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Posts tagged ‘aluminum silica’

Electra Stone confirms nephrite jade on two B.C. properties

October 22nd, 2015

by Greg Klein | October 22, 2015

With its first jade prospecting program finished for the season, Electra Stone TSXV:ELT confirmed the presence of nephrite jade at two of its northern British Columbia projects on October 22. Four of the company’s six projects in a 5,850-hectare jade portfolio underwent exploration. Confirmation was made at Electra’s Greenrock Creek placer property, six kilometres from the Polar Jade operation, and at Electra’s Rustic property, eight kilometres from the Cassiar jade operation.

Electra Stone confirms nephrite jade on two B.C. properties

The initial prospecting program marks an early step towards
Electra’s goal of developing a vertically integrated operation
of jade mining, trading and marketing.

“The completion of this program is a positive first step towards Electra’s plans of developing a vertically integrated B.C. jade mining, trading and marketing platform,” said CEO John Costigan. “The information provided will help prepare us for the next exploration season. We will continue to build out our exploration assets and knowledge thereof, while we expand our trading with additional shipments of B.C. nephrite jade for sale to markets in China.”

The company’s first shipment left for Shanghai last month, with 18 tonnes bought from another B.C. operation to establish contacts with Chinese buyers. B.C. supplies about 75% of the world’s nephrite jade, most of which is bought in China.

Electra also produces chalky geyserite, or aluminum silica, from its Apple Bay quarry on Vancouver Island. Last summer Electra and a U.S. cement manufacturer began a co-operative drill program to consider expanding the operation.

Read more about Electra Stone.

See infographics: The History of Jade, the Emperor’s Stone and The Rush for Jade in British Columbia.

Electra Stone’s first jade shipment en route to China

September 23rd, 2015

by Greg Klein | September 23, 2015

An initial 18-tonne cargo of jade left the southern British Columbia port of Tsawwassen for Shanghai, Electra Stone TSXV:ELT confirmed on September 23. On arrival, a ceremony will connect company management with buyers including jade carvers, manufacturers and resellers, as part of Electra’s strategy of building a vertically integrated jade mining and trading platform linking B.C. supply with Chinese markets.

Electra Stone’s first jade shipment en route to China

“Shanghai is the first of many important regional markets for Electra,” said president/CEO John Costigan. “The similar geological environment in B.C. provides the conditions to produce the same nephrite jade in B.C. as the jade that has been sought after by the people of China for thousands of years.”

Nephrite is the type of jade originally used in China. As domestic supply ran out, the country began importing the more costly jadeite. More recently, decreasing supplies of jadeite have re-awakened interest in nephrite jade. Depending on its quality, it can be used for jewelry and carvings or for building materials.

Although Electra purchased and shipped the jade cargo to test Chinese markets, the company holds six jade properties totalling about 5,000 hectares in northern B.C., a province that supplies about 75% of the world’s nephrite jade. Company appointments, meanwhile, have added people with jade expertise to Electra’s board and staff.

The company also produces chalky geyserite, or aluminum silica, from its Apple Bay quarry on Vancouver Island. Earlier this month Electra joined a U.S. cement manufacturer in a co-operative drill program to assess expansion of the operation.

Read more about Electra Stone.

See an infographic: The History of Jade, the Emperor’s Stone.

Electra Stone, Ash Grove Cement seek aluminum silica expansion in B.C.

September 1st, 2015

by Greg Klein | September 1, 2015

In a co-operative drill program that began August 31, a miner and its customer hope to expand a British Columbia deposit of chalky geyserite, or aluminum silica. Electra Stone TSXV:ELT and Ash Grove Cement plan 24 holes of percussion drilling totalling around 700 metres over a five-day period on Electra’s Apple Bay quarry on northern Vancouver Island.

The crew will take samples every three metres to gather around 180 samples for analysis. Technical staff from both companies will take part.

Electra has provided Ash Grove, the United States’ sixth-largest cement manufacturer, with a continuous supply of aluminum silica since 2003. The product is used in cement as a binder and makes up about 20% of cement mix by weight. Electra anticipates this year’s aluminum silica sales to reach about 100,000 tonnes, a year-on-year increase of 60%.

After closing an oversubscribed private placement of $997,344 in late June, Electra began exploration on its northern B.C. nephrite jade properties. Work began on the company’s Polar placer jade project, about a kilometre from the Polar Jade mine, one of Canada’s most important jade operations.

