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Posts tagged ‘Aldrin Resource Corp (ALN)’

Athabasca Basin and beyond

February 14th, 2015

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to February 13, 2015

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium expands main zone at PLS

With a 100% hit rate so far, the first 14 holes of Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) winter campaign extend the geography of Patterson Lake South’s largest zone. Nine holes reported February 10 expand R780E at different points laterally 40 metres north, 30 metres eastward along strike and 50 metres vertically up dip—continuing a process begun with five step-outs released January 26. The R780E zone already holds about 96% of indicated and 90% of inferred categories from last month’s estimate for Triple R, the Athabasca Basin’s largest undeveloped uranium deposit. The resource “remains open in several directions, including strike, width and vertically,” the company stated.

Scintillometer readings, which are no substitute for assays, showed strong mineralization for all holes. R780E now stretches about 900 metres in strike length. Beyond a 225-metre gap to the west, Triple R’s R00E zone adds another 125 metres in strike. Overall, the 31,039-hectare property hosts four zones running east-west along 2.24 kilometres of potential strike.

This year’s exploration budget comes to $15 million. Winter drilling gets a $10-million, four-rig, 20,230-metre program. Thirty-five holes will focus on the Triple R deposit as well as the R600W zone. Another 28 holes will test regional targets. Of special interest is the Forest Lake conductive corridor, which features “geophysics and radon signatures similar to the Patterson Lake conductive corridor” that hosts Triple R.

Read about the Patterson Lake South resource estimate.

See an historical timeline of the Patterson Lake South saga.

Fission Uranium buys into Fission 3.0

On February 11 Fission Uranium announced its intention to pay $3.08 million to get about 12% of its own spinout Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU, a company not exactly known for monogamy.

Dev Randhawa, who leads both companies, resigned from the board of Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ, according to a February 6 statement. Three days later came the announcement that he joined Aldrin Resource’s (TSXV:ALN) board.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to February 13, 2015

On February 5 Aldrin had announced a plan to acquire up to 50% of Fission 3.0’s Key Lake properties, an 18,392-hectare package on the southeastern Basin. The deal would cost Aldrin $100,000 cash, 1.9 million shares and $6.9 million in expenditures up to May 2019. Fission 3.0 remains project operator.

Fission 3.0’s already busy with winter campaigns on two PLS-vicinity projects. At the PLN project, a joint venture with Azincourt, a $1.45-million program of seven holes and geophysics has begun. The Clearwater project, a JV with Brades Resource TSXV:BRA, has 10 holes plus geophysics underway at an expected cost of $1.04 million.

In a mid-January announcement, Brades described three northeastern Basin acquisitions as part of an “objective to stake highly prospective areas near, and in the case of Perron Lake and Cree Bay, adjacent to, properties of Fission 3.0.”

NexGen honoured for 2014 performance, reports 2015 progress

A Fission Uranium next-door neighbour, NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE made it into the TSX Venture 50, the company announced February 12. The TSXV compiles the list by ranking the top 10 companies in five sectors for market cap, share appreciation, volume and analyst coverage.

Last year’s last batch of Rook 1 assays hit as high as 2.34% U3O8 over 26.5 metres, starting at 592.5 metres in downhole depth. Impressive as it was, the result fell short of earlier assays considered among the Basin’s best.

A three-rig, 18,000-metre program began last month, focusing on the project’s Arrow zone as well as “regional targets on the Rook 1 claim that covers all the major uranium-bearing conductor corridors in the southwestern region of the Athabasca Basin.”

One target was noted in a January 20 announcement, a radon-in-lake-water anomaly 480 metres long by 20 to 150 metres wide that was found 400 metres northeast along strike from Arrow.

One week later the company reported scintillometer results for the first four holes from Arrow, all of them finding “substantial broad mineralization.” Then, the following day, NexGen announced that VTEM, ground gravity and magnetic surveys identified six targets on the Fury area, about 13.5 kilometres southeast of Arrow. As a result, Fury’s slated for about 4,500 metres of winter drilling.

Denison reports eU3O8 from Mann Lake and Wheeler River

Denison Mines TSX:DML released the year’s first results on February 4 from Mann Lake and Wheeler River, two eastern Basin projects five kilometres apart and among the company’s 14 drill campaigns scheduled for this year.

Measured with a downhole probe, the single Mann Lake hole showed 9.8% uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) over 3.5 metres, starting at 671.7 metres in downhole depth. True thickness would come to at least 80%.

Denison holds a 30% stake in the JV, along with operator Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (52.5%) and AREVA Resources Canada (17.5%).

Three holes at Wheeler River’s Gryphon zone showed:

  • 0.3% eU3O8 over 2 metres, starting at 664.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 2.9% over 2.4 metres, starting at 764.2 metres

  • 2.8% over 2.4 metres, starting at 786.3 metres

  • 9% over 4.6 metres, starting at 641.6 metres

True thickness is estimated at about 75%.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

December 5th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission strikes 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, delays maiden resource

All assays are in but Fission Uranium’s (TSX:FCU) highly anticipated resource for Patterson Lake South seems to have been put off. The milestone was originally scheduled for this month but in a December 1 statement president/COO Ross McElroy said, “We expect to be able to release preliminary results by early 2015.” Meanwhile the company announced last summer’s final 18 delineation holes, again flaunting the PLS trademark of high grades at shallow depths.

This batch comes entirely from R780E, by far the biggest of four zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. R780E itself now extends about 164 metres at its widest point and 905 metres in strike, remaining open in all directions. The upcoming resource will focus on zones R780E and R00E.

Some of the best December 1 assays follow.

Hole PLS14-275

  • 0.2% U3O8 over 26 metres, starting at 137.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.26% over 2 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere to December 5, 2014

A summer of round-the-clock drilling brought the
final assays prior to Patterson Lake South’s first resource.

  • 0.31% over 9 metres, starting at 171 metres
  • (including 1.96% over 1 metre)


  • 13.84% over 10 metres, starting at 71.5 metres
  • (including 29.29% over 4.5 metres)


  • 0.48% over 13 metres, starting at 117.5 metres
  • (including 1.17% over 4.5 metres)


  • 0.83% over 30 metres, starting at 131 metres
  • (including 2.09% over 10.5 metres)

  • 1.24% over 6.5 metres, starting at 163.5 metres
  • (including 2.5% over 2.5 metres)


  • 0.4% over 14.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres
  • (including 1.02% over 4 metres)


  • 0.54% over 9 metres, starting at 177 metres
  • (including 3.84% over 1 metre)

  • 2.61% over 9 metres, starting at 257.5 metres
  • (including 8.61% over 2.5 metres)


  • 0.96% over 7.5 metres, starting at 287.5 metres
  • (including 2.56% over 2 metres)

  • 0.36% over 15 metres, starting at 299 metres


  • 7.91% over 21.9 metres, starting at 61.1 metres
  • (including 17.3% over 9.5 metres)

  • 0.42% over 30.5 metres, starting at 86.5 metres

  • 1.49% over 4.5 metres, starting at 96 metres


  • 3.72% over 64.5 metres, starting at 133.5 metres
  • (including 32.53% over 6.5 metres)


  • 2.34% over 11 metres, starting at 198.5 metres
  • (including 11.74% over 2 metres)


  • 0.8% over 10.5 metres, starting at 61 metres
  • (including 1.77% over 4 metres)

  • 0.27% over 21 metres, starting at 111 metres


  • 0.7% over 33 metres, starting at 174 metres
  • (including 2.21% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 2.2% over 4 metres)


  • 0.52% over 22.5 metres, starting at 184 metres
  • (including 1.39% over 3 metres)

  • 2.21% over 5.5 metres, starting at 210 metres
  • (including 6.76% over 1.5 metres)


  • 1.51% over 13.5 metres, starting at 246.5 metres
  • (including 2.38% over 5 metres)

True widths weren’t available.

