Monday 23rd January 2017

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘b.c.’

Infographic: VRIC 2017 approaches but there’s still time for free registration

January 18th, 2017
Infographic: VRIC 2017 approaches but there’s still time for free registration

Ever-popular Yukon Dan returns to AME B.C.’s Roundup, overlapping with VRIC.

You might want to be there just for the buzz—the world’s largest investor event for resource exploration returns amid revived optimism. This is the opportunity to learn from the experts, meet the companies and soak up the gossip.

There’s simply no better place to do that than Cambridge House International’s Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017, taking place January 22 and 23.

By fortunate design, VRIC overlaps with AME B.C.’s Roundup 2017, the Association for Mineral Exploration British Columbia’s annual conference. Roundup officially runs January 23 to 26, but pre-events include the family-friendly Discovery Day on January 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Roundup and VRIC take place side by side, at the Vancouver Convention Centre East and West. Follow the links for Roundup registration and VRIC registration.

 

Infographic: VRIC 2017 approaches but there’s still time for free registration

Golden Dawn Minerals advances southern B.C.’s Greenwood renaissance

January 18th, 2017

by Greg Klein | January 18, 2017

With a fresh batch of assays from underground drilling, Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM progresses towards its goal of reviving southern British Columbia’s Greenwood mining camp. Results from nine holes (one released previously) totalling 805 metres show the May Mac project’s Skomac vein mineralization continues past the former mine’s #7 level.

Some highlights show:

Hole MU16-01 (previously released)

  • 131.3 g/t silver, 2.34 g/t gold, 0.6% lead, 0.4% zinc and 0.1% copper over 2.33 metres, starting at 17.45 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 250 g/t silver, 4.96 g/t gold, 1.2% lead, 0.9% zinc and 0.2% copper over 1.1 metres)

MU16-02

  • 132 g/t silver, 0.14 g/t gold, 1.9% lead, 1.6% zinc and 0.5% copper over 0.5 metres, starting at 24.09 metres
Golden Dawn Minerals advances Greenwood renaissance in southern B.C.

Located about 500 kilometres east of Vancouver,
Golden Dawn’s Greenwood assets include a 200-tpd mill.

MU16-03

  • 21.1 g/t silver, 0.55 g/t gold and 0.1% zinc over 0.49 metres, starting at 18.38 metres

MU16-04

  • 57.5 g/t silver, 0.32 g/t gold, 0.7% lead, 1.1% zinc and 0.1% copper over 0.5 metres, starting at 17 metres

MU16-05

  • 176.5 g/t silver, 1.06 g/t gold, 3.2% lead, 1.1% zinc and 0.3% copper over 1.5 metres, starting at 32.92 metres

MU16-06

  • 173 g/t silver, 0.22 g/t gold, 2.7% lead, 2.5% zinc and 0.1% copper over 0.76 metres, starting at 69.28 metres

MU16-07

  • 105 g/t silver, 0.15 g/t gold, 3.7% lead and 0.3% zinc over 0.44 metres, starting at 23.4 metres

MU16-08

  • 84.8 g/t silver, 0.2 g/t gold, 0.6% lead and 0.1% zinc over 0.43 metres, starting at 34.57 metres

MU16-09

  • 151 g/t silver, 2.97 g/t gold, 0.9% lead, 0.7% zinc and 0.1% copper over 0.48 metres, starting at 53.3 metres

  • 152 g/t silver, 0.4 g/t gold, 4.5% lead, 1.7% zinc and 0.1% copper over 0.4 metres, starting at 58.54 metres

True widths weren’t available.

These results follow assays released in December from May Mac as well as the 16,000-hectare Greenwood project’s Amigo, Glory Hole and Sylvester K former mines. But the January 17 announcement revised one December hole, a surface stepout labelled BF16-26. The hole “not only demonstrates the northwest strike extension, but also extends the vein to 13 metres below the #7 adit level,” the company stated. “It indicates that mineralization similar to that historically mined from the upper levels of the mine is present down to the #7 level, and that the mineralization continues along strike and is open to the northwest. Further surface drill testing will test the extent of the mineralized zone.”

Meanwhile May Mac has underground drilling scheduled to resume by January 21. The company also has permitting underway to extend the #7 drift northwest and extract a bulk sample of up to 10,000 tonnes. The material would be processed at Golden Dawn’s Greenwood mill, 15 kilometres southeast of May Mac.