Last week Electra shareholders approved a $2-million private placement from a single individual, which would create a new control person. The placement remains subject to final agreements and TSXV approval.

Read more about Electra Stone.

Updated: Electra Stone appointments bolster jade explorer’s expertise

July 15th, 2015

by Greg Klein | Updated July 15, 2015

Two recent appointments complement the world’s first publicly traded jade exploration company, Electra Stone TSXV:ELT announced. Neil Froc joins the company as exploration and land acquisition manager while David Zhang becomes a director.

Froc has served as executive VP and officer of Hard Creek Nickel TSXV:HNC, where he oversaw technical and socio-economic development of the Turnagain nickel project in northern British Columbia.

Zhang holds a master’s degree in money and banking from Zhongnan University in China and has 20 years’ experience in China’s financial and banking sector. As manager of Metath Investment Company, he heads the fund’s Canadian operations.

Electra president John Costigan noted Froc’s experience developing projects in northern B.C. and Zhang’s background in North American and Asian markets.

The company began exploration on its B.C. nephrite jade properties late last month, with work initially focusing on the recently acquired Polar placer jade project, about a kilometre from the Polar Jade mine, one of Canada’s most important jade operations. Funding comes from an oversubscribed private placement of $997,344 that Electra closed June 29.

The company also mines chalky geyserite, or aluminum silica, from the Apple Bay quarry on Vancouver Island.

Read more about Electra Stone.

Electra Stone appoints Neil Froc exploration and land acquisition manager

July 14th, 2015

This story has been updated and moved here.

Electra Stone closes over-subscribed private placement, begins B.C. jade exploration

June 30th, 2015

by Greg Klein | Updated June 30, 2015

Electra Stone closes over-subscribed private placement for nearly $1 million

With an oversubscribed private placement that closed on $997,344 the previous afternoon, Electra Stone TSXV:ELT announced the beginning of exploration on its British Columbia nephrite jade projects on June 30. Work will initially focus on the company’s recently acquired Polar placer jade project, about a kilometre from the Polar Jade mine, one of Canada’s most important jade operations. The team will also explore Electra’s other northern B.C. claims.

This Phase I program follows an oversubscribed private placement that “demonstrates the strength of Electra’s offering in these difficult markets,” said president/CEO John Costigan. The world’s first publicly traded jade exploration company, Electra also mines chalky geyserite, or aluminum silica, from a quarry on Vancouver Island.

Read more about Electra Stone.

June 29th, 2015

This story has been updated and moved here.

Strategies for success

June 2nd, 2015

Four junior explorers discuss their pursuit of diverse commodities

by Greg Klein

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Four junior explorers discuss their pursuit of diverse commodities

Chris Berry moderates as reps from Commerce Resources, Electra Stone,
Lakeland Resources and Equitas Resources talk about their Canadian projects.

Why do some juniors thrive despite depressed capital markets? Obvious answers would include the right commodities, projects and management. But how that plays out on a company-by-company basis came through in a May 31 Canvest ’15 panel discussion bringing together four explorers pursuing widely diverse minerals.

The quartet comes under the umbrella of Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC, a prospect generator with several core holdings among junior explorers. Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK holds one of the Athabasca Basin region’s largest portfolios of uranium prospects. Equitas Resources TSXV:EQT brings modern exploration techniques to a surprisingly under-explored Labrador land package southeast of Voisey’s Bay. Electra Stone TSXV:ELT has made aggressive moves into British Columbia jade properties while producing industrial minerals. Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE continues to advance its Ashram rare earths deposit in Quebec towards pre-feasibility while also holding a tantalum-niobium project in southern B.C.

Four junior explorers discuss their pursuit of diverse commodities

Panel moderator Chris Berry, president of House Mountain Partners and co-editor of the Disruptive Discoveries Journal, opened the discussion by asking about each company’s competitive advantage.

Commerce president Chris Grove noted that Ashram is one of a “very, very small” number of comparable projects that survived the rare earths bubble. Meanwhile rare earths demand for electric vehicles and magnets “has actually increased since the highs in 2010, 2011 and arguably will increase.”