Fission noted that scissor drilling brought “vastly improved strength of mineralization on section 735E.” Oriented opposite to the south-to-north holes, they “provide geometry control and confirmation on the mineralization.” One scissor hole hit the star assay for this batch, 3.72% U3O8 over 64.5 metres, in an area that had previously seen only moderate results, the company stated.

With assays for 22 exploration holes still pending and a winter program in the planning stages, speculation remains on whether the company will spend more time testing the property’s lesser-known areas.

Denison drills 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres at Wheeler River

The final batch of assays from Gryphon’s summer season at Denison Mines’ (TSX:DML) Wheeler River property revealed the zone’s highest grade so far, 22.2% U3O8 over 2.5 metres. Announced December 2, that hole was also the deepest, making down-plunge extensions a priority for the next round of drilling, scheduled to start next month.

As usual, the chemical assays generally show better grades than the previously reported U3O8-equivalents that came from a downhole gamma probe.

Some highlights include:

Hole WR-571

  • 8.8% U3O8 over 2.5 metres, starting at 757.5 metres in downhole depth

  • 1.9% over 1 metre, starting at 761.5 metres


  • 2.5% over 1 metre, starting at 651.1 metres

  • 9.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 1.8% over 1 metre, starting at 714.5 metres

  • 2.1% over 1 metre, starting at 717.5 metres


  • 22.2% over 2.5 metres, starting at 768 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 779 metres


  • 5% over 2 metres, starting at 665 metres

  • 1.5% over 1 metre, starting at 675.5 metres

  • 14.6% over 2 metres, starting at 696.5 metres


  • 2.7% over 2 metres, starting at 626.5 metres

The company estimates true widths at about 75%.

Wheeler River’s summer program comprised 20 holes totalling 14,937 metres, all of it at or near the newly discovered Gryphon zone.

Meanwhile, as a result of metallurgical testwork from the project’s Phoenix deposit, “a high-purity yellowcake product was produced that met all ASTM C967-13 specifications,” Denison stated. The sample grade was 19.7% U3O8, close to the average for Phoenix, which hosts 70.2 million pounds indicated.

The company closed a $14.99-million private placement in August.

With a 60% interest in Wheeler River, Denison acts as project operator. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds 30% of the 11,720-hectare southeastern Athabasca Basin property, leaving JCU (Canada) Exploration with the other 10%.

Lakeland Resources boosts portfolio, offers $1.88-million private placement

All acquired by staking, four new properties and five property expansions announced by Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK on November 19 increase the company’s portfolio by 40,218 hectares in and around the Basin.

The five expansions cover targets identified by historic data. Among the highlights is the 4,753-hectare addition to Lazy Edward Bay, which underwent extensive field work last summer. Now totalling 31,128 hectares, the project features eight exploration trends, many of them drill-ready. Other additions came to Lakeland’s Riou Lake, Hawkrock Rapids, Small Lake and Fedun Lake properties.

Of the new land, the 1,508-hectare Carter Lake property covers part of the Carter Lake Structural Corridor, parallel to the Patterson Structural Corridor hosting the discoveries of Fission and NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE.

If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.—Jonathan Armes, president/CEO of Lakeland Resources

Cable Bay, a 1,077-hectare property on the Basin’s southern rim, benefits from extensive geophysics showing a trend of graphitic meta-sedimentary rocks in the basement, below 10 metres or less of Athabasca sandstone.

The 6,479-hectare Highrock property on the Basin’s southeastern margin features a moderately strong conductor that has yet to see follow-up work.

Extending beyond the Basin’s eastern rim, the 8,889-hectare Wright River project underwent an airborne survey showing a radiometric anomaly in the property’s centre. Regional lake sediment samples have graded up to 61 ppm.

Early new year plans include a 1,500-metre program on Star/Gibbon’s Creek, two adjacent properties forming one project on the Basin’s north-central rim. Also drill-ready are Lazy Edward Bay and, east of Star/Gibbon’s, Newnham Lake. More funding is expected from a $1.88-million private placement announced December 4.

“There’s not that much ground left to be had in the Basin,” Lakeland president/CEO Jonathan Armes tells “Most of what we see as quality ground is not available. If you look back to 2006 and 2007, there were probably 60 to 70 juniors active in the Basin. Right now you’ve got about 20. So if we do see this [price] resurgence continue, we’ll have that opportunity to link up with JV and strategic partners and get as many drills turning as we possibly can.”

Read more about Lakeland Resources.

NexGen plans 18,000 metres for Rook 1, updates other properties

Funded by an $11.5-million private placement that closed last month, NexGen plans a three-rig, 18,000-metre program to start in January. Work will focus on Rook 1’s Arrow zone and along strike to the northeast and southwest, but will also test some of the project’s regional targets, the company stated on December 3. An infill ground gravity survey will precede the drilling.

Now complete are airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys over Rook 1 as well as additional nearby land that has had little or no previous mention from NexGen, the “SW2 property portfolio which includes Bishop 1 and 2, Meanwell and R-7 claims.” Winter plans include a radon-in-water survey.

NexGen also updated what it calls its “SW3 project portfolio (Rook 2, Sandhill and Dufferin).” Rook 2 and Sandhill underwent airborne gravity surveys. Dufferin got airborne VTEM and magnetometer surveys, as did the eastern Basin Madison and 2Z Lake properties.

Rook 1 covers all the southwestern Basin’s major uranium-bearing conductor corridors, according to the company. Still pending are assays from 16 summer holes on Arrow. In October the company claimed one of the Basin’s best-ever drill results.

UEC reports 77% increase in Burke Hollow’s inferred resources

Seven trends at Uranium Energy Corp’s (NYSE MKT:UEC) Burke Hollow project in Texas now have total inferred resources of 2.9 million tons averaging 0.09% for 5.12 million pounds U3O8. About 14,152 metres of drilling in 526 holes were used to calculate the 77% increase. UEC has three additional areas of the property under consideration for drilling.

Burke Hollow, potentially an in-situ recovery operation, has an application for a radioactive material licence and mine permit currently under review.

The 7,824-hectare project lies about 80 kilometres from the company’s Hobson processing plant, the centrepiece of UEC’s “hub and spoke” properties. The portfolio includes the Palangana ISR mine, the Goliad ISR development project and nearly two dozen exploration projects, two in Paraguay and the rest in the western U.S. The company released a preliminary economic assessment for its Anderson uranium project in Arizona last September, as well as a PEA for its Slick Rock uranium-vanadium deposit in Colorado last April.

