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Posts tagged ‘Aldrin Resource Corp (ALN)’

Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 12th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 5 to 11, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium reports seven strong holes from Patterson Lake South

They probably don’t surprise anyone anymore but Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) weekly dispatches from Patterson Lake South continue to impress. Radiometric readings from all seven holes released April 7 showed wide intervals and “off-scale” radioactivity.

The results, which are no substitute for assays, come from a hand-held scintillometer that measures gamma radioactivity from drill core in counts per second up to a maximum possible (“off-scale”) reading of 9,999 cps. Lab results are pending.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 5 to 11, 2014

Fission Uranium found off-scale radiometric readings for intervals
from each of seven holes in this week’s news from Patterson Lake South.

This week’s batch comes from zone 780E, the third of five zones along a west-east strike that just last week extended to 2.24 kilometres and remains open at both ends.

The star hole was PLS14-201, which gave up a composite total of 82.5 metres (not true widths) of mineralization including a composite of 16.8 metres straining the scintillometer at 9,999 cps. The interval closest to surface began at 84 metres in downhole depth while the deepest stopped at 340.5 metres.

The other six holes showed intervals in roughly similar ranges of depth, with one beginning as close as 58.5 metres from surface and the deepest ending at 415 metres.

The company has now finished 70 of 100 holes totalling 30,000 metres planned for the $12-million winter campaign. Four rigs will sink about 85 of those holes to delineate the 31,039-hectare project’s main mineralized trend. A fifth rig explores farther away.

Also on April 7 Fission Uranium granted insiders 500,000 options at $1.65 for five years. The previous week the company granted 6.5 million options on the same terms.

Lakeland Resources stakes five more Saskatchewan properties totalling 52,255 hectares

A quintet of new acquisitions in and around the Athabasca Basin bolstered Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) portfolio to 16 properties totalling about 157,000 hectares. The turf came through staking which, president/CEO Jonathan Armes told ResourceClips.com on April 11, is ideal for juniors “because you own it 100% with no encumbrances, underlying NSRs and so on.”

Neil McCallum, a company director and project geologist/manager with Dahrouge Geological Consulting, says Lakeland had been studying the properties while waiting for them to come available. “A lot of people get land because it’s in or near the Basin without targeting anything in particular. You can do a lot of research, if you know what you’re looking for, to find good targets before you acquire them.”

A lot of people get land because it’s in or near the Basin without targeting anything in particular. You can do a lot of research, if you know what you’re looking for, to find good targets before you acquire them.—Lakeland Resources
director Neil McCallum

The new ground includes Lazy Edward Bay, a 21,990-hectare project on the Basin’s southern margin with four shallow trends that Lakeland considers drill-ready.

Just off the Basin’s northeastern rim, the 7,195-hectare Karen Lake project has yet to be drilled despite several silt samples grading over 1% uranium. Another 2,889-hectare property along the Basin’s northern edge, Black Lake has a shallow depth to the unconformity of about 260 metres and has undergone historic and recent geophysics.

The 16,925-hectare Hidden Bay sits about eight kilometres east of the Basin and hosts an outlier of Athabasca sandstone and at least four graphitic corridors. About 70 klicks south of the Basin, the 3,258-hectare Fedun Lake property sits on the Wollaston domain that hosts most of the Basin’s uranium deposits.

With cash in hand from last month’s oversubscribed $2.8-million private placement, McCallum says Lakeland is “certainly funded to prioritize the projects we want to work ourselves. If we find JV opportunities for other projects, we wouldn’t mind that either. We have enough projects that we can work some ourselves and have those JV opportunities at the same time.”

Speaking of joint ventures, Gibbon’s Creek is about to undergo a ground electromagnetic survey prior to an anticipated 2,500-metre drill campaign funded by partner Declan Resources TSXV:LAN. Boulder samples from the 12,771-hectare northern Basin project have graded as high as 4.28% uranium oxide (U3O8) while a RadonEx survey showed some of the highest measurements ever found in the Basin.

Read more about Lakeland’s new acquisitions.

MPVC/CanAlaska report radon anomalies from Northwest Manitoba project

Now trading under TSXV:UNO following its change of business, MPVC Inc joined CanAlaska Uranium TSXV:CVV on April 8 to announce “highly anomalous radon results” from the Maguire Lake area of their Northwest Manitoba project. The land-based survey covered a three-by-10-kilometre section of the 143,603-hectare project finding trends “in some cases over four kilometres and approximately 100 to 200 metres wide.” The survey also identified areas of about 400 by 800 metres where radon measured over three times the background levels, sometimes coinciding with gravity and resistivity lows.

Two islands with anomalous values also feature radioactive outcrops. Boulder samples from one island have graded up to 66% U3O8.

The Manitoba property shares some geological features with the Basin, with a distinction that “uranium mineralization outcrops within our project area rather than being deeply buried as is the case with many deposits in the Basin,” the companies stated.

Upcoming plans include a radon survey over the lake itself prior to a drill program scheduled to begin in late April. As part of its 80% option with CanAlaska, MPVC must spend $3.2 million on exploration by 2015.

The previous week CanAlaska sold its Kasmere South project in Manitoba to a private company for $1.8 million to help advance its “core Japanese and Korean joint ventures at West MacArthur and Cree East.”

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 29th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 22 to 28, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Another record-breaking hole at Patterson Lake South as Fission merges more zones

Still fattening itself up for acquisition, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU moves closer to its goal of defining one big deposit at Patterson Lake South. On March 24, for the third time in 19 days, the company announced that drilling had merged two more high-grade zones. The project now consists of four zones—two high-grade zones in the middle, with another zone on each of the east-west flanks—along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike. Mineralization remains open at both ends.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 22 to 28, 2014

The field crew examines core at Patterson Lake South,
where Fission Uranium continues to exceed past performance.

And, for those not yet suffering from repetitive record-breaking fatigue induced by this project, Fission Uranium announced another best-ever hole, which “far surpasses” its last such accomplishment.

Results for the nine holes released March 24 come from a hand-held scintillometer that measures radiation from drill core in counts per second. Scintillometer results are no substitute for assays, which are still to come.

The record-breaker, hole PLS14-187, showed a composite 53.47 metres (not true width) at 9,999 cps, the maximum that the device can measure. Six other holes also showed intervals with maximum readings. The interval closest to surface began at 54.5 metres, while the deepest stopped at 452 metres in downhole depth.

The $12-million winter campaign has four rigs attacking the high-grade area, while a fifth explores farther away. No target date has been announced for the project’s maiden resource.

Forum closes $3.04-million financing, resumes drilling NW Athabasca JV

Two days before closing a private placement, Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC announced drilling had resumed at its 9,800-hectare Northwest Athabasca joint venture. The 3,000-metre program “is designed to determine the eastern extent of the mineralization discovered at Otis West and its extension onto the Otis East gravity target, both of which lie on the south side of the [historic, non-43-101] 1.5-million-pound Maurice Bay deposit,” the company stated on March 24.

Otis West shows a 50-metre strike, a depth of about 110 metres and remains open to the east and at depth, Forum added. Drilling will also test basement targets below Maurice Bay, Zone A and MB East, an untested gravity low east of Maurice Bay.

Among previous assays, last June Otis West showed 0.152% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 39.5 metres, starting at 131 metres in downhole depth. The previous month Zone A gave up 1.34% over 3 metres, starting at 88.5 metres.

Forum and NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE jointly hold 64% of the JV, with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada holding 23.5% and 12.5% respectively. Forum acts as project operator.

On March 26 Forum reported closing a private placement for $3.04 million.