Pending a dewatering permit and the dewatering process, production would resume at Greenwood’s Lexington gold-copper mine, which has been on care and maintenance since 2008. The project has measured and indicated resources calculated last year that total 96,300 gold-equivalent ounces. Golden Dawn has also submitted a work application to drill its Golden Crown property, which has a 2016 resource showing 62,500 gold-equivalent ounces indicated and 13,100 ounces inferred.

The company stands to gain a $5.2-million advance payment from a purchase agreement announced earlier this month for gold that would be produced at Lexington and Golden Crown. The money would be used to repay a bridge loan, for working capital and to complete the acquisition of Kettle River Resources and its 12,000 hectares hosting 30 former mines. Golden Dawn expects to complete a 43-101 technical report on the property this month.

Read more about Golden Dawn Minerals.

Cobalt: A precarious supply chain

January 14th, 2017

by Jeff Desjardins | posted with permission of Visual Capitalist

Cobalt: A precarious supply chain

 

How does your mobile phone last for 12 hours on just one charge? It’s the power of cobalt, along with several other energy metals, that keeps your lithium-ion battery running.

The only problem? Getting the metal from the source to your electronics is not an easy feat, and this makes for an extremely precarious supply chain for manufacturers.

This infographic comes to us from LiCo Energy Metals TSXV:LIC and it focuses on where this important ingredient of green technology originates from, and the supply risks associated with its main sources.

What is cobalt?

Cobalt is a transition metal found between iron and nickel on the periodic table. It has a high melting point (1493° C) and retains its strength to a high temperature.

Similar to iron or nickel, cobalt is ferromagnetic. It can retain its magnetic properties to 1100° C, a higher temperature than any other material. Ferromagnetism is the strongest type of magnetism: it’s the only one that typically creates forces strong enough to be felt and is responsible for the magnets encountered in everyday life.

These unique properties make the metal perfect for two specialized high-tech purposes: superalloys and battery cathodes.

Superalloys

High-performance alloys drive 18% of cobalt demand. The metal’s ability to withstand intense temperatures and conditions makes it perfect for use in:

  • Turbine blades

  • Jet engines

  • Gas turbines

  • Prosthetics

  • Permanent magnets

Lithium-ion batteries

Batteries drive 49% of demand—and most of this comes from cobalt’s use in lithium-ion battery cathodes:

Type of lithium-ion cathode Cobalt in cathode Spec. energy (Wh/kg)
LFP 0% 120
LMO 0% 140
NMC 15% 200
LCO 55% 200
NCA 10% 245

The three most powerful cathode formulations for li-ion batteries all need cobalt. As a result, the metal is indispensable in many of today’s battery-powered devices:

  • Mobile phones (LCO)

  • Tesla Model S (NCA)

  • Tesla Powerwall (NMC)

  • Chevy Volt (NMC/LMO)

The Tesla Powerwall 2 uses approximately seven kilograms and a Tesla Model S (90 kWh) uses approximately 22.5 kilos of the energy metal.

The cobalt supply chain

Cobalt production has gone almost straight up to meet demand, more than doubling since the early 2000s.

But while the metal is desired, getting it is the hard part.

1. No native cobalt has ever been found.

There are four widely distributed ores that exist but almost no cobalt is mined from them as a primary source.

2. Most cobalt production is mined as a byproduct.

Mine source % cobalt production
Nickel (byproduct) 60%
Copper (byproduct) 38%
Cobalt (primary) 2%

This means it is hard to expand production when more is needed.

3. Most production occurs in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a country with elevated supply risks.

Country Tonnes %
Total 122,701 100.0%
United States 524 0.4%
China 1,417 1.2%
DRC 67,975 55.4%
Rest of World 52,785 43.0%

(Source: CRU, estimated production for 2017, tonnes)

The future of cobalt supply

Companies like Tesla and Panasonic need reliable sources of the metal and right now there aren’t many failsafes.

The United States hasn’t mined cobalt in significant volumes since 1971 and the USGS reports that the U.S. only has 301 tonnes of the metal stored in stockpiles.

The reality is that the DRC produces about half of all cobalt and it also holds approximately 47% of all global reserves.