On December 2 UEC stated it secured US$5.6 million of surety bonds to replace the same amount in reclamation deposits for future decommissioning. The bonds “require cash collateral of $1.7 million, allowing for the release of $3.9 million of previously restricted cash to the company.”

Last March the company received a two-year extension on a $20-million loan.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 9th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 2 to 8, 2014

by Greg Klein

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High grades, wide intervals from neighbours Fission and NexGen

Nearly simultaneous announcements from two adjacent projects once again evoke a sense of wonder about the Athabasca Basin’s southwestern rim. Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South still comes out ahead with an August 7 best result of 12.12% U3O8 over 27 metres. Still, NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) same-day best of 3.42% over 22.35 metres can hardly be dismissed. Fission also retains the shallower depths. But NexGen’s relatively recent Arrow discovery suggests something big might have spread beyond Fission’s 31,039-hectare property.

First, a look at NexGen.

Two days after announcing the “strongest and shallowest mineralization to date” from Rook 1’s Arrow zone, the company rushed to market with two stock-propelling assays from a single hole. Announced August 7, the results come from AR-14-15, the zone’s 15th hole so far. NexGen released the numbers in a sort of Russian doll formation of intervals within intervals, showing ever-higher grades as the widths contracted:

  • 3.42% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 22.35 metres, starting at 564 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 10.72% over 6.85 metres)
  • (which includes 15.74% over 4.5 metres)
  • (which includes 26.1% over 2.6 metres)
  • (which includes 55.8% over 0.45 metres)

  • 1.52% over 32 metres, starting at 594 metres
  • (including 2.98% over 15.85 metres)
  • (which includes 10.4% over 3.15 metres)
  • (which includes 43.7% over 0.35 metres)

True widths weren’t provided but the hole was sunk at a dip of -70 degrees.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for August 2 to 8, 2014

The assays follow an August 5 batch of radiometric readings. Those eight holes, which included AR-14-15, extend Arrow’s strike by 45 metres to about 515 metres in length for a zone that’s up to 180 metres wide and open in all directions. Encouraged by a near 100% hit rate, the company has increased its summer program from 13,500 metres to 18,500 metres of drilling.

These results come from a handheld scintillometer that measures gamma radiation from drill core in counts per second. They’re no substitute for assays.

The zone’s shallowest finding came from hole AR-14-20, which showed a composite of 51.3 metres of mineralization within a 284.45-metre section starting at 118.55 metres in downhole depth. True widths weren’t provided.

The strongest results came from AR-14-15.

Two regional holes totalling 558 metres at Rook 1’s Area K failed to find mineralization. The company now plans regional drilling at Area A on an electromagnetic conductor that NexGen interprets to be PL-3B, which hosts the PLS discovery. Rook 1 has two other conductors as well.

Not including one abandoned hole, the eight Arrow holes bring the zone’s total to 22 so far. Just one failed to find mineralization. Radiometric results have been reported previously for the first six summer holes, while assays have been released for last winter’s eight-hole campaign.

With Arrow clearly the project’s focus, NexGen has changed Rook 1’s protocol for identifying holes. Arrow hole numbers now begin with the letters AR, while regional holes retain the prefix RK.

AR-14-15’s assay came out with remarkable speed. Both NexGen and Fission use the same lab (SRC Geoanalytical Laboratories in Saskatoon). But while Fission is still releasing assays from last winter’s drilling, months after publishing their radiometric results, NexGen somehow released a summer assay just two days after reporting the same hole’s radiometrics.

Fission hits with six holes from winter, 12 from summer

As has been the case for most of last winter’s PLS drilling, the half-dozen holes released August 7 came from the project’s R780E zone, the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. Fission’s most outstanding results showed:

Hole PLS14-201

  • 2.51% U3O8 over 12 metres, starting at 128 metres
  • (including 5.6% over 5 metres)

  • 12.12% over 27 metres, starting at 149 metres
  • (including 26.41% over 12 metres)


  • 0.54% over 43 metres, starting at 132.5 metres
  • (including 1.54% over 7.5 metres)

  • 2.65% over 10 metres, starting at 229 metres
  • (including 11.57% over 1.5 metres)

  • 0.59% over 35.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres


  • 4.05% over 34 metres, starting at 147.5 metres
  • (including 11.37% over 11 metres)

True widths weren’t provided. One additional hole on the R00E zone failed to find significant mineralization. Still to come are assays for another 17 holes from last winter’s 92-hole program.

Like NexGen, Fission’s assays followed radiometric results by two days. And, like NexGen, those measurements expand the size of a zone. Taking advantage of barge-based angle drilling, a new technique first announced the previous week, the crew sunk 12 angled holes into the lake, all of them showing wide mineralization.

Hole PLS14-248 expanded the zone’s eastern half approximately 40 metres south while PLS14-236 showed mineralization about 50 metres north. The usual scintillometer disclaimer applies.

The $12-million, 63-hole summer program continues its progress towards a December resource.

U3O8 Corp Argentinian PEA sees payback in 2.5 years

U3O8 Corp TSX:UWE emphasized low cash costs as the company announced a preliminary economic assessment for its Laguna Salada deposit in Argentina on August 5. The deposit’s characteristics would make it “competitive with low-cost in-situ recovery uranium projects and with high-grade deposits in the Athabasca Basin,” the company stated.

Taking into consideration a vanadium credit and a 3% NSR, cash costs for the 10-year mine life would average $21.62 per pound of uranium. The study estimates even lower initial cash costs of $16.14 a pound as production starts in higher-grade zones, bringing payback in just 2.5 years.

Using U.S. dollars for all figures, the PEA forecast a $134-million capex and used a 7.5% discount rate to calculate a net present value of $55 million and an 18% post-tax internal rate of return. The numbers were based on presumed prices of $60 a pound U3O8 and $5.50 a pound vanadium.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

August 2nd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for July 26 to August 1, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission off to a scintillating summer at Patterson Lake South

Fourteen widely mineralized holes released July 28 mark Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) first summer results from Patterson Lake South. All tested R780E, the middle and largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. Two holes extended the eastern part of the zone about 50 metres north. Among other PLS news is a new technique that allows barge-based angle drilling to better determine the mineralization’s size and shape. And new technology—a scintillometer can now measure radioactive drill core up to 65,535 counts per second, replacing a model that maxed out at 9,999 cps.

Scintillometer readings, as the usual disclaimer relates, are no substitute for assays, which are pending. But the brand new gizmo shows measurements that would have been well off scale for the older device. Some examples from Fission’s multi-page chart include:

Hole PLS 14-219

  • <300 to 33,000 counts per second over 17 metres, starting at 160 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for July 26 to August 1, 2014

PLS 14-220

  • <300 to 15,000 cps over 32 metres, starting at 59.5 metres

  • <300 to 30,000 cps over 14.5 metres, starting at 97 metres

  • <300 to 41,000 cps over 11 metres, starting at 163 metres

PLS 14-223

  • <300 to 41,000 cps over 13.5 metres, starting at 176.5 metres

PLS 14-224

  • <300 to 42,000 cps over 19.5 metres, starting at 128.5 metres

PLS 14-225

  • <300 to 30,000 cps over 39 metres, starting at 145.5 metres

PLS 14-229

  • <300 to 31,300 cps over 27.5 metres, starting at 96.5 metres

One interval in hole PLS 14-230 came close to maxing out the new scintillometer:

  • <300 to 65,500 cps over 24 metres, starting at 229 metres

True widths weren’t provided.