In late February the company began drilling its 9,910-hectare, PLS-adjacent Clearwater project. Forum has also been busy picking up other projects in Nunavut and the northeastern Basin, in the vicinity of the Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK/Declan Resources TSXV:LAN flagship Gibbon’s Creek.

Aldrin offers $500,000 placement, plans up to 4,000 metres at Triple M

It’s not clear whether drilling has yet begun, but Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN has up to 4,000 metres planned for Triple M, a 12,001-hectare property adjacent to PLS. Previous work has shown gravity lows associated with anomalous radon values over basement conductor anomalies. More recently, an infill gravity survey helped refine targets, the company stated on March 25.

One day earlier the company offered a $500,000 private placement. The previous week Aldrin announced TSXV approval to convert $220,000 in debt to shares. The sum remained outstanding out of $500,000 to be paid to Sotet Capital for the project.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 22nd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 15 to 21, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Denison signs LOI to acquire International Enexco, finds new Wheeler River zone

The expansionist Denison Mines TSX:DML announced another potential acquisition with a letter of intent to take over one of its joint venture partners, International Enexco TSXV:IEC. The March 19 after-market announcement had Denison chairperson Lukas Lundin saying his company “continues to focus on becoming the pre-eminent exploration company in the Athabasca Basin.”

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 15 to 21, 2014

The acquisition of JV partner Enexco would give Denison full ownership
of Bachman Lake, one of the company’s priority projects.

The plan of arrangement would exchange each Enexco share for 0.26 of a Denison share plus an undetermined portion of a spinco or subsidiary that would hold Enexco’s assets outside the Basin.

The deal would have Enexco shareholders owning about 2.1% of Denison. The latter company already holds about 8.4% of Enexco, along with another 1.8 million warrants.

The LOI includes a non-solicitation covenant on the part of Enexco, while Denison has the right to match any superior proposal.

The two companies JV together on the 11,419-hectare Bachman Lake property four kilometres west of Cameco Corp’s TSX:CCO proposed Millennium mine in the southeastern Basin. Enexco holds a 20% interest. Operator Denison describes the project as one of the company’s highest priorities “due to its location in the southeast Athabasca Basin and the presence of strong conductors, graphitic basement and sandstone alteration.”

Mann Lake, another JV 20 klicks northeast, is held 30% by Enexco, 52.5% by Cameco and 17.5% by AREVA Resources Canada. The 3,407-hectare property lies on trend between Cameco’s Read Lake and Denison’s 60%-held Wheeler River projects.

In Nevada, Enexco’s 100%-held Contact copper project is currently working towards feasibility.

Denison’s most recent acquisition closed in January, after the company grabbed Rockgate Capital to thwart its proposed merger with Mega Uranium TSX:MGA. Rockgate’s directors initially characterized Denison’s manoeuvre as an “unsolicited opportunistic hostile takeover bid.” As a result Denison gained the advanced-stage Falea uranium-silver-copper project in Mali. The company had said it intended to spin out its non-Athabasca projects.

Enexco valued the combined Denison/spinco offers at $0.64 for an Enexco share, a 63% premium over its March 19 close of $0.39, after having been trading between a 52-week low of $0.23 and a 52-week high of $0.48. But by March 21 close the stock had reached $0.53. With 47.79 million shares outstanding, the company had a market cap of $22.68 million.

Denison closed March 19 on $1.74 and March 21 on $1.72. With 484.68 million shares outstanding, its market cap came to $833.65 million.

One day after the LOI announcement, Denison’s Wheeler River JV returned to prominence with a high-grade hole from the newly found Gryphon zone, three kilometres northwest of the Phoenix deposit.

The one interval reported, from hole WR-556, showed:

  • 3.7% uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) over 12.6 metres, starting at 691 metres in downhole depth

  • (including 9.7% over 4.6 metres)

True thickness was about 70%. The results come from a downhole radiometric probe which, although more accurate than a scintillometer, are no substitute for assays.

As project operator, Denison targeted two historic holes where it found “a basement wedge that has been faulted up into the sandstone and then encountered a large interval of graphitic basement, within which is a zone of alteration and mineralization 140 metres down-dip of the old drill holes.”

Gryphon’s mineralization lies “approximately 200 metres beneath the sub-Athabasca unconformity and is open in both strike directions and down-dip,” the company added.

In late February Denison released radiometric results for eight holes on the Phoenix deposit and briefly updated some other projects.

Fission Uranium merges two more zones at Patterson Lake South

Back on the subject of M&A, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU might be considered an acquisition waiting to happen. On March 17, for the second time in less than two weeks, the company said it merged two zones at Patterson Lake South, evidently part of its ambition to demonstrate one big deposit before the company gets swallowed by a bigger fish.

Radiometric results closed an approximately 60-metre gap, joining zone R585E to its former neighbour to the west, R390E. The project now has five zones, three of them high-grade, along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike. The $12-million winter program’s primary goal is to delete the word “potential.”

The news followed a March 5 announcement that drilling had merged two other zones into R780E and a March 10 announcement of the project’s second-strongest radiometric results. Of eight holes released March 17, five showed intervals of 9,999 counts per second, the highest possible reading on the hand-held scintillometer that measures radioactivity from drill core. Scintillometer readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Maximum readings for three holes showed composites of 15.25 metres, 7.14 metres and 5.85 metres. Of all mineralized intercepts, the interval closest to surface began at 60 metres in downhole depth, while the deepest stopped at 373 metres.

Of the three high-grade zones, R00E shows a 165-metre strike and lateral width up to about 45 metres. About 135 metres east, the newly expanded R390E has an approximately 390-metre strike and lateral width up to about 50 metres. About 75 metres east again, R780E shows an approximately 300-metre strike and lateral width up to about 95 metres.

Two additional zones, R1155E and R600W, sit at the eastern and western ends of the 1.78-kilometre stretch.

Fission Uranium has four drills trying to connect the high-grade zones and a fifth exploring outside the mineralized area just south of the Basin.

Lakeland/Declan JV announces Gibbon’s Creek plans, Lakeland closes oversubscribed $2.83-million financing

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 15 to 21, 2014

Boulder samples at the Lakeland/Declan Gibbon’s Creek JV assayed up to 4.28% U3O8, while radon measurements returned some of the Basin’s highest results.

One day after announcing imminent exploration plans for its Gibbon’s Creek project, Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK closed an oversubscribed private placement for $2.83 million. With JV partner Declan Resources TSXV:LAN spending a first-year commitment of $1.25 million on their Gibbon’s flagship, Lakeland can now turn to its 14 other Basin projects.

Gibbon’s is about to get a ground electromagnetic survey to confirm historic work prior to an anticipated drill program of up to 15 shallow holes totalling 2,500 metres. Results released in January from the 12,771-hectare project showed some of the highest radon gas levels ever measured in the Basin, along with surface boulders grading up to 4.28% U3O8. The property is about a 10-minute drive from the northern Basin town of Stony Rapids.

Lakeland’s other properties dot the northern, eastern and southern sections of the Basin.

“Several of our projects are at that stage where we just need to do line-cutting, resistivity and RadonEx to identify drill targets,” president/CEO Jonathan Armes told ResourceClips.com. “But with all these projects, we know we can’t do them all. We’ll continue to develop other joint venture possibilities, while at the same time compiling data on the projects to identify those we want to focus on.”

Read more about Gibbon’s Creek and Lakeland’s 15-property Basin portfolio.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 15th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 8 to 14, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Innovation overcomes epic struggle to put Cameco’s Cigar Lake into production

 

 

With an ore grade 100 times the world average, Cameco Corp TSX:CCO overcame tremendous challenges to put Cigar Lake into production. Indeed the project’s first ore shipment on March 13 suggests that high grade is the mother of invention.