He suggests investors consider a rare earths deposit for its distribution of magnet materials. “In that regard our project is not only hosted by the three minerals that are processed every day basically all around the world but it also has a great distribution of those magnet materials.”

Electra president John Costigan related his company’s entry into the $20-billion global jade industry. “B.C. accounts for 75% of the world’s nephrite jade … and that market is worth about $400 million.” Coming from an industrial minerals perspective, Electra sees neglected potential in the province’s B-grade jade, which Costigan says is literally left behind in the quest for higher-grade stuff used in jewelry and carving.

Among Lakeland’s advantages is its location. “We’re in the Athabasca Basin where the world’s highest grades are,” said manager of corporate communications Roger Leschuk. Uranium deposits outside the Basin average 0.1% to 0.15% U3O8, he added. Pointing to Basin grades like McArthur River’s 22% to 24% and Cigar Lake’s 18% to 22%, he said, “These mines are essentially hundreds of times richer, so the cost per pound of pulling it out of the ground is lower. Even in a low-rate environment, the Athabasca Basin’s the only place that makes sense.”

Location also helps explain the optimism of Equitas president Kyler Hardy. His company’s flagship Garland project sits 30 kilometres southeast of Vale’s (NYE:VALE) Voisey’s Bay on a land package undergoing modern exploration techniques for the first time. Canadian sulphide-type nickel deposits are “considered some of the best mines in the world simply because they’re not laterites,” Hardy said. “The environmental destruction that can occur when you mine laterite is massive because you’re basically strip-mining.”

And markets for Canadian nickel are relatively close. While other countries might produce the metal for China, Canadian nickel goes mostly to the eastern U.S., Montreal and Europe.

Tough equity markets have failed to keep these four companies down. So Berry asked about their sustainability plans for the next 12 to 24 months.

Last year’s $11.1 million in financings testifies to Commerce’s stability, Grove replied. The money supported a 31-hole drill program and Phase I mini-pilot plant tests, with the second phase set to begin within weeks. “Sustainability in this industry goes back to the actual rocks,” he said. When a company finds the metals it’s looking for and understands the market for those metals, “then arguably you have both sides covered.”

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Canvest ’15

May 28th, 2015

Commodities, tech, trends converge at Vancouver’s Canadian Investor Conference

by Greg Klein

The event takes place in familiar surroundings at the Vancouver Convention Centre West from May 31 to June 1. But while Canvest ’15 has become an annual institution, it’s one that adapts to the times. That gives mining and exploration investors a chance to not only catch up with companies’ progress but learn more about the convergence of commodities with energy and technology. Nearly 40 speakers will present talks, panel discussions, corporate presentations and workshops, along with almost 100 exhibitors ready to meet investors one-on-one.

Commodities, technologies, trends converge at Vancouver’s Canadian Investor Conference

Shown here at last year’s Canvest, Chris Berry emphasizes
the importance of learning about energy minerals
and their supply chains.

Considering the challenges of resource markets, Chris Berry credits Canvest organizer Cambridge House International for this new approach. “I think a lot of stakeholders in the natural resource space are searching for the new model,” says the Disruptive Discoveries Journal co-editor. “My sense is that Cambridge House may be on to something by trying to broaden its scope and provide opportunities for investors to get some insights into how natural resources and technology are converging.”

With such a broad range, not every sector links up with each other. But topics include mineral exploration, oil and gas, liquefied natural gas, agriculture, life sciences, energy metals, technology and—appropriately for a city where weed wafts ubiquitously—marijuana.

Canvest’s opening day promises to keep Berry busy with a keynote talk and four panel discussions. “My presentation will focus on disruptive technologies, not so much in the mining space but in the economy, taking a macro view of some of the forces I think are converging right now that make learning about disruptive business models and the potential for metals demand very, very important,” he says.

Even with minerals markets facing a prolonged downturn, Berry sees signs of hope. “I think the really optimistic and bullish case has to do with how quickly energy technologies, and technology in general, are being adopted and advanced. Longer-term, you want to be looking at a country like India. It’s much less urbanized than China, which served as the engine for metal demand.”

Among Berry’s Sunday panels will be an 11:30 a.m. commodities forum with reps from four holdings of prospect generator Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC. On board will be Commerce Resources TSXV:CCE (rare earths, tantalum, niobium), Equitas Resources TSXV:EQT (nickel), Electra Stone TSXV:ELT (jade, industrial minerals) and Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK (uranium).