Why is this a concern for end-users?

1. The DRC is one of the poorest, most corrupt and most coercive countries on the planet.

It ranks:

  • 151st out of 159 countries in the Human Freedom Index

  • 176th out of 188 countries on the Human Development Index

  • 178th out of 184 countries in terms of GDP per capita ($455)

  • 148th out of 169 countries in the Corruption Perceptions Index

2. The DRC has had more deaths from war since WWII than any other country on the planet.
Recent wars in the DRC:

  • First Congo War (1996-1997)—An invasion by Rwanda that overthrew the Mobutu regime.

  • Second Congo War (1998-2003)—The bloodiest conflict in world history since WWII, with 5.4 million deaths.

3. Human rights in mining

The DRC government estimates that 20% of all cobalt production in the country comes from artisanal miners—independent workers who dig holes and mine ore without sophisticated mines or machinery.

There are at least 100,000 artisanal cobalt miners in the DRC and UNICEF estimates that up to 40,000 children could be in the trade. Children can be as young as seven years old and they can work up to 12 hours with physically demanding work earning $2 per day.

Meanwhile, Amnesty International alleges that Apple, Samsung and Sony fail to do basic checks in making sure the metal in their supply chains did not come from child labour.

Most major companies have vowed that any such practices will not be tolerated in their supply chains.

Other sources

Where will tomorrow’s supply come from and will the role of the DRC eventually diminish? Will Tesla achieve its goal of a North American supply chain for its key metal inputs?

Mining exploration companies are already looking at regions like Ontario, Idaho, British Columbia and the Northwest Territories to find tomorrow’s deposits.

Ontario: Ontario is one of the only places in the world where cobalt-primary mines have existed. This camp is near the aptly named town of Cobalt, which is located halfway between Sudbury, the world’s nickel capital, and Val-d’Or, one of the most famous gold camps in the world.

Idaho: Idaho is known as the Gem State while also being known for its silver camps in Coeur d’Alene—but it has also been a cobalt producer in the past.

B.C.: The mountains of B.C. are known for their rich gold, silver, copper, zinc and met coal deposits. But cobalt often occurs with copper and some mines in B.C. have produced cobalt in the past.

Northwest Territories: Cobalt can also be found up north, as the NWT becomes a more interesting mineral destination for companies. One hundred and sixty kilometres from Yellowknife, a gold-cobalt-bismuth-copper deposit is being developed.

Posted with permission of Visual Capitalist.

Optimism’s back. So is VRIC

January 2nd, 2017

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017 readies for a resurgence

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017 readies for a resurgence

The VRIC buzz replaces the word on the street.

 

Optimism has returned to the markets. So have opportunities. Will the upturn continue? And if so, what’s the best way to gain advantage? Those will be among the topics scrutinized on January 22 and 23 as the Vancouver Resource Investment Conference makes its 2017 appearance. It’s the world’s largest investor event dedicated to resource exploration and this just might turn out to be a pivotal year for commodities.

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017 readies for a resurgence

Vancouver being the world capital of mineral exploration, those juniors will be out in force, making up most of the event’s more than 200 exhibitors. But that’s a majority, not a monopoly. Oil and gas, renewable energy and financial services count among the other sectors taking up exhibition hall tables.

This is the chance to talk face to face, ask tough questions and size up the people behind the projects.

It’s also the chance to listen to some of the keenest commentators on resource-related topics. People like Rick Rule, Frank Holmes, Doug Casey, Jonathan Goodman, Joe Martin, Brent Cook, Keith Neumeyer and many others will share their insights. Supply and demand, commodity prices, macro-economics, geopolitical issues can all affect wise investment decisions. These are people who study those topics from an investor’s perspective.

This marks the fourth conference co-produced by Cambridge House International (with a history of successful events dating to the early ’90s) and Katusa Research. The show features not only Marin Katusa’s insight—the researcher/analyst/author/portfolio manager has raised over $1 billion for mining and energy—but also his style. Acting as host, he promises to question, debate and even interrogate some of the speakers.

Additionally, VRIC 2017’s a place where deals get done. Rubbing shoulders with retail investors will be those of the accredited and institutional categories. All that contributes to the distinct VRIC ambience, where the buzz of the convention centre replaces the word on the street.

