Friday 6th December 2019

Resource Clips


Posts tagged ‘Agnico Eagle Mines Ltd (AEM)’

Dunnedin Ventures reports diamond recovery from Kahuna sample

March 21st, 2016

by Greg Klein | March 21, 2016

With processing of a 2.4-tonne sample about 40% complete, 36 commercial-sized diamonds have been recovered so far from Dunnedin Ventures’ (TSXV:DVI) Notch kimberlite. Lab work for the Kahuna project in Nunavut found 278 diamonds above 0.425 millimetres, with three dozen over 0.85 mm, the company reported March 21. The commercial-sized stones totalled 0.66 carats, with the three largest weighing 0.1, 0.08 and 0.05 carats respectively.

Dunnedin Ventures reports diamond recovery from Kahuna sample

CEO Chris Taylor described the results as “an attractive diamond population with most stones being clear and colourless variants of octahedra.”

An 820-kilogram sample reported last November from the PST kimberlite showed 526 diamonds, 96 of them commercial-sized stones totalling 5.34 carats. The sample grade came to 6.5 carats per tonne. The 13,000-hectare project holds eight diamondiferous kimberlites.

A January 2015 inferred resource for the Kahuna and Notch dykes, 12 kilometres apart, provided numbers for two sieve sizes over 0.85 mm.

  • Kahuna (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.06 million tonnes averaging 1.04 carats per tonne for 3.19 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.8 ct/t for 2.45 million carats

  • Notch (+0.85 mm cutoff): 921,000 tonnes averaging 0.9 ct/t for 829,000 carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.83 ct/t for 765,000 carats

  • Total (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 ct/t for 4.02 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.81 ct/t for 3.22 million carats

Exposed at surface, the dykes remain open along strike and at depth.

The stones’ value can’t be estimated until a parcel is sent to Antwerp.

Before the lab returns to the bulk sample, Dunnedin plans to have last year’s till samples processed to guide exploration on Notch and PST. Processing would then resume on the remaining 1.4 tonnes of Notch kimberlite, plus additional kimberlite from PST and other targets.

The Kahuna project lies about 25 kilometres from the hamlet of Rankin Inlet. An all-weather road to Agnico Eagle’s (TSX:AEM) Meliadine development project covers about half that distance.

Read more about Dunnedin Ventures.

See Chris Berry’s research report on long-term diamond demand.

High-grade glitter

November 13th, 2015

Dunnedin Ventures surpasses historic results at its Nunavut diamonds project

 

Just the first bulk sample released by Dunnedin Ventures TSXV:DVI, it shows “some of the best diamond results reported in Canada,” declared CEO Chris Taylor. The November 12 announcement distinguished the Kahuna project in Nunavut as “having kimberlites with both high grades and large diamonds.” That would seem especially auspicious following the company’s first field season. But this is a project with a history, in a region that saw roughly $25 million of past exploration. And it’s getting some help from the dean of Canadian diamond exploration, Chuck Fipke.

“This is not grassroots,” Taylor emphasizes. “We know the diamonds are there. We just have to add to those we’ve found.”

Dunnedin Ventures surpasses historic results at its Nunavut diamonds project

Dunnedin CEO Chris Taylor ventures
into the Notch kimberlite last summer.

Dunnedin signed a four-year, 100% option on the property in November last year “after a lot of tire-kicking,” Taylor says. A former Imperial Metals TSX:III geologist who moved into the juniors about six years ago, he was attracted to diamonds as “the only real bright spot I could see in resources over the last couple of years.”

There was a family connection too. His Flemish great-grandfather imported diamonds into Belgium, where he had “about 100 guys cutting stones for him.” Taylor has family business heirlooms decorating his office, some from his grandfather, who worked with gems in this country.

A “contact of a contact” knew people at De Beers, where a geologist pointed Dunnedin to Kahuna.

The project, about 25 kilometres from the hamlet of Rankin Inlet on Hudson Bay’s northwestern shore, had previously been part of a regional program that included radar, airborne magnetics and electromagnetics, and ground-based EM surveys. Over 10,000 till samples revealed approximately 20,000 indicator minerals.

