Tuesday 11th December 2018

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘barite’

Mountain Boy Minerals/Decade Resources cut 6.6 g/t gold over 11 metres, 7.05 g/t over 9 metres in NW B.C.

January 9th, 2018

by Greg Klein | January 9, 2018

It’s not just the lure of gold but the high-grade stuff that keeps Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB and its friends drilling the steep slopes of northwestern British Columbia’s Golden Triangle. A new year batch of assays from the Red Cliff project delivered just that, with several impressive intercepts from the property’s Montrose zone.

Mountain Boy has a 35% stake in the project, with joint venture partner Decade Resources TSXV:DEC holding the remainder. The companies share more complicated ownership of nearby acquisitions.

Mountain Boy Minerals/Decade Resources cut 6.6 g/t gold over 11 metres, 7.05 g/t over 9 metres in NW B.C.

Access roads wind their way to Red Cliff’s lofty heights.

Last year’s work traced a mineralized system over Red Cliff for two kilometres. These results constitute the final assays from Montrose, which underwent 35 holes in 2017. Five more were sunk on the Red Cliff zone and another 11 on Waterpump.

Early assays for Waterpump, where core has revealed visible gold, were released in October. They followed September results from the property’s Red Cliff and Montrose zones. Additional Waterpump assays are pending. Mountain Boy considers the three areas to constitute a single zone that was displaced by faulting.

Some highlights from the final Montrose batch show:

Hole DDH-MON-7

  • 10.2 g/t gold over 1.52 metres, starting at 237.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 5.88 g/t over 5.03 metres, starting at 251.83 metres

  • 10.4 g/t over 1.52 metres, starting at 264.39 metres

DDH-MON-8

  • 14.6 g/t over 2.2 metres, starting at 241.01 metres

DDH-MON-13

  • 5.28 g/t over 2.9 metres, starting at 45.27 metres

DDH-MON-29

  • 2.62 g/t over 8.08 metres, starting at 82.77 metres

  • 7.05 g/t over 9.15 metres, starting at 96.85 metres

  • 2.06 g/t over 9.15 metres, starting at 112.2 metres

DDH-MON-31

  • 5.75 g/t over 3.05 metres, starting at 352.44 metres

  • 6.6 g/t over 11.19 metres, starting at 374.79 metres
  • (which includes 13.9 g/t over 2.04 metres)
  • (and also includes 13.7 g/t over 3.05 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

Recent results will be incorporated with data from 2007 to 2012 to calculate Red Cliff’s maiden resource, expected this year.

In another high-grade Golden Triangle JV, Mountain Boy (20%) and Jayden Resources TSXV:JDN (80%) announced assays last November from a new gold zone northeast of their Silver Coin deposit, following last year’s 14-hole, 2,226-metre campaign.

Mountain Boy’s third 2017 drill program had 500 to 600 metres planned for the 100%-held Surprise Creek property. Forsaking gold this time, the target was barite, a mineral essential to oil and gas exploration. The company also holds the Manuel Creek zeolite project in south-central B.C.’s Okanagan region.

Among new faces joining the company last month, incoming president/CEO/director Mark Brown holds 25 years of financial and mining experience. A chartered accountant, he founded Rare Element Resources and built it into a $500-million company listing on the NYSE Amex exchange. New CFO/corporate secretary Winnie Wong is also a CA with extensive mining company experience.

Joining the BOD is well-known commentator and industry executive Lawrence Roulston. His nearly 40-year career includes executive positions with numerous B.C. exploration companies. He currently acts as managing director of WestBay Capital Advisors.

In October Mountain Boy offered a private placement of up to $300,000.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Critical attention

December 21st, 2017

The U.S. embarks on a national strategy of greater self-reliance for critical minerals

by Greg Klein

A geopolitical absurdity on par with some aspects of Dr. Strangelove and Catch 22 can’t be reduced simply through an executive order from the U.S. president. But an executive order from the U.S. president doesn’t hurt. On December 20 Donald Trump called for a “federal strategy to ensure secure and reliable supplies of critical minerals.” The move came one day after the U.S. Geological Survey released the first comprehensive update on the subject since 1973, taking a thorough look—nearly 900-pages thorough—at commodities vital to our neighbour’s, and ultimately the West’s, well-being.