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017 takes place January 22 and 23 at the Vancouver Convention Centre West. Avoid the $20 door charge by pre-registering here.

 

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017 readies for a resurgence

Frank Holmes addresses a packed crowd at last year’s VRIC.

 

The Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2017 readies for a resurgence

The Vancouver Convention Centre once again hosts
the world’s largest investor event dedicated to resource exploration.

Golden Dawn Minerals continues revival of B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp

December 13th, 2016

by Greg Klein | December 13, 2016 | updated with revised assays January 17, 2017

A well-financed company working to bring new life to a cluster of past-producers 500 kilometres east of Vancouver, Golden Dawn Minerals TSXV:GOM released assays from former mines on December 13. The results come from the Amigo, Glory Hole, May Mac and Sylvester K sites, part of the mostly contiguous 16,000 hectares comprising the Greenwood project.

At May Mac, two of three surface holes from the same collar missed the Skomac vein system. But BF16-26, described as a “very significant 100-metre stepout hole along the northwesterly trend” of the vein system, showed these revised assays, which were released January 17:

  • 133.6 g/t silver, 0.54 g/t gold, 3.6% lead and 1.5% zinc over 6.07 metres, starting at 177.47 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 688 g/t silver, 1.18 g/t gold, 19% lead and 7% zinc over 0.96 metres)
Golden Dawn Minerals continues revival of B.C.’s historic Greenwood camp

Golden Dawn hopes to begin bulk
sampling next year at May Mac’s #7 level.

True widths weren’t provided.

The results show that historically mined mineralization continues another 75 metres vertically, remaining open at depth and along strike to the northeast, Golden Dawn stated. The company plans further drilling in that direction early next year.

An underground percussion hole at May Mac’s #7 drift showed these highlights from two consecutive 1.2-metre samples of cutting sludge:

  • 156 g/t silver, 3.04 g/t gold, 2.91% lead, 1.1% zinc and 0.33% copper

  • 135 g/t silver, 7.95 g/t gold, 0.6% lead, 1.3% zinc and 0.08% copper

Cautioning that accuracy might be affected by material loss, Golden Dawn stated the results show substantial mineralization within five metres of the end of the #7 level.

That level also underwent nine diamond drill holes totalling 805 metres, with assays pending for eight. Hole MU16-01 was drilled horizontally from the end of the adit to determine the distance to the vein. One intercept showed:

  • 131.3 g/t silver, 2.34 g/t gold, 0.59% lead and 0.42% zinc over 2.33 metres, starting at 17.45 metres
  • (including 250 g/t silver, 4.96 g/t gold, 1.2% lead and 0.89% zinc over 1.1 metres)

One kilometre south of May Mac, the former Amigo and Glory Hole mines underwent a surface drill program of 16 holes totalling 904 metres to search out extensions of known veins. Highlights include:

  • Hole BF16-10: 3 g/t silver and 1.04 g/t gold over 1.15 metres, starting at 41.31 metres in downhole depth

  • BF16-11: 5.8 g/t silver and 6.12 g/t gold over 0.74 metres, starting at 19.26 metres

  • BF16-15: 28 g/t silver and 0.98 g/t gold over 0.2 metres, starting at 5.5 metres

  • BF16-17: 2.8 g/t silver and 1.3 g/t gold over 1.32 metres, starting at 44.94 metres

  • BF16-18: 0.5 g/t silver and 1.13 g/t gold over 0.5 metres, starting at 14.5 metres

  • BF16-18: 1.8 g/t silver and 1.37 g/t gold over 1.26 metres, starting at 36.57 metres

  • BF16-24: 148 g/t silver over 0.25 metres, starting at 31.35 metres

Due diligence on a proposed property acquisition included seven channel samples at the Sylvester K past-producer, three kilometres from Golden Dawn’s mill. Six in a continuous line averaged 9.92 g/t gold over a true width of 15.2 metres.

Following the Christmas break, a program of 20 to 25 holes begins at the Greenwood project in mid-January. Permitting is in process to extract a 10,000-tonne bulk sample at May Mac adit #7, which would be processed at Golden Dawn’s mill, 15 kilometres from the former mine.

Last month the company closed a $1.18-million private placement, part of $3.97 million in private placements, $2.93 million in exercised warrants and US$2.4 million in long-term debt raised in 2016 that totals about $10.03 million.