Forty-three holes of the 63-hole, 20,330-metre summer program will attack the project’s main mineralized trend in hopes of extending it north, south and along strike to the east, as well as delineating the December resource. In the meantime, the market awaits assays for the last 24 holes from 92 sunk last winter.

Denison steps out at Wheeler’s Gryphon zone

On the southeastern Athabasca Basin, step-out drill results from Denison Mines’ (TSX:DML) Wheeler River showed some strong numbers, although possibly not as strong as the company had hoped. Out of 10 holes reported July 29 from the project’s Gryphon zone, seven were 50-metre step-outs from two previously announced holes: Gryphon discovery hole WR-556, which assayed 15.3% U3O8 over 4 metres, and WR-560, which showed 21.2% over 4.5 metres.

The latest batch was provided as radiometric-equivalent uranium from a downhole probe. Lab assays are pending. Some highlights showed:

Hole WR-564

  • 0.8% uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) over 20.5 metres, starting at 736.3 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 3% over 2.3 metres)
  • (also including 4.5% over 1 metre)


  • 1.1% over 2.7 metres, starting at 727.2 metres


  • 3.1% over 3 metres, starting at 662.6 metres

  • 9.4% over 3.7 metres, starting at 679.3 metres

  • 8.1% over 1.1 metres, starting at 692.3 metres

  • 5.3% over 5.9 metres, starting at 702.1 metres

  • 3% over 2 metres, starting at 724 metres


  • 2.3% over 6.5 metres, starting at 755.8 metres
  • (including 10.9% over 1 metre)
  • (also including 1.9% over 1.1 metres)

True widths were estimated at approximately 75%. Three other step-outs failed to find significant mineralization, as did two extensions of historic holes.

Denison described the area as a zone of mineralization above 1% eU3O8 enveloped by lower-grade stuff. “The higher-grade mineralization plunges to the northeast and has now been drilled over 150 metres in the along-plunge direction and over 50 metres across the plunge,” the company added. “Mineralization is open down plunge to the northeast, up plunge to the southwest and across the plunge at depth.”

Last March’s Gryphon discovery diverted attention from Wheeler River’s Phoenix deposit three kilometres southeast. Nevertheless, in June Denison announced a 34% increase in Phoenix indicated resources.

Wheeler’s agenda calls for another 10 holes at Gryphon this summer. Denison acts as operator and holds 60% of the 12,333-hectare property, along with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (30%) and JCU Canada Exploration (10%).

The previous week Denison announced a $13.04-million bought deal that’s expected to close around August 12. In June the company closed its acquisition of International Enexco. Denison plans to spend $15 million on Canadian exploration this year.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

June 28th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 21 to 27, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission about to start $12-million summer program, targets December resource

Apparently hoping to get something really big for Christmas, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU has yet more delineation drilling planned for Patterson Lake South this summer. Some 63 holes totalling about 20,330 metres are scheduled to start imminently, with 43 closely spaced holes sunk from barges over the lake. The campaign calls for up to four rigs to help produce a maiden resource for December. The focus is R780E, which merged with three other zones last winter to become by far the biggest of five PLS zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 21 to 27, 2014

Twenty holes will test electromagnetic conductors prioritized by geophysical and radon-in-water surveys. Fission stated its 31,039-hectare property “remains highly prospective for several kilometres both in the immediate area of known mineralization and along strike in both the WSW and ENE directions.”

The company also plans metallurgical and petrographic studies “to evaluate important characteristics of uranium recovery and rock characteristics, including work on gold recovery.” Back in June 2013 the former Fission Energy/Alpha Minerals joint venture reported gold results from PLS.

A batch of assays released June 16 left 48 holes to report from last winter’s 92. Was that number a fluke?

Lakeland Resources expands exploration prospects with another Athabasca Basin acquisition

With the Fond du Lac project announced June 25, the Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK portfolio now totals 17 properties in and around the Athabasca Basin. The 2,827-hectare newcomer straddles the rim of the northeastern Basin in the vicinity of the company’s Small Lake, Karen Lake and Hidden Bay properties.

Featuring relatively shallow depth to the unconformity, Fond du Lac underwent regional airborne and geochemical surveys, ground EM, magnetic and gravity surveys, and one drill hole by 1984. More recent work confirmed a conductive target and roughly coincident uranium and pathfinder element geochemical anomalies.

“Over the last 30 years there’s been a lot of improvement in how you assess these properties,” corporate communications manager Roger Leschuk tells “Back in the ’70s and ’80s they worked to the best of their knowledge and technology of the time. Now people like Neil McCallum and Jody Dahrouge [of Dahrouge Geological Consulting] can come along and look at it in a different light. So the historic data is just a starting point.”

Subject to TSXV approval, Lakeland gets the 100% interest by issuing 200,000 shares to Anthem Resources TSXV:AYN, which retains a 1.5% NSR.

“The property comes with a $50,000 work commitment by year-end, but we’ll likely spend more on a program that would include a radon survey and boulder-sampling,” Leschuk says. “We want to get it to the drill-ready stage.”

We’re well-financed, we have more cash than we had a year ago and we intend to continue advancing our projects and looking for good partners. We have a busy summer ahead with more news coming.—Roger Leschuk, corporate
communications manager
for Lakeland Resources

Lakeland’s 17 properties now cover 164,316 hectares. In April the company expanded its Lazy Edward Bay project. Two weeks before that Lakeland picked up five other acquisitions. Gibbon’s Creek, the company’s joint venture with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN, has shown surface boulders grading up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the Basin’s highest radon readings.

“We’re well-financed, we have more cash than we had a year ago and we intend to continue advancing our projects and looking for good partners,” Leschuk adds. “We have a busy summer ahead with more news coming.”

Lakeland also announced its May 30 trading debut on the OTCQX under the symbol LRESF. “The OTCQX is a highly visible trading platform that has emerged as the world’s leading, premier cross-listing venture for international issuers that wish to benefit from U.S. trading and investor demand without diluting their current shareholder base,” the company stated.