Among other tribulations, flooding in 2006 and 2008 stalled the eastern Athabasca Basin mine, which dates back to a 1981 discovery and began construction in 2005. Last year’s planned start-up hit another delay with leaks from tanks built to hold the run-of-mine slurry. Around the same time the McClean Lake mill faced delays of its own with modifications to the leaching circuit.

Cameco devised innovative techniques of bulk freezing and jet boring to extract the deposit lying 410 to 450 metres below surface, “where water-saturated Athabasca sandstone meets the underlying basement rocks.”

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 8 to 14, 2014

The jet boring tunnel at Cigar Lake, which Cameco calls “among
the most technically challenging mining projects in the world.”

To prevent flooding, the company freezes the ore and surrounding rock “by circulating a brine solution through freeze holes drilled from both surface and underground.”

To extract the ore, Cameco developed a method of high-pressure water jet boring “after many years of test mining” that keeps operators safely distant from the enormously high-grade deposit.

The company’s targeting 18 million pounds a year at full production, making it the world’s largest high-grade uranium mine after the Cameco/AREVA (70%/30%) McArthur River operation. But even 33 years after Cigar Lake’s discovery, the company anticipates further difficulties: “As we ramp up production, there may be some technical challenges which could affect our production plans.”

As of December 31, Cigar Lake capital expenditures came to $2.6 billion. Over 600 people will staff the mine.

Milling will take place at McClean Lake, 70 kilometres northeast. Operator AREVA Resources Canada says the plant “is expected to produce 770 to 1,100 tonnes of uranium concentrate from Cigar Lake ore in 2014. Its annual production rate will ramp up to 8,100 tonnes as early as 2018.”

Cigar Lake shows proven and probable reserves averaging 18.3% for 216.7 million pounds U3O8. Measured and indicated resources average 2.27% for 2.2 million pounds. The inferred resource averages 12.01% for 98.9 million pounds.

Cigar Lake is a joint venture of Cameco (50.025%), AREVA (37.1%), Idemitsu Canada Resources (7.875%) and TEPCO Resources (5%).

The McClean Lake JV consists of AREVA (70% ), Denison Mines TSX:DML (22.5%) and OURD Canada (7.5%).

Read more about Cigar Lake here and here.

Fission Uranium reports Patterson Lake South’s second-best radiometric results, $25-million bought deal

Patterson Lake South’s momentum continued on March 10 as Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU released its third batch of radiometric readings in five days—this time boasting one hole with “the second strongest off-scale results recorded at PLS to date, placing it amongst the best holes drilled in the Athabasca Basin.” The four new holes also continue the winter program’s 100% hit rate and further encourage the company’s quest to connect the six zones along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike.

Fission Uranium reports Patterson Lake South’s second-best radiometric results

Fission uses a hand-held scintillometer to measure
radiation from drill core prior to receiving lab assays.

The most recent star hole is PLS14-164, whose intervals showed a total of 30.08 metres of off-scale readings at 9,999 counts per second, the maximum amount of gamma radiation that the hand-held scintillometer can measure. The readings, taken from drill core, are no substitute for assays, which will follow.

Another hole showed a composite 2.1 metres of off-scale radioactivity. Of the four holes, the mineralized intercept closest to surface started at 56 metres, while the deepest stopped at 380.5 metres.

Oddly enough, Fission Uranium’s March 10 release says one of the new holes “has narrowed the distance between zones R390E and R585E to approximately 60 metres.” That’s the same distance between the same zones reported by the company on March 7.

Already 40 holes have been completed in the $12-million winter campaign that began in mid-January. The company plans about 85 or 90 holes totalling around 30,000 metres on the ice-bound lake before spring. While one rig explores outside the mineralized area, Fission Uranium hopes its four other drills will fill the gaps between the project’s six zones.

Just before the March 10 closing bell Fission Uranium announced a $25-million bought deal. A syndicate of underwriters led by Dundee Securities agreed to buy 15.65 million warrants, exercisable for one share each, at $1.60. The company expects to close the private placement by April 1. The underwriters may buy an additional 15%.

Fission Uranium surpassed its 52-week high March 10, opening three cents above its previous close, reaching $1.71 and then settling on $1.67 when trading was halted at the company’s request minutes before the $25-million announcement.

Trading resumed the following day. The company closed March 14 on $1.59. With 330.12 million shares outstanding, Fission Uranium had a market cap of $524.89 million.

NexGen repeats success with second hole at Rook 1’s new area

NexGen repeats success with second hole at Rook 1’s new area

Core from RK-14-27 shows pitchblende within
brecciated shear at 253.8 metres in downhole depth.

With radiometric results from a second hole on Rook 1’s Arrow prospect, NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE repeated last month’s success. On March 13 the company released dozens of tiny intervals ranging from 0.05 to 0.45 metres that showed “significant” readings over 500 counts per second. One intercept of 15.05 metres (not true width) showed almost continuous significant results.

The measurements, which are no substitute for assays, were obtained by scanning drill core with a hand-held radiation detector.

Significant intervals for RK-14-27 started at 224.45 metres in downhole depth and ended at 435.9 metres. Drilling stopped at 576 metres. About a dozen small intervals hit the device’s maximum possible reading of 10,000 cps. Arrow’s mineralization now extends at least 32 metres down dip across two holes, NexGen stated.

Three other holes failed to find significant radiation but “analysis of structures in these holes meant that hole 27 was successfully planned to intersect the interpreted mineralized zones both along strike and down dip.” The company plans to sink RK-14-29 40 metres southwest along strike. Now in progress, RK-14-28 is testing a gravity low roughly 200 metres west of RK-14-27.

The company has two drills working the Arrow area, now the focus of the PLS-adjacent Rook 1 project. A third rig will join by summer.

On March 10 NexGen stated it filed a preliminary short form prospectus regarding the previously announced $10-million bought deal, which the company expects to close on or about March 26.

Fission 3.0 stakes 42,000 additional hectares in and around the Basin

Three acquisitions and one property expansion add nearly 42,000 hectares to Fission 3.0’s (TSXV:FUU) portfolio. Announced March 13, the newly staked properties indicate “there remain many under-explored areas of the Athabasca Basin,” according to COO and chief geologist Ross McElroy.

Not all the new turf actually lies within the Basin. But neither does PLS. The 20,826-hectare Perron Lake property is about 20 kilometres north of the Basin and has benefited from regional lake sediment sampling that showed strong uranium anomalies.

The 9,168-hectare Cree Bay property sits within the northeastern Basin, where historic airborne geophysics suggest potential for hydrothermal and structure-related deposits.

Within the southeastern Basin, the 4,354-hectare Grey Island property is located about 70 kilometres from Key Lake, the world’s largest high-grade uranium mill.

Manitou Falls enlarges by 7,589 hectares to a total of 10,529 hectares. The northeastern Basin property was originally staked last May when the spinco was just a gleam in Fission Uranium’s eye. Historic data shows six radiometric anomalies and multiple basement electromagnetic conductors.

Fission 3.0’s portfolio now numbers nine Saskatchewan and Alberta properties in and around the Basin and one in Peru’s Macusani uranium district.

Purepoint finds new zone at Hook Lake JV

March 10 news from Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU heralded a new zone of mineralization at its Hook Lake joint venture five kilometres northeast of PLS. Although two of four holes failed to find mineralization, the other two prompted the company to move its second rig to the new Spitfire zone.

