Tuesday 12th November 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘alberta’

PDAC infographics: Highlighting mining’s contributions to Canada’s economy

October 28th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 28, 2019

Although Canadian miners hold global stature, Canadians don’t always recognize the industry’s importance to our own country. Yet the numbers tell a story that’s not only impressive but vital to understanding an economy in which mining supports one in 29 jobs and provides the largest private sector source of native employment.

To state the case clearly, the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada created a series of infographics outlining the industry’s contributions. Check them out yourself by scrolling down to see facts and figures for Canada overall and for each province or territory. Or click on the menu below for a direct link to each jurisdiction.

Canada nationwide | Yukon | Northwest Territories/Nunavut | British Columbia | Alberta | Saskatchewan | Manitoba | Ontario | Quebec | New Brunswick/Nova Scotia | Newfoundland and Labrador/Prince Edward Island

Posted with permission of the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada.

 

PDAC infographics Highlighting mining’s contributions to Canada’s economy

 

PDAC Yukon mining infographic

 

PDAC NWT Nunavut mining infographic

 

PDAC BC mining infographic

 

PDAC Alberta mining infographic

 

PDAC Saskatchewan mining infographic

 

PDAC Manitoba mining infographic

 

PDAC Ontario mining infographic

 

PDAC Quebec mining infographic

 

PDAC Nova Scotia New Brunswick mining infographic

 

PDAC Newfoundland Labrador PEI mining infographic

Posted with permission of the Prospectors & Developers Association of Canada.

Over a Barrel: Documentary now online about Vivian Krause vs. the U.S.-funded campaign against Canadian oil

October 25th, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 25, 2019

What they’ve done to us is actually brilliant—it’s pure brilliance. Because they’re not doing it to themselves. They’re getting Canadians to do it to ourselves. And I don’t think Canadians understand that this is what’s happening to them. On a larger scale, they’re doing to Canada what they did to my community. So I don’t think Canada really understands that the real war here is an outside force pitting Canadians against Canadians.—Ellis Ross, B.C. MLA and former chief councillor of the Haisla Nation, from the documentary Over a Barrel

The impressive work of a singularly remarkable activist has come to the screen, both in movie theatres and on computers. Over a Barrel presents a half-hour documentary on the research of Vivian Krause into the American-backed anti-oilsands campaign. Having already appeared in Alberta theatres, the film’s now online and, until October 31, for free (although donations are accepted).

Starting November 1, and in lieu of rich U.S. backers, an online viewing will cost $4.99.

Through well over a decade of perseverance, Krause has documented a money trail leading to powerful American interests whose more than half a billion in funding, tactics of disinformation, and interference in Canadian elections targets Albertans and other Canadians to the benefit of Americans and their oil industry.

The documentary also portrays a human cost to the campaign, as native spokespeople discuss how foreign interference and urban activists deprive their communities of badly needed economic development.

Click here to watch Over a Barrel online, for free or by donation until October 31 and for $4.99 after that.

Read an October 22 op-ed by Vivian Krause: Obama wasn’t the only American interfering in the Canadian election.

Read more about Vivian Krause and her work.

Canada election 2019: Fragmented results from a fragmented country

October 21st, 2019

by Greg Klein | October 21, 2019, updated October 22, 2019

Updated results (numbers in parenthesis show seats at dissolution and 2015 popular vote)

  • Liberal Party: 157 seats, 33.1% of the popular vote (177 seats, 39.5%)
  • Conservative Party: 121 seats, 34.4% (95 seats, 31.9%)
  • Bloc Québécois: 32 seats, 7.7% (10 seats, 4.7%)
  • New Democratic Party: 24 seats, 15.9% (39 seats, 19.7%)
  • Green Party: 3 seats, 6.5% (2 seats, 3.4%)
  • People’s Party: 0 seats, 1.6% (1 seat, N/A)*
  • Independents: 1 seat, 0.4% (8 seats, 3.4%)
  • Co-operative Commonwealth Federation: N/A (1 seat, N/A)*
  • (5 vacant seats at dissolution)

* The People’s Party was created in 2018 by MP Maxime Bernier after he resigned from the Conservatives. The name of the historic CCF party was adopted in 2018 by expelled NDP MP Erin Weir, who didn’t run for re-election.

 

The two top parties got just a third of the popular vote each, the party that won the most votes came in second, Quebec separatists made great strides, the traditional left-labour party shed seats and Alberta defied The Great Big Cause of Our Time (2019 edition). One interpretation might find that the election demonstrated Canada’s growing status as a failed nation. But another might say that, united at last, Canadians found a common enemy: Alberta.

At least that was the case for most of Canada outside the West.