Paladin boosts Michelin M&I to 84.1 million pounds U3O8

Although low uranium prices have forced Paladin Energy TSX:PDN to cut back on production, the company continues to build resources for the future. On June 26 Paladin released a substantial upgrade to its Michelin deposit in Labrador, boasting a 25% increase to the measured and indicated categories. The open pit portion uses a cutoff of 0.025% U3O8 to show:

  • measured:10.46 million tonnes averaging 0.0938% for 21.63 million pounds U3O8

  • indicated:5.93 million tonnes averaging 0.0937% for 12.26 million pounds

  • measured and indicated:16.4 million tonnes averaging 0.0938% for 33.89 million pounds

  • inferred:1.64 million tonnes averaging 0.1343% for 4.86 million pounds

Beginning 230 metres below surface, the underground portion uses a 0.05% cutoff to show:

  • measured:5.11 million tonnes averaging 0.1104% for 12.45 million pounds

  • indicated:16 million tonnes averaging 0.1072% for 37.8 million pounds

  • measured and indicated:21.11 million tonnes averaging 0.108% for 50.24 million pounds

  • inferred:7.17 million tonnes averaging 0.114% for 18.02 million pounds

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

June 21st, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 14 to 20, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Patterson Lake South gives Fission 91 metres of 4.29% U3O8

High grades and shallow depths continue to characterize Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) Patterson Lake South. A June 16 batch of assays found positive results from three holes targeting the eastern part of R780E, the middle of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike. The two best holes showed:

Hole PLS14-161

  • 0.11% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 13 metres, starting at 137 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for June 14 to 20, 2014

  • 0.2% over 22 metres, starting at 153 metres

  • 1.88% over 3.5 metres, starting at 190.5 metres

  • 2.48% over 4.5 metres, starting at 209.5 metres

  • 7.85% over 3 metres, starting at 221.5 metres
  • (including 18.1% over 1 metre)

Hole PLS14-164

  • 4.29% over 91 metres, starting at 97 metres
  • (including 14.69% over 6.5 metres)
  • (and including 21.2% over 7 metres)

  • 3.5% over 2.5 metres, starting at 228 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Another hole testing the gap between R780E and discovery zone R00E to the west failed to find significant mineralization.

The results followed a late May batch that featured 4.44% U3O8 over 38 metres. The tally from last winter’s campaign now stands at 44 holes reported and 48 pending.

With still no word on a maiden resource, another question remains outstanding: When will someone find the source of the uraniferous boulder field that inspired so much successful drilling since November 2012?

Denison boosts Wheeler River to 70 million pounds indicated, drills Gryphon zone

Denison Mines TSX:DML reported a 34% increase for the indicated category of the Phoenix zone on its Wheeler River joint venture June 17. The resource uses a 0.8% cutoff to estimate:

  • indicated: 166,400 tonnes averaging 19.13% for 70.2 million pounds U3O8

  • inferred:8,600 tonnes averaging 5.8% for 1.1 million pounds
Denison boosts Wheeler River’s Phoenix resource, drills Gryphon zone

A substantial upgrade to the Phoenix resource now complete,
Denison turns its focus to Wheeler River’s Gryphon zone.

With a 60% interest in Wheeler River, project operator Denison’s share comes to 42.1 million pounds indicated and 600,000 pounds inferred. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO holds a 30% interest while JCU (Canada) Exploration holds the rest.

The estimate was based on 25 new holes in addition to the 2012 resource. With mineralization at 400 metres in depth and varying from disseminated to massive, “Phoenix belongs to a select group of very high-grade unconformity uranium deposits that includes the prolific McArthur River mine (37 kilometres to the northeast) and the Cigar Lake mine (80 kilometres to the northeast),” Denison stated.

JV partner Cameco operates the Key Lake mill about 35 kilometres northeast of Wheeler.

The Phoenix upgrade notwithstanding, Wheeler’s newly discovered Gryphon zone has taken centre stage. Now underway is a two-drill, 18-hole, 14,000-metre summer program three kilometres northwest of Phoenix. Meanwhile Denison has a 3D DC-resistivity survey planned for the northern extension of the Phoenix trend.

The previous week Denison closed its most recent company acquisition, of International Enexco. With $15 million committed to Canadian exploration in 2014, Denison announced its summer plans earlier this month.

Aldrin’s first three Anticline holes at Triple M reveal radioactivity

Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN reported more radioactive mineralization from the Anticline target on its PLS-adjacent Triple M property June 19. Results for the first three holes showed significant intervals above 300 counts per second for widths above 0.3 metres as measured by a downhole radiometric probe.

Hole ALN14-008 had been reported in late May but further drilling found additional radioactivity in small intervals ranging from 0.4 metres to 6.5 metres (not true thicknesses) of mineralization between downhole depths of 176.6 and 323.9 metres.

ALN14-009 showed radioactivity in several small intercepts between 214.9 and 289.1 metres in depth, while ALN14-010 revealed intervals between 226.7 and 282 metres.

The company cautioned that radiometric results could indicate potassium or thorium. Aldrin describes the Anticline target as “a coincident basement conductor, gravity low and structural feature extending more than 2.5 kilometres on strike.” These three holes tested its northeast corner.

Drilling will resume “immediately following our high-resolution surface geophysics and geochemistry,” CEO Johnathan More stated.

In April the company released initial results from four of seven holes on Triple M’s Forrest Lake fault. The 12,000-hectare project comprises two blocks west and south of PLS.

Fission 3.0, Azincourt to begin summer drilling at Patterson Lake North

Adjacent and to the north of PLS, Patterson Lake North has four or five holes totalling about 1,600 metres that were expected to begin imminently, according to June 16 announcements from Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU and Azincourt Uranium TSXV:AAZ. The plan is to test the project’s A1 and A4 conductors with three holes spaced 400 metres apart and a fourth contingent on the first three results. Winter drilling failed to find radioactivity but did “confirm the high prospectivity of the target areas,” the companies stated last April.

This summer’s budget comes to $1.5 million, including geophysics. Fission 3.0 acts as operator on the 27,408-hectare property, where Azincourt has just entered year two of a 50% earn-in.

Late last month Azincourt and Macusani Yellowcake TSXV:YEL stated they would extend to June 15 a letter of intent to consolidate their Peruvian assets. That date passed without further announcement.

The Fission 3.0 portfolio also includes a Peruvian interest in addition to nine others in Saskatchewan and Alberta. Late last month the company joined Brades Resource TSXV:BRA to announce VTEM results from their Clearwater West joint venture.

Next Page 1 | 2

Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 31st, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 24 to 30, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Fission Uranium drills 38 metres of 4.44% U3O8 at Patterson Lake South

Still no word on a resource estimate, but Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU released assays for 10 more infill holes from Patterson Lake South on May 29. The latest batch brings the total reported holes from last winter to 40, with 52 more to come. Nine of the most recent came from R780E, the middle and the largest of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open to the east and west. Some of the best results show:

Hole PLS14-153

  • 0.34% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 21.5 metres, starting at 166.5 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 1.47% over 2 metres)
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 24 to 30, 2014

  • 0.78% over 5.5 metres, starting at 203 metres
  • (including 3.76% over 1 metre)

  • 0.64% over 10.5 metres, starting at 215 metres
  • (including 4.16% over 1 metre)

Hole PLS14-156

  • 4.68% over 19 metres, starting at 103.5 metres
  • (including 12.32% over 5.5 metres)

  • 3.69% over 4.5 metres, starting at 202 metres
  • (including 10.67% over 1.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-160

  • 4.44% over 38 metres, starting at 69 metres
  • (including 14.74% over 10 metres)

  • 1.05% over 9.5 metres, starting at 187 metres
  • (including 3.44% over 2.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-167

  • 1.16% over 18.5 metres, starting at 120 metres
  • (including 3.1% over 6.5 metres)

Hole PLS14-171

  • 1.05% over 18.5 metres, starting at 75 metres
  • (including 4.42% over 2.5 metres)

  • 2.96% over 48 metres, starting at 105 metres
  • (including 8.67% over 11.5 metres)

Fission Uranium also released one assay from R00E, the second zone from the west and location of the project’s first hit.

Hole PLS14-163

  • 0.14% over 5 metres, starting at 128.5 metres

True widths weren’t provided.