U.S. president Trump calls for a national strategy to reduce foreign dependence on critical minerals

The U.S. 5th Security Forces Squadron takes part in a
September exercise at Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota.
(Photo: Senior Airman J.T. Armstrong/U.S. Air Force)

The study, Critical Mineral Resources of the United States, details 23 commodities deemed crucial due to their possibility of supply disruption with serious consequences. Many of them come primarily from China. Others originate in unstable countries or countries with a dangerous near-monopoly. For several minerals, the U.S. imports its entire supply.

They’re necessary for medicine, clean energy, transportation and electronics but maybe most worrisome, for national security. That last point prompted comments from U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, whose jurisdiction includes the USGS. He formerly spent 23 years as a U.S. Navy SEAL officer.

“I commend the team of scientists at USGS for the extensive work put into the report, but the findings are shocking,” he stated. “The fact that previous administrations allowed the United States to become reliant on foreign nations, including our competitors and adversaries, for minerals that are so strategically important to our security and economy is deeply troubling. As both a former military commander and geologist, I know the very real national security risk of relying on foreign nations for what the military needs to keep our soldiers and our homeland safe.”

Trump acknowledged a number of domestic roadblocks to production “despite the presence of significant deposits of some of these minerals across the United States.” Among the challenges, he lists “a lack of comprehensive, machine-readable data concerning topographical, geological and geophysical surveys; permitting delays; and the potential for protracted litigation regarding permits that are issued.”

[Trump’s order also calls for] options for accessing and developing critical minerals through investment and trade with our allies and partners.

Trump ordered a national strategy to be outlined within six months. Topics will include recycling and reprocessing critical minerals, finding alternatives, making improved geoscientific data available to the private sector, providing greater land access to potential resources, streamlining reviews and, not to leave out America’s friends, “options for accessing and developing critical minerals through investment and trade with our allies and partners.”

Apart from economic benefits, such measures would “enhance the technological superiority and readiness of our armed forces, which are among the nation’s most significant consumers of critical minerals.”

In fact the USGS report finds several significant uses for most of the periodic table’s 92 naturally occurring elements. A single computer chip requires well over half of the table. Industrialization, technological progress and rising standards of living have helped bring about an all-time high in minerals demand that’s expected to keep increasing, according to the study.

“For instance, in the 1970s rare earth elements had few uses outside of some specialty fields, and were produced mostly in the United States. Today, rare earth elements are integral to nearly all high-end electronics and are produced almost entirely in China.”

The USGS tracks 88 minerals regularly but also works with the country’s Defense Logistics Agency on a watch list of about 160 minerals crucial to national security. This week’s USGS study deems the critical 23 as follows:

  • antimony
  • barite
  • beryllium
  • cobalt
  • fluorite or fluorspar
  • gallium
  • germanium
  • graphite
  • hafnium
  • indium
  • lithium
  • manganese
  • niobium
  • platinum group elements
  • rare earth elements
  • rhenium
  • selenium
  • tantalum
  • tellurium
  • tin
  • titanium
  • vanadium
  • zirconium

A January 2017 USGS report listed 20 minerals for which the U.S. imports 100% of its supply. Several of the above critical minerals were included: fluorspar, gallium, graphite, indium, manganese, niobium, rare earths, tantalum and vanadium.

This comprehensive work follows related USGS reports released in April, including a breakdown of smartphone ingredients to illustrate the range of countries and often precarious supply chains that supply those materials. That report quoted Larry Meinert of the USGS saying, “With minerals being sourced from all over the world, the possibility of supply disruption is more critical than ever.”

As both a former military commander and geologist, I know the very real national security risk of relying on foreign nations for what the military needs to keep our soldiers and our homeland safe.—Ryan Zinke,
U.S. Secretary of the Interior

David S. Abraham has been a prominent advocate of a rare minerals strategy for Western countries. But in an e-mail to the Washington Post, the author of The Elements of Power: Gadgets, Guns, and the Struggle for a Sustainable Future in the Rare Metal Age warned that Trump’s action could trigger a partisan battle. He told the Post that Republicans tend to use the issue to loosen mining restrictions while Democrats focus on “building up human capacity to develop supply chains rather than the resources themselves.”

Excessive and redundant permitting procedures came under criticism in a Hill op-ed published a few days earlier. Jeff Green, a Washington D.C.-based defence lobbyist and advocate of increased American self-reliance for critical commodities, argued that streamlining would comprise “a positive first step toward strengthening our economy and our military for years to come.”