Canada election 2019 Fragmented results from a fragmented country

Justin Trudeau: Holding power with which
party’s support and under what conditions?
(Photo: Liberal Party of Canada)

The campaign could have emphasized issues such as housing affordability, rental affordability, student debt, the gig job market, urban decline, deficit spending and national unity, just to mention a few. And such matters did pop up. But if anything took precedence other than the incumbent prime minister’s tarnished halo, it was climate change. The way to counter that, four of five parties agreed, was to shut down Alberta industry.

Lost in the rhetoric was any serious discussion of whether this country can substitute its resource-based economy for a vaguely imagined green economy, and whether doing so would appreciably affect climate change.

Given the relatively low union presence in Alberta’s oil patch, New Democrats felt confident in joining the Greens’ oilsands opposition. So prominent was the issue that Quebec separatists and federalists alike tried to turn it to their advantage, at Alberta’s expense. As noted by Calgary Herald columnist Don Braid, Bloc Québécois leader Yves-Francois Blanchet proposed another tax that would hit Albertans the hardest. Liberal leader Justin Trudeau actually made it an ethnic issue, inviting the Quebecois to rally against Alberta’s economy. Reporting on a French-language debate, Braid wrote:

Blanchet comes across like an old-school Quebec nationalist, hard as nails and firm in his beliefs. He also knows how to talk to the younger climate-change activists.

Trudeau clearly knows his majority is most endangered in Quebec. Hence this remarkable statement on climate change: “It’s necessary to have a strong government, full of Quebecers, full of francophones, who are going to be able to continue the fight” against conservatives who, in his view, “wouldn’t do anything.”

No leader in my memory has ever promised a government full of Ontarians, or British Columbians, or Albertans—or, for that matter, full of English speakers. It’s extraordinary.

The question now remains which party will prop up the Liberals’ minority seat count and even lower vote count. The Greens, rising from two to just three seats despite their extravagant optimism, failed to match previous advances in a federal by-election as well as provincial and, in the Vancouver area, municipal contests. That leaves the New Democrats or Bloc. The separatists, with considerably more seats than the NDP, lean ideologically much closer to the Liberals than the Conservatives, but might hold fratricidal animus. The NDP, a severe loser in this campaign, has to consider whether sleeping with the boss would embellish or tarnish its reputation.

Meanwhile Alberta’s Conservative support (sweeping 33 of 34 seats) might best be considered a Quixotic protest. Could a Tory victory have realistically revived pipeline proposals?

Currently led by a messianic kid, environmentalism has taken on a religious zeal, although it’s pushing a belief system based not on cosmology, morality, transcendence or salvation, but on doom. A mono-apocalyptic faith, it tolerates no rivals—for example economic collapse, infrastructure failure, terrorism, civil breakdown, Malthusian catastrophe or plain old-fashioned war.

Those are just some of the possibilities. Of course they can interact with especially nightmarish consequences.

Canada election 2019 Fragmented results from a fragmented country

Segregated blocks of Liberal red, Conservative blue, Bloc Québécois pale blue
and NDP brown suggest a politically balkanized country.
(Image: Elections Canada)

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney calls an inquiry into the foreign-financed anti-oilsands campaign

August 16th, 2019

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Site visits for sightseers II

July 23rd, 2019

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

by Greg Klein

Our survey of mining museums and historic sites continues east through the prairie provinces. Although some oil and gas sites have made this list, generally not included for reasons of space are museums of mineralogy and museums not mostly dedicated to mining. Keep in mind, though, that local museums in mining regions often merit a mining buff’s attention.

Be sure to confirm opening hours and inquire about footwear or other clothing requirements for industrial sites.

See Part 1 about Yukon and British Columbia, Part 3 about Ontario and Quebec, and Part 4 about the Atlantic provinces.

Alberta

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

A family follows in the footsteps of coal miners at Bellevue.
(Photo: Bellevue Underground Mine)

Don a lamp-equipped miner’s helmet and descend into Bellevue, a Crowsnest-region mine that gave up over 13 million tons of coal between 1903 and 1961. Forty-five minutes of the one-hour tour consist of a guided walk (accessible for strollers and wheelchairs) along 300 metres of what was once a 240-kilometre network of tunnels. Dress for temperatures as low as zero, even when it’s summer on surface.

Located in the community of Bellevue in the municipality of Crowsnest Pass, off the Crowsnest (#3) Highway. Access road starts at 2501 213 Street, by the Old Dairy Ice Cream Shoppe parking lot. Tours begin every half hour from 10:00 to 5:00, daily to August 31. During September and October every half hour from 9:00 to 4:00; from November to April group tours by appointment; from May to June 9:00 to 4:00 daily. More info.