Back to the R780E assays, Fission Uranium stated they show “the exceptional strength of uranium mineralization in the middle region over a substantial strike length” of the zone.

Aldrin finds radioactivity at Triple M’s Anticline area

The first hole sunk on the Anticline target at Aldrin Resource’s (TSXV:ALN) Triple M property went radioactive, the company announced May 29. A downhole probe found nine intervals totalling 14.6 metres (not true widths) showing “significant” radiation above 300 counts per second for intercepts above 0.3 metres. The nine intervals occurred at downhole depths between 176.6 and 246.2 metres.

Radiation measurements are no substitute for assays. The company noted that radiation could come from potassium or thorium, but radiometric readings have shown some correlation with uranium at the adjacent PLS project.

Aldrin has also drilled seven holes so far on the project’s Forrest Lake fault, reporting preliminary results for the first four in April. The 12,000-hectare Triple M property consists of two blocks west and south of PLS.

Ur-Energy reports Shirley Basin eU3O8, prepares 43-101

Radiometric results announced May 28 follow completion of a 14-hole confirmation drill program at Ur-Energy’s (TSX:URE) Shirley Basin project in Wyoming. Providing the results not as counts per second but as uranium oxide-equivalent, the company found 13 intercepts above 0.02% eU3O8 for intercepts ranging between 1.83 metres and 5.79 metres thick (not true widths). The intercepts started at downhole depths ranging from 68 to 161 metres.

Historically, the Shirley Basin district has hosted low-grade deposits suited to in-situ recovery operations. But this campaign found higher-grade results too, including:

  • 0.502% eU3O8 over 2.44 metres, starting at 95 metres in downhole depth

  • 0.321% over 3.81 metres, starting at 73.8 metres

  • 0.189% over 5.79 metres, starting at 100.95 metres

Now underway is a 43-101 technical report on the property, part of last December’s acquisition of Pathfinder Mines. In August Ur-Energy began ISR production at another Wyoming project, Lost Creek. In May the company revised the mine’s guidance in view of low uranium prices.

Fission 3.0 and Brades report Clearwater West conductors

On May 27 Fission 3.0 TSXV:FUU and Brades Resource TSXV:BRA announced more detailed results from a previously reported VTEM survey. The companies now say 24 conductive areas have been located on the Clearwater West joint venture, five coinciding with anomalous radiometric readings. In all, seven high-priority areas have been identified on the eastern side of the 11,835-hectare property that borders PLS to the north.

Follow-up work will include boulder prospecting and ground-based electromagnetic and DC resistivity surveys to determine drill targets.

The Fission Energy spinco acts as operator and currently holds 100% of the project. Brades has a three-year, 50% option that would call for $5 million in spending by October 2016 and a first-year commitment of $700,000.

New listing enhances Lakeland Resources’ American exposure

Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK made its OTCQX trading debut May 30, marking an important step “as we continue to grow and expand our shareholder base globally,” said president/CEO Jonathan Armes. “The United States is an important market to be active in and we look forward to the increased visibility and exposure that this new listing will offer.”

In April the company announced a 4,475-hectare expansion to its Lazy Edward Bay project, one of Lakeland’s 16 uranium properties in and around the Basin.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 17th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 10 to 16, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Cameco suspends Millennium mine proposal

Declining uranium prices have forced Cameco Corp TSX:CCO to postpone its Millennium mine proposal. On May 16 the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission stated a public hearing for a licence application scheduled for June had been adjourned at Cameco’s request. A brief message on the company’s website blamed “poor economic conditions in world uranium markets.”

Figures from 2009 credited the project with an indicated resource of 46.8 million pounds uranium oxide (U3O8) averaging 4.53% uranium. A 2013 environmental impact statement forecast an initial 10-year lifespan, but anticipated extensions if further resources were found. Ore would have been shipped 36 kilometres south to the Key Lake mill, held 83% by Cameco and 17% by AREVA Resources Canada.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for May 10 to 16, 2014

Although just last month Cameco expressed optimism in uranium’s
long-term outlook, the company blamed market conditions as it
withdrew its Millennium licence application.

Uranium prices have continued their slide to new record lows. Although there’s no spot price for the metal, UX Consulting’s most recent indicator, published May 12, came to $29 a pound.

In last month’s Q1 report, Cameco expressed optimism about the long-term outlook, expecting “an increase in annual uranium consumption from today’s 170 million pounds to about 240 million pounds” over the next decade.

In March Cameco finally put its Cigar Lake mine into production, nine years after construction began and 33 years after its discovery.

The CNSC left the door open for Cameco to make a future request that its licence application be considered by the commission, which would then call a public hearing.

Fission Uranium hits 30 metres of 2.58% U3O8 at Patterson Lake South

Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU unloaded assays for eight more holes from Patterson Lake South on May 13, all of them from the R780E zone. This week’s star, PLS14-158, marks the eastern-most R780E hole for which assays have been released, boosting the company’s optimism in the deposit’s eastward potential. Some of the best results show:

Hole PLS14-141

  • 0.72% U3O8 over 11 metres, starting at 163 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 2.04% over 3 metres)

  • 0.77% over 6 metres, starting at 187.5 metres
  • (including 2.31% over 1.5 metres)


  • 0.26% over 14 metres, starting at 145 metres

  • 0.41% over 5 metres, starting at 248 metres
  • (including 1.06% over 1.5 metres)


  • 0.79% over 19 metres, starting at 127.5 metres
  • (including 3.21% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.46% over 7.5 metres, starting at 151.5 metres

  • 0.3% over 8.5 metres, starting at 196 metres
  • (including 1.43% over 1 metre)

  • 2.07% over 3 metres, starting at 208 metres
  • (including 3.21% over 1.5 metres)


  • 1.83% over 3.5 metres, starting at 154.5 metres
  • (including 2.9% over 2 metres)

  • 0.63% over 5 metres, starting at 192.5 metres


  • 0.2% over 17.5 metres, starting at 117.5 metres


  • 2.94% over 7 metres, starting at 219 metres
  • (including 5.58% over 3.5 metres)

  • 0.22% over 19.5 metres, starting at 285.5 metres


  • 0.35% over 6.5 metres, starting at 125 metres

  • 0.29% over 14.5 metres, starting at 168.5 metres


  • 0.72% over 8 metres, starting at 141 metres

  • 2.58% over 30 metres, starting at 152 metres
  • (including 22.02% over 1 metre)
  • (and including 8.57% over 5 metres)

  • 6.85% over 10 metres, starting at 232.5 metres
  • (including 12.23% over 5.5 metres)

  • 3.53% over 4.5 metres, starting at 253.5 metres
  • (including 11.95% over 1 metre)

True widths weren’t provided. R780E is the middle of five zones, and the largest of all five, along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open both to the east and west. With assays released for 30 winter holes so far, lab results are pending for approximately 62 more.

Although winter exploration drilling fell short of exciting, the season’s focus was on infill drilling to define a maiden resource that will—on some unspecified date—debut to an intensely curious audience.