In a bill presented to U.S. Congress last March, Rep. Duncan Hunter proposed incentives for developing domestic resources and supply chains for critical minerals. His METALS Act (Materials Essential to American Leadership and Security) has been in committee since.

Speaking to ResourceClips.com at the time, Abraham doubted the success of Hunter’s bill, while Green spoke of “a totally different dynamic” in the current administration, showing willingness to “invest in America to protect our national security and grow our manufacturing base.”

Update: Read about Jeff Green’s response to the U.S. national strategy.

“Shocking” USGS report details 23 minerals critical to America’s economy and security

December 19th, 2017

This story has been expanded and moved here.

Update: Mountain Boy Minerals hits visible gold, high-grade assays up to 14.93 g/t over 8.38 metres in NW B.C.

October 31st, 2017

Update: On October 31, Mountain Boy Minerals announced visible gold had been intersected on Red Cliff’s Waterpump zone, described as a faulted extension of the Montrose zone. Four holes had been completed so far at Waterpump, with at least four to six more to come. The company expects to release more Montrose assays soon.

by Greg Klein | October 26, 2017

With one of three drill campaigns vying for attention this season, Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB moves the Red Cliff project in British Columbia’s Golden Triangle closer to a maiden resource. The latest assays “continue to indicate a large and extensive mineralized zone that has a length of at least 600 metres, a depth of 600 metres and widths up to 40 metres,” said president Ed Kruchkowski. Highlights included 14.93 g/t gold over 8.38 metres and 9.5 g/t over 10.98 metres.

Mountain Boy holds a 35% interest in the project through a JV that has recently acquired additional claims.

Assays for the project’s Red Cliff and Montrose zones, about 1.2 kilometres apart, were released late last month. The current batch comes from Montrose:

Hole DDH-MON-14

  • 4.95 g/t gold over 3.96 metres, starting at 81.71 metres in downhole depth
Mountain Boy Minerals hits more NW B.C. high grades with 14.93 g/t gold over 8.38 metres

A rig tests the Red Cliff project’s Montrose zone.

DDH-MON-15

  • 3.8 g/t over 2.74 metres, starting at 14.63 metres

  • 3.31 g/t over 2.13 metres, starting at 21.65 metres

  • 6.12 g/t over 2.13 metres, starting at 29.7 metres

DDH-MON-16

  • 6.63 g/t over 9.14 metres, starting at 5.79 metres

DDH-MON-17

  • 6.21 g/t over 9.15 metres, starting at 17.38 metres

  • 7.01 g/t over 2.59 metres, starting at 28.81 metres

DDH-MON-18

  • 4.95 g/t over 7.93 metres, starting at 35.98 metres

  • 14.93 g/t over 8.38 metres, starting at 49.7 metres

DDH-MON-26

  • 4.93 g/t over 3.05 metres, starting at 258.54 metres

DDH-MON-27

  • 9.5 g/t over 10.98 metres, starting at 290.15 metres

True widths weren’t provided.

Still to come are assays for 20 other holes. The program drilled five holes on the Red Cliff zone and 35 on Montrose, with a highlight from the latter zone showing 19.9 g/t gold over 4.12 metres. The company now has a crew building a road to move the rig to the Waterpump zone for another eight to 10 holes.

Earlier this week Mountain Boy announced metallurgical results on two composite core samples from a single Red Cliff hole produced recoveries of 94.8% and 97.6% gold, additionally showing potential for lead and copper byproducts.

Also this week Mountain Boy and 65% JV partner Decade Resources TSXV:DEC stated they would buy the Red Cliff vendor’s 1% NSR on a pro rata basis. Mountain Boy’s share will cost $3,500 and 171,428 shares.

Two weeks ago the company released assays from its 20%-held Silver Coin, another Golden Triangle project that had completed 10 holes totalling 1,616 metres out of a 2,000-metre program. Results came in as high as 22.95 g/t gold and 13.1 g/t silver over 2.5 metres; along with 31.02 g/t gold and 28.5 g/t silver over 1.5 metres.

Assays are also pending from the season’s third drill campaign, which consisted of two holes sunk on a barite-sulphide area of Mountain Boy’s 100%-held Surprise Creek project.