 

Maybe four kilometres southeast of Bellevue, Leitch Collieries offers “graceful ruins” of a processing plant for a “glorious failure” of a coal mine that lasted eight years up to 1915. Although the actual mine—beneath a former cattle rustlers’ haven 1.5 kilometres away—is off limits, visitors can learn about the operation from listening posts, storyboards and summer guides.

Located just off the Crowsnest (#3) Highway near the eastern limits of Crowsnest Pass municipality. Open all year but guides are available 10:00 to 5:00 daily until September 2. More info.

 

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

Coal mining, processing and shipping
infrastructure survives at Brazeau Collieries.
(Photo: Government of Alberta)

Once Alberta’s most productive mine, Brazeau Collieries operated in the Rocky Mountain foothills between 1914 and 1955. Now two different two-hour guided walks take visitors through parts of the 31-hectare site. Tour A checks out workshops, houses and external workings, and also enters the mine shaft. Tour B goes through the 1950s briquette plant.

Tours begin at the Nordegg Heritage Centre on Stuart Street in the town of Nordegg, off Highway #11, about 80 kilometres west of Rocky Mountain House and 60 klicks northeast of Banff National Park. Each tour runs a few times daily, except Wednesdays. More info.

 

The Rockies’ Bow Valley had hosted numerous coal mines since the early 1880s, with the last shutting down in 1979 at Canmore. Mining awareness continues at the Canmore Museum and Geoscience Centre through a number of programs and a permanent exhibit called From Coal to Community.

Located in the Canmore Civic Centre, 902b Seventh Avenue. Open Monday to Friday noon to 4:30 and weekends 11:00 to 4:30 until September 2. Then open to October 14 Monday to Thursday noon to 4:30 and Friday to Sunday 10:00 to 4:30, then to June 1 Monday, Wednesday and Friday noon to 4:30, and weekends 11:00 to 4:30. More info.

 

Further into the Rockies, in fact right inside Banff National Park, the coal town of Bankhead once overshadowed the neighbouring tourist town. Little remains of Bankhead’s 20-year life but mining enthusiasts already visiting the park might take the interpretive trail featuring explanatory signage, exhibits in the transformer building and a mine train. The C-level Cirque Trail passes ventilation shafts and the skeleton of an old mine building, along with unmistakably Banff-style scenery.

More info here and here.

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

An historic vehicle takes a trip through history.
(Photo: Atlas Coal Mine National Historic Site)

 

The last of 139 operations in the Drumheller Valley Badlands from 1911 to 1979, the Atlas Coal Mine National Historic Site features numerous buildings, rail lines, machines and other artifacts within a 31-hectare property. In a number of separate tours, visitors look at a mine tunnel and Canada’s last wooden tipple, or they travel around the site via antique locomotive.

Located on Highway #10, 20 minutes southeast of Drumheller. Tours run daily to early October. Click here for schedule updates.

 

Coal was once Alberta’s main extractive commodity but a 1914 natural gas discovery turned attention to another type of fuel and a new petrochemical industry at the Turner Valley Gas Plant. Guided tours, an exhibit hall and historic buildings present western Canada’s first commercial oilfield and processing plant.

Located on Sunset Boulevard SE in the town of Turner Valley. Open weekends and stats from 10:00 to 5:00 until September 2. More info.

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

A tribute to tenacity, Leduc #1 followed 133 dry wells.
(Photo: Canadian Energy Museum)

 

Alberta’s energy industry changed again in 1947 when a geyser of oil erupted at Leduc. The nearby Canadian Energy Museum “celebrates Canada’s relationship with energy past, present and future.” A summer exhibit portrays the lives of those who experienced Leduc’s sudden boom, while a fall exhibit will look at the model town of Devon, a boom-time creation.

Located at 50339 Highway #60, Leduc County. Open Monday to Saturday 9:00 to 5:00. Book ahead for individual or group tours.

 

The history, science and technology that unlocked another rich source of fuel comes alive in Fort McMurray’s Oil Sands Discovery Centre. Demonstrations, films and exhibits include an 850-tonne bucketwheel excavator and a 150-tonne truck.

Located at 515 MacKenzie Boulevard, Fort McMurray. Open daily 9:00 to 5:00 until September 2. Off-season hours are Tuesday to Sunday 10:00 to 4:00. More info.

 

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

Exhibits and mine simulations relate potash from
extraction to application. (Photo: Tourism Saskatchewan)

Saskatchewan

“Just like being in a potash mine without the dust and heat” was how one visitor described it. The Saskatchewan Potash Interpretive Centre showcases the geology, how the stuff gets mined and refined, and what it’s used for. The centre comprises one of a number of attractions in Esterhazy Historical Park.

