Friday 19th April 2019

Resource Clips



Deep thoughts from B.C.’s energy and mines minister

by Greg Klein | April 12, 2019

Proving they could sink lower than anyone else, Russians spent 24 years drilling their world-record 12,261-metre Kola Superdeep Bore Hole. But northeastern British Columbia’s oil patch seems to have reached something like 25 times as far. And in doing so, they must be employing super-durable materials impervious to intense heat and pressure but unknown to the outside world.

Deep thoughts from B.C.’s energy and mines minister

A reference work for B.C. cabinet ministers?

Or so you might think on reading a comment by B.C.’s minister of energy, mines and petroleum resources, Michelle Mungall.

Discussing the natural gas industry, she told Black Press legislative correspondent Tom Fletcher, “In B.C. we’re drilling about 300 kilometres below the surface.” That would mean reaching about 5% of the distance to the planet’s hot, liquid inner core and well within temperatures that would melt any metal known to mankind.

“Wildly inaccurate,” Fletcher responded. “In fact, the gas and petroleum liquids-rich Montney shale formation that runs under Fort St. John, Dawson Creek and into Alberta is from two to four kilometres deep, similar to the Marcellus shale in the U.S.”

But if Mungall knows something that isn’t common knowledge, numerous possibilities arise, and not just in mining and geothermal energy. If drilling’s possible at such fathomless depths, why not tunneling and why not continue right through the globe to the Southern Hemisphere? That might open up trade links to compete with China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

Meanwhile borehole champion Russia, always vain about its accomplishments and now along with China officially considered a security threat to Canada, no doubt will be watching closely for any credible signs of one-upmanship in a downwards direction.

Share |

View All: News Stories