The company closed a $586,400 private placement last month.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Mountain Boy Minerals releases high gold grades from B.C.’s Golden Triangle

October 12th, 2017

by Greg Klein | October 12, 2017

Impressive assays came with the news released by Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB as it updated three current drill campaigns in northwestern British Columbia. The Silver Coin property has seen 10 holes totalling 1,616 metres so far out of a planned 2,000-metre program. With assays available from two holes, the company said SC17-442 found a new high-grade zone at surface as well as continuity of the main zone at depth. Results show:

  • 31.02 g/t gold and 28.5 g/t silver over 1.5 metres, starting at 28.71 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 56.3 g/t gold and 30.7 g/t silver over 0.7 metres)
  • (and including 8.9 g/t gold and 26.6 g/t silver over 0.8 metres)
Mountain Boy Minerals releases high gold grades from B.C.’s Golden Triangle

Geology grants the Golden Triangle
spectacular scenery as well as mineral riches.

  • 6.97 g/t gold and 38.3 g/t silver over 1.2 metres, starting at 55.54 metres

  • 11.6 g/t gold and 31.7 g/t silver over 1 metre, starting at 64.21 metres

Hole SC17-443 also hit a new high-grade zone at surface and extended the main breccia zone at depth, with intercepts showing:

  • 22.95 g/t gold and 13.1 g/t silver over 2.5 metres, starting at 15.28 metres
  • (including 108 g/t gold and 51 g/t silver over 0.5 metres)

  • 8.44 g/t gold and 20.4 g/t silver over 6.2 metres, starting at 71.34 metres
  • (including 9.22 g/t gold and 23.6 g/t silver over 5.2 metres)
  • (which includes 15.5 g/t gold and 42.2 g/t silver over 1.5 metres)
  • (and including 12.37 g/t gold and 23.72 g/t silver over 1.7 metres)

True widths were estimated between 60% and 80%.

The campaign intends to extend and upgrade lenses of high-grade gold within the project’s main breccia zone and test targets along strike to the south and a potential sub-parallel zone to the east, Mountain Boy stated. The company holds a 20% stake in the 1,470-hectare project.

Drilling, mapping and sampling continues at Red Cliff, where five holes have been completed on the Red Cliff zone and another 31 on the Montrose zone, about 1.2 kilometres north. Late last month the company released assays from five holes on each zone, with a standout intercept from Montrose grading 19.9 g/t gold over 4.12 metres. Plans also call for one or two holes on Montrose north of Lydden Canyon and eight on the Waterpump zone. Mountain Boy holds a 35% interest in the Red Cliff joint venture and a partial interest in additional claims.

At its 100%-held Surprise Creek project, Mountain Boy has assays pending from two holes sunk on a barite-sulphide area of the Ataman zone.

The company closed a $586,400 private placement in September.

Read more about Mountain Boy Minerals here and here.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Mountain Boy Minerals hits high-grade gold as drills turn on three B.C. properties

September 28th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 28, 2017

With initial results in from one of Mountain Boy Minerals’ (TSXV:MTB) three current drill programs at British Columbia’s Golden Triangle, assays show some of the grades that make the region so attractive. So far 33 holes have been completed at the Red Cliff property, 28 on the Montrose zone and five on the Red Cliff zone. The first batch of assays covered five holes from each zone, with Montrose hitting as high as 19.9 g/t gold over 4.12 metres and 9.98 g/t over 3.35 metres. Drilling extended Montrose at depth and along strike, showing the campaign’s best results:

Hole DDH-MON-3

  • 1.53 g/t gold over 3.05 metres, starting at 227.44 metres in downhole depth
Mountain Boy Minerals hits high-grade gold as drills turn on three B.C. properties

  • 1.06 g/t over 0.46 metres, starting at 231.55 metres

  • 9.98 g/t over 3.35 metres, starting at 248.48 metres

DDH-MON-4

  • 2.61 g/t over 2.28 metres, starting at 244.97 metres

  • 19.5 g/t over 0.76 metres, starting at 256.25 metres

  • 5 g/t over 2.13 metres, starting at 264.33 metres

DDH-MON-5

  • 2 g/t over 5.74 metres, starting at 279.73 metres

  • 1.07 g/t over 0.74 metres, starting at 310.52 metres

  • 19.9 g/t over 4.12 metres, starting at 311.28 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Two selected chip samples from Lower Montrose excelled with grades of 390 g/t and 35.7 g/t gold.