The single interval released from hole HK14-09 showed:

  • 0.32% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 6.2 metres, starting at 208.9 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.1% over 0.5 metres)

Thirty metres northwest, HK14-11 showed:

  • 0.11% over 2 metres, starting at 197.9 metres

  • 0.05% over 3 metres, starting at 201.9 metres

  • 0.57% over 0.9 metres, starting at 210.6 metres

True widths weren’t provided. These holes were drilled at a -70 degree dip.

All four holes targeted the 2.9-kilometre D2 electromagnetic conductor, which features “a large magnetic low, possibly indicative of hydrothermal alteration,” said VP of exploration Scott Frostad. “Now that the D2 conductor has been shown to be associated with uranium mineralization, we will increase our drilling efforts towards the northeast where geophysics suggests there is a more structurally complex setting.”

Purepoint stated D2 comprises part of the Patterson Lake conductive corridor, the same conductive trend targeted by Fission at PLS.

Purepoint holds a 21% interest in the 28,683-hectare project and acts as operator for partners Cameco (39.5%) and AREVA Resources Canada (39.5%). The work is part of a $2.5-million, 5,000-metre campaign that began in late January.

In early February Rio Tinto NYE:RIO began drilling Purepoint’s Red Willow project as part of Rio’s 51% earn-in.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

March 9th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 1 to 7, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium merges two zones, narrows gap between two others at Patterson Lake South

Fission Uranium merges two zones, narrows gap between two others at Patterson Lake South

Fission Uranium has four of its five rigs trying
to fill the gaps in the now six-zone PLS project.

With several zones stretched along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike at Patterson Lake South, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU obviously wants to find one big, shallow, high-grade deposit. That dream came closer to reality with radiometric results released March 5 and 7. Zones R780E and R945E are now one, forever intertwined, while the gap between two zones to the west has been narrowed.

Scintillometer results from 20 holes released March 5 show mineralization at depths as shallow as 54 metres and as deep as 459 metres. Thirteen holes showed off-scale intervals, reaching the maximum 9,999 counts per second on the hand-held device that measures drill core for gamma radiation. Scintillometer readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

Apart from the hope of merging more zones—the goal of this winter’s drill program—Fission Uranium sees expansion potential. The best hole of this batch was the most easterly of the newly merged zone, which “bodes extremely well for high-grade expansion to the east.”

Two days later Fission Uranium unveiled scintillometer results for four more holes, each from a different zone, starting with R780E and moving west to the discovery zone. The interval nearest to surface started at 51 metres and the deepest ended at 276 metres. Intervals from one hole showed a total of 16.18 metres of off-scale radioactivity, while another hole gave up an off-scale composite of 2.65 metres. The gap between R390E and R585E has been narrowed to about 60 metres.

With 36 of the planned 85 winter holes complete, Fission Uranium claims a 100% hit rate. The company has one rig exploring outside the mineralized trend and four others attacking the gaps between these six zones:

The discovery zone, R00E, has a 165-metre strike and a lateral width up to about 45 metres. About 135 metres east, R390E has a 255-metre strike and a lateral width up to about 50 metres. Sixty metres east again, R585E has a 75-metre strike and a lateral width up to about 20 metres. About 105 metres east, R780E now has an approximately 270-metre strike, as a result of subsuming R945E. The lateral width reaches up to about 90 metres.

R780E’s geology “is similar to other zones,” Fission Uranium stated, “consisting of mineralization primarily associated with sequences of steeply south-dipping pelitic lithology with localized mylonites and cataclasites.”

Two other zones at the eastern and western extremities, R1155E and R600W, bring the potential strike to 1.78 kilometres.

Two weeks earlier Fission Uranium released lab assays from R585E that showed the project’s best hole ever—or maybe that should be “so far.”

Update: On March 10 Fission released its “second-best” radiometric results from PLS. Read more.

NexGen announces $10-million bought deal for Athabasca Basin exploration

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for March 1 to 7, 2014

With Fission Uranium’s PLS rigs in the background, NexGen drills Rook 1.

A $10-million bought deal for NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE reinforces the company’s new prominence in Athabasca Basin uranium exploration. Announced March 4, the private placement follows news of radiometric results from a new area of the company’s Rook 1 project, which is adjacent to PLS.

Subject to approvals, the deal involves 22.3 million units at $0.45 and gives the underwriters an option to buy an additional 15%. Each unit consists of a share and one-half warrant, with each entire warrant exercisable at $0.65 for two years. Proceeds will go to Basin exploration, working capital and general corporate purposes.

NexGen’s stock took off with the February 19 release of radiometric readings from the first hole in Rook 1’s Arrow area, which the company called “a totally new zone of uranium mineralization.” The news propelled the company from a 52-week low of $0.225 to a 52-week high of $0.65 in two days. The stock closed March 7 at $0.49.

Meanwhile NexGen has moved its other rig to Arrow to focus two drills on the new area.

NexGen holds several properties in the Basin. But it has yet to release results from last summer’s nine-hole campaign on the Radio project, where the company has a 70% earn-in.

NexGen expects to close the bought deal by March 26.

Zadar announces 2014 plans for PNE and Pasfield projects

With permit applications submitted, Zadar Ventures TSXV:ZAD announced plans for two projects on March 3. The 15,292-hectare PNE, about 11 kilometres northeast of PLS, has about 3,500 metres scheduled for winter and summer drilling, along with ground-based geophysics. Previously identified radon anomalies and conductive trends will help determine targets.

Plans for the 37,445-hectare Pasfield Lake property, within the Cable Bay shear zone in the east-central Basin, include airborne and ground geophysics and a proposed 3,800 metres of drilling “followed by a staged program of uranium exploration culminating in [a] 32,000-metre drilling program,” the company stated.

Pasfield Lake is one of a number of properties that Zadar acquired from Canterra Minerals TSXV:CTM late last year.

Noka Resources/Alpha Exploration begin radon surveys on Carpenter Lake

Radon surveys on lake water and sediment have begun at Carpenter Lake on the Basin’s south-central edge. Announced March 4 by Noka Resources TSXV:NX and Alpha Exploration TSXV:AEX, the four-to-five-week agenda will include sampling from about a thousand locations over a 16-kilometre stretch of the Cable Bay shear zone, which the companies have described as a “major regional shear zone with known uranium enrichment.”

Spring and summer plans for the 20,637-hectare property include high-resolution airborne radiometrics to search for near-surface uranium boulders, followed by ground prospecting and geochemical sampling. The work is part of the Alpha Minerals spinco’s 60% earn-in from Noka, a member of the Western Athabasca Syndicate that plans to drill its PLS-vicinity Preston Lake property this month.

Late last month Noka closed a $1.13-million private placement. Alpha Exploration announced plans for other projects in December and January.

Hodgins Auctioneers pursues Basin uranium claims

A company specializing in auctioning equipment and real estate has signed a conditional agreement to acquire uranium interests in the Basin. Under a deal announced March 6 with Majesta Resources Inc, Hodgins Auctioneers TSXV:HA would get a 25% interest in a 39,125-hectare contiguous package that comes within 10 kilometres of the Key Lake mill.

Apart from TSXV approval, the transaction hinges on raising a $350,000 private placement.

An initial 25% would cost Hodgins $100,000 in cash or debt, two million shares and $300,000 in exploration spending. An additional 35% would require an extra four million shares and $400,000 in spending. A further 30% would call for another $400,000 cash or debt and two million shares.