But the Kahuna claims lapsed after the last operators left, Stornoway Diamond TSX:SWY to focus on Renard and Shear Diamonds to tackle the ill-fated Jericho project, Taylor says. Vendors re-staked the claims and signed the option with Dunnedin late last year.

Besides finding kimberlite pipes, past explorers “found this series of kimberlite dykes, which is what our project is based around, and realized these were the sources of the indicator minerals. When they popped holes in them, they realized they had good diamond grades,” relates Taylor.

“When we looked at the bulk sample data, there seemed to be enough work done to do an initial resource, which is what we ended up publishing earlier this year.”

Announced in January, the inferred resource for the Kahuna and Notch dykes, 12 kilometres apart, provided figures for two sieve sizes over 0.85 millimetres, considered commercial sizes.

  • Kahuna (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.06 million tonnes averaging 1.04 carats per tonne for 3.19 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.8 ct/t for 2.45 million carats

  • Notch (+0.85 mm cutoff): 921,000 tonnes averaging 0.9 ct/t for 829,000 carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.83 ct/t for 765,000 carats

  • Total (+0.85 mm cutoff): 3.99 million tonnes averaging 1.01 ct/t for 4.02 million carats
  • (+1.18 mm cutoff): 0.81 ct/t for 3.22 million carats

The two kimberlites are exposed at surface and remain open along strike and at depth. The project holds six other diamondiferous kimberlites, four of them between Notch and the PST dyke, location of the November 12 results.

PST’s 820-kilogram sample gave up 526 diamonds, 96 of them above 0.85 millimetres and totalling 5.34 carats. The sample grade hit 6.5 carats per tonne, nearly tripling the historic 2.18 carats per tonne. And for that, Dunnedin thanks Chuck Fipke.

“He’s an old school friend of one of our directors, Pat McAndless, and the first person I went to when we started on diamonds,” Taylor says. “Chuck’s a very open, genuine guy. He showed me some of the methods they used to make the discovery at Ekati, the characteristics of diamond deposits. It provided guidance for me to find a project that our company could work with.” An adviser to the company since July, Fipke’s “guiding us on the ongoing sample processing and exploration methods, and we’re using his lab.”

Fipke’s CF Mineral Research has developed unique methods of diamond recovery, Taylor says, accounting for dramatic improvement. Also, Fipke “can recover all the indicator minerals at the same time, which is a helluva bonus. Usually, if you do caustic fusion, which is how most companies get their diamonds out of the rocks, you destroy all the minerals that came up in that kimberlite. But we can use them to hone in on our exploration.”

Chad Ulansky, Fipke’s “right-hand man in diamond exploration,” accompanied Dunnedin’s first field season last summer. The company has its own expertise too in McAndless, recently retired as VP of exploration for Imperial Metals, and his near-namesake Tom McCandless, Dunnedin’s technical adviser. With diamond experience in Africa, Europe and the Americas, McCandless took part in the discovery and assessment of Stornoway’s Renard kimberlites and in earlier work at the Kahuna project.

Still to come are sample results for over three tonnes taken from the Notch and Kahuna dykes as well as other targets. Another 180 concentrated till samples from last summer also remain to be processed, which Taylor hopes will point to additional targets.

There’s a real efficiency in getting those diamonds because of the high grade and the location near town. It’s not going to cost us anything near what it costs other companies to do bulk samples.—Chris Taylor,
CEO of Dunnedin Ventures

But the big question remains: What are the diamonds worth? For that, Taylor would have to send a 1,000-carat package to his family’s former city of Antwerp for evaluation. The resource estimate noted a 2008 description of Kahuna diamonds “as having encouraging value characteristics, with a high abundance of colourless and near-colourless varieties with octahedral shapes being the dominant morphology.”

The PST sample reported November 12 included “an octahedral crystal weighing 0.77 carats and a polycrystalline diamond weighing 2.22 carats. A preliminary examination of the diamonds suggests approximately 50% to 60% are clear and colourless.”

In his previous work McCandless reassembled a 13.42-carat Kahuna diamond that “blew up in a jaw crusher,” Taylor says, leaving fragments as big as 5.43 carats.

Aiding the economics of the 13,000-hectare project is Meliadine, where Agnico Eagle TSX:AEM has underground development underway. An all-weather road linking the site to Rankin Inlet covers about half the 25 kilometres from the hamlet to Kahuna.