Five other holes targeted the Red Cliff zone, about 1.2 kilometres south. Highlights showed:

RC-17-3

  • 6.4 g/t gold and 3.37% copper over 0.61 metres, starting at 53.23 metres

RC-17-4

  • 1.6 g/t gold and 4.89% copper over 0.46 metres, starting at 37.01 metres

Again, true widths weren’t provided. Two other Red Cliff zone holes showed low values, the company stated.

At the project’s Waterpump zone, meanwhile, a grab sample returned 11.6 g/t gold and a chip sample graded 19.2 g/t.

Mountain Boy considers Montrose, Lower Montrose and Waterpump to be a single zone that was displaced by faulting. Expected to continue another six weeks, the Red Cliff program has several holes slated at depth on Montrose and to the west, as well as six to eight others for Waterpump.

Mountain Boy holds a 35% interest in Red Cliff in a joint venture that has recently acquired additional claims.

The Silver Coin project’s current drill program calls for about 2,000 metres to extend and upgrade lenses of high-grade gold mineralization within the Main Breccia zone to the northwest and to test targets along strike to the south and east.

Using a 2 g/t gold cutoff, a 2013 resource for Silver Coin’s four zones totals:

  • indicated: 702,000 tonnes averaging 4.46 g/t gold, 17.89 g/t silver, 0.88% zinc, 0.33% lead and 0.07% copper

  • inferred: 967,000 tonnes averaging 4.39 g/t gold, 18.98 g/t silver, 0.64% zinc, 0.25% lead and 0.04% copper

Mountain Boy holds a 20% interest in Silver Coin, with the remainder held by JV partner Jayden Resources TSXV:JDN.

And the third drill program has just begun, as the Ataman zone on Mountain Boy’s 100%-held Surprise Creek undergoes 500 to 600 metres to test and sample barite, a mineral essential to oil and gas exploration. Last July the company announced production of a barite concentrate exceeding American Petroleum Institute standards.

Earlier this week Mountain Boy closed a private placement of $586,400.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Drilling, sampling, optioning: Mountain Boy Minerals updates B.C. activities

September 13th, 2017

by Greg Klein | September 13, 2017

Demonstrating that a diverse portfolio doesn’t necessarily mean idle properties, Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB updated several projects in northwestern British Columbia’s Golden Triangle.

Drilling has just resumed at Silver Coin, held 20% by Mountain Boy and 80% by joint venture partner Jayden Resources TSXV:JDN. Acting as operator is Sprott Mining Inc on a campaign of about 6,000 metres mostly focusing on stepouts. The agenda also calls for regional exploration on the 1,470-hectare property.

Silver Coin hosts a 2013 43-101 resource that uses a 2 g/t gold cutoff to show an inferred 967,000 tonnes averaging 4.39 g/t gold, 18.98 g/t silver, 0.64% zinc, 0.25% lead and 0.04% copper.

Drilling, sampling, optioning: Mountain Boy Minerals updates B.C. activities

Mountain Boy awaits assays from Red Cliff,
where core from five holes has revealed visible gold.

Drilling continues at the Red Cliff property, where 25 holes have been completed so far with assays pending. In July Mountain Boy reported visible gold in the program’s first five holes. Red Cliff also has sampling underway at the Lower Montrose and Waterpump zones. The latter has drilling planned, once sampling assays arrive.

Mountain Boy has a 35% interest in Red Cliff, with JV partner Decade Resources TSXV:DEC holding the rest. The ownership gets more complicated, however, now that the two companies have teamed up on additional claims to the southeast. The acquisition gives the JV an earn-in total of up to 80% of the extension, with 28% to be held by Mountain Boy and 52% by Decade. The size of neither the original Red Cliff property nor the additional claims was reported. Mountain Boy and Decade share overlapping management and directors.

TSXV approval came through earlier this month for Mountain Boy’s 100% options on the Surprise Creek and BA properties, both formerly 50/50 JVs with Great Bear Resources TSXV:GBR. Over $12 million of exploration has gone into the nearby projects over the last 10 years, revealing zones of high-grade zinc, lead and silver, as well as zinc, copper and silver.