Hodgins attributed a “low cost relative to similar transactions in the area due to the relationship between two of the insiders of the corporation and the party which owns the mineral claims.” Majesta would act as project operator.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

February 22nd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 15 to 21, 2014

by Greg Klein

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New “zone” at Rook 1 rocks NexGen stock

Judging by share performance, radiometric readings from NexGen Energy’s TSXV:NXE Rook 1 project far outshone next-door neighbour Fission Uranium’s TSXV:FCU Patterson Lake South last week—even though PLS assays showed its best hole yet. Possibly a bit premature, NexGen claimed the first hole in Rook 1’s Arrow area constitutes “a totally new zone of uranium mineralization.” Then again, the company also refers to intercepts as “zones.”

NexGen’s February 19 announcement said scintillometer readings showed a number of significant radioactive intervals in a hole that’s still being drilled. By “significant,” the company means at least five centimetres above 500 counts per second from a hand-held device that measures gamma ray particles in cps.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 15 to 21, 2014

NexGen’s first hole in the Arrow area of Rook 1 stole attention
from Patterson Lake South and catapulted the company’s stock.

Results so far show well over a dozen “significant” intervals ranging from 0.05 metres to 1.65 metres in width. They occurred between downhole depths of 207.8 metres and 319.1 metres.

Radiometric readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

The company’s now revising its original 6,000-metre program “to substantially expand the program at Arrow and the other 11 western-located Rook 1 target areas,” according to CEO Leigh Curyer.

Last summer’s drilling found three mineralized holes roughly four kilometres southwest of Arrow, closer to the PLS boundary.

NexGen’s stock soared. Having previously closed on a 52-week low of $0.225, it shot up to a 52-week high of $0.65 in two days, before closing February 21 on $0.53.

Another best hole to date from Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South

Although upstaged by NexGen’s same-day announcement, Fission Uranium once again outperformed previous results by reporting its “strongest mineralized hole to date” from PLS on February 19.

The celeb du jour is hole PLS14-129 on zone R585E, the fourth of seven zones along a southwest-northeast potential strike of 1.78 kilometres. The zone itself has a defined strike of 30 metres and a lateral width of about 10 metres.

Of eight intervals reported, the best results show:

  • 13.66% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 38 metres, starting at 56 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 38.49% over 10.5 metres)

  • 11.19% over 31.5 metres, starting at 108.5 metres
  • (including 27.57% over 12 metres)

  • 6.82% over 11.5 metres, starting at 145.5 metres
  • (including 20.28% over 2.5 metres)

  • 3.37% over 12.5 metres, starting at 160 metres
  • (including 9.57% over 4 metres)

True widths weren’t available. Drilling was vertical.

“Nothing less than phenomenal,” was president/COO and chief geologist Ross McElroy’s immodest appraisal. The grade-times-thickness value nearly doubled that of the previous best hole, which dates back to September on the neighbouring R390E zone.

Last week Fission Uranium released a batch of radiometric readings for seven holes from four zones. The $12-million campaign, which includes ground geophysics as well as 90 holes totalling 30,000 metres, continues.

Anthem reports initial drill results from Hatchet Lake JV with Denison

Anthem Resources TSXV:AYN released preliminary drill results from Hatchet Lake, a joint venture with Denison Mines TSX:DML, on February 20. The 10-hole, 2,025-metre program on the Athabasca Basin’s eastern edge found no significant mineralization but a downhole radiometric probe intersected anomalous radioactivity in four holes.

The campaign also found prospective features “including strong fracturing, de-silicification (sanding) and clay and hematite alteration in the sandstone, and weak to strong chlorite and clay alteration, graphitic fault zones and sulphide mineralization in the basement,” Anthem stated. Assays are still to come.

Anthem’s cash position prevented a contribution to Hatchet’s $750,000 budget and the $300,000 IP survey on the Murphy Lake property, also part of the JV. As a result, Anthem’s interest dropped from 50% to about 41%. Denison acts as project operator.

Forum to acquire northeastern Basin property from Anthem

The same day as the Hatchet Lake news, Anthem and Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC announced an agreement to move a Basin property from the former to the latter. Forum will get the 14,205-hectare Fir Island claims on the Basin’s northeastern margin for 300,000 shares and a 1.5% NSR, of which Anthem may buy two-thirds for $1 million.

With little or no sandstone cover and road access within two kilometres, the property lies directly on a major structure, the Black Lake Shear Zone, and adjacent to the former Nisto mine, Forum stated. Previous geophysical and geochemical surveys identified several shallow drill targets which Forum plans to refine through ground gravity work.

Two weeks earlier the company announced it would buy two sets of claims from Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM to consolidate Forum’s North Thelon project in Nunavut.

This month Forum plans to begin drilling 12 to 15 holes totalling 3,000 metres at its 9,910-hectare PLS-adjacent Clearwater project. The company’s eastside Basin 40%/60% Henday JV has $150,000 worth of summer magnetic and electromagnetic surveys planned by project operator Rio Tinto NYE:RIO.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

January 19th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for January 11 to 17, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South gives up more high-grade assays

More results from Fission Uranium’s TSXV:FCU Patterson Lake South show last summer’s sowing continues to reap high-grade rewards. Released January 15, the latest batch comes from two holes on the Athabasca Basin project’s R390E zone and four on the R780E zone, the third and fifth of seven zones trending northeast.

All holes were vertical or near-vertical. The R390E zone currently has a strike length of 255 metres and a lateral width of about 40 metres. Some highlights show:

Hole PLS13-102

  • 0.32% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 12.5 metres, starting at 119.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.58% over 9.5 metres, starting at 138 metres
  • (including 1.44% over 1 metre)

  • 0.12% over 9 metres, starting at 154 metres

  • 0.73% over 4 metres, starting at 171.5 metres

Hole PLS13-104

  • 0.13% over 12 metres, starting at 61 metres

  • 4.97% over 13 metres, starting at 99 metres
  • (including 13.2% over 4.5 metres)
  • (which includes 35.9% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.42% over 6.5 metres, starting at 131 metres
  • (including 2.1% over 1 metre)

  • 0.22% over 17 metres, starting at 146.5 metres

Zone 780E shows a 60-metre strike and approximately 50-metre lateral width. The best assays include:

Hole PLS13-082

  • 1.25% over 41 metres, starting at 141 metres
  • (including 4.94% over 9 metres)

Hole PLS13-089

  • 0.17% over 16 metres, starting at 150 metres

  • 0.18% over 8 metres, starting at 198.5 metres

Hole PLS13-097

  • 0.99% over 48 metres, starting at 119 metres
  • (including 1.94% over 5 metres)
  • (and including 2.05% over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 6% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.54% over 6 metres, starting at 228.5 metres
  • (including 1.1% over 1 metre)

Hole PLS13-101

  • 0.5% over 34.5 metres, starting at 103 metres
  • (including 1.89% over 4.5 metres)

  • 0.63% over 11.5 metres, starting at 163 metres
  • (including 2.27% over 1 metre)

  • 1.04% over 17 metres, starting at 179 metres
  • (including 2.44% over 3.5 metres)

True widths were unavailable. Both zones remain open in all directions.

And the project’s potential remains open to speculation, not to mention exploration. On January 13 the company announced a new radon survey to follow up on 10 basement electromagnetic conductors. So far the technique has been used systematically on only one of the property’s over 100 basement EM conductors, Fission Uranium stated. Expected to last five or six weeks, the survey will take some 2,300 samples from three areas within Patterson Lake and a fourth within Forrest Lake, immediately south.

$50-million Uranium Participation financing bolsters commodity price confidence

In what’s been hailed as a testament of faith in uranium prices, Uranium Participation Corp TSX:U announced a $50-million private placement on January 16. “By mid-day the bought deal was complete,” reported Toll Cross Securities analyst Tom Hope.