“There’s a real efficiency in getting those diamonds because of the high grade and the location near town,” Taylor maintains. “It’s not going to cost us anything near what it costs other companies to do bulk samples.”

Dunnedin has just closed a $158,000 first tranche of a $1.1-million private placement offered in August. Fipke stated his intention to participate.

The company has also held its first consultations with the Kivalliq Inuit Association. “It’s really nice to work with a community that’s knowledgeable,” Taylor says, pointing out that Rankin Inlet began as a nickel mining town and now has Meliadine 25 kilometres away. “They know how to work with mining companies, what the KIA can bring to the table and what the company can bring to the table.”

Peregrine welcomes Nunavut port proposal, but few other mineral projects would benefit

July 31st, 2015

by Greg Klein | July 31, 2015

With a Canadian federal election call anticipated any day now, cynics are calling the Conservative government spending announcements “Christmas in July.” But one potential miner welcomes the plan to build a deep water port in the Nunavut capital of Iqaluit. Following the July 30 announcement by Nunavut MP and Minister of the Environment Leona Aglukkaq, Peregrine Diamonds TSX:PGD noted the Baffin Island facility would “dramatically” improve efficiency and costs for its flagship Chidliak project, 120 kilometres north. The company has a preliminary economic assessment planned for next year.

Peregrine welcomes Nunavut’s new port, but few other mineral projects would benefit

Although a deep sea port at Iqaluit would serve Baffin Island, this map shows most of Nunavut’s advanced stage projects located on the mainland.
(Image: NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines)

While Baffin Island’s only operating mine already has its own port, most Nunavut projects are on the mainland. Baffinland Iron Mines trucks iron ore from its Mary River mine to Milne Inlet, 100 kilometres away. The Nunavut Impact Review Board is currently reviewing Baffinland’s application to expand shipping from three summer months to 10 months a year.

As is the case for most of the territory’s exploration and development projects, Nunavut’s other mine sits on the mainland. Agnico Eagle’s (TSX:AEM) largest gold producer, Meadowbank, links to the hamlet of Baker Lake via an all-weather, 110-kilometre road. The mine “depends on the annual, warm-weather sealift by barge from Hudson Bay to Baker Lake for transportation of bulk supplies and heavy equipment,” the company states.

The feds offer to pay 75% of the Iqaluit port’s estimated $84.9-million price tag. The deal depends on the territorial government funding the rest, environmental approvals and, judging by her remarks, Aglukkaq’s re-election.

“What I can say is that if I’m re-elected, I’m going to make sure that the funding remains here,” the CBC quoted her. “And I’ve committed to it, I’ve announced it today, and that it is my commitment to delivering on this project.”

Diamonds lift Northwest Territories mining revenue

March 20th, 2015

by Greg Klein | March 20, 2015

Copper and tungsten value slipped but diamonds were enough to raise Northwest Territories’ mining revenues by 14% last year. Citing new federal government stats, the NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines put the territory’s 2014 mining production at $1.886 billion, a $227-million increase over the previous year. The rise came from $1.561 billion in diamond revenue, a 15% jump over 2013.

That offset tungsten’s 2% decline to $84.71 million and copper’s 17% fall to $1.86 million.

Diamonds lift Northwest Territories mining revenue

The territory’s four operating mines include North American Tungsten’s (TSXV:NTC) CanTung operation and three diamond mines—Dominion Diamond’s (TSX:DDC) majority-held Ekati mine, the Dominion/Rio Tinto NYE:RIO Diavik joint venture and De Beers’ Snap Lake.

Even if De Beers’ Victor mine in Ontario were excluded, NWT diamond production would keep Canada in third place for global diamond production by value.

The Chamber of Mines also noted a 2% increase in Nunavut’s mining revenues, which came to $642 million last year. Gold accounted for $639 million, a 2% increase over 2013, while silver contributed $2.6 million, an 8% rise. Agnico Eagle TSX:AEM operates the Meadowbank mine, 300 kilometres west of Hudson Bay.

The data, from Natural Resources Canada, provided no figures for Nunavut’s other mine, Baffinland Iron Mines’ Mary River, which began iron ore production last September.

Read more about NWT mining.

Read about diamond mining in Canada.