Read more about Golden Dawn Minerals.

Infographic: AME BC’s Mineral Exploration Roundup 2017 approaches

December 12th, 2016
AME BC’s Mineral Exploration Roundup 2017 approaches

 

by Kendra Johnston, Roundup 2017 organizing committee chairperson | December 12, 2016

This year’s Mineral Exploration Roundup brings together geoscientists, prospectors, investors, suppliers and First Nation partners to share ideas that will help shape the future of mineral exploration and development. As the industry continues to work through the current downturn, we reflect on the importance of networking, professional development and relationship building with our partners, stakeholders and competitors. Mineral deposits are becoming harder to find; we must now travel to more remote locations, search deeper beneath cover and sometimes settle for lower grades. These aspects, coupled with the challenging market conditions, remind us that we must be more creative and collaborative as we explore to discover and develop new mineral deposits.

With the theme of Gearing Up for Discovery, this year’s conference focuses on sharing new ideas, generating new connections and creating collaborative solutions. Our prominent Technical Sessions will highlight projects that have overcome challenges to succeed by using a combination of tried and tested techniques and new, innovative solutions. The best-practice Show Case Sessions will explore new ideas in areas of the industry that must be mastered to successfully navigate challenges and opportunities. Lastly, our public outreach presentation, Discovery Day, has been expanded to feature more interactive displays, industry-focused public interest talks and activities for your whole family.

Join us at Roundup 2017 from January 23 to 26 at Canada Place in Vancouver. Learn, share ideas and connect with others from every aspect of the industry, from prospecting to reclamation and everything in between.

Click here for registration information.

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures to create gold-copper spinco

November 23rd, 2016

by Greg Klein | November 23, 2016

With a gold-copper asset in British Columbia and a diamond project with gold prospects in Nunavut, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI proposes to distribute its portfolio between two companies. On November 23 Dunnedin announced plans to spin out the non-diamond assets into a new listing.

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures to create gold-copper spinco

The company currently holds the 60,000-hectare Kahuna diamond project in Nunavut, where an inferred resource for two kimberlites totals 4.02 million carats, using a +0.85 mm cutoff. Till samples collected last year also showed anomalous gold of 50 ppb or more in 84 of 129 samples.

Meanwhile previous drill results from Dunnedin’s 4,000-hectare Trapper porphyry project in northwestern B.C. showed strong gold intercepts, with silver, lead and zinc showings as well.

“We believe that separate corporate vehicles for diamond and metal assets will yield the best long-term value to shareholders,” said CEO Chris Taylor.

Subject to approvals, Trapper and rights to gold at Kahuna would go to a newly created subsidiary with working capital for exploration. The new company’s shares would be distributed to Dunnedin shareholders on a pro rata basis. The new company would apply for a TSXV listing.

Dunnedin shareholders will vote on the proposed spinout early next year.

Dunnedin also plans to accelerate expiration of over six million warrants to December 23. Should all warrants be exercised, proceeds would come to about $632,708.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

Conuma Coal Resources president Mark Bartkoski remarks on stakeholder support as a former Walter Energy mine re-opens in B.C.

October 28th, 2016

…Read more

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures ponders its B.C. gold-copper porphyry project

October 26th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 26, 2016

Diamond explorer Dunnedin Ventures ponders its B.C. gold-copper porphyry project

Primarily focused on Nunavut diamond exploration, Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI has launched a technical and strategic review of its Trapper gold project in northwestern British Columbia.

The 40-square-kilometre property lies adjacent to Brixton Metals’ (TSXV:BBB) Thorn project and hosts the Ring zone “with over 10 kilometres of strike surrounding a porphyry centre, with gold-rich polymetallic mineralization drilled across 2.2 kilometres and associated surface copper porphyry showings,” Dunnedin stated.