Uranium Participation describes itself as “an investment alternative for investors interested in holding uranium.” Proceeds of the financing will be used to stockpile further purchases of U3O8 and uranium hexafluoride (UF6). Hope estimates the company will buy up to 1.28 million pounds to hold a total of about 14.7 million pounds “or approximately 9% of our estimated 2014 global mine output.”

A Denison Mines TSX:DML subsidiary manages Uranium Participation.

Declan grabs more ground north of Gibbon’s Creek

North of the company’s Gibbon’s Creek joint venture with Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK, Declan Resources TSXV:LAN has acquired the 11,100-hectare North Star property, the company announced January 17. The property “is believed to contain the northerly extensions of a number of important regional structures associated with uranium projects in the area,” Declan stated. “An interpretation of the magnetic background at Gibbon’s Creek shows a northerly trending structure which continues to the north through Lakeland Resources Ltd’s Star property, and onto the North Star property.”

The deal costs Declan $15,000 and 1.5 million shares, with a 2% gross sales royalty in effect. The previous week Declan and Lakeland reported Gibbon’s Creek boulder samples grading up to 4.28% U3O8, as well as some of the Basin’s highest-ever radon readings.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

Azincourt closes Peru property acquisitions

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for January 11 to 17, 2014

Along with the more advanced Macusani project, Azincourt’s newly acquired Muñani property positions the company in Peru’s emerging uranium district.

Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ announced January 16 completion of its $2-million cash-and-share deal with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and Vena Resources TSX:VEM. Coming with the advanced-stage Macusani project and the earlier-stage Muñani property, the buyout of Cameco and Vena’s Minergia S.A.C. places the purchaser prominently in Peru.

Back in Saskatchewan, Azincourt is earning into a 50/50 JV with Fission Uranium on their Patterson Lake North project. In December Azincourt closed two private placements totalling $2.5 million.

As for Vena, the deal “reactivates our investment in the uranium business,” chairman/CEO Juan Vegarra stated. The agreement allows Vena to double its Azincourt holdings within months.

Read more about Azincourt’s Peru acquisitions.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

January 12th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to January 10, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium says lower-grade assays confirm new PLS zone 195 metres east

Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU continues to pick away at its nearly 50-hole backlog of assays from Patterson Lake South. Results released December 30 come from the project’s eastern-most high-grade zone as well as a not-so-high-grade zone farther east.

Highlights from hole PLS13-099 on zone R945E include:

  • 0.11% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 15 metres, starting at 122 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.14% over 16 metres, starting at 140 metres

  • 0.99% over 23.5 metres, starting at 159.5 metres
  • (including 2.49% over 8.5 metres)

  • 3.99% over 17 metres, starting at 185.5 metres
  • (including 18.52% over 3.5 metres)
  • (which includes 43.5% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.12% over 8.5 metres, starting at 205 metres

  • 2.69% over 30.5 metres, starting at 222.5 metres
  • (including 5.1% over 6 metres)
  • (and including 5.4% over 7.5 metres)

True widths were unavailable. With a dip of -88 degrees, downhole depths were close to vertical. Three other holes from R945E were released earlier in December. The zone remains open in all directions.

About 195 metres east, two other holes confirm the existence of the less-spectacular zone R1155E. The single assay released from hole PLS13-090 shows:

  • 0.09% over 12 metres, starting at 189.5 metres

Results from PLS13-103 show:

  • 0.07% over 1.5 metres, starting at 176 metres

  • 0.06% over 3.5 metres, starting at 188 metres

  • 0.06% over 1.5 metres, starting at 199.5 metres

  • 0.05% over 0.5 metres, starting at 209 metres

  • 0.06% over 0.5 metres, starting at 365.5 metres

Again, true widths weren’t provided. Both holes were vertical. The results, from a “geologic setting similar to the high-grade zones to the west, [lead to] encouragement that the mineralized system remains open to the east,” the company stated. Winter drilling will continue east of R945E and between the higher-grade zones to the west.

Just before Christmas the company released assays from one hole at zone R585E and seven from R390E. On January 9 Fission Uranium announced that president/COO/chief geologist Ross McElroy had won PDAC’s 2014 Bill Dennis Award for a Canadian discovery or prospecting success. “It takes a team to make a discovery and I’m delighted to have won this award on behalf of Fission,” the statement quoted McElroy.

Recognition also goes to Fission Uranium’s former joint venture partner. In mid-December the father/son team of Ben and Garrett Ainsworth, formerly with Fission acquisition Alpha Minerals and now with spinco Alpha Exploration TSXV:AEX, won the 2013 Colin Spence Award for excellence in global mineral exploration from the Association for Mineral Exploration British Columbia for their part in the PLS discovery.

Lakeland Resources surveys historic drilling, finds high-grade boulders and some of Athabasca Basin’s highest radon readings

Lakeland Resources’ TSXV:LK Gibbon’s Creek uranium project now shows some of the highest radon gas readings ever found in the Athabasca Basin, the company says. Data collected last year and released January 8 also confirms an historic boulder field, with assays reaching 4.28% U3O8. Additionally, a DC resistivity survey has mapped basement alteration found by historic drilling.

Lakeland Resources Gibbon's Creek exploration

Existing access trails are among the benefits of more than
$3 million of previous work at Riou Lake/Gibbon’s Creek.

The 12,771-hectare project forms part of the 35,463-hectare Riou Lake property, a joint venture in which Declan Resources TSXV:LAN may earn 70% over four years, with a first-year exploration commitment of $1.25 million.

The survey by RadonEx Exploration Management, whose proprietary technology proved vital to Fission Uranium’s PLS, found Gibbon’s Creek readings peaking at 9.93 picocuries per square metre per second (pCi/m²/s). According to a statement by Lakeland president Jonathan Armes the readings, “to our knowledge, are the highest ever reported for the Athabasca Basin area.”

The highest value coincides with a uranium-in-soil anomaly found in historic work, part of more than $3 million of exploration performed on Riou Lake prior to Lakeland’s acquisition of the northern Basin property. Nine more radon samples reached above 3.2 pCi/m²/s, while the background level showed about 1.3 pCi/m²/s.

Meanwhile assays have confirmed existence of an historically defined radioactive boulder field. Prospecting by Dahrouge Geological Consulting found a 1-by-1.2-kilometre field with eight boulders grading over 1% U3O8, one of them hitting 4.28%. Eleven other samples assayed above 0.2%, with nine more below 0.2%. Also showing were anomalous values for nickel, arsenic, lead and cobalt.

Following up on historic drilling by Cameco Corp TSX:CCO-predecessor Eldorado Nuclear, the DC resistivity survey mapped one trend that ranges from near surface to about 200 metres, roughly coinciding with historic basement alteration and mineralization at 100 metres. A second resistivity trend coincides with strong radon values.

Ranking high on the project’s to-do list is a further radon survey. This year’s field work will also try to track the high-grade boulders to their source. Gibbon’s Creek sits less than three kilometres from the settlement of Stony Rapids, with power lines and highways passing through the property.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

NexGen Energy reports three mineralized holes at Rook 1

NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE released assays on January 9 for three mineralized holes found in last summer’s 13-hole, 3,032-metre program on the Rook 1 project. The widely spaced holes tested three parallel conductors along strike of the PLS discovery 2.1 kilometres southwest. Highlights show:

Hole RK-13-03

  • 0.00137% U3O8 and 0.0204% thorium over 1 metre, starting at 150 metres in downhole depth

Hole RK-13-05

  • 0.05093% U3O8 and 0.0027% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 220.5 metres

  • 0.07098% U3O8 and 0.0014% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 221 metres

  • 0.022% U3O8 and 0.00163% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 221.5 metres

  • 0.027% U3O8 and 0.0024% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 222 metres

  • 0.03796% U3O8 and 0.0025% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 223.5 metres

  • 0.04834% U3O8 and 0.00268% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 224 metres

Hole RK-13-06

  • 0.00118% U3O8 and 0.026% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 152 metres

  • 0.00125% U3O8 and 0.0315% thorium over 0.5 metres, starting at 153 metres

True widths were unavailable. Assays for RK-13-05 indicate “the uranium occurs almost wholly within pitchblende/uraninite and not in complex refractory minerals,” the company added. Winter drilling, scheduled to begin this month, will follow up on RK-13-05 and also target several regional anomalies interpreted from geophysical surveys and historic drilling.