Undaunted by dogma

April 25th, 2014

Kapuskasing Gold wants to prove, once again, that Mike Tremblay’s right about Ontario’s newest gold district

by Greg Klein

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He might have spent over 20 years as a voice crying in the Kapuskasing wilderness, but prospector Mike Tremblay saw his theories validated by a 2010 discovery on property he staked. That was the Borden Lake project in what Probe Mines TSXV:PRB calls Ontario’s newest gold district, the Kapuskasing structural zone. Now as an adviser to Kapuskasing Gold TSXV:KAP, Tremblay wants to open up more of this almost unexplored region.

The Kapuskasing zone sits tantalizingly close to a number of gold camps. Yet it’s received surprisingly little attention. Having grown up in the nearby town of Chapleau, Tremblay says locals often asked, “Why do we have mines all around us but there’s no mines here?” His response: “It was because of this great big Kapuskasing structure that nobody was exploring in.”

Kapuskasing Gold wants to prove, once again, that Mike Tremblay’s right about Ontario’s newest gold district

Tremblay says he was “lucky enough to learn from really smart people, the kind of people who would take you under their wing and teach you.” But something about the region close to home intrigued him. “I always had that contrary, stubborn streak in me, so you couldn’t tell me that something wasn’t possible.”

While working with Noranda Mines he learned about a VMS target that the company walked away from. Tremblay staked it in 1987, lost it at one point, re-staked it and, along with partner Jack Robert, finally sold it to Probe.

That was in March 2010. By June of that year the company had flown a VTEM survey. That summer they hit, eventually announcing a 91-metre intercept averaging two grams per tonne gold from one of six near-surface mineralized holes over a potential 250-metre strike.

Vindicated, Tremblay and his collaborators sought new turf in the Kapuskasing. Meanwhile by January 2013 Probe revealed a global resource of 5.19 million ounces indicated and 1.18 million ounces inferred. In May of last year Agnico Eagle TSX:AEM took a 9.9% stake in Probe. Then in November Tremblay, Robert and Probe won the 2013 Ontario Prospectors Association Award. The OPA credited the “new and unique discovery” to the fact that Tremblay and the others showed themselves “undaunted by dogma.”

Early this year Tremblay and his staking team sold two more properties, “my dream concepts in the area,” to Olympic Resources. He also joined as an adviser, helping transform the company into Kapuskasing Gold.

The acquisitions are Borden North, two claim blocks totalling 6,800 hectares by the Kapuskasing zone’s eastern margin about 60 kilometres north of Probe’s resource, and Rollo, a 7,136-hectare property just east of the zone.

“On Borden North there’s a big S-fold up in the mafic volcanics, so if there was anything it would fatten out in the fold, it would be a structural trap,” Tremblay explains. “When KAP got involved, we staked ground around it to cover all the potential.”

“Rollo was another one that I generated,” he adds. “I once worked with a prospector in his 80s. He was 18 years old in 1933, when they made some big discoveries in the region. So he had intimate knowledge of the area and he told me about this gold showing on a portage on what is now the Rollo project. So when that ground came open, 20 years after he passed on, I remembered he talked about a porphyry on that portage where he panned gold. That was the enticement to get the other guys to put in money.”

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April 16th, 2014

Yamana, Agnico Eagle team up to acquire Osisko in friendly deal Stockhouse
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How Russia is working together with China Equedia
IM22 conference: Innovation will lead the way for industrial minerals Industrial Minerals
Alluvial and placer mineral deposits Geology for Investors
Dark markets may be more harmful than high-frequency trading VantageWire
Infographic—Unearthing the world’s gold supply GoldSeek

Athabasca Basin and beyond

February 22nd, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 15 to 21, 2014

by Greg Klein

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New “zone” at Rook 1 rocks NexGen stock

Judging by share performance, radiometric readings from NexGen Energy’s TSXV:NXE Rook 1 project far outshone next-door neighbour Fission Uranium’s TSXV:FCU Patterson Lake South last week—even though PLS assays showed its best hole yet. Possibly a bit premature, NexGen claimed the first hole in Rook 1’s Arrow area constitutes “a totally new zone of uranium mineralization.” Then again, the company also refers to intercepts as “zones.”