Located at 701 Park Avenue (Highway #22), Esterhazy. Open daily 9:00 to 5:00 until August 31. For off-season visits, phone 306-745-5406 or 306-745-3942.

 

Manitoba

Heavy duty equipment befitting a hard rock heritage goes on display at the Snow Lake Mining Museum. Exhibits include jackleg drills, battery-powered trammers, rocker shovels, mock-ups of mining drifts and a mine rescue centre.

Located at 163 Poplar Avenue, Snow Lake. Generally open Mondays 10:00 to 5:00, Tuesdays to Saturdays 10:00 to 6:00, and occasional Sundays, until August 30. Phone 204-358-7867 to confirm hours.

Experience mining’s past and present in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba

Rugged gear reflects the rugged life of northern Saskatchewan’s Snow Lake region.
(Photo: Snow Lake Mining Museum)

See Part 1 about Yukon and British Columbia, Part 3 about Ontario and Quebec, and Part 4 about the Atlantic provinces.

Conrad Black suggests Alberta set an example in reforming securities regulations

July 11th, 2019

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Crediting Vivian Krause, Alberta calls inquiry into foreign-funded anti-oilsands campaign

July 4th, 2019

by Greg Klein | July 4, 2019

Forsaking a slingshot to work “from my dining room table, using Google on my own nickel,” independent researcher Vivian Krause took on an extremely well-funded Goliath. Now her findings and the questions they raise should come to light in a formal inquiry. Alberta’s United Conservative Party government, elected last April, has ordered an examination of what Premier Jason Kenney said “amounts to a premeditated, internationally planned and financed operation to put Alberta energy out of business.”

Crediting Vivian Krause, Alberta calls inquiry into foreign-funded anti-oilsands campaign

After years of Quixotic efforts, Vivian Krause’s
research comes to prominence.

At risk for foreign-funded Canadian activist groups will be their eligibility for government grants or charitable status. But their credibility also faces challenges. Kenney directed the commission to determine whether foreign groups “provide financial assistance to a Canadian organization which has disseminated incomplete, misleading or false information about the Alberta oil and gas industry.”

Kenney questioned activists’ focus on Alberta while doing “little or nothing” about American oil production doubling over the last decade and global production rising from 90 million to 100 million barrels per day during the same period.

“We’ve seen huge increases in production and consumption from OPEC countries, from the Russian autocracy, from the Venezuelan dictatorship and even from our neighbours to the south but almost all of this political pressure [targets] this liberal democracy with the highest human rights, labour and environmental standards. And we want to know why, who and how much. We want to know what exactly lies behind this campaign to defame and landlock Canadian energy.”

Kenney blamed the campaign for the loss of tens of thousands of Albertan jobs, thousands of business closures, negative economic growth and a massive increase in public debt.

Headed by forensic accountant Steve Allan, the commission will interview witnesses as well as review existing info and conduct further research. A public hearing may follow. Backed by a $2.5-million budget, the commission must deliver an interim report by January 31 and a final report with recommendations by July 2, 2020.

The premier emphasized the inquiry comprises one aspect “of a comprehensive plan to fight back against those seeking to hurt our prosperity and kill our jobs while applying a hypocritical double standard to other energy producers.” His government also plans an “energy war room” to counter disinformation, legal action against bills C-48 and C-69, and the creation of a coalition of provincial and territorial governments, first nations and business groups to encourage resource development.

Crediting Vivian Krause, Alberta calls inquiry into foreign-funded anti-oilsands campaign

Along with energy minister Sonya Savage,
Kenney announces the inquiry on July 4.
(Photo: Government of Alberta)

Kenney praised Krause’s “valiant research” in tracing over half a billion dollars from American foundations to Canadian activists. He also noted U.S. and NATO evidence that Russia provided money and used social media tactics to encourage opposition to North American and European oil and gas projects.

On the same day as the Alberta announcement, the Calgary Herald reported a recent speech in which Krause accused Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of preventing the Canada Revenue Agency from auditing politically active charities and then having retroactively changed legislation to allow political activism. One week after she testified before a House of Commons committee on the subject, she said, the CRA deleted 14 years of tax records from its online database, leaving only the last five years on the Web.

According to the Herald, Krause also alleged that the CRA had been concerned about an approximately $400,000 severance payment from the World Wildlife Fund to Gerald Butts when he left the charity to become Trudeau’s principal secretary.

Exactly what power Alberta might have to counter anti-oilsands funding remains to be seen. But “sunlight makes the best disinfectant,” Kenney said. Additionally, Krause’s years of research now gain considerable attention as the country faces a federal election.