Prior to a drill program expected later this month, the 7,472-hectare Surprise Creek has sampling underway on a large barite zone and on areas of VMS mineralization revealed by historic sampling. In July the company announced successful production of a barite concentrate that surpassed American Petroleum Institute standards. The mineral is considered essential to oil and gas exploration.

Additional sampling has taken place on the 9,489-hectare BA VMS project, just north of a 2016 channel sample result that returned 3.84% zinc, 1.25% lead and 108 g/t silver over 15 metres. That included a sub-interval of 5.31% zinc, 1.97% lead and 132 g/t silver over 7.5 metres.

Mountain Boy also optioned 60% of West George, a 288-hectare copper property adjacent to the company’s George copper project that the company now holds 100%. The original George has non-43-101 copper-silver-gold estimates. West George has sampling underway.

Meanwhile assays are pending for recent sampling from MB Silver, a project with historic, non-43-101 polymetallic estimates. In southern B.C., Mountain Boy plans to begin PEA studies on its 100%-held Manuel Creek zeolite project.

The company expects to soon close a private placement of up to $1 million.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.

Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard points out the added potential of barite on a polymetallic B.C. project

August 17th, 2017

…Read more

René Bernard of Mountain Boy Minerals pursues industrial minerals as well as base and precious metals in B.C.

August 10th, 2017

…Read more

Barite concentrate from Mountain Boy Minerals’ B.C. project surpasses industry standards

July 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | July 18, 2017

It’s a commodity essential to oil and gas drilling and one that the North American industry relies mostly on imports. But Mountain Boy Minerals TSXV:MTB has found barite on its Surprise Creek property in northwestern British Columbia’s Golden Triangle. Now metallurgical tests have produced a concentrate that far exceeds standards of the American Petroleum Institute, the company announced July 18.

Barite concentrate from Mountain Boy Minerals’ B.C. project surpasses industry standards

Mountain Boy explores the Golden Triangle for base
and precious metals, as well as industrial minerals.

“We are talking about a mineral which, according to the 2016 USGS report on barite, sells for an average of $198 f.o.b. mill with industry relying on imports for 78% of its needs,” said chairperson René Bernard. “With this knowledge in hand we can now promote our location within short trucking distance to deep water port, infrastructure, metal credits and proximity to key markets to attract industry partnerships. Our goal is to have a 43-101 industrial mineral resource later this year after all drilling is completed.”

Flotation tests were applied to a VMS-mineralized intercept that assayed 0.12 g/t gold, 28 g/t silver, 1.21% zinc, 0.03% lead, 0.31% copper and 46.73% barite over 18.94 metres. The hole remained open as drilling was suspended due to bad weather.

Flotation first separated copper and zinc, producing a concentrate of 26.2% copper at 70.5% recovery and 53.8% zinc at 89.1% recovery in an open cycle batch test. Higher recovery would be anticipated in a closed circuit test, the lab reported.

The tailings then underwent open circuit flotation, producing 91.6% BaSO4 at 83.2% recovery. The lab estimated that locked cycle tests could bring barite recovery closer to 90%.

The core comes from a drill hole on the Ataman zone, which extends over 1,200 metres of strike and comprises one of a number of the 100%-optioned property’s VMS zones. Last year’s surface work found a 25-metre-wide barite zone with significant base metals values 120 metres west of the hole, Mountain Boy stated. “Surface work also indicated barite zones extending to the mountaintop.”

This year’s Surprise Creek plans include further definition of sulphide/sulphide-barite zones and natural barite veins, along with additional metallurgical work on 2017 drill core, as well as the 43-101 resource.

Reporting on another northwestern B.C. project earlier this month, Mountain Boy announced the third hole in a row showing visible gold from its 35%-held Red Cliff property.

The company’s Golden Triangle portfolio also includes a 100% option on the BA project; a 20% stake in Silver Coin, a gold-silver-base metals project with a resource estimate; the MB property, with historic, non-43-101 polymetallic estimates; a 50% stake in the George property, with non-43-101 copper-silver-gold estimates; the American Creek and Bear Valley silver-base metals projects; as well as copper-gold claims. In southern B.C., Mountain Boy plans to begin PEA studies on its Manuel Creek zeolite project.

Read Isabel Belger’s interview with Mountain Boy Minerals chairperson René Bernard.

See an infographic about B.C.’s Golden Triangle.