect

Coinciding with Energizer’s Tuesday release, Pistol Bay Mining TSXV:PST announced an option on the Portland graphite property in southeastern Ontario. Also on Tuesday, Canada Strategic Metals TSXV:CJC released metallurgical tests from its La Loutre property back in southern Quebec.

More metallurgical news came the following day from Standard Graphite’s TSXV:SGH Mousseau East deposit, again in southern Quebec. Then on Thursday Mason Graphite TSXV:LLG weighed in with drill results from Lac Gueret in northeastern Quebec.

No graphite news on Friday, however. Presumably everyone was en route to PDAC 2013, where they’ll conspire to pump up a repeat of last spring’s graphite mania.

No wait, this is the hottest new commodity

“Rhodium, the scarcest precious metal used in making catalytic converters, is outperforming platinum and palladium for the first time in seven years as global car sales rise to a record,” stated a Thursday Bloomberg report.

“The metal, used with palladium and platinum in pollution-control devices, rose 16% this year, about three times the increase of the other two ingredients and 20 times more than the benchmark commodities index (MXWD). Output will trail demand for four more years after the first deficit since 2007 [took place] last year [and eroded] inventories, Standard Bank Plc’s SBG Securities … forecasts.”

It seems to be gaining safe haven status too. “Baird & Co., a UK precious metals dealer, sold about 10,700 one-ounce rhodium bars … more than 10 times the amount planned when production began in May 2012,” the news agency added. “The London-based company expanded with bars that weigh one-tenth an ounce to five ounces to meet increased demand.”

A Baird spokesperson told Bloomberg, “At the moment we can’t make them quick enough so we are stepping up production. The market is so thin that it just needs a car company to buy a year’s worth of production or a hedge fund to pull out a little bit of loose change. It doesn’t take a lot to create quite sharp price movements.”

De Beers blockade: Cops’ lack of resolve resolves nothing

At press time Friday, De Beers’ Victor diamond mine in northern Ontario had gone seven (7) days without an illegal native blockade. The most recent roadblock ended late February 22 when the five or six protestors simply left. Then, and only then, did police move in.

So far the company has lost nearly half of an approximately 45-day opportunity to haul a year’s worth of heavy supplies over a seasonal ice road. As a result, the mine might face a temporary shutdown, the Timmins Daily Press reported on Tuesday.

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