In early December NexGen announced completion of airborne radiometric and magnetic surveys. Later that month the company closed a $3.11-million private placement, with funds destined for Rook 1. Still pending are assays from a nine-hole, 3,473-metre campaign at the eastern Basin Radio project, where NexGen holds a 70% option.

UEX announces winter work for western Athabasca and Black Lake projects

Along with its JV partners, UEX Corp TSX:UEX has 2014 exploration slated for its Laurie, Mirror River and Erica projects in the western Athabasca as well as Black Lake in the northern Basin, the company stated January 7.

The western Athabasca projects consist of seven or eight sites (depending which UEX info you consult) totalling 116,137 hectares and held 49.1% by UEX and 50.9% by project operator AREVA Resources Canada. UEX funds $982,000 of this year’s $2-million budget. A 2,000-metre drill campaign begins at Laurie imminently, to be followed by another 2,000 metres at Mirror. Both projects are located around the Basin’s southwestern rim. Erica, north of the other two and west of the company’s 49.1%-owned Shea Creek project, undergoes a ground tensor magnetotelluric survey starting in March.

UEX acts as operator on the 30,381-hectare Black Lake project in the Basin’s north. This year’s 3,000-metre, $650,000 drill program will be funded by Uracan Resources TSXV:URC, which has an option to earn 60% of UEX’s 89.97% portion of the project. AREVA holds the remainder. The campaign begins in late January.

Previous UEX drilling at Black Lake in 2004, 2006 and 2007 found intervals of 0.69% U3O8 over 4.4 metres, 0.5% over 3.3 metres, 0.79% over 2.82 metres and 0.67% over 3 metres.

UEX wholly owns six Basin projects and holds JVs in another eight. Resource estimates have been compiled for Shea Creek and Hidden Bay.

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Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South assays and other U3O8 news in brief

December 24th, 2013

by Greg Klein | December 24, 2013

Among a pre-Christmas blitz of uranium news from several companies, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU released assays from Patterson Lake South—the second batch in five days from a project that’s largely ridden the market on scintillometer results. The December 23 announcement reports one hole from R585E and seven from R390E, narrowing the gap between the two zones.

Highlights from hole PLS13-098 on R585E show:

  • 0.73% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 11.5 metres, starting at 68.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.56% over 3.5 metres)
Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South assays and other news

  • 0.21% over 5.5 metres, starting at 113.5 metres

  • 8.47% over 16.5 metres, starting at 123.5 metres
  • (including 26.36% over 4.5 metres)
  • (which includes 60.3% over 0.5 metres)
  • (and including 7.51% over 2 metres)

  • 18.62% over 4 metres, starting at 145.5 metres
  • (including 34.78% over 2 metres)

  • 0.67% over 9.5 metres, starting at 160.5 metres
  • (including 3.41% over 1.5 metres)

From the R390E zone, highlights from the better holes show:

PLS13-083

  • 0.53% over 17.5 metres, starting at 53 metres
  • (including 1.63% over 4 metres)

  • 0.27% over 8.5 metres, starting at 132 metres

  • 0.44% over 3 metres, starting at 143 metres

  • 0.78% over 4 metres, starting at 151 metres
  • (including 4.09% over 0.5 metres)

PLS13-088

  • 0.1% over 14.5 metres, starting at 62.5 metres

  • 0.21% over 23.5 metres, starting at 80 metres
  • (including 1.35% over 1 metre)

  • 0.52% over 7 metres, starting at 135 metres
  • (including 1.42% over 1 metre)

  • 0.36% over 4.5 metres, starting at 163.5 metres

PLS13-094

  • 0.3% over 7.5 metres, starting at 104 metres
  • (including 2.24% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.5% over 11.5 metres, starting at 130 metres
  • (including 1.16% over 3 metres)

PLS13-095

  • 0.63% over 11.5 metres, starting at 68 metres
  • (including 2.79% over 2 metres)

  • 0.2% over 6 metres, starting at 94 metres

  • 0.22% over 23.5 metres, starting at 125.5 metres
  • (including 1.02% over 1 metre)

PLS13-100

  • 0.75% over 5.5 metres, starting at 53 metres
  • (including 2.54% over 1 metre)

  • 0.35% over 3.5 metres, starting at 101 metres
  • (including 2.06% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.17% over 12.5 metres, starting at 107 metres

  • 0.8% over 4.5 metres, starting at 138 metres
  • (including 2.42% over 1 metre)

True widths weren’t available. The company reported all holes as vertical.

A PLS13-098 interval within an interval shows the highest grade found at PLS so far, 60.3% over 0.5 metres.

The R390E zone now extends east, within about 105 metres of R585E. The two zones comprise the third and fourth of six zones along a 1.78-kilometre trend. Additionally, two R390E holes increase “the prospectivity of extending the zone laterally to the south along the entire length of the corridor,” the company stated.

Both zones remain open in all directions.

Other uranium news in brief…

On December 23 Uravan Minerals TSXV:UVN announced results from an airborne electromagnetic survey over its Stewardson Lake project in the Athabasca Basin. Among other findings, the data shows features “interpreted to be the northern extension of the C and E conductors identified on Cameco’s Virgin River project” adjacently south of Stewardson. With a 51% earn-in option, Cameco TSX:CCO is now reviewing Uravan’s proposed program and budget. Uravan acts as project operator.

European Uranium Resources TSXV:EUU and Portex Minerals CNSX:PAX announced a definitive agreement December 23 on their proposed merger, first announced in a letter of intent earlier this month. The new company would be named European Minerals Inc.

On December 23 Strateco Resources TSX:RSC announced closing a $3-million loan from the Sentient Group and amendments to a $14.9-million convertible note. The transaction allows Strateco to proceed with its 60% option on Denison Mines’ TSX:DML Jasper Lake project in Saskatchewan, among other goals.

Ur-Energy TSX:URE reported the first sale from its Lost Creek in-situ recovery mine in Wyoming. Some 90,000 pounds of U3O8 fetched an average $62.92 per pound. In another December 23 announcement, the company stated it closed its acquisition of Pathfinder Mines, a $5.18-million private placement and a $5-million loan redraw.

Majescor Resources TSXV:MJX announced the resignation of director Peter Chodos on December 23.

Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN stated December 23 it cancelled a brokered $2-million private placement with Industrial Alliance Securities and was instead offering a $1-million non-brokered flow-through placement.

On December 24 Uracan Resources TSXV:URC announced raising $1.24 million from flow-through shares of $683,000 and non-flow-through units of $556,350.

The same day Purepoint Uranium Group TSXV:PTU reported closing the second tranche of a private placement to raise $441,949. Combined, the two slices equal $745,484.

CanAlaska Uranium TSX:CVV delists from the big board on December 27, the company announced December 24. But “it is understood” the company will begin Venture trading under TSXV:CVV on December 30.