Powertech files Kyrgyzstan resource held 80% by proposed merger partner, updates South Dakota licence challenge

Powertech Uranium TSX:PWE has filed an inferred resource for the Kyzyl Ompul licence in Kyrgyzstan, the company announced on May 13. The 42,379-hectare project is held 80% by Azarga Resources Ltd, which plans to merge with Powertech. The resource uses a 0.01% cutoff to show 15.13 tonnes averaging 0.022% for 7.51 million pounds U3O8 inferred.

Powertech described the Kok Moinok main zone as about 700 metres along an east-west strike, 600 metres north-south and 10 to 30 metres in depth. The report also included two conceptual exploration target area estimates.

Although Powertech acknowledged that access to the project was blocked by political unrest in 2005 and 2010, the company maintained that “the main risk factors at this stage are commodity prices….”

Last year Kyrgyzstan managed to fall a few spots to the very bottom of the Fraser Institute’s policy perception index and achieved near-bottom rankings for several other categories in the annual poll of mining professionals. But a May 7 Financial Post article by Peter Koven pointed out that despite public opposition, social unrest and ongoing government policy threats, Centerra Gold’s (TSX:CG) Kyrgyzstan mine “continues to run and churn out cash.”

The Kyzyl Ompul licence expires at the end of 2015. Read more about the Powertech/Azarga merger here and here.

On May 14 Powertech updated events following a challenge to its operating licence for the company’s Dewey-Burdock project in South Dakota. In oral hearings the previous day, opponents questioned procedures followed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the importance of possible native religious sites in the area.

As the hearings continue, the NRC’s Atomic Safety and Licensing Board will decide whether Dewey-Burdock’s licence becomes effective or remains on hold until a formal hearing in August. Read more about the licence challenge.

MPVC begins drilling Maguire Lake target at NW Manitoba

Drilling has begun at MPVC Inc’s (TSXV:UNO) Northwest Manitoba project, the company announced May 14. While winter conditions persist, a diamond drill will focus on Maguire Lake. Preliminary radon measurements from the lake reported the previous week were, to the company’s knowledge, second only to PLS for a water-based survey. MPVC will also bring in a rotary air blast drill, which is intended to test shallow targets quickly.

With ground gravity survey results now in hand, the company has filled in gaps between three earlier sets of data, extending previously identified gravity lows and discovering new gravity lows.

To earn 80% of the 143,603-hectare project from CanAlaska Uranium TSXV:CVV, MPVC must spend $3.2 million on exploration by 2015.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

May 3rd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 26 to May 2, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Wheeler River JV gives up 36.8% U3O8 over 6.5 metres, Denison plans June resource

Denison Mines TSX:DML diverted attention from activity in and around the Athabasca Basin’s southwest on April 30 with huge grades from the east. Assays from seven of 11 winter holes at Zone A of the Phoenix deposit were reported along with previously released uranium oxide-equivalent (eU3O8) results from a downhole probe for the same holes. In most cases the actual U3O8 graded higher than the eU3O8, sometimes with wider intervals.

Here are the best assays, with the previous eU3O8 results in brackets:

Hole WR-538

  • 2.92% U3O8 over 5 metres, starting at 393 metres in vertical depth
  • (2.14% eU3O8 over 5.1 metres)

Hole WR-539

  • 13.12% U3O8 over 5 metres, starting at 400 metres
  • (11.63% eU3O8 over 3.5 metres)

Hole WR-545

  • 24.47% U3O8 over 3.5 metres, starting at 401.7 metres
  • (16.98% eU3O8 over 3.1 metres)

Hole WR-548

  • 36.83% U3O8 over 6.5 metres, starting at 406.8 metres
  • (29.61% eU3O8 over 6.5 metres)

Hole WR-550

  • 29.32% U3O8 over 4 metres, starting at 406.2 metres
  • (18.37% eU3O8 over 4.7 metres)

Hole WR-555

  • 15.99% U3O8 over 3 metres, starting at 404.5 metres
  • (12.92% eU3O8 over 2.7 metres)

With vertical holes and approximately horizontal mineralization, the intercepts are close to true widths, Denison stated. One of the 11 holes wasn’t assayed while three others, with core recovery below 80%, were reported with eU3O8 only.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 26 to May 2, 2014

Still to come are assays for 16 holes from other parts of Wheeler including the newly discovered Gryphon zone, three kilometres northwest of the Phoenix deposit.

A Phoenix resource estimate is scheduled for June. Operator Denison holds a 60% interest in the project, along with Cameco Corp TSX:CCO (30%) and JCU (Canada) Exploration (10%). The 11,720-hectare property lies 35 kilometres from the Key Lake mill.

Denison also acted as operator on 10 of its 12 winter programs in the eastern Basin, which included eight drill campaigns. “Highlights included intersections of weak uranium mineralization at the Oban target area at Waterbury Lake, intersections of weak uranium mineralization and strong base metal mineralization at Hatchet Lake, and intersections of weak uranium mineralization at Bell Lake,” the company added.

In mid-April Denison announced a definitive agreement to acquire International Enexco TSXV:IEC on the same terms reported in a March letter of intent.

Patterson Lake South exploration drilling disappoints but Fission finds high radon readings

Having announced the completion of winter delineation drilling the previous week, Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU followed up on April 28 with an exploration update for Patterson Lake South. Ten holes failed to find significant radioactivity. But some radon-in-water anomalies were “on the scale of intensity as the anomalies associated with the PL-3B conductor” found last year, which the company called “a contributing factor in the success of drill collar step-outs as large as 465 metres.”

Mineralization has so far been revealed on two basement electromagnetic conductors, PL-3B and PL-3C. Last winter’s 12 exploration holes included two on PL-3C, which expanded the strike with the new R1620E zone. The most recent 10 holes, on conductors PL-1B and PL-2C, “provided encouraging data for use in upcoming drill programs,” the company stated.

PLS now consists of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open to the east and west. Still pending are assays for approximately 70 holes. Spring plans for the 31,039-hectare project have yet to be announced—as is the case for a maiden resource target date.

The company also reported the exercise of 17.97 million warrants on April 28 from a private placement that raised $28.75 million earlier that month.

Declan adds properties, releases VTEM, offers $2-million placement

Among news announced April 30 by Declan Resources TSXV:LAN are property acquisitions in Saskatchewan and Wyoming, preliminary VTEM results from Alberta and a $2-million offering.

The 10-claim Copper Mountain property in Wyoming covers most of the historic North Canning deposit which holds a non-43-101 resource averaging 0.05% uranium for approximately 6.5 million pounds U3O8, according to a reference book. The vendors get two million shares and a 2% gross overriding royalty. The Athabasca property costs Declan nine million shares. Its location wasn’t divulged.

From the Basin’s Alberta side, the company said early VTEM findings for its newly acquired Maybelle North and Richardson River properties indicate four EM trends linked to regional magnetic linears. Declan hopes further analysis will help find graphitic conductors within meta-sedimentary rocks associated with the Basin’s unconformity-style deposits.

The company also offered a private placement up to $2 million and cancelled 2.4 million options.

In March Declan announced plans for the northern Basin’s Gibbon’s Creek project, in which the company holds a $1.25-million first-year exploration commitment under a joint venture with Lakeland Resources TSXV:LK.