NexGen’s February 19 announcement said scintillometer readings showed a number of significant radioactive intervals in a hole that’s still being drilled. By “significant,” the company means at least five centimetres above 500 counts per second from a hand-held device that measures gamma ray particles in cps.

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 15 to 21, 2014

NexGen’s first hole in the Arrow area of Rook 1 stole attention
from Patterson Lake South and catapulted the company’s stock.

Results so far show well over a dozen “significant” intervals ranging from 0.05 metres to 1.65 metres in width. They occurred between downhole depths of 207.8 metres and 319.1 metres.

Radiometric readings are no substitute for assays, which are pending.

The company’s now revising its original 6,000-metre program “to substantially expand the program at Arrow and the other 11 western-located Rook 1 target areas,” according to CEO Leigh Curyer.

Last summer’s drilling found three mineralized holes roughly four kilometres southwest of Arrow, closer to the PLS boundary.

NexGen’s stock soared. Having previously closed on a 52-week low of $0.225, it shot up to a 52-week high of $0.65 in two days, before closing February 21 on $0.53.

Another best hole to date from Fission Uranium’s Patterson Lake South

Although upstaged by NexGen’s same-day announcement, Fission Uranium once again outperformed previous results by reporting its “strongest mineralized hole to date” from PLS on February 19.

The celeb du jour is hole PLS14-129 on zone R585E, the fourth of seven zones along a southwest-northeast potential strike of 1.78 kilometres. The zone itself has a defined strike of 30 metres and a lateral width of about 10 metres.

Of eight intervals reported, the best results show:

  • 13.66% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 38 metres, starting at 56 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 38.49% over 10.5 metres)

  • 11.19% over 31.5 metres, starting at 108.5 metres
  • (including 27.57% over 12 metres)

  • 6.82% over 11.5 metres, starting at 145.5 metres
  • (including 20.28% over 2.5 metres)

  • 3.37% over 12.5 metres, starting at 160 metres
  • (including 9.57% over 4 metres)

True widths weren’t available. Drilling was vertical.

“Nothing less than phenomenal,” was president/COO and chief geologist Ross McElroy’s immodest appraisal. The grade-times-thickness value nearly doubled that of the previous best hole, which dates back to September on the neighbouring R390E zone.

Last week Fission Uranium released a batch of radiometric readings for seven holes from four zones. The $12-million campaign, which includes ground geophysics as well as 90 holes totalling 30,000 metres, continues.

Anthem reports initial drill results from Hatchet Lake JV with Denison

Anthem Resources TSXV:AYN released preliminary drill results from Hatchet Lake, a joint venture with Denison Mines TSX:DML, on February 20. The 10-hole, 2,025-metre program on the Athabasca Basin’s eastern edge found no significant mineralization but a downhole radiometric probe intersected anomalous radioactivity in four holes.

The campaign also found prospective features “including strong fracturing, de-silicification (sanding) and clay and hematite alteration in the sandstone, and weak to strong chlorite and clay alteration, graphitic fault zones and sulphide mineralization in the basement,” Anthem stated. Assays are still to come.

Anthem’s cash position prevented a contribution to Hatchet’s $750,000 budget and the $300,000 IP survey on the Murphy Lake property, also part of the JV. As a result, Anthem’s interest dropped from 50% to about 41%. Denison acts as project operator.

Forum to acquire northeastern Basin property from Anthem

The same day as the Hatchet Lake news, Anthem and Forum Uranium TSXV:FDC announced an agreement to move a Basin property from the former to the latter. Forum will get the 14,205-hectare Fir Island claims on the Basin’s northeastern margin for 300,000 shares and a 1.5% NSR, of which Anthem may buy two-thirds for $1 million.

With little or no sandstone cover and road access within two kilometres, the property lies directly on a major structure, the Black Lake Shear Zone, and adjacent to the former Nisto mine, Forum stated. Previous geophysical and geochemical surveys identified several shallow drill targets which Forum plans to refine through ground gravity work.

Two weeks earlier the company announced it would buy two sets of claims from Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM to consolidate Forum’s North Thelon project in Nunavut.

This month Forum plans to begin drilling 12 to 15 holes totalling 3,000 metres at its 9,910-hectare PLS-adjacent Clearwater project. The company’s eastside Basin 40%/60% Henday JV has $150,000 worth of summer magnetic and electromagnetic surveys planned by project operator Rio Tinto NYE:RIO.