Read more about Vivian Krause.

Conscription, colonization, a gold-backed buck: Some Conrad Black remedies for Canada

June 3rd, 2019

by Greg Klein | June 3, 2019

Here’s a guy who wants to make this country a “world-important nationality”—in other words, to put Canada on the map. Yes, a country that makes “unassuming” a euphemism for “sub-mediocre” just might have hope after all. But Canadians would have to follow Conrad Black’s plan, Conrad Black says.

Conscription, colonization, a gold-backed buck Some Conrad Black remedies for Canada

Not at all modest in his proposals, the former Canadian who renounced his citizenship outlines them in his most recent book, The Canadian Manifesto. Despite zero likelihood of finding acceptance, the ideas do offer a peculiar interest.

Forced military service is one of them, as is a Canadian colonial empire in the Caribbean. Of interest to goldbugs, however, is Black’s “sensible, radical and imaginative” alternative to the northern peso: “Canada should tie the value of its currency to a combination of the prices of gold, oil, and a consumer shopping basket in equal thirds.”

Sounds interesting, as far as it goes. But that’s as far as it goes. Black provides no additional info.

As for Canada’s resource industries, Black lambastes the “faddish environmental trends” holding them back.

“All that we have that the world needs are natural resources. More than forty per cent of the stock values on the Toronto Stock Exchange are extractive industries that operate in Canada. The banking cartel lives largely off the resources companies, which feed all heavy, and most light industry, and the legal and accounting and consulting professions live off the banks and their principal clients.”

Speaking of the TSX, Black says it suffers from over-regulation. He suggests one province, preferably Alberta, simplify its securities system. Provinces that follow its example “would almost immediately become serious international financial centres, and not just, as Canadian stock exchanges have always been, non-essential eddies of local resource promotion and small-capital start-ups and the odd site of a great international and inter-listed company. Canada could easily surpass Singapore, Hong Kong, and any other centre—except New York and London and perhaps Tokyo and Shanghai—as a world leader in modern securities issuance and trading.”

A capricious and pestilential tumour on the entire Canadian securities industry.—Conrad Black ponders the
Ontario Securities Commission

As for that “sociopathic securities regulator” looming over Toronto, “an added benefit would be the humbling of the Ontario Securities Commission, which periodically tries to shoulder aside the other provinces and become a national regulator, and has become a capricious and pestilential tumour on the entire Canadian securities industry, such, in its stunted condition, as it is.”

Looking at other aspects of the Canadian malaise, Black challenges the Charter of Rights, under which “practically every judge in Canada is now cock-a-hoop imposing his or her own idiosyncratic versions of legislation.

“[….] Pierre Trudeau himself told me, nearly twenty years after the patriation of the Constitution and promulgation of the Charter, that he never intended any such disorderly rout as had already begun to tumble out of the many courts and jurisdictions in his last years.”

Compulsory service, military and civil, augments Black’s plan to tackle unemployment and impress the world. “We need at least 100,000 more people in the armed forces,” he insists.

How on earth would Ottawa sell such an idea? By making it sexy, Black suggests: “The military could also be kitted out in far more attractive uniforms, by Canadian designers, and that would help instil greater pride in military service, which the distinguished military traditions of Canada certainly justify. One need only look at YouTube videos of Italian carabinieri, or crisply professional and stylishly clad contemporary Chinese female soldiers to see how easily the martial career, even if used chiefly for assisting in humanitarian disasters, could be made more attractive.”

A measure that would quickly expand the population would be the absorption of parts of the West Indies.—Conrad Black advocates Canadian colonialism

Of course Black’s “world-important nationality” would need many more people. One tactic of population expansion could be territorial expansion with “the absorption of parts of the West Indies.” As examples he mentions Bahamas, Barbados, Antigua and Bermuda, along with Haiti, “already a significant contributor to such increases as there are in the French-speaking population of Quebec.”

Black examines other topics including health care, culture and education, the latter problem sometimes evident in this document’s editorial standards. The book can be unintentionally entertaining for its curmudgeonly comments as well as its impractical boldness. But, even if it proposes to substitute one wretched dystopia with another, The Canadian Manifesto does offer a serious perspective on a country that’s lost its way, if it ever had one. This could be just the thing to read on a Canada Day trip to the States.

Read Mark Steyn’s comments on Conrad Black’s prosecution.

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney vows to counter a U.S.-backed campaign against the province’s resources

May 23rd, 2019

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Vivian Krause discusses her one-person campaign to expose wealthy American interests bankrolling Canadian environmentalists

April 26th, 2019

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