NexGen completes ground gravity at Rook 1’s Arrow zone, plans May drilling

Discovered last February, the Arrow zone continues to command NexGen Energy’s (TSXV:NXE) attention at its PLS-neighbouring Rook 1 project. A tightly spaced ground gravity survey extended a potential alteration system adjacent to recent drilling and along strike, the company stated April 29. The results will help NexGen choose drill targets for a three-rig program of over 13,000 metres to begin in mid-May.

So far seven of eight holes at Arrow hit mineralization, according to radiometric results from a hand-held spectrometer. Assays are still to come.

The previous week NexGen announced a property acquisition from Long Harbour Exploration TSXV:LHC.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

April 27th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 19 to 25, 2014

by Greg Klein

Next Page 1 | 2

Fission Uranium completes winter delineation, releases Patterson Lake South drill results

Delineation drilling, the focus of Fission Uranium’s (TSXV:FCU) winter 2014 Patterson Lake South program, has come to its seasonal end. While one rig worked outside the main mineralized area, four others sunk 82 infill holes, roughly 85% of the 30,000-metre campaign, since mid-January. As a result PLS now consists of five zones along a 2.24-kilometre potential strike that’s open at both east and west. Along with its April 24 announcement Fission Uranium released radiometric results for the last dozen holes. Two days earlier the company reported assays for nine others.

Ten of the 12 latest holes came from zone R780E, the third of the five east-west zones. With a total of 77 holes so far, R780E has about 855 metres in strike and up to about 95 metres in lateral width. Seven of the latest 10 holes showed substantial intercepts reaching the maximum possible reading of 9,999 counts per second on a hand-held scintillometer that measures radiation from drill core. Scintillometer results are no substitute for assays, which are pending for these holes.

R1620E, at the eastern extent and declared a new zone earlier this month after just one hole, now has a second which showed 38.5 metres (not true width) ranging from under 300 cps to 3,500 cps. Ironically for the discovery zone, R00E gave up just half a metre of 490 cps.

Assays released two days earlier included yet another PLS “best yet”—this time “the widest high-grade interval to date,” which helped PLS14-187 nearly equal a previously recorded best hole. This nine-hole batch marks the third set of assays, totalling 22 holes, for the winter campaign. Like the previous week’s dozen holes, all nine came from R780E. Some of the best results showed:

Hole PLS14-138

  • 0.2% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 34 metres, starting at 73 metres in downhole depth
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for April 19 to 25, 2014

  • 0.4% over 3.5 metres, starting at 137.5 metres

  • 1.04% over 17 metres, starting at 170 metres
  • (including 2.88% over 4.5 metres)


  • 0.15% over 30 metres, starting at 130 metres

  • 0.28% over 8.5 metres, starting at 199 metres


  • 0.1% over 19.5 metres, starting at 22.5 metres

  • 0.28% over 7.5 metres, starting at 254.5 metres


  • 0.13% over 27.5 metres, starting at 89.5 metres

  • 0.97% over 22.5 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 2.24% over 7.5 metres)

  • 1.34% over 2.5 metres, starting at 178.5 metres

  • 0.4% over 7.5 metres, starting at 203.5 metres

  • 0.22% over 8 metres, starting at 218 metres


  • 2.18% over 47 metres, starting at 132 metres
  • (including 4.3% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 14.27% over 2 metres)

  • 1.04% over 4 metres, starting at 237 metres
  • (including 3.64% over 1 metre)

  • 3.19% over 2 metres, starting at 254 metres


  • 0.15% over 28.5 metres, starting at 115 metres


  • 0.31% over 6 metres, starting at 125.5 metres

Best of the batch and second-best overall was PLS14-187:

  • 5.98% over 102.5 metres, starting at 63 metres
  • (including 27.2% over 3 metres)
  • (and including 12.93% over 10.5 metres)
  • (and including 14.12% over 6 metres)
  • (and including 16.92% over 2.5 metres)
  • (and including 16.14% over 4.5 metres)

  • 2.59% over 9 metres, starting at 218.5 metres

True widths weren’t provided. “Mineralization is both located within and associated with a metasedimentary lithologic corridor, bounded to the south by the PL-3B basement electromagnetic conductor,” Fission Uranium added.

The $12-million winter agenda also calls for geophysics. And no, there’s still no word on when Fission Uranium might unveil its maiden resource.

Lakeland Resources acquisition expands Lazy Edward Bay project

Out of Lakeland Resources’ (TSXV:LK) portfolio of 16 uranium properties in and around the Athabasca Basin, Lazy Edward Bay has taken on greater prominence. A three-claim, 4,475-hectare acquisition announced April 24 expands the project to 26,375 hectares. The new turf also adds two conductive trends, giving Lazy Edward a total of six around the Basin’s southern margin.

Subject to TSXV approval, the 100% interest will cost Lakeland $5,000, 250,000 shares and a 2% gross revenue royalty.

Of the two additional conductive trends, the Ponderosa consists of two parallel graphitic trends, each about 2.5 kilometres long, Lakeland stated. Ground EM surveys and seven holes tested the trend in 1989, with more EM and another hole following in 2001.

The Jack trend extends from the original Lazy Edward property, tripling the trend to about 5.1 kilometres. In 2007 it underwent a ground fixed loop transient EM survey but hasn’t been drilled.

Historic work has sunk at least 53 holes on Lazy Edward’s six trends but, with each ranging between five and seven kilometres long, they remain under-explored. One hole on the Bay trend assayed 770 ppm uranium, along with anomalous pathfinder metals. Depths to the unconformity along the Basin’s southern edge range from zero to 350 metres.

“As a result of the historic and recent exploration on the property, all six trends are considered drill ready,” the company stated.

Among other projects in Lakeland’s portfolio is Gibbon’s Creek, a joint venture with Declan Resources TSXV:LAN that features surface boulders grading up to 4.28% U3O8 and some of the highest radon readings ever measured in the Basin.

Read more about Lakeland Resources here and here.

Aldrin reports initial findings from Triple M’s initial four holes

With drilling suspended by snowmelt, Aldrin Resource TSXV:ALN reported preliminary results from the first four holes on its PLS-adjacent Triple M property. All four “intersected alteration, structures and breccia zones within a metasedimentary rock succession including elevated radioactivity counts in a graphitic fault zone,” the company stated on April 22. Assays have yet to come.

With less than 25% of the planned 4,000-metre program complete, the quartet tested the Forrest Lake fault. Aldrin plans at least four more holes over the same fault “moving towards the most intense part of the basement conductive anomaly” before starting on the Anticline target.

Drilling could resume on the 12,000-hectare property in as little as two weeks, the company added.

NexGen adds to eastern Basin holdings

The size of the property wasn’t divulged. Nor was its name. But NexGen Energy TSXV:NXE announced an eastside Basin acquisition and option on April 25. Subject to approvals, NexGen gets a 75% interest in five claims by issuing Long Harbour Exploration TSXV:LHC shares worth $135,000. NexGen’s option on the other 25% would require additional shares worth $45,000. Value would be calculated by the volume-weighted average for five days before closing. The property remains subject to a 2% NSR and 2% gross overriding royalty. The claims lie “in close proximity” to NexGen’s Thorburn Lake property.

On April 22 the company implemented a shareholder rights plan.

Late last month NexGen wrapped up winter drilling at its southwestern Basin Rook 1 flagship by announcing radiometric results for the project’s best hole so far.

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