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Athabasca Basin and beyond

February 10th, 2014

Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 1 to 7, 2014

by Greg Klein

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Fission Uranium releases final summer 2013 assays from Patterson Lake South

Having spent months doling out only occasional assays from last summer’s drilling at Patterson Lake South, on February 5 Fission Uranium TSXV:FCU suddenly dumped results for 20 holes—half of which showed no significant mineralization. They did, however, improve the company’s “understanding of the geological setting and controls of mineralization at PLS.”

The best results came from R780E, the fifth of seven zones along a 1.78-kilometre potential strike. R780E now boasts a 75-metre strike, with a lateral width up to about 60 metres. A few highlights show:

Hole PLS13-105

  • 3.93% uranium oxide (U3O8) over 3 metres, starting at 128 metres in downhole depth
  • (including 10.85% over 1 metre)

  • 1.12% over 3.5 metres, starting at 189 metres
Uranium news from Saskatchewan and elsewhere for February 1 to 7, 2014

Hole PLS13-107

  • 1.94% over 3 metres, starting at 171.5 metres

  • 0.57% over 6.5 metres, starting at 192.5 metres
  • (including 1.58% over 1 metre)

  • 0.23% over 13.5 metres, starting at 251.5 metres

Hole PLS13-108

  • 0.99% over 19.5 metres, starting at 152.5 metres
  • (including 3.46% over 2 metres)
  • (and including 3.92% over 1.25 metres)

  • 0.67% over 6.5 metres, starting at 174.5 metres
  • (including 1.64% over 2.5 metres)

  • 1.33% over 11 metres, starting at 184.5 metres
  • (including 6.52% over 1.5 metres)

  • 3.48% over 4.5 metres, starting at 228 metres

Hole PLS13-109

  • 4.22% over 8 metres, starting at 108 metres
  • (including 11.1% over 3 metres)
  • (which includes 24.6% over 0.5 metres)

  • 0.55% over 17.5 metres, starting at 141 metres

  • 5.89% over 6 metres, starting at 205.5 metres
  • (including 14.57% over 1.5 metres)

Off the lake and onto dry land, zone R600W shows a 30-metre strike and a lateral width up to 20 metres. Some of the better results include:

Hole PLS13-118

  • 0.34% over 6.5 metres, starting at 192 metres

Hole PLS13-121

  • 0.2% over 11.8 metres, starting at 98.7 metres

Hole PLS13-124

  • 0.29% over 6 metres, starting at 97.5 metres

The company also released assays from one hole on the R585E zone, 150 metres west of R780E. R585E now shows a 30-metre strike and a lateral width up to 10 metres. Some highlights from PLS13-106 include:

  • 0.19% over 5.5 metres, starting at 158.5 metres

  • 0.11% over 17 metres, starting at 166.5 metres

  • 0.39% over 12.5 metres, starting at 202 metres

True widths weren’t provided. Holes were vertical or close to it. One R600W hole and nine stepouts east of the zone drew blanks. These results constitute the final batch of summer assays. The current $12-million campaign, including ground geophysics as well as 90 holes totalling 30,000 metres, will primarily try to fill in the gaps separating the high-grade zones.

Rio drills Purepoint’s Red Willow

Rio Tinto NYE:RIO has begun winter drilling at Red Willow, Purepoint Uranium TSXV:PTU announced February 5. About 2,500 metres will test four target areas identified by geophysics, geochemistry and historic assays, the company stated. Rio is nearly halfway into its $5-million option to earn 51% of the 25,612-hectare property by December 31, 2015. The major may spend a total of $22.5 million by the end of 2021 to earn 80% of the eastern Athabasca Basin project.

In another project with some big name buddies, Purepoint began a $2.5-million, 5,000-metre program at its Hook Lake project in January. Cameco Corp TSX:CCO and AREVA Resources Canada each hold a 39.5% interest in the PLS-vicinity property, leaving the junior with 21%.