Cambridge House describes its speaker line-up as “top industry analysts, newsletter writers, c-suite executives, hedge fund managers, trends forecasters and finance celebrities.” Twenty “young” clean tech companies will take their places at the new PowerHaus Pavilion. Events that aren’t formally on the agenda but remain well-entrenched Canvest customs include networking, schmoozing, gossiping and maybe just a bit of rumour-mongering.

Commodities, technologies, trends converge at Vancouver’s Canadian Investor Conference

Gianni Kovacevic says Canvest offers exposure to bold
new technologies as well as essential commodities.

Sunday’s 8:30 a.m. opening features a keynote presentation by Gianni Kovacevic, chairperson of CopperBank Resources CSE:CBK and author of My Electrician Drives a Porsche? His talk covers emerging markets, their “new spending class,” the merger of technology and energy, and other aspects of “the new energy renaissance.” He’ll also discuss his book, in which Kovacevic expresses his ideas through the interplay of two fictional characters, a boomer-generation doctor and a younger tradesman who became a canny investor by studying new and emerging trends.

Kovacevic will be giving away free copies of the novel.

He sees positive signs for the minerals sector through the simple necessity of supply. “Nobody’s building anything new of significance—I mean big, big new mines,” he says. “Ultimately you need a stronger underlying commodity price or nothing’s going to get built, so it’s a matter of time.”

A veteran of previous Cambridge House events as well as other investor shows, Kovacevic expects to see a lot of new faces among Canvest’s new diversified exhibitors. As for returning companies, he says they’ll offer investors a report card on their progress.

“The hard core resource investor talks to the 30 people he always talks to, he meets five or 10 new guys, he kicks the tires,” Kovacevic explains. “Even if you’re not going to invest right now, you’re going to see a company you like and you’re interested in, and if that sector moves or that company moves, you get very interested very quickly.”

Canvest ’15 runs May 31 to June 1, from 8:30 to 5:30, at Vancouver Convention Centre West. Avoid the $20 door charge by registering in advance.

Disclaimer: Zimtu Capital Corp, Commerce Resources Corp and Lakeland Resources Inc are clients of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in those companies.

MGX Minerals teams with Eaton Industries and Highbury Energy on Driftwood Creek magnesium project

May 26th, 2015

by Greg Klein | May 26, 2015

A partnership agreement announced May 26 brings MGX Minerals CSE:XMG considerable support to develop its flagship Driftwood Creek magnesium property in southern British Columbia. Immediate plans include a scoping study with initial results expected in about 30 days. The study will consider a processing plant with one or more industrial kilns and ancillary processing equipment for calcining magnesite ore. Caustic calcined magnesia can be used in fertilizer and feedstock, hydrometallurgy for nickel, copper and cobalt, pulp and paper production, and water treatment.

MGX Minerals teams with Eaton Industries and Highbury Energy on Driftwood Creek magnesium project

Recent surface sampling followed
last year’s drill program at Driftwood.

The study will be conducted by Eaton Industries (Canada), a subsidiary of Eaton Corp NYE:ETN, which provides energy-efficient services for electrical, hydraulic and mechanical power, including new mine and mill design. With about 102,000 employees, Eaton Corp’s 2014 revenue came to US$22.6 billion.

The third partner is Highbury Energy, a company that uses proprietary technology to convert biomass into high-grade synthesis or fuel gas. Driftwood’s kiln would be powered partly by Highbury’s technology, offering the project clean, low-cost energy.

The three companies will work together on several aspects of designing, developing and financing Driftwood’s proposed mining and processing project. Additionally, the trio will apply a similar business model to between seven and 10 other industrial minerals projects, MGX stated. The company’s portfolio includes most of B.C.’s known magnesite occurrences.

MGX also holds a strategic alliance with Zimtu Capital TSXV:ZC and Electra Stone TSXV:ELT to develop other B.C. industrial minerals properties, including Electra’s Longworth silica project. Additionally MGX has a technical services agreement regarding Electra’s chalky geyserite (aluminum silica) quarry operation on Vancouver Island.

Read more about MGX Minerals.

Disclaimer: Zimtu Capital Corp is a client of OnPage Media Corp, the publisher of ResourceClips.com. The principals of OnPage Media may hold shares in Zimtu Capital.