Over $4 million of exploration included a 42-hole, 8,580-metre program completed in 2011. Some highlights showed:

Hole TG-11-011

  • 1.71 g/t gold, 5.6 g/t silver, 1.01% lead and 0.25% zinc over 34.11 metres, starting at 106.89 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 92.8 g/t gold, 18.8 g/t silver, 0.13% lead and 0.12% zinc over 0.41 metres)
  • (and including 3.9 g/t gold, 27 g/t silver, 9.11% lead and 0.91% zinc over 3.39 metres)

Hole TG-11-038

  • 1.68 g/t gold, 1.8 g/t silver, 0.02% lead and 0.07% zinc over 15 metres, starting at 122.5 metres
  • (including 5.08 g/t gold, 4.4 g/t silver, 0.05% lead and 0.13% zinc over 4.23 metres)
  • (which includes 21.8 g/t gold, 11.9 g/t silver, 0.15% lead and 0.36% zinc over 0.62 metres)

Hole TG-11-039

  • 1.01 g/t gold, 2.3 g/t silver, 0.02% lead and 0.13% zinc over 30 metres, starting at 67.5 metres
  • (including 2.19 g/t gold, 2.7 g/t silver, 0.06% lead and 0.3% zinc over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 2.98 g/t gold, 4 g/t silver, 0.04% lead and 0.09% zinc over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 2.64 g/t gold, 2.5 g/t silver and 0.35% zinc over 2.34 metres)

Hole TG-11-040

  • 1.19 g/t gold, 1.8 g/t silver, 0.01% lead and 0.07% zinc over 27.5 metres, starting at 132.5 metres
  • (including 11.15 g/t gold, 5.7 g/t silver, 0.03% lead and 0.17% zinc over 2.5 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

“The property overlies an unusually gold-rich porphyry copper complex including drill-ready copper porphyry and gold-rich semi-massive sulphide stockwork,” commented CEO Chris Taylor. “Dunnedin is conducting a comprehensive review of this 100%-owned project to determine how best to unlock its value for shareholders.”

The company has also been finding gold on its flagship Kahuna diamond project, with evidence from 2015 till sampling—just recently evaluated for gold—and from historic rock samples.

This year’s program collected 10 times as many till samples as 2015, gathering 1,111 samples to be analyzed for diamond indicator minerals and gold. The company also staked another 25,000 hectares, increasing Kahuna to about 60,000 hectares.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s report on long-term diamond demand.

Commerce Resources announces successful close of 2016 field season

October 20th, 2016

by Greg Klein | October 20, 2016

A series of hydrogeological tests concluded the 2016 field season as Commerce Resources’ (TSXV:CCE) Ashram rare earths deposit moves towards pre-feasibility. Last month the company finished the year’s definition drilling and environmental data collection on the northeastern Quebec project.

“With the three main field objectives now completed, drill core processing and sample collection for analysis are the next steps,” the company stated.

Commerce Resources announces successful close of 2016 field season

Still to come are assays from the season’s
14-hole, 2,000-metre, near-surface drill campaign.

The hydrogeological data will help evaluate sub-surface water flow and slope stability of different pit shell configurations. The environmental program included surface water and groundwater samples for baseline data collection and related studies. Last June the Quebec government granted Commerce $300,000 towards studies to optimize tailings management.

The season’s drill program sunk 14 holes totalling about 2,000 metres on the deposit’s northern, western and southern margins. While assays are pending, “initial geologic review and portable XRF data indicates significant mineralization is present over appreciable widths in several holes,” Commerce added. The goal is to expand and upgrade the project’s 2012 high-grade, near-surface resource.

The company keeps busy on a number of fronts as the project advances. Metallurgical studies have simplified Ashram’s flowsheet and shown a potential byproduct in fluorspar. Ashram’s rare earth elements mostly appear in monazite and to a lesser extent bastnasite and xenotime, minerals that dominate commercial extraction processes. Ashram’s REE distribution shows enrichment in the critical and magnet feed elements neodymium, praseodymium, europium, terbium, dysprosium and yttrium.

While rare earths remain the company’s focus, a sampling program on the same property but one kilometre from the deposit brought a “spectacular” result of 5.9% niobium pentoxide last month. Forty out of 64 samples graded above 0.5% Nb2O5, with 16 surpassing 1%. Significant tantalum, phosphate and rare earth oxide grades were also found.

In August the company closed a private placement of $551,040 and the second tranche of a short-form prospectus that totalled nearly $1.45 million.

Commerce also holds the Blue River tantalum-niobium deposit in southeastern British Columbia, which reached PEA in 2011 and a resource update in 2013.

Read more about Commerce Resources.