Continental Precious Minerals updates PEA for Swedish polymetallic project

An updated resource and preliminary economic assessment takes a new approach to Continental Precious Minerals TSX:CZQ Viken uranium-polymetallic project in central Sweden. Using a 6.5% discount rate, the study calculates an after-tax net present value of US$943 million and a 12.9% internal rate of return. Pre-production capital comes to $1.23 billion with payback in 6.9 years from an operation with two open pits and a 34-year lifespan, according to the February 6 announcement.

Viken’s original 2010 PEA considered uranium-vanadium-molybdenum production using fine grinding, tank leaching and roasting. Now Continental plans bio-heap leaching for nickel, zinc and copper sulphides as well as uranium. “This has substantially lowered operating and capital costs, and has led to more robust project economics,” stated CEO/chairperson Rana Vig.

More details will be available on sedar.com within 45 days.

Eagle Plains options out eastside Basin project

Eagle Plains Resources TSXV:EPL announced a definitive option agreement on February 4 for its Tarku property in the eastern Basin. The non-arms-length deal would give Clear Creek Resources a 60% interest for $500,000 cash, $5 million in exploration and 1.2 million shares over five years. Clear Creek may increase its interest to 75% by paying Eagle Plains another $1 million and completing feasibility. Previous work, including historic airborne surveys that found northeast-trending conductors, make the property prospective for both gold and uranium, Eagle Plains stated.

Next month Clear Creek expects to complete a three-way amalgamation with Ituna Capital TSXV:TUN.P and its subsidiary. Eagle Plains holds interests in over 35 properties.

Alpha airborne over Noka’s Carpenter Lake; Noka boosts private placement

Project operator Alpha Exploration TSXV:AEX has begun flying a VTEM and magnetic survey over Carpenter Lake on the Basin’s south-central edge. The 1,892-line-kilometre survey will test the 19-kilometre strike of the Cable Bay Shear Zone, a “major regional shear zone with known uranium enrichment,” Alpha stated on February 3. The work initiates the company’s 60% earn-in on Noka Resources’ TSXV:NX 20,637-hectare property.

About 10 to 14 days have been allotted to this portion of the winter campaign, which will also include radon sampling. Spring and summer should see airborne radiometrics, ground prospecting and geochemical sampling.

With interests in several properties, the Alpha Minerals spinco announced other exploration plans in December and January.

Noka, a member of the four-company Western Athabasca Syndicate, stated on February 6 it would increase a “heavily oversubscribed” private placement from $500,000 to $1.1 million, subject to exchange approval.

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Gold stocks slaughtered, Barrick drops 10%

October 31st, 2013

by Frik Els | October 31, 2013 | Reprinted by permission of MINING.com

The gold price slid more than $24 or 2% an ounce on October 31 to a week low of $1,323 after the U.S. Federal Reserve signalled it may cut back its stimulus program sooner than thought and Chinese demand for the metal waned.

After a fightback from near three-year lows below $1,200 struck at the end of June, gold’s momentum now seems to have turned negative again with gold stocks sold off heavily on a relatively modest fall in the price of the metal.

By the October 31 close Barrick Gold TSX:ABX had lost 5.9%, after announcing results that were in line with expectations and the suspension of its troubled Pascua Lama project on the border between Chile and Argentina.

The world’s number one miner of the precious metal followed up after hours with more damaging news. The Toronto-based miner announced it is raising $3 billion by issuing 163.5 million common shares at $18.35 per share.

Barrick is now worth $19.4 billion, down 44% so far this year and nowhere near its $54-billion market value a mere two years ago.

Investors duly marked down the stock again with the counter shedding an additional 5.7% to $18.31 in after-hours trade in New York, wiping more than $2 billion off the value of the company on the day.

Barrick is now worth $19.4 billion, down 44% so far this year and nowhere near its $54-billion market value a mere two years ago.

Newmont Mining NYE:NEM, with a market value of $13.5 billion, escaped the worst of it, down 2.8% in regular trading and trading slightly to the upside after hours, after announcing profits up 11% despite a fall in revenue.

Attributable gold production rose 4% to 1.28 million ounces, while attributable copper output decreased 3% to 34 million pounds during the third quarter at the Denver-based company.

The world’s third-largest gold producer behind Newmont, AngloGold Ashanti NYE:AU was one of the worst performers of October 31. The Johannesburg-based company’s ADRs listed in New York slid 6.7% on October 31 and the value of the company has now halved this year.