Also on Christmas eve, Laramide Resources TSX:LAM announced closing a $2-million private placement.

See last week’s roundup of uranium news.

Athabasca Basin and beyond

December 7th, 2013

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 30 to December 6, 2013

by Greg Klein

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Introducing the Alpha Minerals spinco—Alpha Exploration Inc

With court blessing announced December 2 for the Alpha Minerals TSXV:AMW takeover by Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU, the deal faces just one more approval, this one from the TSXV. That was expected, but not announced, on December 6. Alpha’s spinco, Alpha Exploration Inc (anticipated ticker TSXV:AEX) gets about $3 million cash and all non-Patterson Lake South assets, including properties in Ontario and British Columbia as well as Saskatchewan. Each Alpha Minerals share fetches 5.725 Fission shares and one-half spinco share. Since December 3 Alpha Minerals shares have no longer traded with spinco shares attached.

The current Alpha Minerals board and management will “substantially” move into AEX positions.

Court approval for Fission Uranium’s spinco—tentatively titled Fission 3.0 to also commemorate Fission Uranium’s predecessor and Denison Mines’ TSX:DML acquisition Fission Energy—was announced the previous week. Each Fission Uranium shareholder gets one share of post-arrangement Fission Uranium as well as a share of the Fission spinout, expected to start trading December 10.

Having obtained full PLS ownership from its 50/50 joint venture ally, Fission Uranium has undoubtedly caught the attention of much bigger takeout artists.

Read more about the takeover.

Read more about uranium merger-and-acquisition activity.

Lakeland/Declan Resources JV accelerates work, strengthens their positions

In this market you have to work with strong partners. You have to collaborate and be a bit creative. We’re fortunate to work with people like Declan president Wayne Tisdale’s team and the financial connections they can bring.—Ryan Fletcher, director of Lakeland Resources

A new team of Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK and Declan Resources TSXV:LAN means an accelerated winter drill program for their Gibbon’s Creek flagship as well as the opportunity to put additional work into other Basin-area projects.

Declan’s first-year commitment will inject another $1.25 million into Gibbon’s, a 12,771-hectare north-central Basin property that already underwent over $3 million of work prior to last fall’s field campaign by Lakeland. Declan may earn 50% of the project by spending that $1.25 million, paying Lakeland $100,000 and issuing two million shares in 12 months. Over four years Declan may obtain a 70% interest for a total of $1.5 million in cash, 11 million shares and $6.5 million in spending.

The agreement further demonstrates Declan’s new direction, following its acquisitions in September and October of the 9,000-hectare Patterson Lake Northeast and 50,000-hectare Firebag River properties.

Declan’s commitment also allows Lakeland to ramp up its campaign for two other north-central Basin properties, South Pine and Perch Lake. Work on all those properties will be managed by Dahrouge Geological Consulting, led by PLS and Waterbury Lake veteran Jody Dahrouge.

Field results from Lakeland’s fall campaign are pending, while new appointments are anticipated from Declan.

Read more about the Lakeland/Declan JV and their other projects.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

Macusani claims low-cost uranium potential in Peruvian PEA

Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL presented its case for a low-grade but potentially low-cost uranium mining operation in Peru with a preliminary economic assessment released December 5. The company envisions both open pit and underground operations with “a low stripping ratio in the open pit operations, anticipated low acid consumption and high process plant recoveries expected to be achieved in a short period of time.”

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for November 30 to December 6, 2013

The under-explored Macusani plateau shows considerable
uranium potential, according to the eponymous Macusani Yellowcake.

The report, using U.S. dollars, uses an 8% discount rate to calculate a $417-million after-tax net present value with a 32.4% internal rate of return. Those numbers assume a long-term price of $65 a pound uranium oxide (U3O8).

Initial capital expenditures would come to $331 million to build the mine and a plant processing 8.5 million tonnes per year. Total sustaining capital costs for the 10-year lifespan would reach $228 million. Payback would take 3.5 years.

Life of mine cash costs would average $20.57 a pound but, Macusani emphasized, years one to five would average $19.45, “placing it in the lowest quartile in the world using 2012 production figures.” Those first five years would produce an average 5.17 million pounds annually which would, were it operating now, rank the mine the world’s sixth largest, the company maintained. The 10-year average would be 4.3 million pounds.

The project, on the Macusani plateau in southeastern Peru, features multiple deposits, some adjacent to each other, others a few to several kilometres apart. The December 5 news release once again claimed last August’s resource update showed a 167% increase in measured and indicated categories. But there was no increase in the measured category. In fact measured pounds equal less than 1% of the M&I total.

Calling the project potentially “one of the lowest-cost uranium producers in the world,” Macusani CEO Laurence Stefan added, “The PEA demonstrates that the Macusani plateau has significant potential to become a major uranium-producing district, considering that only small areas have been explored to date.”

The company expects to begin pre-feasibility work in 2014.

NexGen announces initial geophysical results for Rook 1

An airborne radiometric survey over the PLS-vicinity Rook 1 project found at least five zones with elevated readings, NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE reported on December 2. Two of the zones are “proximal” to last summer’s drilling and could provide targets for another program beginning in January. Additionally aeromagnetic data identified regional and local basement structures.

The company will pursue the source of the elevated radiometrics next summer through ground radiometric surveying, mapping and sampling. Meanwhile the current data from 5,772 line-kilometres of high-resolution magnetic, very low frequency and radiometric surveys undergoes more comprehensive analysis.

Still to come are assays from NexGen’s nine-hole, 3,473-metre campaign at the eastside Basin Radio project, where the company holds a 70% option two kilometres east of Rio Tinto’s NYE:RIO Roughrider deposits. Having raised $5 million in late August, NexGen stated it’s still well-financed.

More near-surface, district-wide potential found in Argentina, says U3O8

In mid-November U3O8 Corp TSX:UWE said a discovery roughly 40 kilometres northeast of its Laguna Salada deposit could indicate district-scale potential. On December 4 the company stated another Argentinian discovery, on the southern extension of Laguna Salada, further suggests that potential. In both cases vertical channel sampling found near-surface, soft gravel uranium-vanadium mineralization.

Laguna Salada trials showed that screening could concentrate over 90% of its uranium in about 10% of the gravel’s original mass, resulting in 10 to 11 times greater grade, U3O8 stated. The company maintains its deposits offer continuous surface mining potential with alkaline leaching.

Dubbed La Susana, the new discovery’s slated for pitting and trenching to determine the extent of mineralization. While Laguna Salada’s PEA nears completion, the company continues JV negotiations with a province-owned mining company that could unite Laguna Salada with adjoining concessions.

U3O8 has a Colombian uranium-polymetallic project with a PEA and an earlier-stage project in Guyana.

Aldrin finishes Triple M gravity survey, offers $2-million private placement

With its ground gravity survey complete, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN stated anomalies coincide with previous results and already-identified drill targets. Data from 871 stations on Triple M, adjacent to and southwest of PLS, covered two parallel bedrock conductors already noted from an airborne VTEM survey and surface radon anomalies, the company reported on December 4.

Gravity anomalies consist of relatively low readings “reflecting the dissolution and removal of rock mass by the same basinal fluids that may also precipitate uranium,” Aldrin explained.

Two days earlier the company announced a $2-million private placement for Triple M exploration and drilling. The offer comprises 18.18 million units at $0.11, with each unit consisting of one flow-though share and one-half warrant, with each full warrant exercisable at $0.16 for 18 months.

In early November Aldrin reported closing a $972,500 first tranche of a private placement that had been announced the previous month. The company has also indicated plans to buy the Virgin property around the Basin’s south-central rim.

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