Fellow South African miner Gold Fields NYE:GFI, the worst performer among the gold majors this year, gave up 4.4% in New York. The world’s fourth-largest gold producer has had its value slashed 63% in 2013, with investors punishing it for its contrarian purchase of high-cost mines amid the slump.

Goldcorp TSX:G, expected to produce around 2.5 million ounces of gold this year, declined 3.9%. The Vancouver-based company retained the top spot as the most valuable gold stock, with a Toronto big board market capitalization of $21.6 billion.

Toronto’s Kinross Gold TSX:K managed to hold above a $6-billion value despite losing 5.3% on the day. Investors in the company are nursing a $5-billion loss in market cap this year after Kinross, like all the majors, took multi-billion charges against the value of its operations.

Canada’s second-tier gold miners also suffered a loss of confidence from gold investors, giving up much of the gains of recent weeks.

Yamana Gold TSX:YRI skid 3.4%, Agnico Eagle Mines’ TSX:AEM losses were fairly modest at 2.5% while Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD declined 5.1% and IAMGOLD TSX:IMG dropped 5.3%.

Reprinted by permission of MINING.com

Investors pile back into gold stocks, Goldcorp up $2 billion in a week

October 22nd, 2013

by Frik Els | October 22, 2013 | Reprinted by permission of Mining.com

Investors pile back into gold stocks, Goldcorp up $2 billion in a week

Good day for the gold team. Photo: Perpetual Tourist

The gold price jumped more than $20 or 1.8% an ounce on October 22 to a three-week high above $1,340 after disappointing U.S. economic data.

The much weaker-than-expected employment numbers in the U.S. convinced gold buyers that any reduction in economic stimulus by the Federal Reserve will come later rather than sooner.

With positive sentiment returning to the gold market, investors took the chance to jump back into mining stocks which have been decimated by the 20% retreat in the price of the metal this year.

On October 22 Barrick Gold TSX:ABX shot up 4.8%, scaling the $20-billion market value for the first time in a month.

The Vancouver-based company has jumped more than $2 billion in market value over the past week and is now worth $21.3 billion.

The world’s number one miner of the precious metal has added more than $5 billion in market value since hitting 21-year lows early July.

Barrick is now worth $20.5 billion on the TSX, still down 41% so far this year amid an aggressive divestment and cost-cutting drive that is beginning to bear fruit.

Newmont Mining NYE:NEM, with a market value of $14.1 billion, added 3.5%. The company recently cut predictions for its copper output, but gold production targets remain unchanged at 4.8 million to 5.1 million ounces for the year.

The Denver-based company has not escaped the carnage in the gold sector and is down 38% this year.

The world’s third-largest gold producer behind Newmont, AngloGold Ashanti NYE:AU was one of the best performers on October 22. The Johannesburg-based company’s ADRs listed in New York gained 9% to a four-month high, but are still trading down 48% this year.

Fellow South African miner Gold Fields NYE:GFI, which is the worst performer among the gold majors this year, jumped 5% in New York. The world’s fourth-largest gold producer has had its value slashed 62% in 2013 with investors punishing it for its contrarian purchase of high-cost mines amid the slump.

Goldcorp TSX:G, expected to produce around 2.5 million ounces of gold this year, jumped 4.9%, helping retain its top spot as the most valuable gold stock.

The Vancouver-based company has jumped more than $2 billion in market value over the past week and is now worth $21.3 billion.

Toronto’s Kinross Gold TSX:K scaled the $6-billion mark, gaining 3.3% but investors in the company are still nursing a $5-billion loss in market cap this year after Kinross, like all the majors, took multi-billion-dollar charges against the value of its operations.

Australia’s Newcrest Mining declined 0.5% on the Sydney bourse, missing out on the gold price rally in New York. The Melbourne-based company earlier this month ousted its CEO and chairman after its August results showed an AU$5.6-billion loss.

Canada’s second-tier gold miners also enjoyed a rerating with Yamana Gold TSX:YRI adding 4.6%, Agnico Eagle Mines TSX:AEM jumping more than 4.7%, Eldorado Gold TSX:ELD advancing 3.8% and IAMGOLD TSX:IMG upping its value 4.5%.

Reprinted by permission of Mining.com